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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLICATIONS 



ZOOLOGY 



■f; 



WILLIAM EMERSON RITTER 

AND 

CHARLES ATWOOD KOPOID 

EDITORS 



VOLUME XV 

WITH 38 PLATES 



.' t-.11.1 la 










UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS 
BERKELEY 
1915-1916 



CONTENTS 

PAGES 

Introduction. Dependence of Marine Biology upon Hydrography and 

Necessity of Quantitative Biological Eesearch, by Ellis L. Michael i-xxiii 

1. Hydrographic, Plankton, and Dredging Records of the Seripps Insti- 

tution for Biological Research of the University of California, 
1901 to 1912, compiled and arranged under the supervision of 
W. E. Hitter, by Ellis L. Michael and George F. McEwen; four 
text-figures and map 1-206 

2. Continuation of Hydrographic, Plankton, and Dredging Records of 

the Seripps Institution for Biological Research of the University 
of California (1913-1915), compiled and arranged under the 
supervision of W. E. Ritter, by Ellis L. Michael and George F. 
McEwen; seven figures in text 207-25-t 

3. Sununary and Interpretation of the Hydrographic Observations made 

by the Seripps Institution for Biological Research of the Univer- 
sity of California, 1908 to 1915, by George F. McEwen; with 
plates 1-38 255-356 

Index 357-360 




INDEX* 

Titles of papers and names of new species in boldface. 



Abbreviations for character of ocean 
bottom, 204. 

Alexander Agassiz, The, 7 ; descrip- 
tion, 8; equipment, 9-13. 

Apparatus used by Scripps Institution 
in hvdrographic observations, 9- 
13, 209-214; errors due to, 21-26. 
Collecting: Combination, 13, illus- 
trated, 12; Ekman reversing 
water bottles, 12 ; Kof old closing- 
net, 11, 22, 201, illustrated, 12; 
Kofoid water bottle, 11, attach- 
ments, 212-214, illustrated, 213; 
Nansen closing-nets, 10, 201 ; 
Eichter thermometer, 15 ; serial 
closing, 209-211; subsurface 
pump, 11; surface nets, 9, 201. 
Measuring: Fox, gas content, 12.5; 
hydrometers, 30 ; pycnometers, 
28; sinker, 34, illustrated, 35. 
Sounding: Thompson's sounding 
machine, 9, 126. 

Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, seaside 
laboratory, 5. 

Beaufort, South Carolina, Marine Bio- 
logical Station, viii. 

Behavior, animal, in laboratory experi- 
ments, xii, xiii. 

Biology, marine, discussion of, iii-xi ; 
primary obligation, iv, x, xxii ; 
contribution to evolution and 
heredity, iv; relation to general 
biology, vii, xxii ; institutions con- 
tributing to science of, viii. See 
also Cytology ; Ecology ; Embry- 
ology ; Methods ; Morphology ; 
Physiology ; Scripps Institution. 

Bjerruni, estimate of error in specific 
gravity, 39. 

Brenneck, experiments on percentage 
of error in depth determinations, 
21. 

Buchanan, estimate of error in specific 
gravity, 38. 

Cabral, Captain, 6, 7. 

Cerros Island, 7. 

Circulation. See Oceanic circulation. 

Commission for the Scientific Investi- 
gation of the German Seas, xix, 

XX. 

Contour maps of ocean bottom region 
explored, 257, 258, opp. 282, 284, 
286, 288. 

Convective oceanic circulation, 258. 
See also Oceanic circulation. 



Coronado, zoological laboratory, 6, 7 ; 
distribution of isohalines and iso- 
therms in region of, 263. 

Cortez Banks, 7. 

Crandall, W. C, acknowledgment, 4. 

Cytology, problems of, as branch of 
marine biology, iii, v, viii. 

Dead reckoning, used to determine 
position, 20. 

Dependence of Marine Biology upon 
Hydrography and Necessity of 
Quantitative Biological Be- 
search, i-.xxiii. 

Depth, determination of, 20-21 ; error 
in, 21, 214-216; relation of den- 
sities to, 25. 

Dickson, H. N., estimate of error in 
specific gravit}', 38. 

Ecology, problem of, as branch of 
marine biology, iv, v, vii, viii. 

Ekman, V. W., hydrodynamical theory 
of oceanic circulation, 277. 

Ekman reversing water bottle, 12. 

Elsie, The, 6. 

Embryology, problem of, as branch of 
marine biology, iv, v, viii. 

Errors, in temperatures of Kofoid 
water bottle, 14, 15, 214; in field 
observations, 18-25 ; due to posi- 
tion, 18-20, to inclination of 
cable, 20, to collecting apparatus, 
21-26 ; from use of Nansen nets, 
23 ; in salinity, 25 ; in specific 
gravity, 30, 31, 32, 36; due to 
.judgment of color, 39, 40; in 
hydrographic records (depth, 
salinity, temperature), 214-215; 
methods of detecting, 215-216. 

Experiment vs. observation, xiii— xvi. 

Fathoms to meters, tables for convert- 
ing, 205. 

Field observation vs. laboratory ex- 
periments, xi-xvi ; laboratory lim- 
itations, xii, xiii ; pseudo-scientific 
speculation illustrated, xiv; mu- 
tual dependence, xv. See also 
Behavior, animal. 

Field observations, causes of errors in, 
18-25; tabulation of data, 133- 
198. 244-254. See also Appa- 
ratus; Hydrographic records. 

Fox, C. J. H., apparatus for determin- 
ing gaseous content of sea-water, 
125. 

Gaseous content of sea-water, 125. 



' Univ. Calif. Publ. Zool., vol. 15. 



[357] 



Index 



Guadalupe Island, 7. 
Helland-Hansen, B., estimate of error 
in specific gravity, 39 ; cited on 
proportion of salts in sea-water, 
41. 
Hydrobiological problems, complexity, 
xvi-xxii; illustrations of, xvii, 
xviii; limitations of oceano- 
graphic expeditions, xix. 
Hydrographie observations, subordi- 
nate to biological ones, x; object, 
256; locality, 256; method, 257; 
use of contour maps, 257 ; must 
be numerous, continuous, well dis- 
tributed, 270. 
Hydrographie Observations made by 
the Scripps Institution for Bio- 
logical Research of the Univer- 
sity of California, 1908-1915, 
Summary and Interpretation of, 
255. 
Hydrographie, Plankton, and Dredg- 
ing Records of the Seripps Insti- 
tution for Biological Research 
of the University of California, 
1901 to 1912, 1, (1913-1915), 207. 
Hydrographie records, tabulation of 
data (salinity, specific gravity, 
temperature), 45-206, 217-254; 
explanation of arrangement and 
method, 45, 217; errors in, 18-25, 
214-216; methods of making de- 
terminations, XX, 28-32, of record- 
ing, 17. 
Ocean data, 49-111, 220-240, expla- 
nation, 48, 218. 
Data relative to San Diego Bav, 
113-124, 241-242, explanation of 
the tables, 112, 240. 
Preliminary observations, 113- 
118, explanation of the tables, 
112. 
Special bay data, 119-121, expla- 
nation of the tables, 119. 
Observations from Coronado Pier, 

120. 
Observations to determine tidal 

effects, 121. 
Miscellaneous, 123-124, explana- 
tion, 122. 
Gas Content, 125, Pox apparatus, 

125. 
Soundings, 126, 127-132. 
Field data, 133-198, 244-254; ex- 
planations of tables, 133, 156, 
194, 198, 243. 
Plankton hauls, 133-193; varia- 
bility of distribution in, 
xviii. 
Preliminary collections, 133- 

155. 
Collections of quantitative sig- 
nificance, 157-193. 
Dredge hauls, 195-200. 

[ 



Sec also, Apparatus; Field Observa- 
tions ; Isohalines ; Isotherms ; 
Salinity. 

Hydrography, indispensable to under- 
standing of marine organism, 
xxii. 

Hydrometer method of determining 
salinity, 30; calibration formula 
31 ; compared with other.methods 
37. 

International Commission for the In- 
vestigation of the Sea., viii, xix, 

XX. 

Isohalines, methods of determining 
259. 
Distribution, 259, 264; direction of 

drift, 261. 
Surface, illustrations of, opp. 300, 
302, 304, 306, 308, 320, 322, 324. 
West of the Coronado Islands, 263 ; 
influence of temperature on dis- 
tribution, 264. 
See also Salinities. 

Isotherms, methods of determining, 
259; distribution, 259, 260; direc- 
tion of drift, 259, 260. 
Surface, illustrations of, opp. 290, 
292, 294, 296, 298, 308, 310, 312, 
314, 316, 318. 
West of the Coronado Islands, 263; 
influence of temperature on dis- 
tribution, 264. 
See also Temperatures ; Salinities. 

Knudsen, M., reduction tables. 28. 

Knudsen and Sijrenson, method of 
salinity determination, 27. 

Kofoid, C. A., acknowledgment, 4. 

Kofoid closing net, 11, 22, 201. illus- 
trated, 12 ; errors arising in use 
of, 22. 

Kofoid water bottle, 11, 14; attach- 
ments, 212; illustrated, 213; de- 
fective operation, 214. 

La Jolla, chosen as location of bio- 
logical station, 6. 

Latitude, one minute of, in terms of 
meters, 206. 

Latitude and longitude, methods of 
determining, 18-20; sextant 
method, 18; use of pelorus, 19; 
' ' dead-reckoning, ' ' 20. 

Laura, The, 6. 

Light intensity, distribution, 279 ; dia- 
gram showing, with respect to 
depth and time of day, opp. 356. 

Literature cited, xxiii, 43, 254, 280. 

Loma, The, 6. 

Longitude, one minute of, in terms of 
meters, 205. 

Los Coronados Islands. See Coronado. 

McEwen, G. P., 1, 207, 255; acknowl- 
edgment, 4. 

Marine Biological Association of San 
Diego, 256. 

Marine Biology. Sec Biology, marine. 
358] 



Index 



Marine Biology, Dependence of upon 
Hydrography and Necessity of 
Quantitative Biological Re- 
search, i. 
Meters to fathoms, tables for couvert- 

ing, 204. 
Methods employed at Scripps Insti- 
tution, for recording of data, 17; 
quantitative, biologic : frequency 
method, abundance method, xix- 
xxi ; collecting, 8 ; measurement, 
of temperature, 13, of salinity, 
27-32; of detecting and rejecting 
doubtful records, 215 ; of deter- 
mining isohalines and isotherms, 
259. 
Michael, E. L., i, 1, 207; acknowledg- 
ment, 4. 
Mohr, titrimetric method of determin- 
ing salinity, 32. 
Morphology, problems of, as branch 
of marine biology, iii, v, vii, viii. 
Nansen, F., estimate of error in spe- 
cific gravity, 38, 39; cited on 
assumption of constant propor- 
tion of salts in sea-water, 42. 
Nansen closing net, 10 ; errors arising 

in use of, 23. 
Naples Zoological Station, aims and 

work, V, vi, vii. 
Nautical mile, definition of, 206. 
Nets, Kofoid, 11, 22, 201; Nansen, 
10, 23, 201. See also Serial clos- 
ing apparatus. 
Observation vs. experiment, xi-xvi. 
Observations. See Field observations; 
Hydrographic observation ; Hy- 
drographic records. 
Ocean bottom, abbreviations used in 
describing character of, 204 ; 
topography of region adjoining 
La Jolla, 257, contour maps of, 
opp. 282, 284, 286; map of region 
west of Coronado Islands, opp. 288. 
Ocean water. See Sea-water. 
Oceanic circulation, general principles, 
258; eonvective, 258; effect of 
upwelling of deep water, 265 ; Ek- 
man 's hydrodynamic theory, 277 ; 
vertical, 278. See also Isohalines ; 
Isotherms; Salinities; Tempera- 
tures. 
Ostwald, viscosity theory of vertical 
migration, used as illustration of 
pseudo-scientific speculation, xiv. 
Pacific Grove, seaside laboratory, 5. 
Pacific Ocean, investigation of life in, 5. 
Physiology, problems of, as branch 

of marine biology, iv, v, viii. 
Puget Sound, 7. 
Pelorus, used to determine location, 

19, 20. 
Port Erin Marine Biological Station, 

viii, xix, XX. 
Pump, subsurface, 11. 

[ 



Pycuometer method of determining 
salinity, 28-30 ; calibration form- 
ula, 29, error in, 29 ; quantitative 
biological methods of determina- 
tion employed at Scripps Insti- 
tution, xix-xxi, 28-32 ; abun- 
dance method, xx; frequency 
method, xx. 
Raymond, W. J., acknowledgment, 4. 
Rielitcr thermometer, description, 15. 
Hitter, W. E., 1, 207. 
Ross, J., acknowledgment, 209. 
St. Joseph, The, 7. 
Salinity, errors in, due to preservation 
of water samples, 25 ; defi)iition, 
26 ; technical meaning of term, 
27-28 ; relation to specific gravity, 
28, tables of, 28; reliability of 
assumption of constant propor- 
tion of salts in sea-water, 41 ; cor- 
respondence of significant differ- 
ences to time and space, 269-270; 
mean annual values, 270 ; relation 
to depth, plate showing, opp. 350, 
354; serial curves, figures show- 
ing, opp. 338, 340, 342, 344. 
Data of, relative to ocean, 49-111, 

220-240. 
Distribution, near Coronado Islands, 
263; effect of upwelling, 262, of 
distance from coast, 265 ; with re- 
spect to depth, 272; plates show- 
ing, opp. 328. 
Measurement, direct, 27 ; methods, 
28, 30, 32; Knudsen and Soren- 
son method, 27; methods used 
by Scripps Institution, 28. 
Surface, 267 ; subsurface minimum, 
273 ; figures showing variation, 
opp. 330, 332, 346. 
Variations, periodic, 267-271 ; 
ranges of surface salinity, 267 ; 
seasonal variation, 268; diurnal 
variation, 271. 
See also Hydrographic records; 
Hydrometer ; Oceanic circulation ; 
Pycnometer ; San Diego Bay ; 
Sinker Method ; Titrimetric 
method ; Upwelling. 
San Diego, 6 ; Marine Biological Asso- 
ciation, 256. 
San Diego Bay, temperature and salin- 
ity, 269. 
San Pedro, seaside laboratory, 6. 
San Pedro Bay, 5. 

Santa Catalina Island, 6; seaside lab- 
oratory, 5. 
Schott, G., estimate of error in spe- 
cific gravity, 38. 
Scripps, E. W., gifts, 6. 
Scripps Institution for Biological Re- 
search, Hydrographic, Plankton, 
and Dredging Records of, 1. 207; 
Summary and Interpretation of, 
255. 
359] 



Index 



Scripps Institution, attitude toward 
marine biology, xi ; character of 
research investigation at, i-iii; 
use of quantitative biologic meth- 
ods, xix, XX, 28-32; frequency 
method, xx, abundance method, 
XX, correlation of, xxi ; historical 
resume, 5-9, boats, 6, 7; region to 
be surveyed, 7, map showing, opp. 
7 ; recording of data, 17. 

Sea-water, analysis, 26-28; composi- 
tion, 26; salinity, methods of 
measurement, 27-32, constant pro- 
portion of salts, 41, conclusions 
regarding, -11, 42; direct method 
of measuring specific gravity, 42 ; 
gaseous content, 125. See also 
Salinity ; Upwelling. 

Serial closing apparatus, 209 ; advan- 
tages, 209, 211; disadvantages, 
211; operation, illustrated, 210, 
described, 211. 

Sextant method of determining lati- 
tude and longitude, 18. 

Sinker method of determining salin- 
ity, 32; apparatus used, 34, illus- 
trated, 35; calibration formula, 
34 ; error in specific gravity, 36 ; 
method compared with other 
methods, 37, 38. 

Skilling, W. T., acknowledgment, 4. 

Solar radiation, absorption of, 378. 

Specific gravity, relation to salinity, 
28 ; data relative to ocean, 49- 
111, 220-240. 

Summary and Interpretation of the 
Hydrographic Obsefvatons made 
by the Scripps Institution for 
Biological Research of the Uni- 
versity of California, 1908-1915, 
255. 

Temperature, methods of measure- 
ment, 13-17; surface, 267, 271, 
330, 332, 346; correspondence of 
significant differences to time and 



space, 269-270 ; mean annual 
values, 270, 348; reversal of, 272; 
serial curves, figures of, opp. 334, 
336, 338, 342, 344. 
Data relative to ocean, 49-111, 220- 

240. 
Distribution, near Coronado Islands, 
263; effect of upwelling, 260, 
262; correlation between areas of 
cold water and depth, 260, 261; 
effect of distance from coast, 265 ; 
plates showing, opp. 326; plates 
showing relation to depth, opp. 
348, 352. 
Variation, periodic, 267-271 ; in 
surface temperature, 267, 271, 
illustrated opp. 330, 332, 346; 
seasonal, 368; diurnal, 271. 
See also Hydrographic records; 
Oceanic circulation; Solar radia- 
tion ; Thermocline ; Upwelling. 

Thermocline, definition, 272 ; position, 
272. 

Thermometer, Richter, description, 15. 

Thompson sounding machine, 9, 126. 

Titrimetrie method, Mohr 's, of deter- 
mining salinity, 32 ; errors in 
specific gravity, 32 ; compared 
with other methods, 37, 38-40. 

Topography of ocean bottom, 247. 

Tritation method. See Titrimetrie 
method. 

Upwelling, effect of, on temperature, 
260," 265, 276; on salinitv, 262, 
276, 

Water. See Sea-water. 

Water bottles, Kofoid, 11, 14, 212, 
214; Ekman reversing, 12. 

Water samples, collecting of, 13-17; 
surface samples, 13 ; method of 
recording, 17-18; errors due to 
preservation of, 25. 

Woods Hole Marine Biological Lab- 
oratory, character of investiga- 
tions at, V, viii. 



Page 91, opp. number 2610. 
Page 102, opp. number 3322. 
Page 163, opp. number 1823. 
Page 227, opp. number 4259. 
Page 240, opp. number 5015. 



EEEATA 
For 93, read 39,. 
For 3:33 P.M. read 
For P.M. read a.m. 
For 60,.;, read 61, .5, 
For Oi, read 40,. 



CORRECTION 

The term "light intensity" (page 279, line 8) is only applicable to the inter- 
val between sunrise and sunset. For the remainder of the twenty-four hour period 
the general term radiation should be used. I am indebted to Dr. E. A. Birge of 
the University of Wisconsin for calling my attention to this error. 

Also the estimate of the coefficient of absorption from temperature data is less 
than the actual value. A detailed discussion of this matter is given in my paper 
on Ocean Temperatures, their Relation to Solar Badiatioti and Oceanic Circula- 
tion, to be published as one of the volumes of the semicentennial series of the- 
University of California. George F. McEwen. 

[360] 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLICATIONS 



ZOOLOGY 

Vol. 15, Introduction, pp. i-xxiii June 19, 1916 



DEPENDENCE OF MARINE BIOLOGY UPON 

HYDROGRAPHY AND NECESSITY OF 

QUANTITATIVE BIOLOGICAL 

RESEARCH 



ELLIS L. MICHAEL 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS 
BERKELEY 



UNIVBESITY OP OAUTOENIA PUBLI0ATI0N8 

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Cited as Univ. Calif. Publ. Zool. 

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Vol. 12. 1. A Study of a Collection of Geese of the Branta canadensis Group from 
the San Joaquin Valley, California, by Harry S. Swarth. Pp. 1-24, 
plates 1-2, 8 text figs. November, 1913 ...„ .80 

2. Nocturnal Wanderings of the California Pocket Gopher, by Harold O. 

Bryant. Pp. 25-29, 1 text fig. November, 1913 ...„ _ „ .08 

8. The Eeptilea of the San Jacinto Area of Southern California, by Sarab 

Eogers Atsatt. Pp. 31-50. November, 1913 _ .10 

4. An Account of the Mammals asd Birds of the Lower Colorado Valley, 

with Especial Eeference to the Distributional Problems Presented, 

by Joseph Grinnell. Pp. 61-294, plates 3-13, 9 text figs. March, 1914. 2.40 

5. Aplodontia chryseola, a New Mountain Beaver from the Trinity Eegion 

of Northern California, by Louise Kellogg. Pp. 295-296. 

6. A Previously Undescribed Aplodontia from the Middle North Coast of 

California, by Walter P. Taylor. Pp. 297-300. 

Nos. 5 and 6 1q one cover. April, 1914 05 

7. A Second Species of the Mammalian Genus Microdipodops from Cali- 

fornia, by Joseph Grinnell. Pp. 301-304. April, 1914 _. .OB 

8. Distribution of Elver Otters In CaUfomia, with Description of a New 

Subspecies, by Joseph Grinnell. Pp. 305-310, plate 14. October, 1914 .06 

9. Pour New Pocket Gophers from California, by Joseph Grinnell. Pp. 

311-316. November, 1914 _. .05 

10, Throe New Eaces of Vespertlllonid Bats from California, by Hilda 

Wood Grinnell. Pp. 317-321. December, 1914 05 

11. Eutamias sonomae, a New Chipmunk from the Inner Northern Coast 

Belt of California, by Joseph GrlnneU. Pp. 321-325, 1 text figure. 
January, 1915 _ _ 06 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLICATIONS 

IN 

ZOOLOGY 

Vol. 15, Introduction, pp. i-xxiii June 19, 1916 



DEPENDENCE OF MARINE BIOLOGY UPON 

HYDROGRAPHY AND NECESSITY OF 

QUANTITATIVE BIOLOGICAL 

RESEARCH 

BY 

ELLIS L. MICHAEL 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

1. IntroiluctioD i 

2. Marine Biology vs. General Biology iii 

3. Field Observation vs. Laboratory Experiment xi 

4. Complexity of Hydrobiological Relations xvi 

5. Quantitative Methods employed at the Scripps Institution xix 

6. Summary and Conclusion xxii 

7. Literature Cited xxiii 



1. Introduction 
During the past fifteen years the Scripps Institution, and its fore- 
runner the San Diego Marine Biological Association, have been making 
a biological and hydrographical survey of the waters adjacent to the 
coast of Southern California. Intensive rather than extensive research 
in marine biology is the leading idea of this survey, and, although this 
involves the acquisition of detailed information concerning particular 
marine organisms, knowledge of the biology of the sea is the ever- 
present ideal. How is this ideal to be approached? Certainly not by 
isolated investigations prosecuted under the Institution's auspices by 
biologists sojourning in Southern California, nor by investigations 
made for the purpose of advancing any general biological theory. 
Continuous and co-ordinative research of several highly trained special- 
ists is the first essential. Under certain conditions the Institution is 



ii University of CaUfornia Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

not only glad but eager to give visiting naturalists opportunity for 
prosecuting their own researches, and special phases of general biology 
are studied from time to time. It is realized, however, that the ideal 
sought can be approached only by a programme of research which 
involves highly specialized and intimately co-ordinated investigations 
on particular and restricted problems concerning the structure, develop- 
ment, function, behavior, etc., of particular species of marine organ- 
isms. But even such specialized investigations can be included in the 
Institution 's marine programme only when subordinated to the larger 
problem of understanding the sum total of the phenomena of marine 
plants and animals. 

Necessarily, this programme demands thorough investigation of 
the conditions under which marine organisms live. Knowledge of the 
environment is as indispensable to a complete understanding of marine 
organisms as is that of the organisms themselves. "Conditions of 
the water as to temperature and currents; mineral, gaseous, and 
albuminoid content, etc., must be known at the particular time and 
place to which the biological studies pertain." (Ritter. 1905. p. ix.) 
Chemistry, physics, and hydrography are therefore as indispensable 
in understanding any marine organism as is morphology, embryology, 
or physiology. Some biologists, however, hesitate to admit this, not 
recognizing that their attitude is equivalent to claiming that a marine 
organism can be completely understood without taking into account 
its most characteristic quality — its marineness, so to speak. 

It has been impossible, thus far, for the Institution to conduct 
chemical investigations on the environment of marine organisms, but 
much time has been devoted to physical and hydrographical research. 
Since 1908, when intensive hydrographic research was begun, more 
than four thousand observations of salinity and density have been made 
and nearly five thousand surface and subsurface temperatures have 
been taken within one hundred miles of the coast and between Point 
Conception (34° 30' N) on the north and Los Coronados (32° 10' N) 
on the .south. Within this area two himdred and sixty arbitrarily 
delimited rectangular "sections." each five minutes on a side, have 
been investigated, more than five hundred hydrographic observations 
having been made in some. But this is insufficient. Knowledge of 
the typical, average, and extreme physical conditions in temperature, 
density, salinity, and current in each "section," at all depths, at all 
hours of the day, during each month, and during each of a series of 
years, is needed to supply an adequate foundation for detailed con- 



I 



1^16] Introduction iii 

elusions respecting the relations maintained between marine organisms 
and the hydrographie elements of their environmental complexes. 
Such information, greatly restricted because of incompleteness of data, 
is given by Dr. McEwen in his "Sununary and Interpretation of the 
Hydrographie Observations made by the Scripps Institution," the 
last paper in this volume. 

What justification has the biologist for his deep interest in hydro- 
graphic matters? To be sure, they concern the conditions under 
which marine organisms live, but is such intensive investigation funda- 
mentally valuable and necessary to the biologist? Cannot all essential 
knowledge concerning the relation between marine organisms and 
their environments be ascertained as accurately and much more ex- 
peditiously by subjecting a few typical organisms to carefully con- 
trolled laboratory experiments? Such are some of the questions con- 
tinually being asked, and the primary purpose of this paper is to 
inquire into their significance. 

The first step in this inquiry consists in distinguishing between 
marine biology and general biology. To discuss completely all the 
implications involved in this distinction would require more space than 
this paper permits. They have been pointed out over and over again 
by the Institution 's director, to whom I am indebted for many valuable 
suggestions. The time seems opportune, however, for assembling cer- 
tain facts revealed by my own research which support these implica- 
tions and for combining them into an organic whole, to the end that 
some of the too prevalent misconceptions concerning the nature and 
function of marine biologv may be corrected. 



2. Marine Biology vs. Gener.vl Biology 

To understand marine organisms is obviously the function of 
marine biology. To \vhat extent and why do marine organisms differ 
in structure, function, and behavior from land and fresh-water 
organisms, and how did these diiferences arise? In short, by virtue 
of wliat is a marine organism marine? This is the central question of 
marine biology: all others are strictly tributary to it. Possession of 
gills, swim-bladders, fins, webbed feet, etc., adapts animals, morpho- 
logically, to an aquatic but not necessarily to a marine habitat. The 
fundamental problems of morphology and cytology, regarded as 
branches of marine biology, are therefore contained in these questions : 
What are the niceties in structure which adapt marine animals and 



iv University of Calif ornia Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

plants to a life in the sea rather than to a life on land or in fresh 
water? How and why did siieh structural adaptations arise? What 
is it in structure that prevents marine animals and plants from living 
on land or in fresh water? Again, the fundamental problems of 
physiology, regarded as a branch of marine biology, is to determine 
the niceties in function which adapt marine organisms to a marine 
life, and to determine how and why such functional adaptations arose. 
Similarlj% the central embryologieal problem concerned in marine 
biology is to determine what structural and functional adaptations 
are involved during successive stages in the life-histories of marine 
animals and plants, and to determine how and why these adaptations 
vary. Finally, the purpose of ecology, as a branch of marine biology, 
is to determine how marine animals and plants are related to every 
element of their environments, and to determine how they behave so 
as to maintain these relations. 

Yet the belief in many quarters is that, unless the marine biologist 
devotes his energies toward proving or disproving some evolutional or 
other widely promulgated theory, his research is devoid of scientific 
merit. Only last summer a prominent biologist plied me with these 
questions : What is your study of the relation between chaetognaths 
and their environments contributing toward an understanding of 
evolution? What light is it throwing upon the hereditary process? 
It was clearly implied that, if I could not foresee how it would bear 
on some dominant theory, my research was superficial and unim- 
portant. But does an animal do nothing important except evolve? 
Does the meaning and significance of life consist solely in the process 
by which one individual develops from another? Is it .superficial and 
unimportant to measure the relations between organisms and their 
environments when life is wholly dependent upon maintaining these 
relations.' 

The marine biologist is not committed to investigating any phase of 
evolution or heredity except as it concerns the evolution and heredity 
of marine organisms, but he is committed, primarily, to finding out 
what marine organisms are — as such. Incidentally, of course, he will 
contribute toward a better understanding of the laws of evolution, 
heredity, variation, and so on, and he will aid in solving many morpho- 
logical, embryologieal. and other problems ; but only as by-products 
of his primary obligation — to understand marine organisms. 

Broadly interpreted, this conception of marine organisms is that 
the significance of no phenomenon essential to the life of any marine 



1916] Introduction v 

organism can hi' fully understood so long as any other phenomenon 
likewise essential to it is entirely ignored. This does not imply that 
the marine biologist must set out with a grim determination to investi- 
gate exhaustively, without rhyme or reason, every organism in the sea. 
Such a course woaild be folly indeed. But it does predicate that 
the point of view with which any particular problem is attacked must 
be so broad and comprehensive as to forestall the too frequent claim 
that the "ultimate" mystery of life is about to be discovered. It 
implies that continuous and intimately co-ordinated investigations in 
morphology, embryology, cytology, physiology, ecology, are required 
in order that headway may be made toward solving the problems of 
marine biology. Every problem investigated must be .subordinated 
to this conception ; each must be so defined and studied as to con- 
tribute its quota toward understanding marine organisms. 

Many prominent marine biological institutions, however, regard 
marine organisms from a quite different point of view. Consider, for 
example, the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory.' No one alive 
to the progress of American biology during the past three decades can 
fail to attribute a large part of this progress to the influence of this 
laboratory. Yet. strictly speaking, scarcely a single investigation 
carried on under its auspices has been one in marine biology, but 
rather, as Ritter (1905, p. ii) has aptly stated: in "general biologt; 
prosecuted by researches on marine organisms." To quote further: 
"The user of marine organi.sms in such investigations is quite indif- 
ferent to everything concerning them that does not bear directly upon 
his particular problem. He puts aside the marine animal after it has 
served his purpose without having even noticed, perhaps, the major 
part of its traits and qualities and the questions concerning it." 
Again (p. ii) he says: "The investigator makes use of animals and 
plants that live in the sea in general biological researches. That these 
organisms happen to be marine is an incident merely. The investigator 
turns away from them without hesitation when others, from whatever 
source, come to hand that suit his purpose better." The investigator 
with such aims makes no attempt to understand marine organisms as 
such. 

Perhaps the difference in point of view will be more clearly revealed 
by considering the aims and work of the Naples Zoological Station. 



1 There are in reality two marine biological laboratories at Woods Hole. One 
is locally known as the " M. B. L. " and the other as the Fisheries Station. Note- 
worthy researches have been prosecuted at both, but these remarks relate prim- 
arily to the M. B. L. 



vi Univcrsihi of CaJifornia I'liblicalions in Zoology [Vol. 15 

the world's most renowned marine laboratory. Here the lines of 
investigation are distinctly twofold. Like the policy of the "Woods 
Hole Laboratory, that of the Naples Station facilitates research in the 
widest .sense, and no eifort is made by the Station to influence the 
lines of investigation of those who occvipy the "research tables." The 
investigator is permitted to pursue any sort of research he chooses. 
For example, a.morphologist may study the pituitary bod.y, hypophysis, 
optic chiasma, auditory vesicles, etc., of a particular species of marine 
fish because he believ&s that peculiarities in their structure will aid in 
understanding the origin and evolution of homologous structures in all 
vertebrates. His investigation, so far as concerns that particular 
species of fish, is restricted to a dead brain. How and why the 
peculiarities in structure are correlated in the living fish with other 
peculiarities in structure, with peculiarities in function, and with 
peculiarities in behavior, which all together make the fish the par- 
ticular species of marine fish that it is, are questions which give no 
direction to his research. In short, his investigation is one in the 
general morphology of the brain or parts of the brain : a fresh-water 
fish might serve his purpose equally well. Again, a physiologist may 
study phosphorescence in Gonyaulax because he believes its unique 
manifestation in this plant will aid in under.standing similar phe- 
nomena in all phosphorescent organisms. The fact that the uniqueness, 
which causes him to study the phenomenon in Gonyaulax rather than 
in a fire-fly, is correlated with other unique functions, structures, and 
behaviors which all together adapt this plant to a marine habitat has 
no effect on his investigation. His problem is phosphorescence, and 
the particular organism with which he deals is an incident only. 
Finally, a cytologist may study chromosomal behavior during sperma- 
togenesis and oogenesis in a ehaetognath because he believes that 
certain oddities in the monoecious nature of the animal may so effect 
this behavior as to aid in understanding chromo.somal behavior gener- 
ally. Here, again, the fact that the monoecious nature of the animal 
relates to an animal having structures, functions, and habits typical 
only of ehaetognaths does not influence the investigation. The 
cytologist is studying the general cytology of germ cells, and the par- 
ticular organism dealt with is an unavoidable incident. Similarly 
with respect to most other investigations. Interest is centered in the 
general theoretical bearing of the structures and functions investi- 
gated, and not in the organisms to which they pertain. In so far as 
the Naples Station has occupied itself with studies of this type it has 



1916] Introduciion vii 

been devoted to researches in general biology whieh only incidentally 
contribute to marine biology. 

But the Naples Station is also engaged in a second enterprise having 
for its object, as manifested in its magnifieent monographic series 
Fauna and Flora, exhaustive knowledge of the fauna and tlora of the 
Gulf of Naples and the Mediterranean Sea. These monographs, it is 
true, relate mainly, though not entirely, to the structure of the organ- 
isms but. in so far as they are taxonomic, they constitute the initial 
step toward understanding the organi.sms of the Gulf and of the 
Mediterranean. The natural second step nuist be ecological, i.e., 
determination of how the various speeie.s are related to their environ- 
mental complexes. Then would follow the more intensive studies of 
structure, function, and behavior required to understand how and why 
the organisms maintain the.se relations. Little more than the first step 
has been taken, for, according to Kofoid (1910, p. 20), "the Station 
has not as yet undertaken any systematic exploration of pelagic, 
abys.sal. or littoral fauna, though much of the work of collection, the 
records of .seasonal occurrence, and the individual researches thus far 
published afford a basis for the beginning of such enterprises." But, 
however limited the actual achievements may be, the Station is engaged 
in a programme of re.search having for its object complete understand- 
ing of the structure, function, and behavior of the organisms by virtue 
of whieh they are adapted to the marine environments of the Gulf of 
Naples and the Mediterranean Sea. When this type of investigation 
.shall have been carried beyond the preliminary taxonomic stage, the 
Naples Station will be engaged fsiricthj in researches in marine biology. 

The two types of investigation, general biology and marine biology, 
are intimately related to each other. The same organisms may be dealt 
with and largely the same methods of study may be employed, but the 
point of view whieh gives direction to each piece of research is funda- 
mentally different. In the former type, marine organisms are regarded 
as tools to be used in solving some morphological or other problem 
relative to land and fresh-water organisms as well. In the latter type, 
morphological and other methods are employed for the purpose of 
understanding marine organisms. Both types of investigation are 
indispensable. "Who could justly maintain one to be necessarily more 
productive to biology than the other? If the purpose of biology is to 
fully understand organisms, it follows that general biological researches 
must contribute toward this end, but it also follows that investigations 
having for their object complete understanding of marine organisms. 



viii University of California Publicatioiis i)i Zoology [Vol.15 

fresh-water orgaiii.sms. or land organisms — as such — most, liy very 
definition, contrilmte toward the .same end. Yet, while the value of the 
former type of investigation is widely appreciated, that of the latter 
is not. 

With few noteworthy exceptions, among the foremost of which stands 
the Port Erin llarine Biological Station, it is not the marine biological 
stations but enterprises such as the Monaco In.stitute of Oceanography, 
the great oceanographic expeditions, the fisheries laboratories like the 
United States Fisheries Stations at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and 
at Beaufort, North Carolina, and the International Commission for the 
Investigation of the Sea, that have contributed most to the science of 
marine biology. The great majority of marine biological stations are 
devoted to general rather than marine biology and, of eour.se, collect 
their material when, where, and how it may be best obtained without 
regard to the problems of marine biology. They rarely trouble them- 
selves w'ith questions concerning the seasonal, vertical, horizontal, or 
topographical distribution of any species of marine plant or animal. 
They frankly make no attempt to determine how or why variations in 
the distribution of organisms are correlated with fluctuations in light, 
temperature, salinity, gas-content, and other elements of their environ- 
ments, or of how any species is ecologically related to any other species. 
It has been contended that such matters pertain only to ecology ; 
that they involve no problems in morphology, embryology, cytology, 
or physiology. Is ecology, then, the major part of marine biologj'? 
Are morphology, embryology, and physiology secondary in importance 1 
Obviously not, for no act of any organism can be fully described in 
terms of behavior alone, function alone, or structure alone, or even in 
terms of the organism alone. Every vital act is virtually a moving 
ecpiation between the organism, a highly integrated system of struc- 
tures and functions, and the environmental complex. The way in 
which organisms are distributed with respect to each element of this 
environmental complex, and hoic they behave so as to maintain this 
distribution is all ecology, strictly speaking, can tell us. Why they are 
so distributed and why they behave as they do are fundamentally 
morphological and physiological problems ; problems difficult to solve, 
perhaps, but none the le.ss real and significant. It must not be for- 
gotten that every act involves an actor; that distribution and behavior 
imply some morpho-physiological thing which is distributed and which 
doe.s the behaving. Does it not follow that a peculiar or unique dis- 
tribution and behavior presupposes an equally peculiar or unique 



1916] Introduciion ix 

organism which is deseribablp only in terms of structure and function? 
To make tliis description is fully as important and essential for 
understanding the relations maintained between organisms and their 
environments as anything an eeologist — as such — can reveal. 

"Why is the eopepod Calanus finmarchicus typically more abundant 
in the San Diego region than its near relative Emalanus elnngatus? 
Why is Sagitta enflata captured in the San Diego region only within 
ten fathoms of the surface, while S. lyra is seldom captured above one 
hundred fathoms? "Why does the etenophore Plrurohrachia harhci 
increase in abundance on the surface as the temperature of the water 
increases from 16° C to 20° C, and why have specimens exceeding nine 
millimeters in height never been taken from water exceeding 17° C, 
although they occur abundantly in colder water ? As the temperature 
of the water increases between 15° C and 20° C, why are the zooids 
of the sexual generation of Salpa democratica obtained from the sur- 
face in decreasing numbers while those of the asexual generation are 
obtained in increasing numbers? Such problems are as fundamentally 
morphological and physiological as they are ecological, but most marine 
biological institutions almost completely ignore them. They are 
admittedly outside their chosen lines of research. Yet no marine 
organism can be well nnderstood until many problems such as these 
are solved. 

What of it? What value has the fact that four hundred individuals 
of a particular species were obtained when the temperature of the 
water was 20° C, while only one hundred were obtained when it was 
15° C? May it not have been a mere coincidence due to the effect 
of random sampling? Why, then, waste time tabulating data when 
they apparently concern facts of no importance in the life of the species 
involved ? 

These questions carry the .subtle implication that the value of 
facts can be predicted in advance of their observation ; that, unless the 
bearing of certain classes of facts upon some dominant theory can 
be foreseen, it is foolish to study them. Theories of evolution, heredity, 
variation, adaptation, and selection must, of course, be formulated 
before they can be proved or disproved. But nothing is more certain 
than that they ought to be formulated in consequence of as well as in 
preparation for inve.stigations. Otherwise induction would be replaced 
by deduction and then no observation would be worth while unless the 
facts which it revealed were first deduced from theory. 



X University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

But this modus operandi is not science. A little retieetion will 
convince anyone that science affords no means exclusive of observation 
of deciding whether particular facts of nature are or are not worth 
observing. Searching investigation alone is capable of determining 
what value attaches to the fact that four hundred individuals of a 
particular .species were obtained when the temperature was 20° C and 
only one hundred when it was 15° C. If it actually turns out to be 
a coincidence due to random sampling, investigation alone can demon- 
strate it. If it is important to the life of the species involved, investi- 
gation alone can demonstrate that. Is it not unscientific to pronounce 
any facts of nature valueless prior to their investigation? Is not the 
examination of facts irrespective of their bearing on any dominant 
theory a necessary step in an.y strictly scientific programme of 
research 1 

Still, if this be granted, it is evident that no one man or institution 
could hope to study every aspect of marine biology any more than he 
could of general biology. Practically, it is necessary to select small 
groups of problems. "What, then, is the likelihood that detailed hydro- 
graphic investigations will yield profitable biological returns? 

Superficially, it looks as if undue emphasis were being placed upon 
the environment ; as if hydrography were masquerading under the 
name of biology. Such, indeed, is too frequently the ease in many 
so-called ecological researches, and it is certain to be the ease unless 
the hydrographie observations are made subordinate to the biological 
ones. When this caution is observed, however, hydrography becomes 
as indispensable as any recognized branch of biology itself for under- 
standing marine organisms; for. obviously, a marine organi.sm is an 
organism that is primarily marine. It can live only within certain 
limits of temperature, salinity, density, and so on, of the water. To 
im])Iy, therefore, that it is a waste of time to define these limits for 
each species, and to determine to what particular temperatures, 
salinities, and densities each species is best adapted, amounts to con- 
tradicting the fact that marine organisms live. Surel.y, to learn how 
they live and what they do is as fundamental, biologically, as to learn 
how they are reproduced and of what they are constructed. It follows, 
then, that when properly subordinated to biology, hydrographie 
investigations yield as important biological returns as do investigations 
that in themselves are biological. 

Therein lies the value of realizing that the true goal of marine 
biology is the acquisition of full and complete knowledge of every 



If 16] Introduction xi 

phenomenon toueliing tlie life of every animal and every i)lant in the 
sea. Adherence to this ideal, though unattainable in a literal sense, 
has a sobering effect upon investigation, and gives it a definiteness and 
co-ordination which it may otherwise lack. The particular problems 
selected for investigation will then be determined entirely from the 
point of view of feasibility and not from that of how they may prove 
or disprove a dominant theory. "What particular group of problems 
would it be most practicable to investigate at this particular time, in 
this particular region, and in regard to available resources and infor- 
mation already at hand ? 

The Scripps Institution looks at the matter in this way and. 
although not restricting itself to marine biology, its efforts have been 
largely spent toward gaining an understanding of the relations main- 
tained between organisms and their natural environments. No other 
aspects of biology .seem of greater importance at the present time, and 
the Institution is so situated as to make this stiidy peculiarly prac- 
ticable. But. as Ritter (1915, p. 232) says: 

The managing board have no delusions as to the uniquely "burning" char- 
acter of the questions under investigation, or as to its having reached the 
threshold of the Ultimate Mystery of Life and Death. Its profound belief in 
the importance of biologic truth to the welfare of human kind is of such sort 
that it knows that many other problems being studied by many other men and 
other institutions are no less vital than those engaging its efforts; and that 
problems of tomorrow, next year, next decade, next century, while different 
from those of today, will be no less numerous and no less insistent than those 
of today. It holds every item of positive knowledge of the living world 
essential to the scientific interpretation of that world; that such interpretation 
alone can beget a right attitude toward that world; and that the high level of 
man's development which we call civilization is wholly dependent upon a right 
attitude on the part of the largest number possible of the community toward 
all things that live. 



3. Field Observation vs. Labor.vtory Experiment 

Some time ago Whitman (1902, p. 504) made this statement: 

The fundamental )irnblems of heredity, variation, adaptation, and evolution 
cannot be wholly settled in the laboratory. ■ They concern vital processes known 
only in living organisms — processes which are slow and cumulative in effects, 
expressing themselves in development, growth, life-histories, species, habits, 
instincts, intelligence. These problems require, therefore, to be taken to the 
field, the pond, the sea, the island, where the forms selected for study can be 
kept under natural conditions, and where the work can be continued from year 
to year without interruption. 



xii Vniversity of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Though true, says the experimentalist partisan, this is an obviously 
impracticable ideal ; and while such problems cannot, perhaps, be 
"wholly settled in the laboratory," their really essential features can 
be satisfactorily worked out by the experimental method. Laboratory 
experiments have demonstrated the physiological mechanism of re- 
spon.se involved in many reflex actions, instincts, and habits, and have 
greatly clarified our vision as to the probable origin of memory, reason, 
and other complex functions of consciousness. Indeed, the literature 
of animal behavior abounds in such terms as phototaxis, geotaxis, 
thermotaxis, and chemotaxis, all of which pay tribute to the ingenious 
achievements of laboratory experiments. Do not the results justify 
the claim that all really essential knowledge concerning the relation 
between marine organisms and their environments can be more accur- 
ately and much more expeditiously ascertained by subjecting a few 
typical organisms to laboratory experiments than by investigations 
prosecuted in the ocean itself? Does not the laboratory method 
eliminate the expense and time-consuming task of analyzing hydro- 
graphically hundreds upon hundreds of water-samples? 

Experiments conducted in a laboratory are and always will be in- 
dispensable but, after all has been said, they reveal only xvhat transpires 
in a laboratory and are necessarily incapable of revealing tohat occurs 
in, nature. Whitman's ideal, though impos-sible of complete realization, 
could and would come much nearer realization than is at present the 
ease were the indisputable fact more widely appreciated that no method 
of laboratory experimentation can reveal the natural behavior of an 
organism imless it is possible to re-create nature in miniature. Even 
if certain environmental conditions can be reproduced in a laboratory, 
the total complex cannot be duplicated. Certain stimuli occur in nature 
which are necessarily absent in the laboratory, and others are probably 
introduced in the laboratory which do not occur in nature. This is 
particularly true with respect to the ocean. How, for instance, could 
the stimuli associated with depth, distance from the coast, velocity of 
current, or wave action be duplicated? Moreover, the nature of an 
animal's response depends \ipon the duration as well as upon the 
intensity of any particular stimulus, and upon other preceeding and 
attendant .stimuli. This fact makes it obvious that laboratory experi- 
ments can offer no reliable evidence concerning an animal's behavior 
in nature. Says Yerkes (1914, p. 181) : 

It woulil appear to be self-eviflent, yet the attitude of many experimental 
students of animal behavior seem to contradict the statement, that every 



191(5] Introduction xiii 

student uf animal life slioulil he familiar with the objects of his interest in 
nature as well as in the laboratory: that he should possess, as a basis for 
evaluating the results of exiieriments, intimate knowledge of the instincts, 
habits, temperaments, and habitat of whatever type of organism he happens 
to be using for experimental purposes. 

Even if the natural environment could be duplicated, another 
insuperable difficulty confronts the laboratory experimentalist. He 
is compelled to restrict his experiments to a few individuals; btit 
he always applies hi.s conclusions to races, varieties, species, or some 
other similar group of organisms. How can he be sure that the behavior 
of the individuals selected is typical of that of the group as a whole? 
He cannot, no matter how large the number of individuals experi- 
mented upon, unless he knows in considerable detail the environ- 
mental conditions at the time and place his selected individuals were 
collected ; and unless he knows how the group as a whole is distributed 
with respect to variations in the environmental element he deals with 
in his experiments. An illustration will make this clear. 

The species of chaetognatha most characteristic of the San Diego 
region, Sagitta bipunctata, increases in abundance on the .surface from 
noon until some time after sunset, when it attains a maximum ; but 
large numbers may occur on the surface at all times of day and night 
— even at noon. Is it reasonable to assume that individuals collected 
at noon would react in the same way to variations in light intensity 
as tho.se collected after sundown? Yet the latter are most typical of 
the .species as a whole. Again, the species decreases in abundance on the 
surface as the temperature increases above 15° C, but large numbers are 
normally present at all temperatures. Is it reasonable to assume that 
those collected on the .surface when the temperature was 20° C would 
react to variations in temperature like those collected when the tem- 
perature was 15° C? Yet the latter are most typical of the species as 
a whole. Similar phenomena occur with respect to variations in 
salinity, and probabl.y with respect to variations in gas-content, and 
other environmental elements. 

Obviously, the magnitudes of each element of an environmental 
complex may act like so many .sieves separating the individuals of any 
one species into a variety of behavior-classes. Reactions witnessed in 
a laboratory, therefore, may be largely due to the particular individuals 
collected. If this is so, intensive investigation of the organism in its 
natural environment is a necessary preliminary to generalizations from 
laboratory experiments on behavior : if it is not so, that fact must be 
proved in each particular case, or conclusions applied to the species (or 



xiv Uiiivrrsitij of CaUfurnia I'uhlicalioux in Zoologij [Vol. 15 

other taxonomic group) will be founded upon an unjustified assump- 
tion. In either case, the facts to which this assumption relates must 
be investigated; they cannot be argued out of existence or into exist- 
ence. Science, if really scientific, must ever proceed by induction : it 
must observe, describe, and classify all ascertainable facts before it 
can justify any generalization involving those facts. For* deduction 
unsupported by induction, "carries the implication that great numbers 
of facts of nature can be explained without having been themselves 
examined." (Ritter and Johnson, 1911, p. 432.) 

The substitution of pseudo-scientific speculation for rigorous induc- 
tive method reaches its extreme, perhaps, in Ostwald's (1902) viscosity 
theory of vertical migration. Basing his speculations on a literal 
interpretation of the commonly accepted definition of plankton as 
"die Summe der schivehenden [italics mine] Wasserorganismen, " 
which he (p. 596) holds to be "die allgemeinste uud entsprechend 
grobste Definition des Planktons, ' ' Ostwald develops his theory : 
"nicht durch Zussammenfassung von Einzelthatsachen. " but "aus 
physikalish-chemischen Voraus-setzungen und einigen sehr allegmeinen 
Lebenseigenschaften des Planktons." He reaches the conclusion that 
variations in viscosity of the water, induced mainly by diurnal and 
other periodic variations in temperature, cause plankton organisms to 
rise and fall, thus accounting for vertical migrations. 

The theory is ingenious and, like many similar ones, is provided 
with innumerable "cubby-holes" in which the main purport of tlie 
theory may be conveniently concealed. It would consume more space 
than this paper permits to point out all its fundamental weaknesses. 
This much, however, must be said: the assumption upon which the 
theory rests is absurd, if literally interpreted, for organisms are not 
corks, and the most characteristic quality of an organism consists in its 
ability to live — not in its ability to float or remain in suspension. 
This tendency, so frequently displayed by biologists, to eliminate the 
organism from consideration and substitute physical and chemical 
processes for its activities, could not be scientifically justified even if 
that organism had been manufactured of physical mixtures and 
chemical compounds. It is precisely such substitutions that cliar- 
acterize Otswald's theory. 

Even if variations in viscosity were the main causes of vertical 
migration, observation demonstrates specificity in their effects: Smjitta 
bipunctata occurs on the surface in larger numbers between 6 and 
8 A.M. than at any other time between midnight and noon; f'alaiius 



19i()] Iiitrotliictloii XV 

fiiimarcJiicKs does not. Why? ()l)viously. no physii-o-elu'iiiical theory 
like Ostwald's can explain siieh facts unless, as is not infrequently the 
case, one selects only the facts which fit and ignores those which do 
not fit. "Every truly vital chemico-physical problem of organisms," 
says Ritter (1915, p. 231), "is two-phased: how do the chemico- 
physical attributes of the constituent substances act upon and .so 
explain the organisms; and what particular structures and activities 
are the chemical substances caused to manifest by being constituents 
of and used by the particular organisms?" Specificities in the vertical 
migrations of S. bipvnctata and C. finmarchicus can be physico- 
chemically accounted for only by corresponding specificities in the 
physico-chemical makeup of the organisms. The main value of 
Ostwald's theory consists in pointing out that variations in viscositj' 
are involved in the phenomena of vertical migration. It. of course, 
contributes something to the explanation of the.se phenomena, but 
very little. 

Laboratory experiment and field observation must go hand in hand. 
The former cannot, except by inference, ascertain the manner in which 
a species is related to its environmental complex. The latter cannot, 
except by inference, ascertain the nature of response involved in 
correlations observed between marine organisms (or any other kind of 
organisms) and their environments. Observation alone cannot deter- 
mine whether the observed correlations are due to tropisms. trials and 
errors, or some indirect metabolic reactions. Experiment alone cannot 
reveal the fact that Sagitta bipunctata, for example, is usually more 
abundant between fifteen and thirty fathoms than at any other depth ; 
that it decreases in abundance below this depth nrach mor(> slowly than 
it does above it ; that it maintains its maxinunn abundance at liigher 
levels during the summer (July to October) than during the winter 
(November to March) ; that it decreases in abundance as the distance 
from the coast increases at all depths above twenty fathoms, while it 
increases in abundance at all depths below thirty fathoms, etc. These 
facts pertain to the species' behavior and have played their roles in its 
evolution just as certainly and to fully as great an extent as is the ease 
with any facts of behavior demonstrated in a laboratory. Assuredly, 
both sorts of investigation are required in order to approach, even 
remotely, complete knowledge of the behavior of any species. "That 
old and true method of natural history," says Whitman (1902, p. 505), 
" — observation — must ever have a large share in the study of living 
things. Observation, experiment, and reflection are three in one. 



xvi University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Together tliey are omnipotent; disjointed, they become impotent 
fetishes. The biology of today . . . has not too mueh laboratory, but 
too little of living nature." 



4. Complexity op Hydrobiological Rel.\tions 

On June 17, 1909, four surface hauls (p. 160, hauls 1659-1662) 
were made off La Jolla with the same net wliile the "Agassiz" was 
tied to its mooring. The temperature of the water was 18?4 C during 
all four hauls. Yet, the first haul (5:00 to 6:00 p.m.) caught thirteen 
specimens of Sagitta bipunctata, the second (6 :00 to 6 :45 p.m.) caught 
none, the third (6:45 to 7:30 p.m.) caught 550, and the fourth 
(7:30 to 8:00 P.M.) caught none. Thus, the number of specimens 
varied erratically from none to 550, and the third haul caught about 
fifty-six times more per hour than the first, an increase of fifty-six 
hundred per cent in one hour and a half. It is evident, from the 
constancy in temperature, that the current, and hence the volume of 
water filtered, could not have varied to an extent corresponding, even 
roughly, to the difference in number of specimens obtained. ]\Iore- 
over, it is iinlikely that any progressive hydrographic change asso- 
ciated with such a brief time interval could have cau.sed first a decrease, 
then an increase, and finally another decrease in number of specimens 
obtained. 

Someone may see in this example a demonstration that hydro- 
graphic investigations can jdeld little definite information concerning 
the relation of this species to the conditions of its environment. Does 
not the instance prove this species to be erratically distributed with 
respect to temperature and other hydrographic conditions; that the 
condition of the environment had nothing to do with the variability 
noted? On the face of the matter it seems so. Yet it is fairly well 
established that Sagitta bipunctata is definitely affected by fluctuations 
in the temperature of the water. On the surface it decreases in abun- 
dance, on the average, as the temperature increases above 16° C. 
Furthermore, every depth thus far investigated (5, 10, 15, 30, 40 and 
50 fathoms) shows that the species increases in abundance as the 
temperature increases from 9° C to 14° C, and decreases as the tem- 
perature increases from 16° C to 21° C. In other words, the species 
maintains a maximum abundance when the temperature lies some- 
where between 14° C and 16° C. in spite of the fact that the above 
instance gives no indication of it. The fact that one case apparently 



1916] Iiitrofhirtioii xvii 

contradicts this generalization really signifies that the natural vari- 
ability in plankton distribution is so large that the hydro-biological 
relations will be masked unless large numbers of searching and fairly 
continuous hydrographie observations are made which correspond in 
time and place to net hauls. Says Herdman (1908, p. 56) : 

It is clear that samples taUen quarterly, monthly, or even fortnightly, are 
quite inadequate to convex' a correct idea of the constitution and changes of 
the plankton of a sea-area in any detail; and, consequently, conclusions ought 
not to be drawn from such insufficient observations. Samples taken weekly 
throughout the year, and almost daily during the . . . most critical months, 
give by no means too much information, but will probably suffice to enable 
one to make that detailed comparison between adjacent localities and dates 
which are necessary for the purpose of determining the representative value 
of such periodic samples. 

The complexity of hydrobiological problems is well illustrated by 
Herdman (1907, p. 37). On April 1. 1907, one mile north of Port 
Erin, Isle of Man, two "exactly similar" surface nets were towed side 
by side for fifteen minutes. One net (which we shall designate as A) 
was hauled in, emptied, and put out again at the expiration of the 
first eight minutes, while the other net (B) was not touched. The 
first half of the haul with A did not contain a single crab zoea, but 
the last half contained essentially the same number as the uninter- 
rupted haul with B did. In both there was "an extraordinary number 
of crab zoeas, rendering the ends of the nets quite dark in color." 
This is "incontrovertible evidence of the sharply defined nature of a 
shoal of organisms . . . [and forms] ... an instructive example of 
how nets hauled under similar circumstances a short distance apart 
may give very different results." 

In spite of the many similar instances that might be cited, there 
seems to be a widespread impression that one, or at most a very few 
hauls with a net of known filtering capacity justify conclusions con- 
cerning the number of each species present over large areas of the sea. 
It is not fully appreciated that the number and kind of organisms 
caught by any one net haid at any one depth, time, and place is 
consequent not only upon the volume of water filtered, but upon the 
temperature, salinity, gas-content, and chemical composition of the 
water ; upon the effects of w'ind, clouds, fog, rain, snow, ice, light, and 
season ; and upon many strictly biological influences, such as stage 
of growth, period of reproduction, food relations, and periodic activi- 
ties. Though collecting apparatus be as perfect as human ingenuity 
can devise and the volume of water filtered be known to the smallest 



xviii UiiivcrsHii of Califoniia Publirafioiis in Zooloc/ij [Vol. 15 

fi'iU'tioii of a culiic millimeter, neither can obviate the necessity of 
making large numbers of hauls in restricted areas, and tabulating the 
hydrographic conditions corresponding to each. 

The objection may be made that the examples cited above were cases 
of extreme, not typical, variability. Let us then consider certain typical 
instances relative to the San Diego region. When the specimens 
of Sagitta hipunctata obtained in each of twenty-tive surface hauls 
made with a 000 net between 4 and 6 a.m. during June and July, 
lt)O8-09. are counted, the mean abundance is found to be 260 per 
hour, while the mean variabiliiy- is 345. Between 6 and 8 .\.m. twenty- 
one hauls give a mean abundance of 317 and a mean variability of 
448; between 8 and 10 a.m. twelve hauls give a mean abundance of 
230 and a mean variability of 357; between 10 and 12 a.m. thirteen 
hauls give a mean abundance of 10 and a mean variability of 14; 
between 12 and 2 p.m. thirteen hauls give a mean abundance of 16 
and a mean variability of 21; between 2 and 4 p.m. thirteen hauls 
give a mean abundance of 15 and a mean variability of 18 ; and 
between 4 and 6 p.m. twelve hauls give a mean abundance of 34 and 
a mean variability of 45. The list might be continued indefinitely, 
and similar data might be presented relative to copepods, schizopods, 
etenophores. salps, etc. All reveal a mean variability which nearly 
always exceeds the mean abundance. Thus, in the above instance, it 
is 1.3 times the abundance between 4 and 6 a.m.; 1.4 between 6 and 
8 A.M.; 1.5 between 8 and 10 a.m.; 1.4 between 10 and 12 a.m.; 1.3 
between 12 and 2 p.m. ; 1.2 between 2 and 4 p.m. ; and 1.3 between 
4 and 6 p.m. 

The significance of these facts is obvious. The accidental error 
involved in a single net haul due to the natural variability in plankton 
distribution exceeds, on the average, the true mean abundance which 
the single haul attempts to measure. In other words. // the volume 
of water filtered can be estimated ivithin an error of one hundred per 
cent nothing can, as a rule, be gained by more accurate measurement. 
Stated again, if the "filtration constant" is approximately known, and 
if the mean velocity of current can be estimated, say as 6 ± 6 kilo- 
meters per hour, the mean number of plankton organisms present per 
cubic meter of water throughout the San Diego region can be deter- 
mined just as accurately as if the "filtration constant" and velocity 
of current were known with the most extreme accuracy conceivable. 



2 By mean variability is meant the average of all differences between the 
mean abundance and the abundance indicated by each haul. It is not equivalent 
to the standard deviation. 



I 



191ii] iHlroducliou xix 

iMore time spent in repeating liydrohiologieal observations nnder tlie 
same controllable conditions, rather than in computing "filtration 
constants" and improving the accuracy of the apparatus, is the most 
urgent need. Not only is time wasted in needless refinement of appar- 
atus, but. as Thorndike (1904. p. 158). says: 

Jluch ignorance is shown liy the many students who ilisparajie all measurements 
that are subject to a large variable error. They either do not know or forget 
that the reliability of a measure is due to the number of cases as well as to 
their variability, and that in the more complex and subtle . . . [phenomena] . . . 
it is always practicable to increase the number of measurements, but often 
impossible to make them less subject to variable errors. They also forget that 
the natural and real variability of the fact itself is often so large as to make 
the variability due to errors of instruments and observation practically negligible. 

Once this fact is grasped it will be evident that the methods of 
collecting and exploring employed by most oceanographic expeditions, 
like the "Challenger." "Blake," "Valdivia." "Siboga. " and even the 
German plankton expeditions, cannot reveal in any detail the relations 
maintained between plankton species and their environment. The 
methods are adequate only for determining the kinds and range of 
species over extensive areas and for yielding general descriptions of 
the associated environments. The results embodied in the numerous 
excellent monographs and reports,' while detailed and comprehensive 
taxonomically. afford little, if any, reliable evidence concerning the 
relative abundance of the various species in their horizontal, vertical, 
or seasonal distribution. The methods are adequate for purposes of 
scientific reconnaissance, but are not adapted to yielding that detailed 
hydrobiological information without which the fir.st .step toward under- 
standing the habits of any marine organism is impossible. It is evident 
that no institution can obtain this required information iniless its 
efforts ai'c primarily liiological rather than oeeanographical. 

5. Quantitative ^Iethods Employed at the Scripps Institutions 

There are several marine institutions in Europe that recognize the 
necessity of quantitative investigations. Among the foremost may be 
mentioned the Commission for the Scientific Investigation of the 
German Seas, the International Commission for the Investigation of 
the Sea, and the Marine Biological Station at Port Erin, Isle of Man. 
To these we are indebted for much mathematical and experimental 
knowledge concerned in quantitative estimates of marine organisms, 
as well as for apparatus for collecting them and for analyzing the 



XX Universiiy of Calif ornia I'ublicaiions in Zoologi/ | Vol. 15 

physical and cliemical conditions of the sea. The two commissions, 
however, especially the German one, have based nearly all their 
researches upon an assumption of uniformity in the distribution of the 
smaller organisms over large areas, and the Port Erin Station is to be 
credited especially with having demonstrated, very completely, the 
serious error involved in this assumption. Furthermore the two com- 
missions differ radically from the Port Erin Station, in that the latter 
is engaged in intensive rather than extensive investigations, and recog- 
nizes the necessity of frequently repeated hydro-biological observations 
in very restricted localities. 

The Scripps Institution has followed, in general, the lead of the 
Port Erin Station, but differs, perhaps most conspicuously, from all 
three European institutions, in that its primary interest is in pure 
rather than economic biology. Its methods are based on the conviction 
that large numbers of somewhat crude hydro-biological observations, 
rather than precision of apparatus and exact computations of "filtra- 
tion constants," will reveal the relations maintained between organ- 
isms and their environments. After such observations are made the 
data are subjected to rigorous examination. Two methods of treating 
the field data are used ; the frequency method and the abundance 
method. 

The frequency method consists in arranging all the biological hauls 
in order of the magnitude of one of the environmental elements, say 
temperature ; separating them into groups so that the temperature 
range in each is the same, say two degrees; and noting the hauls iu 
any one group containing the particular species under investigation. 
Then, by expressing the number of these hauls as a percentage of the 
total number in that group, a mea.sure of the frequency of occurrence 
of the species within the limits of that temperature interval is 
obtained. Proceeding similarly with all the other groups, the relative 
frequency of the species under the different temperature conditions 
is found. By this means variations in the frequency of the species 
may be quantitatively compared with fluctuations in the elements of 
its environmental complex, correlations between the two estal)lished, 
the reliability of the correlations tested by statistical methods, and 
ecmclusions of significance drawn. 

The abiindance method is similar in every way to the frecpiency 
method except that, instead of depending upon the mere presence 
and absence of the species, the specimens in each haul are counted. 
Consequently, the average number of specimens per unit volume of 



1916] Introduction xxi 

water filtered during each luud may be eoinputed and eoniparetl with 
each other. This, of course, is much more accurate and makes a more 
thoroughgoing statistical treatment possible. 

Preliminary and supplementary to the employment of these quan- 
titative methods, the data are examined in a more cursory manner for 
the purpose of ascertaining, in a general way, the degree of corre- 
spondence between the biological and hydrographic data. For example, 
the center of population of Sagitta bipunctata undergoes a seasonal 
oscillation from its maximum depth in winter to its minimum depth 
in summer. In attempting to find a corresponding oscillation in one 
of the environmental elements, the temperature range pertaining to 
this center of population was discovered to be confined to a larger 
and deeper depth interval in winter than in .summer. Combining these 
two facts a single descriptive statement is obtained, namely, that the 
vertical o.scillation of the center of population is apparently correlated 
with a corresponding oscillation of the temperature distribution, or 
"thermocline. " In order to test the extent and validity of this 
apparent correlation recourse is had to the more rigorous methods just 
described. 

A more detailed consideration of these methods would require more 
space than is available in this paper. It would involve discussing the 
relation between frequency and abundance, how the frequency may 
be standardized when the average volume of water filtered differs, and 
how the unit volume of water filtered is measured. It would neces- 
sitate considering the use of geometric means, coefficients of association, 
coefficients of preference, methods of eliminating the effects of one 
variable upon the others, and methods of dealing with accidental and 
systematic errors. It would require an explanation of why the usual 
methods of linear and multiple correlation, and the probable error 
method cannot be legitimately applied to distribution problems of the 
type herein considered ; and it would require an explanation of the 
methods employed in their places. Suffice it to say, therefore, that 
other papers are being prepared in which all of these matters will 
be diseu-ssed in detail. It is hoped, however, that this brief account 
will give some idea of the methods employed. 



University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



6. Summary and Conclusion 

In the foregoing discussion it has been shown that : 

1. The function and, strictly speaking, the only function of marine 
biology is to understand marine organisms. 

2. Broadly interpreted, this means that the significance of no 
phenomenon essential to the life of any marine organism can be fully 
understood so long as any other phenomenon likewise essential to it is 
entirely ignored. 

3. The majority of marine biological institution.s are not engaged 
in marine biology, but are supporting researches in general biology 
which only incidentally contribute to marine biology. 

4. Hydrography is as indispensable as morphology, embryologj% 
cytology, or physiology for understanding the marine organism. 

5. No method of laboratory experimentation can discover an 
organism's behavior in nature. 

6. Hydrobiologieal relations are too complex to be determined 
without searching and fairly continuous observations made in a 
restricted region. 

7. The natural variability in the distribution of marine organisms 
is so great as to make errors of collecting apparatus practically 
negligible. 

8. Only an institution primarily engaged in marine biology rather 
than oceanography or economic biology is in position to investigate 
comprehensively the hydrobiologieal relations of marine organisms. 

It is hoped this introduction will help to make the hydrographic 
data and Dr. McEwen's "Summary" contained in this volume appear 
as interesting and indispensable to the marine biologist as to the 
hydrographer of this coastal region. 

Transmitted March 30, 1916. 

ScRiPPS Institution for Biological Research, 
La Jolla, California. 



1916] Introduction 



LITERATURE CITED 

Herdman, W. a. 

1907. The Marine Biological Station at Port Erin. 21st Ann. Rep., Mar. 

Biol. Sta. Port Erin, 62 pp., 14 figs, in text. 
1008. Ibid., 22n(l Ann. Rep., 68 pp. 24 figs, in text. 
KOFOID, C. A. 

1910. The biological stations of Europe. Bull. U. S. Bur. Education, No. 

440, 360 pp. .55 pis., 48 figs, in text. 

OSTWALD, W. 

1902. Zur Theorie des Planktons. Biol. Centralbl., 22, 596-605, 609-638. 
RiTTEK, W. E. 

1905. A general statement of the ideas and present aims and status of the 

Marine Biological Association of San Diego. Univ. Calif. Publ. 

Zool., 2, i-xvii, 2 maps. 

1908. The scientific work of the San Diego Marine Biological Station dur- 

ing the year 1908. Science (n. s.), 28, 329-333. 
1915. The biological laboratories of the Pacific Coast. Pop Sei. Mo., 86, 
223-232. 

ElTTER, W. E. AND JOHNSON, M. E. 

1911. The growth and differentiation of the chain of Cyclosalpa affinis 

Chamisso. Journ. Morphol., 22, 395-453, pis. 1-4, figs. 1-10 in text. 
Thorxdike, E. L. 

1904. An introduction to the theory of mental and social measurements. 
(New York, Science Press), xii + 212 pp., 87 figs, in text. 
Whitman, C. O. 

1902. A biological farm for the experimental investigation of heredity, 
variation, and evolution, and for the study of life-histories, habits, 
instincts, and intelligence. Science (n.s.), 16, 504—510. 
Yerkes, R. M. 

1914. The Harvard Laboratory of Animal Psychology, and the Franklin 
Field Station. Journ. Animal Behav., 4, 176-184, figs. 1-2 in text. 



UNIVEESITT OF OAI-irOENlA PITBLIOATIONS— (Continued) 

12. Batrachoseps major and Bufo cognatm califomicus, New Amphibia 

from Southern California, by Charles Lewis Camp. Pp. 327-334. 
April, 1915 - 10 

13. Report upon Mammals and Birds found In Portions of Trinity, Siskiyou, 

and Shasta Counties, California, by Louise Kellogg. Pp. 335-398, 
plates 15-18. 

14. An Analysis of the Vertebrate Fauna of the Trinity Region of Northern 

Caafomia, by Joseph GrlnaeU. Pp. 401-412. 

Nos. 13 and 14 in one cover. January, 1916 75 

15. The Status of the Beavers of Western North America, with a Con- 

sideration of the Factors in their Speciation, by Walter P. Taylor. 

Pp. 413-495, 22 text-figures. March, 1916 85 

16. Two New Aplodontias from Western North America, by Walter P. 

Taylor. Pp. 497-501. May, 1916 05 

Vol. 13. 1. The Schlzopoda of the San Diego Eegion, by Calvin O. Estorly. Pp. 

1-20, plates 1-2. April, 1914 _ _ M 

2. A Study of the Occurrence and Manner of Distribution of the Cteno- 

phora of the San Diego Eegion, by Calvin O. Esterly. Pp. 21-38. 
April, 1914 _ _ _ OS 

3. A New Self-Eegulating Parafito Bath, by C. W. Woodworth. Pp. 39- 

42, 2 text-figures. April, 1914 .06 

4. Diplodinium ecauilattim, With an Accoant of Its Neuromotor Apparatus, 

by Sobert G. Sharp. Pp. 43-122, plates 3-7, 4 text figures. May, 

1914 _ - - .80 

6. The Vertical Distribution and Movements of the Schlzopoda of the 

San Diego Region, by Calvin 0. Esterly. Po. 123-145. May, 1914 — .20 

6. The Anatomy of Heterodontus francisci. I. The Exoskeleton, by J. 

Frani Daniel. Pp. 147-166, plates 8-9, 4 text figures. May 23, 
1914 ...._ „ „ _ - .20 

7. The Movements and Reactions of the Isolated Melanopbores of the 

Frog, by S. J. Holmes. Pp. 167-174, plate 10. August, 1914 _ .10 

8. Polychaetous Annelids of the Pacific Coast in the Collections of the 

Zoological Museum of the University of CaUfomia, by Aaron L. 
Treadwell. Pp. 175-234, plates 11-12. 

9. New Syllidae from San Francisco Bay (collected by the XT. S. S. 

"Albatross"), by Aaron L. Treadwell. Pp. 235-238, 7 text figures. 
Nos. 8 and 9 in one cover. October, 1914 — .65 

10. Note on the Medusan Genus Stomolophus, from San Diego, by Henry 

B. Bigelow. Pp. 239-241. September, 1914 .05 

11. A Study of the Structure of Feathers, with Reference to their Taxo- 

nomic Significance, by Asa C. Chandler. Pp. 243-446, plates 13-17, 

7 text-figures. April, 1917 2.00 

12. Anatomical Adaptations in the Thoracic Limb of the California Pocket 

Gopher and Other Rodents, by Charles Daniel Holliger. Pp. 447- 

494, plates 38-39, 20 text-figiires. March, 1916 45 

Vol. 14. 1. A Report upon the Physical Conditions tn San Francisco Bay, Eased 
upon the Operations of the United States Fisheries Steamer "Alba- 
tross" during the Years 1912 and 1913, by F. B. Sumner, G. D. 
Loaderback, W. L. Schmitt, R C. Johnston. Pp. 1-198, plates 1-13, 
20 text figures. July, 1914 _ _ 2.25 

Vol. 15. 1. Hydrographlc, Plankton, and Dredging Records of the Scripps Institu- 
tion for Biological Research of the University of California, 1901 to 
1912, compiled and arranged under the supervision of W. E. Ritter 
by Ellis L. Michael and George F. McEwen. Pp. 1-206, 4 text figures 

and map. JiUy, 1915 „ 2.25 

Introduction, Dependence of Marine Biology upon Hydrography and Necessity 
of Quantitative Biological Research. Pp. i-xxiii. June, 1916 25 

Vol. 16. 1. An Outline of the Morphology and Life History of Crithidia lepto- 
coridis, sp. nov., by Irene McCulloch. Pp. 1-22, plates 1-4, 1 text 
figure. September, 1915 _ .25 

2. On Giardia microti sp. nov., from the Meadow Mouse, by Charles 

Atwood Kofold and Elizabeth Bohn Christiansen. Pp. 23-29, 1 figure 
In text. 

3. On Binary and Multiple Fission in Giardia muris (Grassi), by Charles 

Atwood Kofoid and Elizabeth Bohn Christiansen. Pp. 30-54, plates 
5-8, 1 figure In text. 

Nos. 2 and 3 In one cover. November, 1915 .._ 30 



tTNIVEESITY OF CALITOENIA PUBLICATIONS— (Continued) 

4. The Cultivation of Tissues from Amphlbisins, by Jolrn C. Jolmson. 

Pp. 55-62, 2 figures in text. November, 1915 10 

5. Notes on the Tintinnoina. 1. On the Probable Origin of Dictyocysta 

tiara Haeckel. 2. On Petalotricha entzi sp. nov., by Charles Atwood 
Kofoid. Pp. 63-69, 8 figures in text. December, 1915 05 

6. Binary and Multiple Fission In Eexamitus, by Olive Swezy. Pp. 71-88, 

plates 9-11. 

7. On a New Trlchomonad Flagellate, Tricliomitus parvus, from the Intes- 

tine of Amphibians, by OUve Swezy. Pp. 89-94, plate 12. 

Nos. 6 and 7 in one cover. December, 1915 25 

8. On Blepharocorys equi sp. nov., a New Ciliate from the Caecum of the 

Horse, by Irwin C. Schumacher. Pp. 95-106, plate 13. December, 

1915 _ 10 

9. Three New Helices from California, by S. Stillman Berry. Pp. 107- 

111. January, 1916 05 

10. On Trypanosoma triatomae, a New Flagellate from a Hemipteran Bug 

from the Nests of the Wood Rat Neotoma fuscipes, by Charles Atwood 
Kofoid and Irene McCulloch. Pp. 113-126, plates 14-15. February, 

1916 15 

11. The Genera Monocercomonas and Polymastix, by Olive Swezy. Pp. 127- 

138, plates 16-17. February, 1916 _ 10 

12. Notes on the Spiny Lobster (Pantdint.i interruptiis) of the California 

Coast, by Bennet M. Allen. Pp. 139-152, 2 figs, in text. March, 1916 .15 

13. Notes on the Marine Fishes of California, by Carl L. Hubbs. Pp. 153- 

169, plates 18-20. March, 1916 _ 15 

14. The Feeding Habits and Food of Pelagic Copepods and the Question 

of Nutrition by Organic Substances in Solution in the Water, by 
Calvin O. Esterly. Pp. 171-184, 2 figs, in text. March, 1916 15 

15. The Kinetonucleus of Flagellates and the Binuclear Theory of Hart- 

mann, by Olive Swezy. Pp. 185-240, 58 figs, in text. March, 1916 50 



UNIVERSITY OF CALITORNIA PUBLICATIONS 

IN 

ZOOLOGY 

Vol. 15, No. I, pp. 1-206, 4 text figures and map July 15, 1915 



HYDROGRAPHIC, PLANKTON, AND DREDGING 
RECORDS 

OF THE 

SCRIPPS INSTITUTION FOR BIOLOGICAL 
RESEARCH 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
1901 TO 1912 

COMPILED AND ARRANGED UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF 
W. E. RITTER 



ELLIS L. MICHAEL 

Zoologist and Administrative Assistant 



GEORGE F. McEWEN 

Hydrographer 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS 
BERKELEY 



UNIVBESITT OF OALIFOENIA PTTBLI0ATI0N8 

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VoL 8. 1. The Vertical Distribution of Eucalanua elongatus in the 8an Diego 

Region during 1P09, by Calvin O. Esterly. Pp. 1-7. May, 1911 .10 

2. New and Bare Fishes from Southern California, by Edwin Chapin 

Starks and William M. Mann. Pp. 9-19, 2 test-figures. July, 1911. .10 

3. Classification and Vertical Distribution of the Chaetognatha of the Saa 

Diego Begion, Including Bedescriptions of Some Doubtful Species of 

the Group, by Ellis L. Michael. Pp. 21-186, pis. 1-8. December, 1911. 1.76 

4. Dinoflagellata of the Sao Diego Region, IV. The Genus Gonyaulax, with 

Notes on Its Skeletal Morphology and a Discussion of Its Generic 
and Specific Characters, by Charles Atwood Eofoid. Pp. 187-286, 
plates 9-17. 

5. On the Skeletal Morphology of Gonyaulax catenata (Levander), by 

Charles Atwood Kofoid. Pp. 287-294, plate 18. 

6. Dinoflagellati of the San Diego Begion, V. On Spiraulax, a New Genus 

of the Peridinida, by Charles Atwood Kofoid. Pp. 295-300, plate 19. 

Nos. 4, 5, and 6 in one cover. September, 1911 1.60 

7. Notes on Some Cephalopods in the Collection of the University of Oall- 

fomia, by S. S. Berry. Pp. 301-310, plates 20-21. September, 1911. .10 

8. On a Self-Closing Plankton Net for Horizontal Towing, by Charles 

Atwood Kofoid. Pp. 811-348, plates 22-25. 

9. On an Improved Form of Self-closing Water-bucket for Planktom In- 

vestigations, by Charles Atwood Kofoid. Pp. 349-352. 

Nos. 8 and 9 in one cover. November, 1911 .40 

Index, pp. 353-357. 

Vol. 9. 1. The Homed Lizards of California and Nevada of the Genera Fhryno- 
soma and Anota, by Harold O. Bryant. Pp. 1-84, plates 1-9. Decem- 
ber, 1911 „ _ _ .70 

2. On a Lymphoid Structure Lying Over the Myelencephalon of LepUot- 

tens, by Asa C. Chandler. Pp. 85-104, plates 10-12. December, 1911. .S8 

3. Studies on Early Stages of Development in Bats and Mice, No. 3, by 

E. L. Mark and J. A. Long. The Living Eggs of Eats and Mice with 
a Description of Apparatus for Obtaining and Observing Them (Pre- 
liminary paper), by J. A. Long. Pp. 105-186, plates 13-17. Febmary, 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLICATIONS 

IN 

ZOOLOGY 

Vol. 15, No. I, pp. 1-206, 4 text figures and map July 15, 1915 



HYDROGRAPHIC, PLANKTON, AND DREDGING 
RECORDS 

OF THE 

SCRIPPS INSTITUTION FOR BIOLOGICAL 
RESEARCH 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
1901 TO 1912 

COMPILED AND ARRANGED UNDER THE SUPER\T:SION OF 
W. E. RITTER 



ELLIS L. MICHAEL 
Zoologist and Administrative Assistant 

GEORGE F. McEWEN 
Hydrographer 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Introduction 3 

Part I. Description of apparatus and methods of work 5 

A. Events leading to the present location and methods of work 5 

1. Brief historical resume 5 

2. The region to be surveyed 7 

B. The "Alexander Agassiz" and methods of collecting 8 

1. The boat itself 8 

2. The collecting apparatus 9 

(o) The surface nets 9 

(6) The Nansen closing nets 10 

(f ) The Kofoid closing net '. 11 

(d) The sub-surface pump 11 



2 Vniversitij of California I'ublicatioits in Zoology [Vol.15 

PAGE 

(e) The Kofoid water bottle 11 

(/") The Ekman reversing water bottles 12 

(g) A combination apparatus 13 

(ft) Other apparatus 13 

3. Collection of water samples and measurement of temperature 13 

(a) Surface samples 13 

(ft) Sub-surface samples 14 

4. Method of recording 17 

C. Errors in field observations 18 

1. Errors due to position 18 

(a) Latitude and longitude 18 

(6) Depth 20 

2. Errors due to apparatus 21 

(a) The Kofoid net 22 

(6) The Nansen nets 23 

(c) Preservation of water samples 25 

D. Analysis of sea-water 26 

1. General properties of sea-water and measurement of salinity 26 

(a) Composition of sea-water 26 

(6) Direct measurement of salinity 27 

(c) Methods of measurement in general use 28 

2. Methods of salinity determination employed by the Scripps 

Institution ^ 28 

(a) The pycnometer method 28 

(6) The hydrometer method 30 

(<■) Mohr's titrimetric method 32 

(d) The sinker method 32 

3. Comparison of our experience relative to accuracy and efficiency 

in water analysis with the experience of other investigators.... 37 

(a) Brief review of our own experience 37 

(b) The experience of others 38 

4. Reliability of the assumption of constant proportion of the salts 

in sea-water 41 

E. Literature cited 43 

Part II. Tabulation of data 45 

A. General explanation of tables 45 

B. Hydrographic data 48 

Table 1. Ocean data 48 

Table 2. Data relative to San Diego Bay 112 

Part A. Preliminary observations 112 

Part B. Special bay data 119 

Part C. Miscellaneous bay data 122 

Table 3. Gas content 125 

Table 4. Soundings 126 

C. Biological field data 133 

Table 5. Data relative to plankton hauls 133 

Part A. Preliminary plankton collections ; 133 

Part B. Plankton collections of quantitative significance 156 

Table 6. Data relative to dredge hauls 194 

Part A. Dredge hauls made during 1001 194 

Part B. Dredge hauls made subsequent to 1901 198 



1915] Michacl,et al.: Hydrographic Records of ScripiJS Insfitution 3 

PAGE 

D. Appendices 201 

I. Dimensions and measurements of nets used in making our col- 
lections 201 

II. Lengtli in meters of hauls made during July, 1912, with the 

Kofoid closing net 201 

III. List of hauls and water samples whose distances from the bot- 

tom are known to be within fifteen per cent of the depth 203 

IV. Abbreviations for character of the bottom adopted by the United 

States Coast and Geodetic Survey .' 204 

V. Tables for converting meters into fathoms and fathoms into 

meters 204 

VI. Table giving the length in meters of one minute of longitude for 

each degree of latitude from the equator to sixty degrees 205 



INTRODUCTION 

During- the past few years the data relative to the oceanic explora- 
tions of the Scripps Institution have been in almost continuous 
demand. Hydrographers have desired our temperature and salinity 
records in order to complete their researches. Investigators publishing 
fannistic papers based on material dredged by this institution have 
repeatedly requested information concerning the season, locality, 
depth, nature of the bottom, and other conditions under which the 
specimens were obtained. Finally, the plankton records have been 
urgently called for, particularly by those who. desiring to make 
quantitative ecological investigations, could not proceed at all without 
them. It soon became evident, therefore, that all our hydrographic, 
plankton, and dredging records would have to tie published if we were 
adequately to meet these demands. 

Accordingly, early in January, 1913, was beg-un tlie laborious task 
of compiling and arranging the data which had accumulated during 
the past twelve years. All the records of temperature, depth, position, 
date, and so on, were carefully checked, whenever possible, against 
the original field-notes and all the salinity determinations were twice 
independently computed from the original measurements. It is thus 
hoped that the numlier of occasional blunders consequent upon such 
a vast amount of tabulation and computation has been reduced to a 
minimum. 

In order to make the records available from as many points of 
view as possilile, a description of the apparatus and methods of work 



4 Vnircrsity of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

is given, in addition to the tables of data. However, as most of the 
apparatus used prior to June, 1908. at which time the "Alexander 
Aofassiz" began active work, has also been employed since that time 
while many others have been added, the descriptions apply particu- 
larly to this later period, a brief historical resume serving in general 
to cover the preceeding years. Furthermore, since most of the ap- 
paratus has been completely described elsewhere, it is considered in 
detail only when this is demanded in the interest of clearness, while 
the methods of collecting, recording, and analyzing are more fully 
discussed because of their important bearing upon the interpretation 
of the tables. Finally, since an accurate interpretation depends upon 
a knowledge of the magnitude of the inevitable errors involved, espe- 
cially in the determination of position, depth, temperature, and 
salinity, such errors are fully discussed under the proper headings. 

The actual work at sea has involved the co-operation of many per- 
sons to whom the institution is deeply indebted. The services of most, 
however, are so interdependent that it would be nearly if not quite 
impossible to separate them and duly credit each person with the par- 
ticular services rendered. But there are a few who have been so 
definitely connected with the work, and whose intiuenee upon the 
results achieved has been so great, that they must be mentioned here. 

Except for the services and ingenuity of Professor C. A. Kofoid, 
who had charge of most of the earlier work and to whose ability in 
devising mechanical appliances and .skill in working out details some 
of our most important apparatus is due, much of the work actually 
accomplished would have been impossible. This is especially true of 
the period from 1901 to 1906 when, crippled by lack of funds, the 
work at sea depended entirely upon the improvising of inexpensive 
apparatus. Professor Kofoid was ably assisted during part of the 
summer of 1901 by Professor W, J. Raymond of the Physics Depart- 
ment of the University of California, and later in the summer of 1903 
by Mr. W. T. Skilling. teacher of physics and physical geography in 
the State Normal School at San Diego. 

Since 1908 the scientific crew has as a rule consisted of Captain W. 
C. Crandall, George F. ]McEwen, and Ellis L. Michael, who have been 
responsible for most of the methods of collection employed from that 
time to this. It is in fact due to Captain Crandall's exceptional 
ability in navigating and maneuvering the "Agassiz" that the magni- 
tude of the inevitable field errors have been reduced to a minimum. 



1915] Michael, ct al. : Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 5 



PART I 
DESCRIPTION OF APPARATUS AND METHODS OP WORK 



A. Events Leading to the Present Locations and Methods 
OF Work 

1. BRIEF HISTORICAL RESUME 

Tlie ideas out of which the Seripps Institution grew had their 
origin in 1891, when the present scientific director of the Station was 
called to the newly inaugurated sub-department of biology in the 
University of California. It was at once noted that, while all the 
fields of zoology of western America had been but imperfectly culti- 
vated, the least studied of all was the teeming life of the great ocean 
on whose margin the University is located. It thus came about that 
most of the investigations carried on by the Department of Zoology 
from that day to this have pertained to the life of the Pacific Ocean. 
As a large amount of work in systematic zoology would have to be 
done at the outset, efforts were made, especially during the summei-s. 
to gain a first-hand knowledge of the fauna and their habitat. Thus, 
in the spring of 1S92. a structure, partly of wood and partly of canvas, 
constructed with a view to being taken to pieaes and moved about, was 
built for use as a seaside laboratory at Pacific Grove. This summer's 
work, supplemented by numerous collecting trips to various points on 
the coast both south and north of the Golden Gate, created a desire to 
see more of the southern coast. Accordingly in 1893' the laboratory 
was re-erected on the beach at Avalon, Santa Catalina Island. 

From 1S9-4 to 1901 no organized seaside laboratory work was 
undertaken, but numerous collecting and observational excursions 
were made from time to time, covering the coast from San Diego on 
the south to Alaska on the north. The outcome of this extensive re- 
connoitering was the firm conviction shared by all that San Pedro 
Bay was particularly favorable for almost any sort of marine bio- 
logical activity. 

Without entering further into details (see Ritter, 1912). suffice it 
to sav that the vear 1901 marks the time when the first organized work 



6 Ihiircrsitij of California Publications in Zoologij [Vol. 15 

at sea was started. In view of the meagerness of funds, however, it 
was decided to limit operations to dredging- and trawling in the neigh- 
borhood of San Pedro, where the laboratory was then located. An 
open forty-foot, tifteen horse-power gasoline launch, the "Elsie," was 
hired for the work. Its equipment consisted of a hand-winch for haul- 
ing tlie dredge and trawl, an improvised sounding-machine operated 
by hand and supplied with 275 meters of galvanized steel wire (no. 10 
of the American Steel and Wire Company), and an improvised ap- 
paratus for taking sub-surface samples of water (see Ritter. 1902). 
Two months' work from May 15 to August 15 was done, during which 
the "Elsie" made dredgings around and in the vicinity of Santa 
Catalina Island and San Diego, as well as at San Pedro, the region of 
its main explorations. The main aim of the work being that of getting 
acijuainted with the fauna with a view of determining the most feasible 
place for a permanent location, collections were not made primarily 
from a quantitative point of view, and the data obtained, while ex- 
ceedingly valuable, have little quantitative significance. 

Owing to lack of funds no explorations at sea were made during 
1902, but in 1903 work was resumed with Coronado as the base of 
operations (Ritter, 1912). A small schooner, the "Laura," was 
rented and outfitted with the meager apparatus at hand, put in charge 
of an intelligent Portuguese fisherman, Manuel Cabral, and set to 
work for six weeks during June and July. The experiences of 1901 
had shown that, with a limited boat equipment, bottom and plankton 
collecting could not be well combined and that on the whole plankton 
collections could be made more efficiently and no less profitably from 
the scientific standpoint. The apparatus consisted of a series of 
ordinary tow-nets oi 000, 12, and 20 mesh, with which open vertical 
hauls were made, in addition to the usual surface towings. As the 
funds were insnfificient to permit the purchase of closing nets, a 
method was improvised whereby water from any desired depth could 
be pumped and filtered (see p. 11). Two summers and wnnters were 
spent in telling work during the Coronado period. 

After carefully studying the coast. La JoUa, a suburb of San 
Diego, situated fifteen miles north of the center of the city, was 
selected as, on the whole, the most advantageous place for the perma- 
nent location of the station, and in the summer of 1905 the laboratory 
was moved from Coronado to La Jolla. During the summer of 1904 
i\Ir. E. W. Seripps had placed his pleasure yacht, the "Loma," at 
the disposal of the station, and in the fall of the same year he gave 



• m«f3 nB'- 



fiaeitmo^' 




M«p showing the .rea to b« surveve.l. Modified from United States Coast ami 



eodetic Survey Chart. 




7 
LLA 



1915] Michael, ct ah: Hjidrngriipliic Fccords of Scripps Institution 7 

the vessel to the station. She was tlien taken to San Francisco, re- 
fitted and equipped with scientific gear, returning to San Diego in 
time for the summer's work of 1905. The "Loma" was kept in active 
service, making plankton and dred.ge collections, until she was wrecked 
off the lighthoiLse on Point Loma in July, 1906. While plans for a 
new boat were entered into directly, it was not until August, 1907, 
that the "Alexander Agassiz" was launched and not until June, 1908, 
that she began active work, recourse being had in the meantime to 
Captain Cabral and his fishing-boat, the "St. Joseph." 



2. THE REGION TO BE SURVEYED 

Proljably the most important consideration leading to the estab- 
lishment of the "station" south in.stead of north of San Pedro con- 
sisted in the selection and limitation of the territory to be siirveyed. 
After careful examination (Ritter, 1905), an irregularly triangular 
area extending from Point Conception, 34° 27' N, at the north to a 
base line extending westward from the southern boundary of the United 
States 32° 28' N, bounded on the east by the coast line, and on the 
west by the meridian of Point Conception, 120° 25' W, was selected. 
The shore line of this area, exclusive of the islands, is about 280 miles. 
The lengtli of the western side is about 120 miles, and that of its 
southern side about 19-t miles. The area, therefore, contains over 
11,600 square miles. Some of the important qualifications of thi^ 
area are: (1) a considerable extent of continental shelf, presenting a 
large diversity of bottom with numerous islands, shoals, and submarine 
valleys; (2) proximity to es.sentially oceanic conditions ; (3) a climate 
so equable as to make it practicable to conduct investigations at almost 
any time during the year; and (4) a large variety of shore line readily 
accessible by boat or rail. 

It is, of course, not to be supposed that a stone wall has been built 
about this area, but rather that it makes a well-defined base of opera- 
tions. As a matter of fact, the southern boundary has been altered in 
order to include Los Coronados Islands and the Cortez Banks, at both 
of which places considerable work has been done. In 1908, an expedi- 
tion southward as far as Guadalupe and Cerros islands was made, and, 
in 1912, another to the north as far as Puget Sound. 



Umversity of CaUfoniia F'uhlicafioiis in Zoology [Vol. 15 



B. The "Alexander Agassiz" and Methods of Collecting 



1. THE BOAT ITSELF 

As plankton collecting, from the point of view of quantitative re- 
search, dates hack to June, 1908, when the " Asrassiz" hegau work, a 
description of the boat (see Ritter, 1912, p. 176) is here quoted: 

The "Agassiz" is 85 feet long over all, is of 26-foot beam, and draws 5 
feet of water. She is schooner-rigged, and as originally built was a "ketch," 
that is, a boat with deck area forward of the mainmast large and unencum- 
bered, the wheel being placed behind the rear mast. Her foremast was at 
first 65 feet high, carrying a boom and large mainsail, and her mizzenmast 39 
feet, rigged with a boom. She has a spoon bow and a 15-foot overhang. As 
launched the deck was without superstructures except the two-foot decking of 
the cabin and engine house, these being separated by a narrow passage way. 
Below the main deck the space was apportioned as follows: The forecastle 
contained the galley, the chain locker, and a 110-gallon water tank. Immedi- 
ately behind the forecastle came the cabin area, divided in the middle length- 
wise by the center-board box, into a captain 's cabin forward on the starboard 
side, and a stateroom aft; and on the port side the mess cabin and lavatory. 
Separated from the cabins by a bulkhead is the engine room containing the two 
propelling engines, the main hoisting engine, and the reeling drum for the 
dredging cable. Behind the engine room is a lazaretto containing two dis- 
tillate tanks of 460 and 230 gallons capacity and a 100-gallon gasoline tank. 

The tirst season's work made it clear that the "Agassiz" was rigged 

too heavily — 

that the wheel should be forward; that the scientific work should have better 
accommodations on the after deck; and that the galley was too small. Conse- 
quently the following year the mainmast was cut down 15 feet and reduced in 
diameter; both main and mizzeu-sails were made lighter bj' changing them 
to the leg-of-mutton pattern; the wheel was placed in a pilot house immedi- 
ately aft the mainmast; a naturalist's house was built on the deck behind 
the mizzenmast; and the galley was enlarged by partitioning off a portion of 
the messroom. These changes greatl}- improved the vessel not only in sea- 
worthiness but in comfort and in facilities for scientific work. As now ar- 
ranged, the "Agassiz" has sleeping accommodations for nine persons, there 
being two berths in the forecastle, two "Pullman" berths in the messroom, 
two berths in the stateroom, one in the captain's room, and two in the engine 
room. 

The twin driving engines are gasoline, 30 horse-power each, and were built 
by the Western Standard Engine Company of San Francisco. The main hoist- 
ing engine is a five horse-power gasoline built by the Union Gas Engine Com- 
pany of San Francisco. The large reeling drum and its spooling apparatus 
were designed by Mr. T. W. Ransom of San Francisco, a mechanical engineer, 
and were built by the Union Gas Engine Company. 



1915] Michael, ef al.: Hiidrographic Records of Scripps Institution fl 

These three engines and the drum are in the engine room. The 
drum is built in two sections, the larger of which accommodates 2200 
meters of %-inch hemp-steel cable for dredging and other heavy work, 
while the smaller accommodates 2000 meters of 3 mm. 28-strand gal- 
vanized wire for operating the lighter apparatus. In addition, a 
patent Thompson sounding machine, supplied with 2200 meters of 
%o nim. piano wire, is located aft of the naturalist's hou.se and ar- 
ranged so as to be run by a friction wheel on the flywheel of the main 
hoisting engine. 

All scientific work requiring engine power is done aft. The 
sounding-wire is paid out on the port side and is independent of the 
collecting gear, so that soundings may be taken while other work is in 
progress. The collecting cables are passed from the drum through a 
runway onto the deck, over a recording meter-wheel, thence to the 
boom of the mizzenmast. and finally over the stern to the water line. 
This arrangement has the advantage of bringing together the scientific 
gear and the naturalist's quarters on the rear deck where there is most 
available space. Nearly all the work is done while the vessel is adrift, 
or at a standstill. 



2. THE COLLECTIXG APPARATUS 

(a) The surface nets. — These are all simple conical tow-nets con- 
sisting of a bronze rim to which is attached a head-piece of impervious 
cloth, like butcher's linen or canvas. This head-piece serves as a sup- 
port and means of attachment for the netting proper, which may be 
of a variety of meshes. The upper end of the netting is securely 
sewed onto the head-piece and the lower end onto a foot-piece con- 
sisting of similar impervious cloth, to which the net bucket is attached. 
The nature of the bucket varies somewhat with the size of the net, 
bronze buckets being used with larger ones (000. and 000 c) while an 
ordinary four-ounce pomade bottle has proven the most satisfactory 
for the smaller nets. To provide a proper .support for the netting, 
three ropes attached to the rim at equal distances from each other are 
carried backward and attached to the bucket, and also forward for 
about three feet where they are brought together and tied. 

It is usually customary to operate three surface nets at the same 
time. One of the larger nets (000 or 000 c) is fastened to the end of 
a suitable rope about 200 feet long and to its rim is attached an air- 
tight five-gallon can or carboy to serve as a float. The net is then 



10 Univcrsifi) of California Puhlicafioiis in Zoology [Vol.15 

tlirown over the rail at either side of the boat's stern, depending upon 
the direction of drift. At a distance of about fifteen feet the next 
smaller net (8, 9, 10, or 12) is attached to the rope, and fifteen feet 
from that one the third net (usually no. 20) is likewise attached. The 
nets are then allowed to drift away imtil the rope becomes taut, when 
it is made secure. After a haul of the desired duration has been made, 
the nets are brought on board, carefully washed with surface water 
to prevent the organisms from adhering to the netting and being 
thereby carried over into the next haul, and the contents of the bucket 
are transferee! into containers such a-s pint, quart, or two-quart "sure- 
seal" fruit jars, or, if the catch is unusually large, into pails. The 
catch is then preserved by adding formalin enough to make a ten per 
cent solution, labelled, and temporarily filed in the naturalist's house 
in racks specially constructed for that purpose. About five minutes 
are consumed in hauling-in. wa.shing, transfering, preserving, labelling, 
and filing the catch, and putting the nets out again. 

(b) The Nanseii closing-nets.'' — To operate one of these nets re- 
quires the combined labor of an engineer, a man to stand by the bells 
and read the meter, and two sailors to handle the net itself. When 
the net is ready to be lowered, the ring from which it is suspended 
is fastened to the trip which has previously been made secure to the 
cable and the engineer is signalled to lower. When the net has de- 
scended far enough, .say 100 meters, the net is immediately raised at 
a uniform rate of approximately 60 cm. per second until, say, the 
fifty-meter level is reached. The sailors then send the messenger 
which, striking the trip, closes the net. A vertical haul has thus been 
made from one hundred to fifty meters, and the net is hoisted on deck 
as quickly as possible. It is then thoroughlj- washed with water filtered 
through netting of finer mesh than that of the net, thereby preventing 
contamination by surface organisms. After washing, the catch is 
transfered to containers and eared for as in the case of the surface 
nets and, while one sailor is transfering the catch, the other removes 
the messenger and adjusts the net for the next haul. About one 
minute elapses between the time the net reaches the deck and its 
descent for the next haul. 

From June 19, 1909, when the Nansen nets were first put into 
commission, to February 17, 1910, when they were first used for 
vertical hauling, the only cable with which the " Agassiz" was equipped 
was too large to carry the messengers and trips. An arrangement 



1 For a liescription of this net see Henlman, Seott, ami Dakiu, 1010, p. 337 



1915] Michael, et al. : Hydrocji-aph ic Records of Scriirps Institution 11 

was therefore effected whereby they could be temporarily used for 
horizontal sub-surface towing:. This was done by employing two ropes, 
one being tied into the ring supporting the net and the other to the 
trip-cord. The net, being weighted so as to assume a horizontal posi- 
tion, was lowered and raised by means of the rope attached to the trip- 
cord, which thus being taut kept the net closed. After lowering to the 
desired depth the trip-cord rope was allowed to sag while the rope 
tied into the ring was made taut and tied. The motion of the net 
through the water caused it to open and thus a horizontal closing-net 
liaul was made. This method, however, was very awkward and in- 
volved such a quantity of rope that it became impossible to make hauls 
below one hundred fathoms. Moreover, the depth error was so large 
that hauls could be made with satisfaction only wlieu the sea was 
very quiet. 

(c) The Kofoiil closing-tut. — This net was put into commission 
June 21, 1908. It is operated in much the same manner as the Nansen 
nets, although its great weight requires the large %-inch cable and 
makes the handling more difficult and quite impo.ssible in rough 
weather. Being constructed to make horizontal instead of vertical 
hauls, two messengers are ased, the first to open and the second to 
close the net. Owing to its weight, the net tends to act as a sea-anchor 
which, while insuring a great accuracy in depth, makes it necessary to 
steam ahead slowly with one engine while making the catch. For 
a full description of this net see Kofoid, 1911a. 

(rf) The sub-surface pump. — During 1903 a pumping outfit was 
used for collecting microplankton from below the surface. This con- 
sisted of a semi-rotary clock pump of half-inch intake fitted to one 
hundred fathoms of half-inch white rubber hose. The hose was in 
fifty-foot sections connected together with screw couplings. It was 
lowered and raised by means of an improvised drum operated by 
hand. The water thus obtained was filtered through filter-paper, no. 
20 or no. 12 netting or, after settling, it was decanted. Pumping 
was usually continued for five minutes when, if working at full 
capacity (eight liters per minute), forty liters of water would have 
been obtained. The small volume of water thus obtained, however, 
made the results unsatisfactory, and. after a thorough trial, the method 
was discontinued. 

(e) The Kofoid water bottle. — This bottle, having a capacity of 
20 liters, has been used for making microplankton collections as well 
as for obtaining water samples (see Kofoid, 1905 ; for improved model 



12 



University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



see Kofoid. 1911b). It can be used only on the large cable. When 
lowered to the desired depth the bottle is closed by means of a mes- 
senger, after which it is raised on deck and the temperature is taken 

(see p. 11). Except during July. 
1912, this method of obtaining 
water samples for plankton work 
has been seldom u.sed since July 16, 
1910, at which time the Ekman 
bottles were first put into e(immis- 
sion. 

(/') The Elcman reversing water 
bottles. — These bottles are so con- 
structed (see Ekman, 1905a) that 
several of them may be clamped 
to the same cable and a series of 
depths explored at the same time. 
After they are lowered to the de- 
sired depths, the bottles are allowed 
to remain open for from two to 
three minutes to insure the setting 
of the thermometers (see p. 16). 
A messenger is then sent, which de- 
scending at the rate of two and 
one-half meters per second, reverses 
and closes the uppermo.st bottle, 
thereby freeing a second messenger 
which reverses the second bottle, and 
so on. After all have been closed, 
which can usually be detected by 
feeling the cable, the cable is raised 
until the uppermost bottle reaches 
the deck. This is then detached 
and handed over to the hydro- 
grapher, who notes the temperature 
and places the bottle in a specially 
made rack which allows the water 
to run out into a container (see 
p. 17). By this means, as soon as 
the water has been removed from 
the terminal bottle, everything is in 




Pig. 1. A combination apparatus: 
Kofoid closing net, Ekman water bot 
ties, and Ekman current meter. 



1915] Michael, ct al.:Hiidro<jrapliic Records of Scripps I nsiUution 13 

readiness for a second series. The Richter self-recristerina: deep-sea 
thermometers (see p. 15) have been exclusively used in connection 
with these water bottles. 

(g) A comhination apparatut^. — Durinfr July, 1912. a method was 
devised whereby two Ekman bottles and an Ekman current-meter 
(Ekman. 1905b) were suspended below the Kofoid net, as indicated in 
the accompanying figure. Upon the opening of the net a messenger. 1. 
is freed, causing the reversal of one of the bottles which, in reversing. 
frees a second messenger, 2. thereby starting the current-meter. [Jpon 
closure of the net another messenger, .5, is released, which caiLses the 
reversal of the second water bottle, which in turn frees a fourth mes- 
senger. 4. thereby stopping the current-meter. With this combination 
it was possible to obtain two water .samples, one at the beginning and 
one at the end of each net haul. In addition the current-meter regis- 
ters the distance of the haul or, more properly, the number of meters 
of water through which the net passes during the interval of its haul. 
While this method is somewhat awkward, the value of the collections 
was increased many times, and the results proved very satisfactory. 

(7i) Other apparatus. — Under this heading a variety of trawling 
and dredging apparatus might be described. However, since 1908, 
.such apparatus has been too seldom used to justify taking the space 
here to describe it, while prior to that year the particular kind of 
trawl or dredge used was seldom recorded. Suffice it to say that, in 
addition to the apparatus above described, the "Agassiz" is well 
equipped with various trawls and dredges, ranging in size from the 
four-foot Tanner trawl to a fiftv-foot Otter trawl. 



3. COLLECTION OP WATER SAMPLES AND MEASUREMENT OP 
TEMPERATURE 

(a) Surface samples. — It has been our custom since 1908 to collect 
surface water samples at intervals varying from ten to twenty miuvites 
when the "Agassiz" is under way. The average speed of the boat 
being seven and one-half knots per hour, samples are thus obtained 
at intervals varying from one to three knots, in addition to those 
usually taken in connection with surface-net hauls. A canvas bucket 
having a capacity of about two gallons is used to dip up the water, 
after which a thermometer (manufactured by L. Steger, Kiel) reading 
directly to two-tenths of a degree C is immediately immersed. Two 



14 Universitij of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

01- three minutas later the thermometer is read and the temperature 
estimated to the nearest 0?05 C. Owing to the fact that the scale of 
these thermometers is made of paper so graduated that 0.2 of a degree 
is represented by a di.stance of only 0.71 mm., it is evident that esti- 
mates closer than 0.05 would be unreliable. After reading the tempera- 
ture, a pint of water is tightly sealed in a '.'sure-seal" fruit jar, 
properly labelled, and filed in the naturalist's house until it can be 
taken to the laboratory and analysed. In making the final record of the 
temperatures the readings are corrected from a table of calibration 
errors previously obtained by comparing the thermometer with a 
standard from the "Reichsanstalt. " 

(&) Sub-snrface samples. — Prior to July 16. 1910. all the sub- 
surface samples were collected with the Kofoid water bottle (see p. 
11). The temperatures were taken with the same thermometers and 
the samples were labelled, preserved, and filed as in the case of the 
surface samples. However, owing to the fact that the Kofoid bottle 
is made of bronze and is not insulated, the friction of the surrounding 
water on the bottle as it is being hauled up, in addition to the conduc- 
tion while in the upper layers of water, appreciably increases the tem- 
perature of the enclosed sample. In fact, observations show that the 
water in the top may be from two to three degrees warmer than that 
in the bottom of the bottle, when the samples are obtained from 
depths exceeding three hundred meters. For this reason the tempera- 
ture of the water in the bottom of this bottle was always taken. 

During July, 1912, several series of parallel temperature mea.sure- 
ments were made, one set by the above method, and the other with the 
Ekman reversing water bottles provided with Richter reversing ther- 
mometers (see p. 15). Prom a comparison of the results the effect 
of the friction and conduction above mentioned was ascertained and a 
correction for the same relative to depths less than 350 meters was 
computed. No reliable correction could be made for greater depths, 
owing to the fact that the increase in temperature due to the extra 
friction and conduction is almost, if not quite, balanced by the decrease 
in tempei-ature due to the increase in depth. The following list of 
corrections shows the amount by which the temperatures of the Kofoid 
bottle miLst be decreased in order to obtain the actual temperatures at 
the depths of closure : 



1915] Michael, ct al.: Hijdrograpliic Recorch of Scripps In.<:fittiiion 15 

Degrees C to be Corresponding 

subtracted depth 

from reading in meters 

0.00-0.05 C 0- 25 

0.10 *. 30 

0.15 32 

0.20 34 

0.25 36 

0.30 40 

0.35 46 

0.40 57 

0.45 72 

0.50 87 

0.55 103 

0.60 120 

0.65 138 

0.70 156 

0.75 174 

O.SO 193 

0.85 216 

0.90 247 

0.95 300 

1.00 350 



After this correction has been applied, the temperature may be 
eon-sidered accurate to within 0?2 C providing the temperature of the 
water in the lowest part of the bottle is taken. As stated above, this 
has always been done since 1908. 

Since July 16, 1910, most all sub-surface samples were collected 
with the Elanan bottles (see p. 12) and the temperatures were meas- 
ured with the Richter reversing thermometers, two usually having 
been attached to each bottle. 

The Richter thermometer in reality consists of two tliermometers. 
r and a, fastened together and hermetically sealed in a hea\'y glass 
tube, thereby preventing the mercury bulbs from being affected by 
the water pressure. In one of the thermometers, r, the capillary tube 
is contracted just above the large bulb, B, so that, when inverted, the 
column of mercury in the stem breaks at this contraction, c, and, 
dropping, fills a smaller bulb, h. and a portion of the stem. The actual 
volume of mercury thus In-oken off depends upon the temperature at 
the depth of reversal, and the scale while arranged with the lowest 
values at the small bulb, b, is graduated with respect to the large bulb, 
B, so that a direct reading is possible only when the thermometer is 
read at exactly the same temperature as that at the depth of revereal. 
Since this condition is seldom if ever realized, the reading must be 



16 



Vniversitij of California Publications in Zoology [Vol.15 



corrected for the error thus introduced. It is for this 
purpose that the auxilliary thermometer, a, is pro- 
vided. Its use depends upon the fact that, being an 
ordinary thermometer, any one of its degree-scale 
divisions always corresponds to the change in the 
volume of mercury produced by a change of 1° C 
in temperature, while each degree-scale division of the 
reversing thermometer corresponds to the change in 
the volume of the total amount of mercury produced 
by a change of 1° C but not to that of the small frac- 
tion of the column broken off when inverted. Thus, 
the two thermometers, r and a, will give identical 
readings only at the temperature at which the instru- 
ment is reversed and the difference between their 
respective readings at any other temperature will be 
proportional to the difference between this temperature 
and that at the time of reversal. Hence, by reading 
both thermometers simultaneously the temperature at 
tlie depth of reversal may be computed. "Without 
going further into details, it may be shown that the 
neces.sary correction, k, is given by the formula. 



k: 



(T—t) 



a+-) 



6300 

where T is the reading of the reversing thermometer, 
/ that of the auxiliary thermometer, v the volume of 
the small bulb of the reversing thermometer, s the 
volume of one degree-scale division of the reversing 
thermometer, and 6300 a constant depending upon 
the coefficient of expansion of mercury and the nature 
of the glass. 

Ekmau (1905a) experimented on the time required 
for the Richter thermometer to assume the tempera- 
ture of the surrounding water. He gave the ther- 
mometer a high initial temperature and then reversed 
it in water 10° C colder. Conduction proved to be 
^•^^Z^ ver\- rapid on account of the fact that the large bulb 

Fig. 2. Eichter'sjs immersed in a jacket of mercury. The thermometer 
reversing ther- 
mometer, assumed the temperature of the water within an error 



l''l-5] Michael, ct al.: Iliidrograpliir Records of Scripps Iiistitutioii 17 

of 1° C in the course of half a niimite. within 0?1 in one minute, 
within 0?02 in two and one-half minutes, and within an error of a few 
thousandths of a degree in five minutes. As the thermometer will 
gradually approach the final reading while lowered, it is our custom 
to wait another two or three minutes, depending upon the depth, 
before revensing the instrument, thus insuring an accuracy of about 
0?0] C. We have, however, read the thermometer directly without 
employing a microscope so that our error is somewhat larger, varying 
between 0?01 and 0?03 C. 

The water samples obtained with the Ekinan bottles are nearly 
always preserved in green glass bottles having a volume of 250 c.c, and 
provided with a patent china stopper fitted with a suitable india-rubber 
washer. A small lever of stiff wire is used to pre.ss the stopper 
firmly into the neck of the bottle. These bottles were purchased from 
the Central Laboratory of the International Commission at Christiania, 
and are in general use throughout the world. They have proven 
exceedingly satisfactory both as regards ease of handling and trans- 
portation and a.s an almost perfect means of preventing evaporation 
(see p. 25). 

4. METHOD OF EECOEDING 

Since 1908, when the "Agassiz" began work, no pains have been 
spared to make our .system of recording of the highest efficiency. With 
this end in view a double-entry plan was adopted and is still in use. 
After the hauls and water samples are transfered to containers, the 
recorder labels each one. For this purpose he is provided wnth haid 
and water sample books consisting of tags about IVl; inches square 
made of the best linen paper. Printed along the left-hand margin of 
each tag are the following items : 

Haul tag-booh Water sample tag-book 

Haul no. Water sample no. 

Apparatus Haul no. 

Date and time Date and time 

Position Position 

Depth Depth 

Bottom Temperature 
Water sample no. 

The recorder enters on each tag the information called for, using 
a soft lead pencil except in case of haul (and water sample) numbers ; 
these being recorded in sequence irrespective of the nature of the haul 



18 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol.15 

(oi- water sample), are written iu India ink previous to sailing. How- 
ever, to provide against loss of tags, a few tag-books are carried in 
duplicate in which these numbers are not entered. When the par- 
ticular tag is properly filled out it is placed inside the jar containing 
the haul or water sample, and the latter is then filed until the 
"Agassiz" reaches home. 

In addition to the tags a log-book is kept in which is also entered 
the same data for each haul and water sample, together with the 
details of operating the apparatus, accidents, weather conditions, and 
in fact anything that might have the remotest bearing upon the 
collections. 

Upon completion of the day's work the recorder checks the entries 
in his log-book against those the captain has kept, adding the sextant 
bearings and other remarks relative to the day's navigation. As soon 
as possible after the material reaches the laboratory the hauls are 
condensed into four-ounce pomade bottles, and filed, the salinities of 
the water samples are determined (see p. 28), and the data are 
arranged in final form and typewritten, usually in triplicate. 



C. Errors in Field Observations 
1. ERRORS DUE TO POSITION 

(o) Latitude and longitude. — Three methods are used for de- 
termining the latitude and longitude at which collections are made, all 
of which are sub.ject to errors varying in magnitude consequent on a 
variety of conditions. The sextant method, being the most accurate, 
is always used when practicable. Otherwise the position is ascertained 
b.y a pelorus or, when the use of this instrument is impracticable, 
recourse is had to the less accurate method of "dead-reckoning." i.e., 
of calculating the position from course and log. 

Location by the sextant as used by us consists of the selection of 
three prominent points on land, and the measurement of two angles, 
one between the horizontal lines connecting the observer with the 
central and left-hand points ; the second between the lines connecting 
the observer with the right-hand and central points. Whenever pos- 
sible, choice is made of prominent and sharply dffined headlands or 
other salient points which can readily be identified on the United 
States Coa-st and Geodetic Survey charts. Care is taken to avoid the 
selection of points lying on or near a circle pa.ssing through the 
observer, for under such conditions the location is indeterminate. 



1915] Michael, et al. : Hiidrographic Records of Scripps Institution 19 

Assuming the sextant to be properly adjusted, the following sources 
of error are important : 

1. Difficulty in identifying the points of bearing with those on the 
charts. This difficulty arises from variation in their appearance due 
to different positions of the observer. 

2. Difficulty in clearly distinguishing the point.s becaiLse of the 
hazy condition of the atmosphere. 

3. Impossibility of measuring both angles simultaneously, which 
introduces error because of the drifting of the boat. 

Experience gained through repeated iLse of the same three points 
of bearing may reduce the first source of error sufficiently to make its 
effect negligible. This is especially true of our work in the region 
about Los Coronados Islands, where the error arising from the otlier 
two sources is estimated by Captain Crandall to have varied between 
0.05 and 0.3 miles, depending largely upon the condition of the atmos- 
phere and the distance from the islands. 

The pelorus consists of a circular plate mounted horizontally in 
gimballs and placed at some point on board ship affording a clear 
view for taking bearings. Revolving about the center of the plate are : 
(1) a dumb compass card, usually engraved on metal, whose face is 
level with the raised periphery of the plate, on which score lines are 
marked indicating true directions from its center parallel and per- 
pendicular to the keel of the ship; (2) a pivoted horizontal bar car- 
rying at its extremities a pair of sight vanes so arranged that the line 
of sight always passes through the vertical axis of the pelorus, and 
having an index showing the point at which the line of sight cuts the 
dumb compass. 

In using the pelorus to determine the location of the boat a definite 
course is held. The instrument is then set on a line parallel with the 
ship 's keel and the sight vanes are arranged so as to give the compass- 
bearing on first one point of land and then vipon a second and, as a 
check, upon as many more points as may be desired. 

Aside from the error due to faulty identification of the points of 
land with those on the charts, large errors are due to the following 
causes : 

1. Difficulty of holding the boat on the same course, without making 
too great headway, wliile the sight vanes are set successively upon 
the points of bearing. 

2. DiflSculty of getting clear sights while the boat is rocking and 
pitching. 



20 JJniversity of California Publications in Zoology [Vol.15 

3. The distance the boat moves while the observations are being 
taken. 

In a quiet sea the pelorus "ive.s fairly accurate results but, when 
rough, the error may be very large. For this reason it is seldom used, 
except for cheeking against sextant observations, unless atmospheric 
conditions make the use of the .sextant impossible. Positions deter- 
mined by it may be considered accurate within 0.3 to 0.5 miles. 

Dead-reckoning is used only wlien all other methods are imprac- 
ticable; namely, during fog, or at night, or when the distance from 
land is so great as to render points of bearing invisible. The method 
consists in measuring the speed of the boat along its course by means 
of a log-line. It involves large errors resulting from the following 
causes : 

1. Difficulty in accurately determining the departure point, such 
as the extreme edge of a kelp bed. 

2. Difificult.v of holding the boat on the desired course, which varies 
^\^th the "sea" as well as the .skill of the pilot. 

3. Drift and leeway due to currents, direction of wind and sea, 
and velocity of wind and sea, all of which alter the coiirse of the boat 
and cause the log-line to over or under-read. 

4. Deviation in accuracy of the compass, depending upon number 
and position of anchors and other magnetic materials. 

The latter error is reduced to a minimum by "swinging the ship" 
and making our corrections for each heading, but the effect of the 
other errors is such that their magnitude increases with the distance 
covered by the boat. Care is taken, however, to "cheek back" after 
reaching port or anchorage in order to correct the courses and distances 
registered in the captain's log-book. With the utmost care, however, 
an error of one mile in position sometimes occurs. 

Finally, each of the above methods is ased as a check against the 
others. In addition soundings when made are always compared with 
the entries on the charts and the position thus determined is cheeked 
against that derived by the three methods above described. In this way 
the average error in latitude and longitude, relative especially to our 
work since 1908, was reduced to 0.3 miles, although in some instances 
the error is upwards of one mile (see p. 45). 

(&) Depth.— All our determinations of depth depend upon a meter- 
wheel which registers the amount of cable paid out. It is obvious, 
therefore, that unless the cable be perpendicular, the registration will 
exceed the depth. In order to measure the error due to such inclina- 



1915] Michael, et at. : Hiidroyraphic Records of Scripps Institution 21 

tion, Brennt'ck made a nunihei- of experiments during the "Planet" 
expedition (see Helland-Hansen, 1911-12, p. 7), which resulted in the 
discovery that, when the inclination from the perpendicular was less 
than 30°, the error was less than three per cent of the depth. By 
manoenvering the "Agas.siz" we are visually able to maintain the cable 
within an angle of 15°, which corresponds to an error of less than two 
per cent. In most cases when the inclination exceeded 30° the collec- 
tions were not kept, and in those few instances where they ^\■er(> kept 
the error is noted in the tables. 

By comparing all the temperature-s and salinities relative to each 
depth inve.stigated above two hundred meters we discovered a magni- 
tude of variation exceeding that wliich would be expected from a 
depth error of only two per cent. It would, therefore, seem that the 
same angle of inclination produce.s an increasing relative error as the 
depth decreases from two hundred meters. On the other hand, it is 
certain that the temperature and salinity changes much more rapidly 
in the shallower than in the deeper water. Furthermore, the effect 
of drift and current in causing the inclination of the cable is less 
during work in the upper levels, and the maneouvering of the boat 
is much simpler. All things considered, the depth error probably does 
not greatly exceed two per cent in any case. While this conclusion 
applies to both soundings and intermediate depths, an additional 
source of error, applicable to the latter only, arises from the occasional 
failure of the water bottles to close before beginning to reel in the 
cable. In such instances the temperature reading usually indicates 
the failure immediately, in which event the haul is repeated. In 
order to detect such occurrences which escaped notice on the boat, 
all the temperatures and salinities relative to each depth investigated 
were compared and, when both agreed with those from higher levels, 
it was assumed that the apparatus failed to close at the proper depth. 
As such data, on account of their misleading nature, are either ex- 
cluded from tabulation or questioned, the error in depth relative to 
the data published may be attributed entirely to that arising from 
inclination of the cable. 



2. ERRORS DUE TO APPARATUS 

It will be readily admitted that it is impossible to construct any 
piece of apparatus for the exploration of the sea that can be depended 
upon to work perfectly every time. On the other hand, we doubt if 



22 University of California Puhlications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

anyone, who has not been in actual charge of such work, could antici- 
pate the extent to which trouble is nearly always encountered. In 
some instances the source of trouble is apparent, in others it is verj' 
obscure, while in still others it remains an unsolved mystery. In the 
first category may be noted that, after a haul has been made with the 
Kofoid water bottle from depths exceeding three hundred meters, the 
temperature of the water in the upper part of the bottle dili'ers by 
two or three degrees from that in the lower part, thus causing con- 
siderable trouble in determining the correct temperature (see p. 14). 
In the last category may be mentioned cases in which a Richter ther- 
mometer suddenly balks and, like a stubborn donkey, absolutely re- 
fuses to work until it has had its rest. Most of this trouble, however, 
does not lead to error and has little bearing upon the reliability of 
the data, but some of it relative to hauls made with the Kofoid and 
Nansen nets as well as to the preservation of water samples does lead 
to error and must, therefore, be discussed. 

(a) The Kofoid net. — In using this net one is at times struck by 
the almo.st total absence of organisms obtained during a particular 
haul. In some such instances it has been found that the spring of the 
opening jaw had broken or slipped so that the first messenger failed 
to open the net and the second reversed both jaws at the same time. 
In other instances the net when thorough!}^ tested on deck operated 
perfectly, the presumption therefore being that it failed to capture 
anything because there were no organisms to be captured. During 
July, 1912, a method was devised (see p. 13) by which an Ekman 
current meter could be suspended below the Kofoid net in such a way 
that it would be started when the net opened and- stopped when it 
closed. "With such a combination it is clear that, if any time elapsed 
between the opening and closing of the net, the current meter would 
show a registration and thus a definite means was at hand for deter- 
mining whether or not the net could actually be open and filtering 
water without catching any organisms. 

A large number of hauls were made with this api^aratus, distributed 
in depth from the surface to 550 meters, with the result: (1) that no 
instance came to light in which there was an absence of organisms 
combined with a current-meter registration; and, (2) that in a num- 
ber of cases the current meter failed to register, thereby showing that 
no haul had been made. These facts forcibly indicate that the net, 
when properly opened, may be depended upon to make its capture and. 
consequently, whenever an "empty haul" is discovered, it may be 



1915] Michael, ct al.: IliifJi-ogvaphic Rcronh of Scvipps institution 23 

concluded that the net has opened and closed at the same time even 
though, when thoroughly examined and tested, the net seems to work 
perfectly and the cause of its failure to open in tliat particular case 
cannot be discovered. 

Should the reader think it to lie a simple matter to discovi'r the 
cause for such failure, his attention is called tc the following list of 
causes which were discovered during the work of July, 1912, some 
being easily ascertained while others, like 2, 4, and 6 were exceedingly 
baffling : 

1. Tension of opening spring insufficient to open the net when sub- 
merged, although it will do so on deck. 

2. Tension of spring so great that impact of the first messenger, 
when falling through water, is not sufficient to operate the trip, but 
when augmented by that of the second messenger would cause tripping 
of both jaws. 

3. Spring of opening jaw loose or broken. 

4. First messenger slightly worn along one side so that, when strik- 
ing in a certain way, it slips past the opening trip, and the second 
messenger then trips both jaws. 

5. First messenger slightly flattened and spread in consequence 
of repeated use .so that, with a cable slightly inclined in the right 
direction, it strikes and operates both trips. 

6. First messenger, in descending, scrapes tar off the cable which 
becomes jammed in the groove of the messenger, thus retarding its 
descent so that it does not strike with sufficient force. Impact of second 
messenger then trips both jaws. 

7. Three cases in which the cause was not any of the above six, and 
could not be ascertained. 

(6) The Nansen nets. — Any one having occasion to work over our 
plankton collections from a quantitative point of view will discover 
that some vertical hauls made with these nets reveal an absence of 
certain organisms at depths where, judging from hauls made with 
horizontal closing nets, an abundance would be expected. The general 
impression produced is that, for some reason or other, the Nansen nets 
act in an erratic manner, frequently, though not always, failing to 
capture such organisms even though they may have been abundant. 
While this has not, as yet, been proven, it is advisable to point out 
how such erratic action might arise. 

The "Agassiz's" excessive stern overhang, while of undoubted 
advantage in protecting the collecting apparatus from the propeller- 



24 Univcrsitij of California Publications in Zooluyij [Vol. 15 

blades, permits the waves to strike with suffieieut force, in a moderately 
rough sea, to lift the stern entirely out of the water. Even when fairly 
(juiet, considerable surging- is caused in this manner. Now. if .sucli 
a surge occurs after a haul has been made, say from fifty to tweut\- 
five meters and the net is at rest awaiting the descent of the messenger, 
it is clear that the net will be lowered very suddenly, sometimes as 
much as eight or ten feet. Virtually, therefore, a current of water 
passes upwards through the net which, while of brief duration, has a 
comparatively high velocity. Assuming that it takes two seconds for 
the boat to drop say six feet from the crest to the trough of the sea, 
a temporary current of about three feet per second would thiLs be 
generated which, if flowing horizontally, would be capable of trans- 
porting stones the size of hens' eggs. When one considers that, though 
the lifting power of such a current is much less than the transporting 
power of its horizontal equivalent, the specific gravity of most plankton 
organisms being only slightly greater than tliat of sea-water, it is at 
once evident that .such a vertical current has more than sufficient 
lifting power to throw out everything that the net might catch. 

However, the extent of such expulsion would vary with a number 
of conditions. In the first place, it would depend upon the height of 
the sea for, if any of the organisms were in the net-bucket, the momen- 
tary effect of the surge would be insufficient to lift them above the 
rim unless the net dropped a distance at least equal to its own altitude. 
Secondly, the large surges occur onlj- when the waves follow each 
other and .strike the boat in a particular way. Thirdly, violent surging 
might occur but would have little or no effect unless it happened while 
the messenger was making its descent. Fourthly, as the depth of haul 
increases, the effect of surging decreases because of the inertia of the 
cable which tends to respond by sagging, so that below a certain depth 
the cable would be straightened out before the surge could eiJect the 
net. Finally, those organisms would be expelled first whose exposed 
surface was relatively large or whose specific gravity was relatively 
small, so that a comparatively slight surge might have a selective effect 
in expelling certain organisms while not affecting others. It is thus 
evident that, if expulsion occurs at all, it must be very erratic, and 
probably selective in its effect. 

As .stated above, we have as yet no definite proof that such ex- 
pulsion occurs. One fact, however, pointing in this direction is that 
open vertical hauls, say from fifty meters to the surface, usually (but 
not always) catch many more organisms than an equivalent series of 



1915] Michael, rt al. : 11 [/droyrapltic Records of Scripps I tisl il iil inn 25 

closing-net hauls made with the same net from 50 to 40. 40 to :^0, 
30 to 20, 20 to 10, and 10 meters to the surface. 

(c) Preservation of water samples. — Troublesome errors in salinity 
often result from the manner in which water samples are preserved. 
In fact, if the samples are not tested soon after being collected, ab- 
normally high salinities will occasionally occur despite the utmost 
care in sealing the containers. While the amount of evaporation has, 
in some cases been great enough to be detected veadily, it has generally 
been so slight as to require a special examination of all our salinities 
for its detection. 

f° 
Such an examination has shown that the density in situ, S—^, rela- 

4 

tive to water samples collected at approximately the same time from 
a series of depths, nearly always increases but never decreases as the 
depth increases. This accords with the experience of Makaroff (1904. 
p. K:!!)! who says: "Les poids specifiques doivent augmenter avee la 

t° 
profondeur; s'il arrivait que le poids specifiqile >S' -^ de I'eau de 

4 

profondeur etait inferieur a celui qui serait observe dans les couches 

superieurs, on pourrait en deduire 1 'existence d'une erreur dans la 

determination du poids specifique. " 

This empirical relation of densities in situ, which Makaroff and 
others, as well as ourselves, have found by observation, has also a 
theoretical basis. Stability of the water layers coiild not otherwise 
exist. 

The actual density of a mass of water at any depth depends upon 
its temperature and pressure, as well as upon its salinity, the relation, 
of course, being such that the density decreases with a reduction in 
pressure and increases with a reduction in temperature. Now, when, 
ov^^ng to instability, a mass of water at any level a rises to a higher 
level b, its densit.y changes. The expansion of the water mass due to 
the reduction in pressure directly decrea.ses its density but, as it also 
slightly decreases its temperature, the actual decrease in density is 
not quite so great as it otherwise would be. However, since the reduc- 
tion in temperature due to an ascent of even five himdred meters is 
less than 0?05 C. and the corresponding increase in density less than 
0.00002, while the decrease in density directly caused by the expansion 
is 150 times greater, only the latter effect need be considered. Now, 
while the density of the rising mass of water is being coutinuou.sly re- 
duced owing to the decrease in pressure, both diffusion and conduction 



26 University of California Puhlications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

tciul to make its density equal to that of the surrounding water, and 
it will continue to rise until this condition is realized. Suppose this 
to occur at the level h : then, owing to the effect of diffusion and con- 
duction, its density when at a must have been less than its density 
after it reached b by an amount exceeding the decrease in its density 
caused by the difference in pressure between the two levels a and 6. 
In other words, if the densities at the levels a and b be referred to a 
common pressure, the former must be less than the latter or else the 
mass of water could not rise, w^hence the densities ut situ, wiiich are 
those at the two levels referred to atmospheric pressure, must be 
related to each other in the same way. Hence, it follows that a pro- 
gressive increase of the densities in situ with inerea.sing depth is the 
necessary condition of stability. 

We have therefore used this relation, supplemented by the fact that 
our observations have never revealed a "reversal" in temperature, 
as a criterion for detecting errors in salinity due to evaporation as 
well as to blunders in computation. In some instances, how^ever, this 
criterion was insufficient for, though it revealed an impossible relation 
between the densities in situ, it failed to indicate which partievdar 
salinity determinations were erroneous. In order to isolate these, each 
salinity determination was compared with the average and extreme 
values for the corresponding depth, month, and general locality. All 
the erroneous values thus detected are either excluded from tabulation 
or questioned, depending upon the certainty with which the values 
could be entirely attributed to evaporation and blunders in compu- 
tation. 



D. An.\lysis op Se.\ -Water 

1. GENER.A.L PROPERTIES OF SE.^-WATER AND MEASUREMENTS OF 
SALINITY 
(a) Composition of sea-water. — Sea-water is a dilute solution of 
various solid chemical compounds or salts. The weight of these salts 
in a thoiLsand grams of sea-water is called its salinity and is commonly 
denoted by the symbol S%o. A large niimber of observations have 
shown that, while the salinity varies widely, the proportion of each 
dissolved salt to all the others is nearly the same. The following 
list (see Kriimmel, 1907, p. 219) gives the amount of each salt and its 
proportion to the total in a sample of sea-water whose salinity is 35.00. 



1915] Michael, et al. : Hydroyvaphic Records of Scripps Institution 27 

Grams per 1000 per cent of 

Salt of sea water the total 

NaCl 27.213 77.758 

MgCL 3.807 10.875 

MgSO, 1.658 4.737 

CaSO^ 1.260 3.600 

K,SO, 0.863 2.465 

CaCOj 0.123 0.345 

MgBr, 0.076 0.217 



Totol 35.000 99.997 

Many elements in addition to tliose included in this list are dis- 
solved in one form or another. For instance, one gram of silver has 
been estimated to be present in 100,000,000 grams of sea-water, while 
about five times as much gold occurs. In fact, traces of almost all the 
rare metals have been detected. But the total quantity of all dissolved 
solids, except those listed above, is so small that it cannot be detected • 
by any of the practical methods used in the measurement of salinity. 

(b) Direct measurement of salinity. — The most natural method of 
determining the salinity of a given sample of water would seem to 
be that of evaporating a definite quantity of the water and weighing 
the residue. This method, however, has proved to be too inaccurate for 
oceanographie purposes. In order to expel the last trace of water 
vapor the residue must be heated to redness and, in doing this, hydro- 
chloric acid and carbon dioxide escape in amounts which cannot, as 
was formerly believed, be accuratelj^ determined. 

To overcome this difficultj^ a method was devised by Kuudseu and 
Sorenson for obtaining a residue which could be accurately mea.sured. 
Helland-Hansen (1911-12, p. 33) describes this method as follows: 

To a weighed quantity of sea-water was added hydrochloric acid and 
cblorine-water; the whole was then vaporized, and the salts were dried and 
weighed; the salt residue had first to be heated for some time at 480° C. to 
render the weight invariable; by a special examination a correction was found 
for the difference between the amount of chlorine in the vaporized salt and 
that of the original water-sample. 

While this method gives exceedingly accurate results it does not, 
strictly speaking, give the salinitj' as heretofore defined. However, it 
differs but slightly, being only 0.10 to 0.15 "/„„ less, and their ratios 
are so nearly constant that, for all practical oceanograjjliic purposes, 
the value obtained by this method may be used instead of the salinity 
proper. This is now done and the term salinity has taken on the fol- 
lowing technical meaning (see Helland-Hansen, 1911-12, p. 33) : "The 



28 University of California Publications in Zooloyij [Vol.15 

salinity {per mille) of sea-water is equal to the weight, in grants, of 
all the salts dis.solved in one kilogram of water, when the carbonates 
are converted into oxides, when the bromine and the iodine are re- 
placed by chlorine, and the organic substances oxidated. ' ' 

While this method is used for obtaining the standard values of 
salinit.y, it is not adapted to researches requiring a series of rapid 
analyses and demanding a minimum of expense. To meet such require- 
ments the methods used in practice are all indirect. 

(c) Methods of measurement in general use. — These methods de- 
pend upon the definite relation of salinity to specific gravity, upon the 
empirical assumption of a constant proportion of each salt to all the 
others, or, very infrequently, upon the effect of the dissolved salts on 
certain physical properties of water, such as its index of refraction 
and electrical conductivity. For convenience, tables have been pre- 
' pared showing the magnitudes of physical and chemical properties 
corresponding to salinities ranging from zero to the highest value 
(about 40 V„o) required in oeeanographic investigations. It is cus- 
tomary to measure either the specific gravity or the chlorine content 
directly and obtain the correlative value (S Voo, -Sf > or CZ Voo) from 
such reduction tables. The tables almost universally employed since 
1901 were compiled by Knudsen (1901) and are based upon the values 
of salinity obtained by the method of Knudsen and Sorensen as above 
described. 



2. METHODS OF SALINITY DETERMINATION EMPLOYED BY THE 
SCRIPPS INSTITUTION 

The determination of the salinities of all water samples so far col- 
lected by the Scripps Institution are obtained from direct measure- 
ments of the specific gravity or the chlorine content, and all reductions 
are made by Knudsen 's (1901) tables. In measuring the specific 
gravity, the pycnometer, hydrometer, and sinker are used, while the 
chlorine content is measured by Mohr's titrimetric method. 

(a) The pycnometer method. — The pycnometer used is of the Gay- 
Lussac pattern, provided with a ground-glass stopper having a fine 
perforation through which an excess of water is forced when the bottle 
is closed. Two sizes are used, one having a capacity of 50 c.c, and the 
other of 100 c.c. Most of the determinations are made with the larger 



I 



1915] Michael, ct al. ; IlinlrofjrapJiic Ii'rconh of Scripps Institution 29 

In using this instrument tlie tcmperatuix' cf tlie enclosed sample 
is taken by means of a standard thermometer whose bulb is so im- 
mersed as to give the temperature at the center of the pycnometer. 
The thermometer is graduated into divisions of one-tenth of a degree 
C. and the tejnperature read to the nearest 0?02. When the reading 
becomes constant the thermometer is removed and enough more of the 
sample, usually 2 cc. is added to fill the bottle. The stopper is then 
carefully inserted and the e.xeess of water forced through its top is 
immediately wiped off with the thumb. When the outside of the 
pycnometer is thoroughly dried, its apparent weight is measured to 
the nearest milligram and the specific gravity found from this weight, 
corrections for buoyancy being made. 

Each pycnometer is carefully calibrated from observations made 
on distilled water. The calibration formula relative to one of the 
100 CO. instruments was. in this way. found to be 

\\ = 100.393+0.00282 {t°—20° ) 

where Ft is the volume of the instrument in cubic centimeters at the 
temperature t. The accuracy of this formula is shown below, where 
the volumes computed b.A- its use are compared to those obtained Ijy 
direct measurement at the particular temperatures in question : 



Temperature 
t 
12?65 C. 


Vt computed 

U) 

100.3715 


Vt observed 

(2) 
100.3724 


Differences 

(1-2) 
—0.0009 


17.05 


100.3847 


100.3842 


0.0005 


17.48 


100.3859 


100.3863 


—0.0004 


18.75 


100.3895 


100.3900 


—0.0005 


19.60 


100.3929 


100.3927 


0.0002 


23.66 


100.4033 


100.4030 


0.0003 


23.86 


100.4039 


100.4039 


0.0000 


24.46 


100.4055 


100.4062 


—0.0007 


30.00 


100.4212 


100.4208 


0.0004 



These results show that the volume computed from the formula 
differs from each measured value by less than 0.001 cc, while the 
average is about half a.s much. The above calibration formula, there- 
fore, gives the volume of the pycnometer within a relative error of 
1 in 200,000. 

From this formula, together with the weight of the pycnometer 

itself, the specific gravity. S — . is computed as follows : 
4 

S - :== 1.023667— 0.0000288 (6°— 20°)+ (^—131.90) 



4 ■ ' ' ' 100.293 



30 Universiiij of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

where 6 is the temperature of the water sample at the time of measure- 
ment, and w the apparent weight, in grams, of the pycnometer filled 
with the water sample. If the temperature, 61, lies between 10° and 
30° C and is read to within 0?03, and if the weight iv is determined 
to within one milligram, it is possible to obtain the specific gravity, 

e 

S -r to an accuracy of 1 in 100,000. 
4 

"While this accuracy is po.ssible. it is rarely obtained in practice. 
Small air bubbles may at times escape notice, the temperature actually 
read may not represent, with sufficient accuracy, that of the sample 
at the time the pycnometer is closed, or several other soiirces of slight 
error may be iinconsciously met with when a large number of samples 
are being tasted which are avoided during calibration tests. 

In order to reduce such errors to a minimum, two pycnometers, 
independently calibrated, were alternately used until about two hun- 
dred samples had been tested, when the calibration constants were 
checked by observations on distilled water. As an additional check 
the same samples were occasionally tested by both instruments. Pro- 
ceeding in this way, an average accuracy of 2 in 100,000 was obtained, 
although in some instances the error was greater. The most serious 
objection to this method is the time required which, including the 
necessary computations, amounts to about ten minutes, in spite of the 
fact that tables were compiled to facilitate the computations. 

(ft) The hydrometer method. — In the fall of 1908 three sets of 
hydrometers made by R. Kiichler, of Ilmenau in Thiiringen, were pro- 
cured. The five instruments in each set range respectively from 1.000 
to 1.007. 1.006 to 1.013, 1.012 to 1.019, 1.018 to 1.025, and 1.024 to 
1.031. Their volumes range from 110 to 130 e.c. and the volume of 
their stems corresponding to one scale-division is 0.0001 of that of the 
hydrometer. The stems are about four millimeters in diameter, the 
length of one scale-division being about one millimeter. 

When using these instruments, the place on the stem cut by the 
level water surface is read and care taken to have the instrument and 
especially its stem clean. The hydrometer is allowed to oscillate and 
is read just after coming to rest, the stem thus being wet for a slight 
distance above the water surface. The temperatures are estimated 
to 0?05 C by a floating thermometer graduated to 0?2. 

The readings of the hydrometer are, of course, corrected for the 
variation in temperature at the time of observation and two separate 
determinations are made of each sample, the results obtained being 



1915] Michael, ft al.: Hijdrographic Eccards of Scripps Institution 31 

averaged. Assuming other sources of error to be constant (see p. 38), 


the specific gravity, iS' — , is obtained from the following formula : 
4 

8^ ^B—[k+a {e°—n°5)] 

4 

where R is the hydrometer reading. 6 the temperature at the time of 
observation, and A' and a ealibration constants depending upon the 
particular instrument used. These constants were determined from 
a series of readings made with each hydrometer on water samples whose 
specific gravities had previously been measured with a pycnometer. 

An estimate of the accuracy of this hydrometer method was made 
hy comparing a series of specific gravities determined with a pyc- 
nometer with those computed from hydrometer readings of the same 
samples. The following list, for example, shows such a comparison 
with respect to the values obtained with two hydrometers (nos. 1 and 
2) each having a range from 1.024 to 1.031, the calibration formulae 
being 

no. 1, .S'-^ =i?— [0.00167+0.000029 (r— 17?5)] 



no. 2, S - = E— [0.00175+0.000029 (r— 17?5)] 
4 



List of Comparative Determinations 

Pycuometer No. 1 hydrometer No. 2 hy4lrometer 



e 


e 


S^ 
4 


differeBoe 


4 


difference 


21?74 C. 


1.02322 


1.02330 


—0.00008 


1.02325 


—0.00003 


21.28 


1.02336 


1.02346 


—0.00010 


1.02342 


—0 . 00006 


21.07 


1.02359 


1.02364 


—0.00005 


1.02361 


—0.00002 


21.03 


1.02371 


1.02367 


0.00004 


1.02371 


0.00000 


21.01 


1.023.55 


1.02349 


0.00006 


1.023.53 


0.00002 


20.85 


1.02343 


1.02348 


—0.00005 


1.02344 


— O.UOOOl 


20.74 


1.02407 


1 . 02406 


0.00001 


1.02407 


0.00000 


20.46 


1.02413 


1.02415 


—0.00002 


1.02411 


0.00002 


20.35 


1.02368 


1.02364 


0.00004 


1.02375 


—0.00007 


20.32 


1.02403 


1.02388 


0.00015 


1.02395 


0.00008 


19.90 


1.02372 


1.02365 


0.00007 


1.02371 


0.00001 


19.73 


1.02389 


1.02389 


0.00000 


1.02391 


—0.00002 


19.71 


1.02392 


1.02387 


0.00005 


1.02388 


0.00004 


19.68 


1.02380 


1.02389 


—0.00009 


1.02379 


0.00001 


19.50 


1.02391 


1.02390 


0.00001 


1.02390 


0.00001 



32 rnivcrsifij <i{ Califdrnia Publications in Zooldijij [Vol. Id 

"While the mean error, as shown hy this list, is only about O.OOOOo, 
that actually met with in practice was fully twice as large, and oc- 
casional eiTors as large as 0.00025 were found. 

We had hoped, by employing these hydrometers and occasionally 
checking the results with a pycnometer, to reduce materially the time 
and still maintain the requisite degree of accuracy. While it has been 
possible to make twelve observations per hour, the saving in time is 
more than offset by the loss in accuracy, so that the method was 
discontinued. 

(c) Mohr's litrimrtric mvtliod. — This method wa.s first used in 
the summer of 1910. It is a volumetric method by which the chlorine 
or, more correctly, the halogen content in a definite volume of sea- 
water is precipitated by a measured volume of a solution of silver 
nitrate (AgNOg) of known strength. The strength of this .solution 
may be determined in several ways, but the one commonly used and 
upon which we relied entirely is that of titrating a sample of "normal 
sea-water" of known chlorine (halogen) content. This normal water, 
as well as the apparatus used, was obtained from the Central Labora- 
tory of the International Commission at Christiania. In titrating, 
yellow potassic chromate (K._,CrO.,) is used as an indicator which, 
reacting on the silver nitrate after all the halogens are precipitated, 
produces the red precipitate of silver chromate (AgoCrO^). For 
further details concerning the method and apparatus used see Helland- 
Hansen, 1911-12, pp. 34-39. 

After several weeks' practice, a series of water samples taken from 
the ocean and from San Diego Bay were carefully tested by this 
method and compared with measurements of the same samples made 

with the pycnometer. The results, reduced to specific gravity iS- 

•4 

by means of Knudseirs tables, are listed on the opposite page. 

While the mean error, as showTi by this list, is about 0.00007. it 
has been occasionally found as large as 0.00020. Furthermore, the 
magnitude of the error is so erratic that the method has. thus far, 
proven unreliable. In addition, the time required has been fully as 
great as with the pycnometer. and the expense involved is much 
greater. The method was, therefore, discontinued. 

{d) The sinker method. — Eepeated attempts were made to find 
a method of determining salinity which would combine the accuracy 
of the pycnometer with the speed of the hydrometer. These efforts 
culminated in 1912 when a method depending on the apparent w-eight 



19l-">] MicluK I. ct al.: 11 iidrographic Bfrords of Scripps Institution 83 



pycnometer 


titration 


difference 




ST 


s| 


a)-(2) 


1.02687 


1.02691 


—0.00004 


1.02688 




02685 


. 00003 


1 . 02696 




02689 


0.00007 


1.02697 




02689 


0.00008 


1.02697 




02692 


0.00005 


1.02697 




02714 


—0.00017 


1.02697 




02710 


—0.00013 


1.02698 




02691 


0.00007 


1.02699 




02682 


0.00017 


1.02701 




02694 


0.00007 


1.02702 




02699 


0.00003 


1.02703 




02690 


0.00013 


1.02704 




02709 


—0.00005 


1.02704 




02705 


—0.00001 


1.02706 




02709 


—0.00003 


1.02708 




02700 


0.00008 


1.02709 




02713 


—0.00004 


1.112710 




02707 


0.00003 


1.02710 




02725 


—0 . 00015 


1.02712 




02712 


0.00000 


1.02712 




02698 


0.00014 


1.02713 




02713 


0.00000 


1.02715 




02702 


0.00013 


1.02716 




02718 


—0.00002 


1.02716 




02722 


—0.00006 


1.02719 




02712 


0.00007 


1.02720 




02718 


0.00002 


1.02720 




02729 


—0.00009 


1.02724 




02719 


0.00005 


1.02728 




02721 


0.00007 


1.02739 




02733 


0.00006 


1.02744 




02735 


0.00009 


1.02746 




02746 


0.00000 


1.02748 




02753 


—0.00005 


1.02750 




02742 


0.00008 


1.02751 




02751 


0.00000 


1.02751 




02746 


. 00005 


1.02752 




02753 


—0 . 00001 


1.02752 




02748 


0.00004 


1.02760 




02761 


—0 . 00001 


1.02763 




02754 


. 00009 


1.02765 




02772 


—0.00007 


1.02771 




02767 


0.00004 


1.02778 




02777 


0.00001 


1.02794 




02791 


0.00003 


1.02868 




02852 


0.00016 



34 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

of a sinker suspended in water was developed by one of us, G. F. 
MeEwen. Although the apparatus was not fully ready for use until 
after all the samples herein tabulated were tested, a discussion of the 
method is given for comparison with those just described. 

A small cylindrical glass sinker (s) , having a volume of about 25 e.c. 
and being suitably weighted and hermetically sealed, is suspended by 
a fine silver wire (0.09 mm. in diameter) from one arm of a Sartorius 
chemical balance (sensitive to 0.1 mmg.) in a cylindrical funnel (c) 
which is used for holding the water. A similar glass funnel (/) is 
supported above the balance case and a tube {t), provided with a 
valve (v), leads from the neck of this fimnel through the side of the 
balance case and serves to carry the water into the cylindrical funnel 
(c). In order to prevent the formation of air-bubbles the extremity 
of the tube is tapered to an inside diameter of one millimeter and is 
so arranged as to direct the stream against the wall of the funnel (c). 
From the neck of this fiuinel a drainage tube (fZ) passes through the 
side of the balance ease. 

The manner of operation is as follows: The funnel (/') is filled to 
a certain height with the water sample and after allowing it to stand 
until all the air-bubbles have been expelled the valve (v) is opened, 
allowing the water to flow into the funnel (c) until the top of the 
sinker is covered by about three-fourths of an inch of water. The 
valve (v) is then closed and the next sample placed in the funnel (/'). 
A thermometer graduated to tenths of a degree, which is always kept 
suspended between the sinker and the wall of the fimnel (c), is then 
read and the beam of the balance released for weighing. As soon as 
the oscillation ceases the balance scale is read, after which the beam 
is raised. As a check, the thermometer is again read and the weighing 
repeated. If the two results agree the water is immediately drained 
through the tube (cZ) into the bottle from which it was taken. After 
the tubing has been thoroughly flushed with some of the water of the 
next sample, everything is in readiness for the next test. 

In calibrating the sinker the theoretical formula was reduced to 
the following simpler form, which is accurate to five parts in a million 

providing the specific gravity, S-, lies between 0.99 and 1.025 and the 

temperature at the time of weighing lies between 10° and 30° C : 

S^ =c+a{20°—6°)+k{w—w') 
4 
where c is a constant depending upon the value of «•', a and k cali- 
bration constants, depending upon the sinker used, 6 the temperature 



1915] Michael, et al.: Ilydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 35 




Fig. 3. "Sinker" apparatus for measuring specific gravity. 



36 



VniversHy of California Publications in Zoology [Vol.15 



at the time of weighing, ic the apparent weight (in mmg.) of the im- 
mersed sinker, and w' a constant weight (in mmg.) selected so as to 
facilitate computation. This formula for a particular sinker is 

S - =1.024905+0.000033(20°— e°)—0.00003984((c— 8860) 
4 

Its accuracy is indicated below where the specific gravity. iS -. of dis- 

4 

tilled water as given in the standard physical tables is compared to 

that computed by the formula : 



(W-8860) 


e" 


S - 
4 


S - 
4 


difference 


713.2 


28.13 


Standard 
(1) 
0.996220 


computed 
(2) 
0.996215 


(1-2) 
0.000005 


708.7 


27.35 


0.996445 


0.996420 


0.000025 


707.2 


27.18 


0.996490 


0.996485 


0.000005 


702.9 


26.39 


. 996700 


0.996685 


0.000015 


700.6 


26.05 


0.996795 


0.996810 


—0.000015 


699.4 


25.87 


0.996850 


0.996840 


0.000010 


696.1 


25.29 


0.996990 


0.996995 


—0.000005 


690.9 


24.41 


0.997220 


0.997225 


—0.000005 


679.7 


22.22 


0.997750 


0.997745 


0.000005 


6.59.9 


17.83 


0.998655 


0.998675 


—0.000020 



In order to obtain an additional cheek on the accuracy of this 
method, the specifie gravity of a series of samples determined in this 
way wa.s compared with that determined with a pycnometer. The 
results are listed below : 



S - sinker 


S - pycnometer 


differences 


(1) 


(2) 


(1-2) 


1.02770 


1.02771 


—0.00001 


1.02770 


1.02767 


. 00003 


1.02767 


1.02766 


0.00001 


1.02767 


1.02766 


0.00001 


1.02764 


1.02766 


—0.00002 


1 . 02760 


1.02757 


0.00003 


1.02760 


1.02756 


. 00004 


1.02757 


1.02761 


—0.00004 


1 . 02754 


1.02756 


—0.00002 


1.02752 


1 . 02752 


0.00000 


1.02740 


1.02738 


0.00002 


1.02739 


1.02738 


0.00001 


1.02709 


1.02707 


0.00002 


1.02693 


1.02694 


—0.00001 


1.02693 


1.02691 


0.00002 


1.02692 


1.02695 


—0.00003 


1.02691 


1.02691 


0.00000 


1 . 02688 


1.026S7 


0.00001 



1915] Michad.fi al.: Hydrographic lircords of Hcrippslnsiitution 37 

This table shows that the average ditferenee between the mean of 
the two determinations made by the sinker and that made by the 
pycnometer method is within 0.00002, while the extreme difference 
does not exceed 0.00004. Since these differences involve the errors 
inherent in both methods and since the average error due to the pyc- 
nometer (see p. 30) is approximately 0.00002, it is obvious that 
that due to the sinker can exceed 0.00001 but slightly, which checks 
the estimate heretofore given (see p. 36). Of course blunders are 
occasionally made which result in an error exceeding 0.00004, but 
the second te-st which is always made brings it to light immediately, 
whereupon a third te.st determines which of. the two is correct Since, 
in addition to its great inherent accuracy, the observations and reduc- 
tions involved in two independent determinations of .S' - require onlv 

4 

five minutes, the method is by far the most satisfactory of any thus 
far tried. 



3. COMPARISON OF OUR EXPERIENCE RELATIVE TO ACCURACY AND 

EFFICIENCY IN WATER ANALYSIS WITH THE EXPERIENCE 

OF OTHER INVESTIGATORS 

(a) Brief review of our own experience. — The experience with the 
methods used by the Scripps Institution has shown that measurements 
of specific gravity made with the pycnometer are more satisfactory 
than titrations of chlorine content. Although, after some practice, 
we obtained fairly consistent results with the titration method, we 
failed to reduce the time of a single test below that required by the 
pycnometer method. The latter also gave much more accurate re- 
sults, the error in specific gravity seldom exceeding 0.00003 and aver- 
aging less than 0.00002; the error in the titration method averaged 
0.00007, frequently being as great as 0.0001, and occasionally as much 
as 0.0002. 

The hydrometer and sinker methods proved to be the most rapid, 
the former requiring five minutes for a single determination, including 

the necessary reductions to S-, while two independent determinations 

and reductions can be made by the sinker method in the same time. 
However, while this method has proved to be as accurate as the pyc- 



38 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

nometer method, measurements made with the hydrometers are ex- 
ceedingly erratic, errors in specific gravity of two or three in ten 
thousand being not uncommon while the average was as great as one 
in ten thousand. 

Altogether, therefore, the sinker method is the most satisfactory. 
In addition to being as accurate as the pycnometer and as rapid as 
the hydrometer method, it has the advantage of enabling two inde- 
pendent determinations to be made without undue loss of time, which 
greatly reduces the chance of blunders. 

(&) The experience of others. — Nansen (1902), after careful and 
detailed investigations made during the Norwegian North Polar Ex- 
pedition of 1893-1896, concluded that the specific gravity of sea- 
water determined by any ordinary hydrometer of constant or variable 
weight may be considerably in error. The magnitude of the error he 
found to be proportional to the diameter of the stem as compared 
w'ith the volume of the body of the instrument. The source of error 
he discovered to be due to surface tension of the water, which varies 
in an erratic manner depending upon contamination and the time 
during which the surface is exposed. The readings of a Kiichler 
hydrometer, such as used bj' the Scripps Institution, he found to vary 
by 0.0003 in consequence of a variation in surface tension from its 
maximum to its minimum. Even with the greatest possible care in 
cleaning the hydrometer and testing jar, if the water surface be neg- 
lected, an occasional variation in surface tension would occur suiBcient 
to alter the reading by 0.0002. By taking precautions to clean the 
water surface thoroughly, Nansen was able to obtain the specific 
gravity to an accuracy of two in a hundred thousand, but he found 
the method so troublesome that he recommends the u.se of a pycnometer, 
sinker, or hydrometer of total immersion. 

This experience of Nansen 's is corroborated by that of Schott 
(1902) and Buchanan (see Nielsen, 1912), the former having neg- 
lected the error arising from surface tension while the latter avoided 
it by using distilled water as a means of control and calculating the 
error involved in each determination. Schott estimated the error to 
be fifteen in a hundred thousand, while Buchanan found an error in 
his determinations of only three in a hundred thousand. 

With respect to Mohr's titrimetric method Dickson (1901, p. 74), 
relative to his own experience, says: "The results seem to show con- 
clusively that without spending the time nece.ssary for the highest 
degree of accuracy, but merely taking ordinary care, the chlorine of 



1915] Miclincl. (i al.: H ijdrogrdpJiie Records of Scripps InstUution 39 

large miniluTs of sjiiiiples can ho (Iptcriiiined with eoinparativcly little 
trouble to within the admissible limit of error, ±0.03 Voo-" Since 
this corresponds to an error in specific gravity of five in a hundred 
thousand, his results are more accurate than ours. 

Regarding the accuracy and rapidity with which this method may 
be carried out. Ilelland-Hansen (1911-12, p. 39) states that in some 
Norwegian investigations, "one series of 260 water samples was 
titrated twice, with a mean difference between two determinations of 
the same sample equal to 0.016 "/„„ in salinity," which corresponds to 
about 15 in 1,000,000 in specific gravity. Relative to the speed he 
says: "With some practice the whole process of titration can be gone 
through in about four and one-half minutes." 

To ascertain the accuracy of the same method Nansen (1902) had 
a number of water samples independently titrated by several investi- 
gators. By comparing the results he concluded that, under favorable 
conditions, when the investigator had had special practice and the de- 
terminations were controlled after everj^ tenth or fifteenth test by the 
titration of "normal sea-water," the specific gravity could be deter- 
mined within 15 or 25 in 1,000,000. However, he says (1902, p. 231) : 
"Considering that even the results obtained by the methods of gravi- 
metric analysis of the chlorine (halogens) may differ as much as 
0.037 %„ [which corresponds to 3 in 100,000 in specific gravity] with 
such skillful investigators as Pettersson and his assistants, I think the 
probability is that the accuracy attained by titration will in many 
eases be lowered." This is corroborated by Bjerrum (1904) who, 
after making a thorough study of all the sources of error inherent in 
the method, concluded that their combined effect could not be reduced 
below a mean error in a single specific gravit.y determination of 22 in 
1,000,000, and, since this does not take into consideration errors which 
ought not to be committed but which are not always avoided in prac- 
tice, the actual error is apt to be somewhat greater. 

Finally, there are errors in titration peculiar to the observer him- 
self. Perhaps the best illustration of this is afforded by the follow- 
ing measurements, where the results obtained by two observers (A and 
B) in the titration of the same samples are compared. While the 
results were originally published by Homen (1904, p. 39) in terms of 
chlorine content, we have reduced them to specific gravity (Sf ) by 
means of Knudsen's tables, in order to make them comparable to those 
so far discussed. 



40 



University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



Speci 


ific gravity S f 


Difference 


A 


B 


B-A 


1.00436 


1 . 00442 


0.00006 


1.00477 


1.00481 


0.00004 


1.00500 


1.00508 


0.00008 


1.00513 


1.00518 


. 00005 


1.00527 


1.00.531 


0.00004 


1.00534 


1.00540 


0.00006 


1.00534 


1.00.538 


0.00004 


1.00537 


1.00543 


0.00006 


1.00540 


1 . 00547 


0.00007 


1 . 00544 


1 . 00544 


0.00000 


1.00544 


1 . 00546 


0.00002 


1.00547 


1.00.551 


0.00004 


1.00557 


1 . 00563 


0.00006 


1.00557 


1 . 00563 


0.00006 


1.00560 


1.00565 


0.00005 



Attention is called to the fact that these differences are in every 
ease in the same direction, B's determinations always being higher than 
A's. It is therefore evident that the titration method is subject to a 
systematic error due to the "personal equation" of the observers which 
is nearly twice as great as that admitted to be inherent in the method. 
This is probably due to the difference in judgment of color for, as 
stated by Bjerrum (1904. p. 8) : "The greatest annoyance in the 
titration with chromate of potash as the indicator, especially to unex- 
ercised people, is that even a strong tint may disappear on fast 
stirring for some time." 

It would seem, from the above discussion, that ]Mohr's titrimetric 
method is, as a rule, eaiiable of a high degree of accuracy. However, 
since in such cases the determinations have been made on samples taken 
from a region strictly comparable to that from which the "normal 
sea-water" is obtained, our own failure to attain a degree of accuracy 
comparable to the pycnometer method may in part be due to a devia- 
tion from a normal proportion of the salts in the water about San 
Diego (see p. 41). Nevertheless the titration method is gaining 
ground in oceanography, not because it can replace the pycnometer 
in accuracy, because the latter is used for standardizing all other 
methods, but for the reason given by Helland-Han.sen (1911-12, p. 
39), namely: "it is so rapid that it makes possible the consecutive 
treatment of a great collection of water samples, and so accurate that 
none of the other tolerably fast methods bear comparison with it." 



1915] Michael, ct al.: Hijdrographic Records of Scripps Iiistiiulioti 4-1 

4. RELIABILITY OF THE ASSUMPTION OF CONSTANT PROPORTION 
OF THE SALTS IN SEA-WATER 

Reference has been fre(|uently made, in the preceding pages, to 
Knudsen's .tables by means of which direct measurements of the 
chlorine (halogen) content, specific gravity, or salinity of samples of 
sea-water may be expressed in terms of each of the others. Except 
as regards the relation between specific gravity and salinity, each of 
which is a definite function of the other, the use of these tables de- 
pends upon the reliability of the assumption that the halogen salts 
bear a definite relation to the total salts dissolved in sea-water, as 
illustrated by the formula: 

;S »/„„= 1.8050 CI "/„„+0.030 

Concerning this reliability Helland-Hansen (1911-12. p. 31) says: 
"Although different analysers have found slightly different values for 
the relative percentage of the salts in sea-water, it is nevertheless 
proved that there is a constant proportion between the amount of 
chlorine and the salinity or specific gravity, so that tables of the re- 
spective values can be made out." Again (p. 32) he says: "The 
specific gravity of the sea-water wholly depends upon the quantity 
of dissolved salts. Now, as the .salinity has everywhere a uniform 
composition, it is clear that the relations between the specific gravity 
and the salinity or the amount of chlorine may be expressed in a gen- 
eral formula with fixed constants." In spite of these positive state- 
ments, however, he (p. 31) says: "In the waters of the Red Sea. for 
instance, the relative amount of chlorine is a little below the normal; 
further, there is generally a slight increase of the relative amount of 
carbonates with increasing depth ; also, the formation of ice involves a 
retention of proportionally more sulphates than chlorides in the ice. 
so that the secreted brine contains a small excess of chlorides, and the 
water around melting ice a corresponding excess of sulphates." 

"While Helland-Hansen (1911-12, p. 32) reaches the conclusion that 
"these anomalies are insignificant . . . [and] . . . can only be detected 
by extremely delicate analyses, and may be overlooked in practical 
work," this is scarcely in harmony with the conclusion reached by 
Nansen (1906). He made an extensive series of analyses of water 
from the North Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea. having each 
w-ater sample independently tested by two observers, one of whom 



42 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol.15 

measured the specific gravity with a hydrometer of total immereion 
(corresponding in accuracy with the pj'cnometer) while the other 
measured the chlorine b.y Mohr's titrimetric method. From an exam- 
ination of the results Nansen (1906, p. 11) concluded that, while the 
chlorine content of the North Atlantic ea.st of Greenland was but 
slightly less than normal, that from the Barents Sea exceeded the 
normal by an amount which, allowing for the errors in measurement, 
makes the specific gravity computed from it 0.000025 too high. 

Our own observations bear out. in a general way. this concli^sion 
of Nansen. A series of samples taken from San Diego Bay as well as 
the ocean were carefully titrated and also tested for specific gravity 
with a pyenometer. A comparison of the results (see p. 33) shows 
that, while the average difference in the values obtained by the two 
methods is only 0.000025. differences of as much as 0.00015 frequently 
occur. Furthermore, repeated titrations of the "normal sea-water" 
rarely gave results differing, in specific gravity, from the true value 
by more than 0.00004. thus indicating that the larger differences may 
have been partly due to a variation in the proportion of the salts in 
the water of this region. However, many more similar observations 
must be made before such variation can be proven. 

Nevertheless it is certain that, while the relation between chlorine 
content and salinity may be so nearly the same in many regions that 
the difference can not be detected by the usual methods, there are 
regions where the difference is very apparent. Therefore, until the 
magnitude of this difference is accurately known for a given region, it 
would undoubtedly be wiser to determine both the chlorine content and 
specific gravity directly than to depend iipon a reduction formula 
which may not apply with sufficient accuracy. If this were done and 
the observations repeated whenever the values obtained by both 
methods differed in specific gravity by more than 0.00003. one could 
readily decide whether or not the difference was due to an accidental 
error in measurement or to a variation in the composition of the sea- 
water. Such a comparative series would certainly be of increasing 
value as the work progressed. 

Since it has not been feasible for the Seripps Institution to make 
such an extensive series of comparisons, the direct method of measur- 
ing specific gravity was finally adopted, because : 

1. In plankton investigations a knowledge of variations in salinity 
is of fundamental importance, and it is more advisable to measure it 
bv the most direct method available than to measure the chlorine con- 



1915] Michael, ct al. : Hijdrographic Records of Scripps Institution 43 

tent and depend upon the assumption that the water of this region 
is ahva.ys identical in composition to the "normal sea-water." 

2. In hydrodvnamic investigations, especially relative to convective 
circulation, a knowledge of the densities in situ is essential and, of 
course, depends directly upon specific gravity. 



E. LITERATURE CITED 

BjERRUM, N. 

1904. On the determination of chlorine in sea-water and examination of 

the accuracy with which Knudsen 's pipette measures a volume of 
sea-water. Medd. Komm. Havundersbgelser (Hydrografi) 1 No 
3, 11 pp. < ' ■ 

Dickson, H. N. 

1901. The circulation of the surface waters of the North Atlantic Ocean. 
Phil. Trans. E. Soc. London (A), 196, 61-203, pis. 1-4. 
Ekman, V. W. 

1905a. On the use of insulated water bottles and reversing thermometers. 

Cons, perman. Explor. Mer. Publ. Circ, 23, 28 pp.. 2 pis. 
1905b. Kurze Beschreibung eines Propell-Strommessers. Ibid., 24, 4 pp., 1 pi. 
Fox, C. J. J. 

1905. On the determination of the atmospheric gases dissolved in sea- 

water. Ibid., 21, 24 pp., 1 pi., 4 figs, in text. 
Helland-Hansen, B. 

1911-12. The ocean waters, an introduction to physical oceanography. 
1. General part (methods). Intern. Rev. ges. Hydrobiol. Hydrog., 
3, Hydrog. Suppl., pp. 1-84, figs. 1-46 in text. 
Herdman, W. A., Scott, A., and Dakin, W. J. 

1910. An intensive study of the marine plankton around the south end of 
the Isle of Man, Part 3. Proc. Trans. Liverpool Biol Soc., 24, 255- 
359, pis. A-B, figs. 1-21 in text. 
HOM^N, T. 

1907. Hydrographische Untersucuungen im nordlichen Telle der Ostsee, im 
Bottnischen und im Finnischen Meerbusen, 1898-1904. Findland- 
ische Hydrog. Biol. Unters., 1, 46-|-144 pp., 2 pis. 
Knudsen, M. 

1901. Hydrographische Tabelleu (Copenhagen, Gad), v-f63 pp. 
KoFom, C. A. 

1905. A self-closing water bucket for plankton investigations. Cons. 

perman. Explor. Mer. Publ. Circ, 32, 10 pp., 4 figs, in text. 
1911a. On a self-closing plankton net for horizontal towing. Univ. Calif. 
Publ. Zool., 8, 311-348, pis. 22-25; also in Intern. Rev. ges. 
Hydrobiol. Hydrog., 5, 91-92, pi. 11. 
1911b. On an improved form of self-closing water-bucket for plankton in- 
vestigations. Univ. Calif. Publ. Zool., 8, 349-352, figs. A-C in 
text. 



44 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Krummel, O. 

1907. Handbuch der Ozeanographie (Stuttgart, Engelhorn), 1, xv+.526, 69 

figs, in text. 
Makakoff, S. 

1894. Le "Vitiaz"' et 1 'Ocean Pacifique (St. Petersburg, Kummar), 1, xliii 

+337. 
Nansen, F. 

1902a. The oceanograi)hy of the North Polar basin. Norwegian North 

Polar expedition 1893-1896; Scientific results, 3, No. 9, xi+427, 

33 pis. 
1902b. On hydrometers and the surface tension of liquids. Ibid., No. 10, 

87 pp., 1 fig. in text. 
1906. Northern waters: Captain Roald Amundsen's oceanographic obser- 
vations in the Arctic seas in 1901. Vid. Selsk. Skr., 1, Math. 

Naturv. Klasse, No. 3, 145 pp. 
Nielsen, J. N. 

1912. Hydrography of the Mediterranean and adjacent waters. Kept. Dan. 

Oceanog. Exped. 1908-10, 1, No. 2, 77-19^, pis. 2-11. 
Bitter, W. E. 

1902. A summer's dredging on the coast of southern California. Sci. 

(n.s.), 15, 5.5-65. 
1905. A general statement of the ideas and present aims and status of the 

Marine Biological Association of San Diego. Univ. Calif. Publ. 

Zool., 2, i-xvii, 2 maps. 
1912. The Marine Biological Station of San IMego, its history, present con- 
ditions, achievements, and aims. Ibid., 9, 137-248, pis. 18-24, 2 

maps. 
SCHOTT, G. 

1902. Oceanographie und maritime Meteorologie. Deutsche Tiefsee Exped. 

1898-99, 1, 403 pp., 40 pis., 35 figs, in text. 



1915] Michael, ft al. : Hijdrojjrirpliic Records of i^cripj>s Institution 45 



PART 2 
TABULATION OF DATA 



A. General Explanation of Tables 
(a) Arrangement. — While all our data fm-m an or^anie whole 
they have, for convenience in use as well as in tabulation, been ar- 
ranged into several tables. The hydrographic data are tabulated first 
because they have an intrinsic value in addition to their es.sential 
relation to the plankton and dredge collections. Accordingly all the 
data relative to ocean temperatures and salinities are given in Table 
1, those relative to San Diego Bay in Table 2, and the supplementary 
data concerning gas content and soundings in Tables 3 and 4. Again, 
while all the biological collections were accessioned in chronological 
order irrespective of the nature of the haul, plankton collecting has 
been carried on much more extensively than dredging, so that the data 
relative to plankton hauls are given in Table 5, and the dredge hauls 
in Table 6. All tables are arranged on the same general plan. 

(&) Recording of position. — All positions are entered in latitude 
and longitude, the latter being measured from Greenwich. When- 
ever the error (see p. 18) was estimated as lass than half a mile the 
position, except as .stated below, is entered to tenths of one minute. 
In those instances where the error lay between one half and one mile, 
it is entered to the nearest even minute, and in those rarer instances 
where the error was still larger the latitude and longitude are not 
entered at all, the approximate position being given by the section 
(see p. 46). 

Unless otherwise noted in the tattles, the boat was allowed to drift 
during the actual collecting. In case the position at the end of the 
drift was determined, the latitudes and longitudes relative to the 
collections are not entered as such, but the initial and final positions 

together with this .statement are given : ' ' Prom to the 

boat drifted from the above position to the following position," the 
blanks being filled in with the times corresponding to the two positions. 
In some rare instances, however, it has been impossible to determine 
the amount and direction of drift ; in such cases the initial latitudes 



46 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol.15 

and longitudes are repeatedly tabulated without regard to the possible 
error involved. 

(c) Meaning and nse of sections. — In making certain biological 
and hydrographie investigations it is necessary to compare small areas 
of approximately the same size which differ from each other in their 
distance from the coast, average depth of water, nature of bottom, 
and so on. As an aid to such investigations the region explored, or 
likely to be explored, by us has been divided into rectangular areas, 
or .sections, each containing approximately twenty-five square miles. 
To be more precise, the sections were, for convenience, so chosen that 
the length of their north and south boundaries would be five minutes 
in longitude, while that of their east and we.st boundaries would be 
five minutes in latitude. In defining them two base lines were chosen 
and each section was designated by a nuniber giving its position west 
of one base line, and either a subscript giving its position north, or an 
exponent giving its position south of the other base line. 

To avoid complications arising from sections lying ea.stward as well 
as westward from the north and south base line, the meridian of 114° 
W was chosen and, since the region thus far explored lies, in the main, 
between the parallels of 32' and 34° N, the former was chosen as the 
second base line, thereby reducing the u.se of exponents and large sub- 
scripts to a mininuim. Thus, as illustrated in figure 4, 24j, defines 
the twenty-fourth section west of 114° W and the eleventh section 
north of 32° N, while 24" defines one whose distance we.st of 114° W 
is the same but which is the eleventh one south of 32° N. 

It is evident that, since each section measures five minutes on a 
side and includes all positions \\'ithin 2f5 of its centre, the latitude and 
longitude of any observation bears a definite and simple relation to 
the number and subscript (or exponent) of the section as indicated 
by the following formulae : 

A" = 12 (long?— 114°) 
S = 12(lat? — 32°) 
.B = 12(32? — lat?) 

where N is the section number, S the section subscript, E the section 
exponent, and where the latitude and longitude are expressed in de- 
grees to the nearest 5', or twelfth of a degree. Thus the section cor- 
responding to 33° 12fl N and 118° 6:3 W is such that its center will lie 
at the intersection of 33° 10' N and 118° 5' W, whence 



1915] Michael, et al. : Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 47 

N^ 12(118rV°— 114°) = 12(iS°) =4<), 
S = 12{ 33t-2°— 32°) = r2(li°) = 14 

the section therefore being designated by 49i^. 

In all our tables the section in which each observation was made 

is entered, providing it was not made in San Diego Baj'. in which event 





























































24„ 














































'., 


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































24, 














































/, 








32* 






















































32- 




























































24' 














































'■ 


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































24" 














































i" 


























































ti 


f 





Fig. 4. Sclienie for designating sections. 



it is omitted and a B inserted instead. In some instances, however, 
observations were made so near the line of demarkation between two 
sections that it is uncertain which of the two was really involved. In 
such cases both sections are refered to, 15.5ii, for example, implying 
that the observation was made near the boundary of ISj, and IGn, 
while 15n 5 implies that it was made near the boundary of 15,, and 



■iS Vmversitij of California Publications in Zoology [Vol.15 

15j^,. Any section cut by the coast line is designated in one of three 
ways: when its center is within 2'5 west of the coast, the number is 
bracketed, when it is within 2'5 north or south the subscript or ex- 
ponent, as the ease may be, is bracketed, and when it is within 2f5 both 
west and north or south the entire symbol is bracketed. Thus (15)„ 
implies that the center of the section is within 2^5 west of the coast, 
15, ji, that it is within 2f5 north or south, and (15„) that it is within 
'I'.b both west and north or south of the coast. 

B. Hydrogr.vphic Dat.v 
EXPLANATION OF TABLE 1 
This table includes all the temperature, specific gravity, and salinity 
determinations made from 1901 to 1912 relative to the ocean. San 
Diego Bay data are excluded unless made in connection with the ocean 
work. The few determinations of 1901 were made by Professor W. J. 
Raymond, and all the others by 6. F. McEwen assisted by H. C. 
Burbridge. Soundings are not entered in this table but a list of water 
samples whose distances from the bottom are known to he within 
fifteen per cent of the depth is given in Appendix III. 

First column. — Water-sample numbers entered in chronological order irre- 
spective of the nature of the sample. 

Second column. — Time when the samjde was obtained entered to the nearest 
minute. 

Third coJumii. — Section; for explanation see page 46. The letter B indicates 
that the sample was made in San Diego Bay. 

Fourth and fifth columns. — Latitude and longitude; for error see pages 18 
and 4.5. 

Sixth column. — Liepth of sample, entered to the i earest meter above iOO 
and to the nearest five below that depth; for error see page 20. 

Seventh column. — Temperature iti situ; for accuracy see pages 14 and 17. 

Eighth, ninth and tenth columns. — Specific gravity of the sample under atmos- 

0° 
pheric pressure, the 1.0 being omitted; S tot; that of the sample at 0° C re- 

17?5 
ferred to distilled water at 4° C; S ^r^r that of the samiile at 17?.5C referred to 

17.5 
t° 
distilled water at 17?5 C; Sts^ density in situ referred to distilled water at 4° C. 

Eleventh column. — Salinity per mille of the sample. It was determined with 
a pycnometer (see p. 28) unless followed by the letter h, which indicates a 
hydrometer determination (see p. 30), or the letter c, which signifies that 
Mohr's titrimetrie method was used (see p. 32). The letter I: indicates that 
the sample was collected with the Kofoid water bottle (see p. 11), the tem- 
perature being measured and corrected as described on page 14; all other sub- 
surface samples were collected with Ekman reversing water bottles fsee p. 
12) and the temperatures measured with Eiehter reversing thermometers (see 
p. 1.5). A question mark indicates that a small error in depth, temperature, or 
salinity is suspected (see pp. 20 and 26). 



1915] Michael, et al. : nydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 49 



Specific gravity 



Table 1. — Ocean Data 

Position Temper- 
Water Time , -»- , Depth ature 0° 17?5 t° 

sample of North West in in centi- S S S Salinity 

number day Section latitude longitude meters grade 4?0 17?5 4°0 S Voo 

June 4. 1901 

1 2:40 p.m. (.53,,) 33° 45:7 118° 26:4 17?0 

Junes, 1901 

2 10:00 a.m. (53^) 33 4S.9 118 26.5 16.7 

3 10:00 a.m. (53-,) 33 48.9 118 26.5 265 2734 2599 34.02 

June 6, 1901 

4 7:00a.m. (53^,) 33 48.3 118 26.8 15.6 

5 7:00 a.m. (53^,) 33 48.3 118 26.8 265 2727 2592 33.94 

June 8, 1901 

6 8:30 a.m. 52^ 33 40.0 118 18.7 16.7 

7 8:30 a.m. 52.„ 33 40.0 118 18.7 265 2712 2578 33.75 

June 10. 1901 

8 8:40 a.m. (49,,) 33 43.8 118 7.4 18.0 

9 9:25 a.m. 50,j„ 33 44.0 118 8.0 18.9 

10 11:50 a.m. 50„„ 33 42.0 118 12.0 18.9 

June 11. 1901 

11 1:00p.m. (51,,) 33 42.8 118 13.6 18.3 

June 12, 1901 

12 9:30 a.m. 51,„ 33 38.5 118 14.5 16.0 

13 11:15 a.m. 50,„ 33 42.0 118 12.0 16.2 

June 13, 1901 

14 9:40a.m. 52,„ 33 41.0 118 18.S 17.6 

15 12:10p.m. 52^ 33 41.5 118 17.9 17.4 

June 14, 1901 

16 8:45a.m. (47,,) 33 34.4 117 56.2 17.4 

July 12. 1901 

17 9:00 a.m. 51^ 32 41.4 118 14.2 18.2 

Julv 16, 1901 

18 8:30 a.m. (38,) 32 38.8 117 11.5 15.2 

Julv 17. 1901 

19 8:50 a.m. 39, 32 30.9 117 14.7 16.4 

Julv 18. 1901 

20 2:30 p.m. 39, 32 36.4 117 13.3 22.0 

Julv 19. 1901 

21 8:25 a.m. 40^ 32 26.6 117 17.6 20.2 

22 1:20 p.m. 39, 32 22.8 117 15.2 21.3 

Julv 20, 1901 

23 9:30 a.m. 39, 32 37.0 117 15.0 18.8 

Julv 24. 1901 

24 9:45 a.m. 40, 32 36.3 117 18.0 20.8 • 

Julv 25, 1901 

25 10:10 a.m. 41, 32 34.2 117 23. u 21.0 

Julv 29. 1901 

26 9:40 a.m. 40, 32 31.7 117 22.4 21.0 

June 12, 1908 

27 6:02a.m. (39,„) 32 51.4 117 16.5 u 18.7 2696 2563 2400 33.55 

28 7:44a.m. 42„ 32 52.0 117 28.2 18.4 2705 2572 2418 33.66 

29 8:15 a.m. 42,„ , 32 52.5 117 30.8 18.3 2691 2558 2405 33.49 

30 8:45 a.m. 43„ 32 53.5 117 33.0 16.5 2698 2565 2455 33.58 

31 9:26 a.m. 43„ 32 53.7 117 34.5 16.4 2692 2.5.59 2453 33.50 

32 10:30 a.m. 43„ 32 53.7 117 34.5 915 2764 2628 34.40K 

33 11:14 a.m. 43„ 32 53.7 117 34.5 550 2765 2629 34.41K 

34 12:45 p.m. 43„ 32 43.7 117 34.8 16.5 2690 2557 2447 33.48 

35 1:30 p.m. 43, 32 42.2 117 33.4 16.5 2705 2572 2463 33.66 

36 2:27p.m. 43^ 32 41.7 117 32.6 16.5 2706 2573 2464 33.68 

37 3:33 p.m. 42,' 32 41.4 117 31.6 17.5 2696 2563 2431 33.55 

June 13, 1908 

38 6:43 a.m. (40,,) 33 0.2 117 20.0 18.5 2707 2574 2418 33.69 

39 7:16a.m. (40„) 33 3.1 117 22.2 18.0 

40 7:40a.m. (40.5„) 33 3.4 117 22.5 18.0 

41 9:24a.m. (41.5„) 33 9,1 117 27.5 18.1 

June 15, 1908 

42 7:12 a.m. 39, 32 37.2 117 14.4 15.0 2722 2.587 2512 33.87 

43 7:50 a.m. 40, 32 37.9 117 19.5 15.5 

44 8:12a.m. 40, 32 38.4 117 22.0 17.0 2706 2573 2453 33.68 

45 8:19 a.m. 41, 32 38.5 117 23.0 17.5 2713 2.580 2448 33.76 

46 8:49a.m. 41, 32 39.0 117 26.0 17.5 2699 2566 2434 33.59 

47 9:10a.m. 42, 32 39.3 117 27.8 17.4 2715 2581 2448 33.79 

48 9:59 a.m. 42, 32 39.6 117 30.0 18.3 2700 2567 2414 33.60 

49 10:20 a.m. 42, 32 39.3 117 30.1 18.5 



50 



University of California F'ublications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 









Table 1. 


—Ocean Data — {Continued) 
























Temper- 


Specific gravity 


























^ater 


Time 








>• 


. 


Depth 


ature 


0° 


i7;5 


t° 




mple 


of 




^Ijorth 


West 


in 


in centi- 


S 


s 


S 


Salinity 


mber 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17°5 


4?0 


SO/00 












June 15, 1908 














50 


10:35 a.m. 


42, 


32° 


39:0 


117° 


30:1 


890 




2782 


2644 




34.62K 


51 


11:27 a.m. 


42, 


32 


38.4 


117 


30.0 





i8°.5 










52 


12:15 p.m. 


42, 


32 


37.3 


117 


29.8 





18.5 










53 


12:20 p.m. 


42, 


32 


37.0 


117 


29.7 


455 




2766 


2630 




34.42K 


54 


1:25 p.m. 


42, 


32 


38.2 


117 


31.3 





isVs 










55 


1:59 p.m. 


43, 


32 


39.6 


117 


33.0 





18.3 


2704 


2571 


2419 


33;65 


56 


3:10 p.m. 


42, 


32 


41.5 


117 


2S.0 





18.4 


2703 


2570 


2415 


33.64 












June 16. 1908 














57 


7:50 a.m. 


41,0 


32 


49.7 


117 


26.9 





17.5 


2698 


2565 


2433 


33.58 


58 


8:05 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


49.1 


117 


30.6 





16.9 










59 


9:50 a.m. 


43,0 


32 


48.5 


117 


34.4 





16.5 


2704 


2569 


2460 


3376.5 


60 


11:10 a.m. 


42, 


32 


46.9 


117 


31.8 





18.5 


2705 


2570 


2413 


33.66 


61 


12:01p.m. 


42, 


32 


46.9 


117 


31.8 


640 




2766 


2630 




34.42K 


62 


12:40 p.m. 


42, 


32 


46.9 


117 


31.8 





17.5 


2699 


2566 


2434 


33.59 


63 


1:30 p.m. 


42, 


32 


45.4 


117 


29.3 





18.5 




















June 17, 1908 














64 


8:40 a.m. 


40,1 


32 


52.8 


117 


22.0 





17.4 










65 


12:05 p.m. 


46,. 


33 


0.3 


117 


50.5 





16.5 


2720 


2585 


2476 


3378.5 


66 


1:56 p.m. 


45,, 


32 


59.4 


117 


43.8 





16.5 


2696 


2563 


2454 


33..55 


67 


2:40 p.m. 


44,, 


33 


0.0 


117 


42.0 


915 




2752 


2616 




34.25K 


68 


3:50 p.m. 


43„ 


32 


.59.1 


117 


34.6 





16.5 


2694 


2561 


2451 


33.53 


69 


4:25 p.m. 


42i. 


32 


58.0 


117 


28.8 





17.0 


2695 


2562 


2441 


33..54 


70 


4:35 p.m. 


42,, 


32 


57.8 


117 


28.0 





17.4 


2711 


2577 


2447 


33.74 


71 


5:00 p.m. 


41 „ 


32 


57.1 


117 


24.3 





17.5 


2699 


2566 


2433 


33.59 












June 18, 1908 














72 


6:35 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.4 


117 


19.7 





17.5 










73 


8:15 a.m. 


43,0 


32 


51.4 


117 


32.9 





17.5 










74 


9:00 a.m. 


44,0 


32 


51.7 


117 


40.2 





16.5 


2702 


2569 


2460 


33!63 


75 


9:55 a.m. 


45a„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


45.9 





16.5 


2689 


2556 


2448 


33.47 


76 


12:01p.m. 


46,, 


32 


50.8 


117 


51.9 





17.0 


2689 


2556 


2438 


33.47 


77 


1:40 p.m. 


45,, 


32 


49.8 


117 


46.0 





17.1 


2710 


2576 


2454 


33.73 


78 


2:20 p.m. 


45,„ 


32 


49.8 


117 


46.0 


1025 




2772 


2632 




34.50K 


79 


3:15 p.m. 


44,0 


32 


48.9 


117 


40.2 





if.'s 


2687 


2555 


"2"42'2 


33.44 












June 19, 1908 














80 


8:27 a.m. 


41,, 


32 


57.7 


117 


22.7 





17.8 


2714 


2581 


2441 


33.78 


81 


10:30 a.m. 


(40,3) 


32 


58.8 


117 
June 2 


2o!o 

3, 1908 





17.5 


2716 


2582 


2450 


33.80 


82 


11:45 a.m. 


39, 


32 


37.2 


117 


14.4 





16.7 


2705 


2572 


2458 


33.66 


83 


12:10 p.m. 


(39,.,) 


32 


37.5 


117 


16.2 





18.1 


2715 


2581 


2435 


33.79 


84 


12:35 p.m. 


40, 


32 


38.1 


117 


18.0 





18.3 


2708 


2575 


2423 


33.70 


85 


1:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


39.0 


117 


21.7 





18.5 


2694 


2561 


2404 


33.53 


86 


1:30 p.m. 


41, 


32 


39.7 


117 


24.4 





18.3 


2690 


2557- 


2406 


33.48 


87 


1:50 p.m. 


41, 


32 


40.4 


117 


26.3 





19.0 


2704 


2571 


2401 


33.65 


88 


3:07 p.m. 


42, 


32 


41.4 


117 


30.3 





18.2 


2709 


2576 


2426 


33.71 


89 


4:28 p.m. 


42, 


32 


41.4 


117 


30.3 





18.3 


2706 


2573 


2421 


33.68 


90 


5:25 p.m. 


42, 


32 


42.0 


117 


29.4 





18.3 


2714 


2580 


2429 


33.78 


91 


6:00 p.m. 


41, 


32 


45.0 


117 


25.2 





18.3 


2710 


2576 


2425 


33.73 


92 


6:30 p.m. 


(40),,, 


32 


47.8 


117 
June: 


21.5 

4, 1908 





18.2 


2708 


2575 


2425 


33.70 


93 


6:05 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


56.1 


117 


19.0 





18.5 


2715 


2581 


2425 


33.79 


94 


6:35 a.m. 


(40,,) 


32 


59.7 


117 


21.5 





18.0 


2707 


2574 


2429 


33.69 


95 


7:25 a.m. 


41,, 


33 


1.5 


117 


22.8 





17.7 


2710 


2576 


2439 


33.73 


96 


8:06 a.m. 


41,3 


33 


3.5 


117 


2618 





17.5 


2705 


2572 


2439 


33.66 


97 


8:45 a.m. 


41,3 


33 


3.7 


117 


27.0 


460 




2742 


2607 




34.12K 


98 


9:14 a.m. 


42„ 


33 


4.7 


117 


29.4 





17.6 










99 


9:40 a.m. 


42,3 


33 


4.7 


117 


29.4 


520 




2745 


2610 




34.16K 


100 


10:25 a.m. 


42„ 


33 


5.0 


117 


29.8 





isVi 


2703 


2570 


2416 


33.64 


101 


11:05 a.m. 


42„ 


33 


5.5 


117 


31.6 





18.5 










102 


11:30 a.m. 


42,3 


33 


5.6 


117 


31.8 


660 




2742 


2607 




34.12K 


103 


2:10 p.m. 


43„ 


33 


6.4 


117 


35.4 





17.9 


2704 


2571 


2428 


33.65 


104 


3:50 p.m. 


41.5,, 


33 


0.2 


117 


27.5 





18.5 










105 


4:50 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


54.4 


117 
June; 


20.0 
5, 190g 





18.5 


2716 


2582 


2426 


ssiso 


106 


9:15 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


55.0 


117 


21.4 





18.6 


2708 


2575 


2415 


33.70 


107 


2:45 p.m. 


(40),o 


32 


50.7 


117 


21.5 





19.5 


2714 


2580 


2397 


33.78 


108 


8:55 p.m. 


(39.,) 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.1 





18.5 


2717 


2583 


2427 


33.81 



1915] 



Michael, et ah: IlijdrograpJtic Kccor(h of Scripps Institution 



51 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





Time 

of 
day 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi- 
grade 


Specific gravity 




Water 
sample 
umber 


0° 

S 

4?0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t" 

S • 

4°0 




North 
latitude 


West 
longitude 


Salinity 
SO/oo 


109 


5:34 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


47:6 


June 2 

117 


6, 1908 

'2i:8 





18?5 


2715 


2581 


2424 


33.79 


110 


7:25 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.5 


117 


31.4 





18.0 


2709 


2576 


2430 


33.71 


111 


9:00 a.m. 


43, 


32 


40.3 


117 


35.0 





18.2 


2704 


2571 


2421 


33.65 


112 


9:50 a.m. 


43a 


32 


39.6 


117 


34.5 





18.3 


2706 


2573 


2421 


33.68 


113 


10:28 a.m. 


43, 


32 


39.3 


117 


36.0 





19.4 


2713 


2579 


2399 


33.76 


114 


11:00 a.m. 


43, 


32 


38.7 


117 


37.1 





19.1 


2718 


2583 


2413 


33.83 


115 


11:46 a.m. 


43s 


32 


38.2 


117 


37.2 





19.6 


2709 


2576 


2390 


33.71 


116 


1:02 p.m. 


42, 


32 


39.5 


117 


30.3 





20.0 


2708 


2575 


2379 


33.70 


117 


2:08 p.m. 


41, 


32 


41.3 


117 


27.0 





19.5 


2712 


2578 


2396 


33.75 


118 


3:23 p.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


48.4 


117 


19.4 





19.9 


2719 


2585 


2393 


33.84 


119 


3:48 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


49.8 


117 


18.4 





19.6 


2717 


2583 


2398 


33.81 


120 


5:44 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54.4 


June 2 
117 


7, 1908 
21.5 





18.6 


2713 


2579 


2419 


33.76 


121 


6:02 a.m. 


4I7 


32 


37.3 


June 2 
117 


9. 1908 
25.7 





18.3 










122 


7:30 a.m. 


42, 


32 


39.2 


117 


2S.7 





17.6 










123 


7:37 a.m. 


42, 


32 


39.4 


117 


28.9 





17.7 










124 


7:52 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.7 


117 


29.5 





17.7 










125 


8:12 a.m. 


42, 


32 


41.2 


117 


29.6 





17.7 










126 


8:31 a.m. 


42,5 


32 


42.5 


117 


29.9 





17.7 










127 


8:58 a.m. 


42, 


32 


43.5 


117 


30.0 





17.8 










128 


9:37 a.m. 


42, 


32 


44.2 


117 


30.0 





17.8 










129 


10:12 a.m. 


42, 


32 


45.1 


117 


30.0 





18.5 










130 


10:43 a.m. 


42, 


32 


45.7 


117 


30.0 





19.0 










131 


11:43 a.m. 


42, 


32 


45.1 


117 


30.9 





19.5 










132 


12:35 p.m. 


43, 


32 


40.5 


117 


35.2 





18.3 










133 


1:00 p.m. 


43, 


32 


40.2 


117 


35.1 





18.3 










134 


1:22 p.m. 


43, 


32 


40.0 


117 


35.0 





18.3 










135 


2:10 p.m. 


43, 


32 


39.2 


117 


35.7 





18.5 










J36 


2:40 p.m. 


43, 


32 


38.9 


117 


36.0 





18.7 










137 


3:10 p.m. 


43, 


32 


38.5 


117 


36.2 





19.0 










138 


3:38 p.m. 


43, 


32 


38.2 


117 


36.5 





19.3 










139 


4:10 p.m. 


43, 


32 


37.3 


117 


36.6 





19.4 










140 


4:39 p.m. 


43, 


32 


36.8 


117 


36.6 





19.0 










141 


8:52 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54.4 


June 30, 1908 
117 21.5 





18.5 










142 


2:05 p.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


52.4 


117 


18.3 





19.3 


2713 


2.579 


2402 


33.76 


143 


2:35 p.m. 


40,1 


32 


54.4 


117 


21.5 





19.3 


2711 


2.0,8 


2400 


33.74 


144 


2:55 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


54.4 


117 


21.5 


505 




2757 


2621 




34.31K 


145 


3:50 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


51.6 


July ] 
117 


, 1908 
17.4 





19.0 


2714 


2580 


2410 


33.78 


146 


4:25 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


20.2 





18.7 


2713 


2579 


2417 


33.76 


147 


5:00 a.m. 


41u 


32 


54.4 


117 


24.3 





19.5 


2702 


2569 


2386 


33.63 


148 


5:30 a.m. 


42„ 


32 


55.8 


117 


28.0 


n 


19.3 


2713 


2579 


2402 


33.76 


149 


6:00 a.m. 


42u5 


32 


57.5 


117 


31.9 





19.3 


2717 


2583 


2406 


33.81 


150 


6:30 a.m. 


43„ 


32 


59.3 


117 


36.6 





19.3 


2714 


2580 


2402 


33.78 


151 


7:00 a.m. 


44^ 


33 


0.7 


117 


39.9 





18.75 


2704 


2571 


2408 


33.65 


152 


7:30 a.m. 


45„ 


33 


2.6 


117 


44.3 





17.0 


2709 


2576 


2455 


33.71 


153 


7:37 a.m. 


45,3 


33 


2.9 


117 


45.5 





17.2 


2704 


2571 


2446 


33.65 


154 


7:46 a.m. 


45,3 


33 


3.5 


117 


46.7 





17.0 


2708 


2575 


2454 


33.70 


155 


8:00 a.m. 


46„ 


33 


4.1 


117 


48.2 





16.8 


2711 


2577 


2462 


33.74 


156 


8:30 a.m. 


46,3 


33 


5.7 


117 


52.4 





17.0 


2710 


2577 


2456 


33.73 


157 


9:0Ua.m. 


47,. 


33 


7.7 


117 


57.3 





16.5 


2708 


2575 


2466 


33.70 


158 


9:30 a.m. 


48,. 


33 


9.4 


118 


1.6 





17.0 


2714 


2580 


2460 


33.78 


159 


10:00 a.m. 


49,. 


33 


10.0 


118 


3.8 





16.9 


2707 


2574 


2455 


33.69 


160 


10:30 a.m. 


50,. 


33 


11.2 


118 


7.8 





16.9 


2711 


2578 


2460 


33.74 


161 


11:00 a.m. 


50,. 


33 


11.3 


118 


8.1 





17.3 


2707 


2574 


2446 


33.69 


162 


11:16 a.m. 


50,. 


33 


11.3 


118 


8.1 


365 




2748 


2612 




34.20K 


163 


11:40 a.m. 


50,. 


33 


10.8 


118 


8.7 





17.1 


2708 


2575 


2452 


33.70 


164 


12:05 p.m. 


50,. 


33 


11.0 


118 


9.8 





16.9 


2704 


2571 


2452 


33.65 


165 


1:20 p.m. 


50,. 


33 


11.3 


118 


10.9 





16.7 


2709 


2576 


2462 


33.72 


166 


1 :50 p.m. 


50„ 


33 


12.4 


118 


10.8 





17.3 


2704 


2571 


2443 


33.65 


167 


2:32 p.m. 


50,. 


33 


10.2 


118 


10.6 





16.5 


2700 


2567 


2457 


33.60 


168 


3:35 p.m. 


50,. 


33 


8.5 


118 


12.4 





16.1 


2707 


2574 


2474 


33.69 


169 


4:00 p.m. 


51,. 


33 


11.7 


118 


14.4 





16.0 


2714 


2580 


2482 


33.78 



52 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 









It 


lBLE 1. 


— OCE 


AN Data— ( 


'Continued) 
















Pq..;*:^« 






Temper- 
ature 
in centi- 


Specific gravity 




Water 


Time 








A 




Depth 


0* 


17?5 

s 


' 




sample 


of 




'~N 


orth 


West ' 


s 


s 


Salinity 


lumber 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


i grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4;o 


SO/oo 












July 1, 1908 














170 


4:30 p.m. 


51,s 


33' 


'14:6 


118' 


'16:2 





i5;9 


2715 


2581 


2487 


33.79 


171 


4:58 p.m. 


52,„ 


33 


17.6 


118 


18.4 





18.0 


2719 


2585 


2440 


33.84 


172 


5:25 p.m. 


52„ 


33 


20.8 


118 
JuIvS 


18.9 

!, 1908 





18.6 


2715 


2581 


2422 


33.79 


173 


6:00 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


17.3 


118 


18.0 





16.5 


2709 


2576 


2467 


33.71 


174 


6:30 a.m. 


51.S 


33 


13.5 


118 


14.8 





16.5 


2714 


2580 


2472 


33.78 


175 


7:00 a.m. 


50,, 


33 


9.7 


118 


12.0 





16.5 


2705 


2571 


2462 


33.66 


176 


7:30 a.m. 


50,3 


33 


6.9 


118 


9.6 





17.0 


2706 


2573 


2451 


33.68 


177 


8:00 a.m. 


50,3 


33 


6.4 


118 


9.4 





17.0 


2708 


2575 


2454 


33.70 


178 


9:00 a.m. 


50,3 


33 


4.2 


118 


11.1 





17.0 


2703 


2570 


2449 


33.64 


179 


9:45 a.m. 


50,3 


33 


3.9 


118 


11.2 





18.0 










180 


10:00 a.m. 


50,, 


33 


2.3 


118 


12.3 





17.5 


2712 


2579 


2446 


33!75 


181 


10:35 a.m. 


51,3 


32 


58.2 


118 


14.9 





17.2 


2710 


2577 


2450 


33.73 


182 


11:20 a.m. 


51,, 


32 


58.4 


118 


13.6 





17.0 










183 


12:13 p.m. 


50,, 


32 


58.7 


118 


12.4 





17.5 


2697 


2564 


2432 


33.'56 


184 


12:55 p.m. 


49,, 


33 


0.2 


118 


6.8 





17.5 










185 


1:18 p.m. 


48,, 


33 


1.0 


118 


2.3 





17.5 


2692 


2559 


2427 


33;50? 


186 


2:16 p.m. 


47,, 


33 


2.4 


117 


56.4 





18.5 


2708 


2575 


2419 


33.70 


187 


2:50 p.m. 


46,3 


33 


3.5 


117 


51.8 





18.5 


2703 


2570 


2413 


33.64 


188 


3:14 p.m. 


45,3 


33 


4.6 


117 


46.6 





18.5 


2709 


2576 


2418 


33.71 


189 


3:30 p.m. 


45,3 


33 


5.0 


117 


44.3 





18.3 


2704 


2571 


2419 


33.65 


190 


4:05 p.m. 


44,3 


33 


4.4 


117 


42.2 





18.3 


2709 


2576 


2424 


33.71 


191 


4:40 p.m. 


44,3 


33 


3.3 


117 


37.9 





18.3 


2705 


2572 


2419 


33.66 


192 


5:05 p.m. 


43,3 


33 


2.6 


117 


34.6 





19.3 


2708 


2575 


2398 


33.70 


193 


5:40 p.m. 


42,, 


33 


1.4 


117 


30.0 





19.0 


2723 


2589 


2418 


33.89 


194 


6:22 p.m. 


41,, 


32 


57.6 


117 
July 6 


25.1 
i, 1908 





19.5 


2714 


2580 


2398 


33.78 


195 


9:10 a.m. 


39, 


32 


37.3 


117 


14.5 





18.4 


2720 


2585 


2432 


33.85 


196 


9:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


38.6 


117 


19.8 


■0 


18.6 










197 


10:20 a.m. 


41 8 


32 


39.3 


117 


23.0 





18.7 


2720 


2585 


2425 


33.85 


198 


10:50 a.m. 


4l8 


32 


40.3 


117 


27.4 





19.3 


2721 


2586 


2408 


33.86 


199 


11:10 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.9 


117 


30.3 





19.3 


2724 


2589 


2411 


33.90 


200 


11:30 a.m. 


43, 


32 


41.4 


117 


32.6 





18.9 


2716 


2582 


2415 


33.80 


201 


11:50 a.m. 


43, 


32 


42.1 


117 


35.3 





19.3 


2718 


2584 


2406 


33.83 


202 


12:10 p.m. 


44, 


32 


42.8 


117 


39.0 





20.0 


2718 


2584 


2390 


33.83 


203 


12:45 p.m. 


44.5„ 


32 


43.7 


117 


42.5 





20.2 


2728 


2593 


2393 


33.95? 


204 


12:55 p.m. 


45„ 


32 


44.0 


117 


43.7 





20.0 


2721 


2586 


2391 


33.86 


20.5 


1:05 p.m. 


45, 


32 


44.3 


117 


45.1 





19.7 


2726 


2591 


2404 


33.93 


206 


1:30 p.m. 


46., 


32 


44.9 


117 


48.3 





20.2 


2719 


2585 


2384 


33.84 


207 


1 :50 p.m. 


46, 


32 


45.7 


117 


51.3 





19.1 


2721 


2586 


2416 


33.86 


208 


2:10 p.m. 


47, 


32 


46.3 


117 


53.6 





18.9 


2713 


2579 


2413 


33.76 


209 


2:30 p.m. 


47„ 


32 


46.7 


117 


56.0 





18.2 


2718 


2584 


2435 


33.83 


210 


2:50 p.m. 


48, 


32 


47.4 


117 


59.0 





18.3 


2717 


2583 


2432 


33.81 


211 


3:13 p.m. 


4S„ 


32 


48.1 


lis 


2.0 





18.8 


2727 


2592 


2428 


33.94? 


212 


3:30 p.m. 


49,0 


32 


48.7 


118 


4.5 





18.75 


2717 


2583 . 


2421 


33.81 


213 


3:48 p.m. 


49,, 


32 


48.8 


118 


5.9 





19.2 










214 


4:10 p.m. 


50,0 


32 


48.9 


118 


7.6 





19.3 










215 


4:30 p.m. 


50,0 


32 


48.9 


118 


10.2 





18.5 


2708 


2575 


2419 


33"7() 


216 


4:50 p.m. 


51,0 


32 


48.8 


118 


13.3 





18.5 


2713 


2579 


2422 


33.76 


217 


5:10 p.m. 


olio 


32 


48.8 


118 


16.2 





18.6 










218 


5:30 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.9 


118 


19.0 





18.5 


2726 


2591 


2434 


33"92 


219 


5:50 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.4 


118 
July 7 


21.5 
, 1908 





18.2 










220 


3:50 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


48.8 


118 


23.5 





18.2 










221 


4:50 a.m. 


53, 


32 


47.4 


118 


25.7 





17.5 










ooo 


5:30 a.m. 


53, 


32 


46.0 


118 


23.5 





17.6 










223 


6:00 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.1 


118 


21.9 





17.8 


2714 


2580 


2440 


33.'78 


224 


6:20 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


49.2 


118 


18.4 





17.7 


2720 


2585 


2449 


33.85 


225 


6:39 a.m. 


52, 


32 


46.8 


118 


20.3 





17.5 


2709 


2576 


2443 


33.71 


226 


7:30 a.m. 


52, 


32 


46.4 


118 


20.6 





17.6 


2717 


2583 


2448 


33.81 


227 


10:30 a.m. 


52, 


32 


45.6 


118 


20.5 





19.1 










228 


11:30 a.m. 


52, 


32 


45.8 


118 


19.6 





17.5 










229 


12:30 p.m. 


52, 


32 


45.8 


118 


19.0 





18.2 











1915] Michael, et al.: Hydrographic Records of Scriirps Institution 53 

Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





















Specific gravity 












Position 






Temper- 




















WatPT 


Time 
? of 












Depth 


ature 
in centi' 


0" 


17°5 






sampi, 




North 


West 


. S 


s — '— 


S 


Salinity 


numbei 


r day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


1 grade 


4?0 


17?.') 


4;o 


C3 O / 












July 1 


3, 1908 














230 


8:07 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


°48:i 


118 


° 19:9 


825 




2777 


2640 




34.56K 


231 


10:00 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


■50.8 


118 


20.1 





17.75 


2722 


2588 


2449 


33.87 


232 


10:30 a.m. 


52,1 


32 


54.5 


118 


19.8 





18.0 










233 


11:10 a.m. 


52,, 


32 


59.3 


118 


19.5 





17.8 


2720 


25.8.5 


2447 


33!85 


234 


11:40 a.m. 


•^52,, 


33 


3.8 


118 


19.2 





17.6 


2722 


25S8 


2453 


33.87 


235 


12:10 p.m. 


52„„ 


33 


7.5 


118 


18.8 





17.8 


2722 


2588 


2448 


33.87 


236 


12:45 p.m. 


52„ 


33 


12.0 


lis 


1S.5 





18.0 


2718 


2584 


2440 


33.83 


237 


1:15 p.m. 


52„ 


33 


15.5 


118 


18.3 





19.0 


2716 


2582 


2412 


33.80 


237« 


7:37 p.m. 


52,e 


33 


21.9 


118 


19.1 





18.9 




















July 9, 1908 














238 


6:40 a.m. 


52,. 


33 


16.5 


118 


19.7 





18.5 


2716 


2582 


2426 


33.80 


239 


7:15 a.m. 


52,3 


33 


13.4 


118 


22.3 





18.3 


2719 


2585 


2433 


33.84 


240 


7:45 a.m. 


53.4 


33 


10.7 


118 


24.8 





18.3 


2718 


2584 


2432 


33.83 


241 


8:15 a.m. 


53,. 


33 


8.0 


118 


27.1 





17.7 


2715 


2581 


2444 


33.79 


242 


8:46 a.m. 


54,3 


33 


4.7 


118 


29.8 





17.7 


2718 


2584 


2447 


33.83 


243 


9:15 a.m. 


54,, 


33 


2.0 


118 


32.3 





17.7 


2718 


2584 


2447 


33.,S3 


244 


9:45 a.m. 


55,, 


33 


0.6 


118 


33.2 





18.0 


2705 


2572 


2427 


33.66 












July 10, 1908 














245 


7:17 a.m. 


50„ 


32 


53.4 


118 


10.2 


825 




2777 


2640 




34.56K 


246 


10:34 a.m. 


50„ 


32 


53.4 


118 


9.1 


135 


"ji'.'i) 


2756 


2620 


2642 


34.30K 


247 


10:50 a.m. 


50„ 


32 


53.5 


118 


7.8 





18.5 


2721 


2587 


2431 


33.86 


248 


10:59 a.m. 


49„ 


32 


53.5 


118 


7.4 


640 




2770 


2633 




34.47K 












July 11, 1908 














249 


1:25 a.m. 


53„ 


32 


46.9 


118 


26.5 





17.5 


2714 


2580 


2448 


33.78 


250 


1 :45 a.m. 


54^ 


32 


45.5 


118 


28.8 





17.5 


2718 


2584 


2453 


33..S3 


251 


2:05 a.m. 


543 


32 


43.4 


118 


32.3 





17.5 


2719 


2585 


2453 


33.84 


252 


2:25 a.m. 


55g5 


32 


42.5 


118 


33.7 





17.5 


2718 


2584 


2453 


33.83 


253 


2:45 a.m. 


55, 


32 


41.0 


118 


36.0 





17.5 


2723 


2589 


2456 


33.89 


254 


3:05 a.m. 


56, 


32 


39.4 


118 


38.7 





17.5 


2725 


2.591 


2459 


33.91 


255 


3:30 a.m. 


56, 


32 


37.3 


118 


42.2 





17.5 


2721 


2587 


2454 


33.86 


256 


3:50 a.m. 


57, 


32 


35.7 


118 


44.7 





17.5 


2723 


2589 


2457 


33.89 


257 


4:10 a.m. 


57, 


32 


34.2 


lis 


47.2 





17.2 


2712 


2578 


2453 


33.75 


258 


4:30 a.m. 


58, 


32 


33.0 


118 


49.0 





15.4 


2719 


2585 


2502 


33.84 


259 


4:50 a.m. 


58„ 


32 


31.2 


118 


51.8 





15.4 


2723 


2589 


2506 


33.89 


260 


5:10 a.m. 


59„ 


32 


30.2 


118 


53.6 





15.5 


2715 


2581 


2496 


33.79 


261 


5:30 a.m. 


59„ 


32 


28.7 


118 


56.0 





15.4 


2711 


2578 


2494 


33.74 


262 


5:50 a.m. 


60, 


32 


27.1 


118 


58.6 





15.3 


2724 


2590 


2509 


33.90 


263 


6:10 a.m. 


60'. 


32 


25.7 


119 


0.8 





15.3 


2721 


2587 


2506 


33.86 


264 


6:26 a.m. 


61, 


32 


24.5 


119 


2.8 





15.3 


2711 


2578 


2496 


33.74 


265 


6:41 a.m. 


61, 


32 


23.2 


119 


4.9 





15.3 


2725 


2.591 


2508 


33.91 


266 


7:08 a.m. 


61, 


32 


21.9 


119 


6.8 





15.3 


2721 


2587 


2506 


33.86 


267 


8:08 a.m. 


62. 


32 


22.0 


119 


7.8 





15.6 


2722 


2588 


2502 


33.87 


268 


9:10 a.m. 


62, 


32 


24.2 


119 


8.9 





15.6 


2726 


2591 


2504 


33.92 


269 


9:30 a.m. 


61, 


32 


25.5 


119 


6.1 





15.0 


2726 


2591 


2506 


33.92 


270 


9:50 a.m. 


61, 


32 


26.4 


119 


3.8 





15.4 


2720 


2585 


2503 


33.85 


271 


11:02 a.m. 


59„ 


32 


30.9 


118 


.54.1 





15.5 


2721 


2587 


2501 


33.86 


272 


11:20 a.m. 


58„ 


32 


32.1 


lis 


51.4 





15.5 


2722 


2588 


2502 


33.87 


273 


11:40 a.m. 


58, 


32 


33.7 


lis 


47.7 





15.5 


2716 


2582 


2497 


33.80 


274 


12:35 p.m. 


56, 


32 


36.4 


118 


42.0 





16.0 


2723 


2589 


2492 


33.89 


275 


12:50 p.m. 


56, 


32 


38.0 


118 


38.3 





18.0 


2718 


2584 


2440 


33.83 


276 


1:10 p.m. 


5.5, 


32 


39.9 


118 


34.0 





18.2 


2722 


2588 


2438 


33.87 


277 


1:30 p.m. 


54, 


32 


41.6 


lis 


32.0 





18.3 


2706 


2573 


2421 


33.68 


278 


1:50 p.m. 


54, 


32 


43.3 


lis 


29.8 





18.1 


2708 


2575 


2428 


33.70 


279 


2:10 p.m. 


53., 


32 


46.4 


118 


26.1 





17.7 


2709 


2576 


2438 


33.71 


280 


2:30 p.m. 


53,„ 


32 


49.0 


lis 

July 12 


23.2 

;, 1908 





17.3 


2714 


2580 


2453 


33.78 


281 


5:30 a.m. 


53,„ 


32 


48.8 


118 


23.0 





17.6 


2719 


2585 


2450 


33.84 


282 


6:20 a.m. 


o2,„ 


32 


48.7 


118 


17.8 





IS. 3 


2710 


2576 


2424 


33.73 


283 


6:40 a.m. 


51 ,„ 


32 


4S.7 


lis 


15.0 





17.5 


2711 


2577 


2445 


33.74 


284 


7:00 a.m. 


50,,, 


32 


48. 7 


lis 


12.0 





17.9 


2716 


25S2 


2439 


33.80 


285 


7:40 a.m. 


49,0 


32 


48.6 


118 


6.3 





17.5 


2713 


2579 


2446 


33.76 


286 


8:00 a.m. 


49„, 


32 


48.6 


lis 


3.2 





18.2 


2715 


2581 


2431 


33.79 


287 


8:20 a.m. 


48,,, 


32 


48.6 


118 


0.6 





18.3 


2717 


2583 


2431 


33.81 


288 


8:40 a.m. 


47,,, 


32 


48.5 


117 


57.4 





19.5 


2710 


2577 


2394 


33.73 


289 


9:00 a.m. 


47„, 


32 


48.6 


117 


54.4 





19.7 


2714 


2580 


2392 


33.78 



54 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 









Table 1 


— Ocean Data — {Continued) 
















Po 








Temper- 


Specific grav 


ty 




























Time 

of 












Depth 


ature 
in centi- 


0° 


1705 


t° 




ample 




North 


West ' 


S • 


S — '— 


S 


Salinity 


umber 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


i7;5 


4?0 


SO/00 












July 12, 1908 














290 


9:20 a.m. 


46,0 


32 = 


48:5 


117' 


5i:3 





i9;6 


2714 


2580 


2396 


33.78 


291 


9:40 a.m. 


46,0 


32 


48.5 


117 


48.3 





19.0 


2711 


2577 


2408 


33.74 


292 


10:00 a.m. 


45,0 


32 


48.4 


117 


45.4 





18.8 


2719 


2585 


2421 


33.84 


293 


10:20 a.m. 


44,0 


32 


48.3 


117 


41.9 





18.5 


2711 


2578 


2420 


33.74 


294 


10:40 a.m. 


44,0 


32 


48.2 


117 


38.9 





18.5 


2705 


2572 


2415 


33.66 


295 


11:00 a.m. 


43,0 


32 


48.2 


117 


36.2 





18.5 


2717 


2583 


2427 


33.81 


296 


11:20 a.m. 


43,0 


32 


48.0 


117 


33.0 





18.8 


2711 


2578 


2412 


33.74 


297 


11:50 a.m. 


42j„ 


32 


47.9 


117 


28.4 





19.8 


2720 


2585 


2396 


33.85 


298 


12:13 p.m. 


41,0 


32 


47.8 


117 


25.0 





20.1 










299 


12:35 p.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


49.0 


117 


21.0 





19.1 


2715 


2581 


2410 


33J9 


300 


1:20 p.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.5 





19.5 


2719 


2585 


2403 


33.84 












Julv 16, 1908 














301 


1:42 a.m. 


39, 


32 


37.4 


117 


14.6 





19.5 










302 


2:00 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


37.9 


117 


17.1 





19.3 


2720 


2586 


2409 


33"85 


303 


2:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


38.2 


117 


19.5 





18.5 


2719 


2585 


2429 


33.84 


304 


2:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


38.7 


117 


22.2 





19.5 


2724 


2589 


2408 


33.90 


305 


3:00 a.m. 


41, 


32 


39.1 


117 


24.8 





19.6 


2722 


2588 


2403 


33.88 


306 


3:20 a.m. 


41, 


32 


39.5 


117 


27.3 





20.0 


2723 


2588 


2391 


33.89 


307 


4:00 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.3 


117 


32.0 





19.5 


2713 


2579 


2396 


33.76 


308 


4:30 a.m. 


43, 


32 


40.8 


117 


34.5 





19.3 


2720 


2586 


2409 


33.85 


309 


4:40 a.m. 


43, 


32 


41.0 


11/ 


35.9 





19.2 


2722 


2588 


2413 


33.88 


310 


5:00 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 


117 


39.1 





19.0 


2718 


2584 


2414 


33.83 


311 


5:20 a.m. 


44, 


32 


42.0 


117 


41.5 





19.0 


2717 


2583 


2413 


33.81 


312 


5:40 a.m. 


45, 


32 


42.3 


117 


43.5 





19.2 


2705 


2572 


2396 


33.66 


313 


6:00 a.m. 


45, 


32 


42.7 


117 


45.9 





19.3 


2721 


2587 


2409 


33.86 


314 


6:20 a.m. 


46, 


32 


43.1 


117 


48.3 





19.5 


2727 


2592 


2410 


33.94 


315 


6:40 a.m. 


46„ 


32 


43.6 


117 


51.2 





19.4 


2727 


2592 


2413 


33.94 


316 


7:00 a.m. 


47„ 


32 


43.8 


117 


52.8 





19.2 


2717 


2583 


2407 


33.81 


317 


7:20 a.m. 


47, 


32 


44.4 


117 


55.6 





18.5 


2724 


2589 


2433 


33.90 


318 


7:40 a.m. 


48„ 


32 


45.1 


117 


59.8 





18.5 


2724 


2589 


2433 


33.90 


319 


8:00 a.m. 


48, 


32 


45.3 


118 


1.5 





18.5 


2712 


2578 


2421 


33.75 


320 


8:20 a.m. 


49, 


32 


46.0 


118 


4.4 





19.0 


2714 


2580 


2411 


33.78 


321 


8:40 a.m. 


49, 


32 


46.7 


118 


7.3 





18.6 


2728 


2.593 


2428 


33.95? 


322 


9:00 a.m. 


50, 


32 


47.2 


118 


10.1 





18.6 


2713 


2579 


2420 


33.76 


323 


9:20 a.m. 


50,0 


32 


47.8 


118 


12.3 





19.3 


2718 


2584 


2407 


33.83 


324 


10:05 a.m. 


51,0 


32 


48.7 


118 


14.5 


640 




2761 


2625 




34.36K 


325 


1:15 p.m. 


•51io 


32 


48.7 


118 


14.5 





i's'.'e 


2710 


2576 


2417 


33.73 












July 17, 1908 














326 


1:40 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


48.5 


118 


24.0 





18.1 










327 


2:0Ua.m. 


53, 


32 


46.7 


118 


26.9 





18.7 


2705 


2572 


2410 


s'siee 


328 


2:20 a.m. 


54, 


32 


45.2 


118 


29.4 





18.5 


2716 


2582 


2426 


33.80 


329 


2:40 a.m. 


54, 


32 


43.5 


118 


32.0 





18.5 










330 


3:00 a.m. 


55, 


32 


41.8 


118 


34.7 





18.5 


2703 


2570 


2412 


33!64 


331 


3:20 a.m. 


.55. 


32 


40.2 


118 


37.4 





18.5 


2709 


2575 


2418 


33.71 


332 


3:40 a.m. 


56, 


32 


39.4 


118 


38.8 





18.5 


2705 


2572 


2415 


33.66 


333 


4:00 a.m. 


56, 


32 


37.3 


118 


42.1 





18.1 


2709 


2575 


2428 


33.71 


334 


4:20 a.m. 


57, 


32 


35.7 


118 


44.7 





18.3 


2710 


2576 


2425 


33.73 


335 


4:40 a.m. 


57..5, 


32 


34.0 


118 


47.5 





18.1 


2708 


2574 


2427 


33.70 


336 


5:00 a.m. 


5«„ 


32 


32.4 


118 


50.0 





18.0 


2710 


2576 


2432 


33.73 


337 


5:20 a.m. 


59„ 


32 


30.8 


118 


52.6 





16.5 


2707 


2574 


2464 


33.69 


338 


5:40 a.m. 


59, 


32 


29.3 


118 


55.0 





16.0 


2709 


2575 


2478 


33.71 


339 


6:00 a.m. 


60, 


32 


29.7 


118 


57.6 





16.1 


2698 


2565 


2466 


33..58 


340 


6:20 a.m. 


60, 


32 


26.0 


119 


0.5 





16.3 


2691 


2558 


2455 


33.49 


341 


6:40 a.m. 


61, 


32 


24.5 


119 


2.8 





16.4 


2695 


2562 


2458 


33.54 


342 


7:00 a.m. 


61, 


32 


23.0 


119 


5.2 





16.7 


2688 


2555 


2442 


33.45 


343 


9:30 a.m. 


61, 


32 


23.5 


119 


5.8 





17.0 


2697 


2564 


2443 


33.57 


344 


1:16 p.m. 


61s 


32 


23.7 


119 


6.0 





18.5 










345 


2:09 p.m. 


61> 


32 


23.7 


119 


6.0 





18.3 


2694 


2561 


2412 


33!53 


346 


2:52 p.m. 


61, 


32 


24.2 


119 


6.2 





17.5 


2691 


2.558 


2427 


33.49 












Julv 18, 1908 














347 


7:07 a.m. 


61, 


32 


24.2 


119 


6.2 





16.5 


2694 


2561 


2451 


33..53 


348 


9:32 a.m. 


61 = 


32 


24.2 


119 


6.2 





17.5 


2700 


2567 


2435 


33.60 


349 


10:00 a.m. 


61, 


32 


25.6 


no 


4.3 





17.9 


2686 


2553 


2415 


33.43 


350 


10:20 a.m. 


60, 


32 


27.2 


119 


1.7 





18.3 










351 


10:40 a.m. 


60„ 


32 


2S.G 


118 


.59.5 





IS. 5 


2698 


2565 


2410 


33..58 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



55 









Table 1.— Ocean Data — ( 


Continued) 
























Temper- 


Specific gravity 












Position 




























Depth 




0" 


17°5 


t° 




sample 


of 




North 


West 


in centi. 


S 


S — 




so/no 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude longitude 


meters 


grade 


4^0 


17?5 


4?0 


Salinity 










Jul 


y 18, 1908 














352 


11:00 a. m 


59. 


32 


30:2 1 


18 


57:0 





18?5 


2694 


2561 


2406 


33.53 


353 


11:20 a.m 


59„ 


32 


31.6 1 


8 


54.7 





19.1 


2706 


2573 


2400 


33.68 


354 


ll:40a.m 


58, 


32 


33.1 1 


8 


52.3 





19.5 


2699 


2566 


2382 


33.59 


355 


12:01 p.m 


58, 


32 


34.1 1 


8 


50.6 





19.8 


2708 


2574 


2385 


33.70 


356 


12:20 p. Ill 


57, 


32 


36.2 1 


8 


47.4 





19.5 


2697 


2564 


2381 


33.57 


357 


12:40 p.m 


57s 


32 


37.7 1 


8 


45.0 





20.1 


2717 


2583 


2385 


33.81 


358 


1:00 p.m 


57s 


32 


39.2 1 


8 


42.7 





21.5 


2713 


2579 


2343 


33.76 


359 


1:20 p.m 


56. 


32 


40.6 1 


8 


40.2 





21.3 


2714 


2580 


2349 


33.78 


360 


1:40 p.m 


56, 


32 


42.2 1 


8 


37.7 





20.7 










361 


2:00 p.m 


55, 


32 


43.7 1 


8 


35.4 





20.9 










362 


2:20 p.m 


55„ 


32 


44.8 1 


8 


33.5 





21.0 


2711 


2577 


2355 


33.74 


363 


2:40 p.m 


54„ 


32 


46.0 1 


8 


30.2 





20.3 


2713 


2579 


2376 


33.76 


364 


3:00 p.m 


54, 


32 


47.2 1 


8 


27.6 





20 . 5 


2708 


2574 


2365 


33.70 


365 


4:40 p.m 


•52i„ 


32 


48.6 1 


8 


19.2 





19.0 


2717 


2583 


2413 


33.81 


366 


5:00 p.m 


51,0 


32 


48.5 1 


8 


16.7 





20.1 


2706 


2573 


2375 


33.68 


367 


5:40 p.m 


50,0 


32 


48.3 1 


S 


11.4 





20.2 


2713 


2579 


2380 


33.76 


368 


6:00 p.m 


50,0 


32 


48.3 1 


8 


8.2 





20.4 


2706 


2573 


2366 


33.68 


369 


6:20 p.m 


49,„ 


32 


48.2 1 


8 


5.3 





20.2 


2713 


2579 


2380 


33.76 


370 


6:40 p.m 


48.5,0 


32 


48.2 1 


8 


2.5 





19.9 


2718 


2584 


2392 


33.83 


371 


7:00 p.m 


48,0 


32 


48.1 1 


8 


0.2 





19.7 


2714 


2580 


2393 


33.78 


372 


7:20 p.m 


47,0 


32 


48.0 1 


7 


57.4 





19.8 










373 


7:40 p.m 


47,0 


32 


48.0 1 


7 


55.0 





19.5 


2704 


2571 


2388 


33"6.5 


374 


8:00 p.m 


46,0 


32 


47.9 1 


7 


51.8 





19.5 


2709 


2575 


2394 


33.71 


375 


8:20 p.m 


46,0 


32 


47.9 1 




49.0 





19.5 


2704 


2571 


2388 


33.65 


376 


8:40 p.m 


45,0 


32 


47.9 1 




46.5 





19.5 


2703 


2570 


2387 


33.64 


377 


9:00 p.m 


45,0 


32 


47.8 1 




43.4 





19.6 


2707 


2574 


2388 


33.69 


378 


9:20 p.m 


44,0 


32 


47.6 1 


7 


40.4 





19.7 


2699 


2566 


2378 


33.59 


379 


9:40 p.m 


43,0 


32 


47.6 1 




37.2 





20.3 










380 


10:00 p.m 


43, J 


32 


47.5 1 




35.3 





20.3 


2695 


2.562 


2357 


33.54 


381 


10:20 p.m 


42.5, 


32 


47.4 1 


7 


32.5 





20,1 


2699 


2566 


2367 


33.59 


382 


10:40 p.m 


42„ 


32 


47.3 1 
Jul 


•2 


29.8 
1, 1908 





20.4 


2702 


2569 


2362 


33.63 


383 


10:00 a.m 


41 „ 


32 


56.9 1 


7 


25.8 





21.5 


2710 


2576 


2341 


33.73 


384 


10:30 a.m 


41„ 


32 


53.0 1 


7 


26.8 





21.5 


2702 


2569 


2333 


33.63 


385 


11:00 a.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 





21.3 


2703 


2570 


2340 


33.64 


386 


11:29 a.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 


640 




2754 


2618 




34.27K 


387 


11:30 a.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 





21.5 


2705 


2572 


2335 


33.66 


388 


11 :47 a.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 


460 




2746 


2610 




34.17K 


389 


12:01 p.m 


42,0 


23 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 





2r.'5 


2699 


2566 


2329 


33..59 


390 


12:30 p.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


17 


28.8 





21.5 


2699 


2566 


2329 


33.59 


391 


12:40 p.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 


135 




2734 


2599 




34.02K 


392 


12:58 p.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 


275 


"g'.'o 


2748 


2612 


2462 


34.20K 


393 


1:00 p.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 





21.5 


2708 


2574 


2339 


33.70 


394 


1:30 p.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 





22.0 


2703 


2570 


2321 


33.64 


395 


3:00 p.m 


42,0 


32 


49.6 1 


7 


28.8 





22.3 


2710 


2576 


2318 


33.73 


396 


3:30 p.m 


41 „. 


32 


49.9 1 


7 


26.8 





22.5 


2708 


2574 


2310 


33.70 


397 


4:00 p.m 


(40),,, 


32 


50.6 1 
Jul 


17 


22.9 
3, 1908 





22.1 


2712 


2578 


2326 


33.75 


398 


6:30 a.m 


41,0 


32 


50.2 1 


.7" 


25.5 





20.4 


2692 


2559 


2354 


33.50 


399 


7:00 a.m 


42,0 


32 


49.7 1 


7 


30.2 





21.3 


2704 


2571 


2340 


33.65 


400 


7:30 a.m 


43,0 


32 


49.4 1 


7 


34.4 





21.5 


2706 


2573 


2337 


33.68 


401 


8:00 a.m 


43,0 


32 


50.1 1 


7 


34.0 





20.5 


2709 


2575 


2366 


33.71 


402 


8:30 a.m 


43,0 


32 


50.6 1 


7 


33.7 





20.5 


2701 


2568 


2358 


33.61 


403 


9:00 a.m 


43,0 


32 


51.4 1 


7 


33.3 





21,0 


2705 


25V2 


2349 


33.66 


404 


9:30 a.m 


43,0 


32 


52.0 1 


7 


33.0 





21,1 


2698 


2565 


2340 


33.58 


405 


10:00 a.m 


43„ 


32 


52.6 1 


7 


32.6 





21.3 


2704 


2571 


2340 


33.65 


406 


10:30 a.m 


42„ 


32 


53.3 1 


7 


32.3 





21,5 


2706 


2572 


2336 


33.68 


407 


11:00 a.m 


42„ 


32 


53.8 1 


7 


31.8 





21,5 


2704 


2571 


2334 


33.65 


408 


11:30 a.m 


42„ 


32 


54.4 1 




31.3 





21.7 


2709 


2575 


2335 


33.71 


409 


12:01 p.m 


42„ 


32 


55.0 1 




30.8 





22,3 


2706 


2573 


2316 


33.68 


410 


12:30 p.m 


42„ 


32 


55.6 1 


7 


30.4 





22,5 


2704 


2571 


2307 


33.65 


411 


1:00 p.m 


42„ 


32 


56.3 1 




29.8 





22^5 


2705 


2572 


2308 


33.66 


412 


1:30 p.m 


42„ 


32 


56.9 1 




29.3 





22,5 


2704 


2571 


2307 


33.65 


413 


2:00 p.m 


42,, 


32 


57.6 1 


7 


28.8 





22,1 


2707 


2574 


2321 


33.69 



56 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 



Water Time 

sample of 

number day 



414 
415 
416 
417 
418 
419 

420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
425 
426 
427 

428 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 

434 
435 
436 
437 
438 
439 
440 
441 
442 
443 
444 
445 
446 
447 
448 
449 
450 
451 
452 
453 
454 
455 
456 
457 
458 
459 
460 
461 
462 
463 
464 
465 
466 
467 
468 
4G9 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 



7:00 p.m. 
7:20 p.m. 
7:40 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 
8:20 p.m. 
8:40 p.m. 

4:02 a.m. 
4:20 a.m. 
5:30 a.m. 
5:50 a.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 
8:30 p.m. 
9:00 p.m. 

3:50 a.m. 
4:15 a.m. 
4:35 a.m. 
4:55 a.m. 
5:15 a.m. 
5:35 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:20 a.m. 

8:40 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 

9:20 a.m. 

9:40 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
10:20 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:20 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 
12:20 p.m. 
12:40 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:20 p.m. 

1 :40 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

2:20 p.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

3:20 p.m. 

3:40 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

4:20 p.m. 

4:40 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

5:20 p.m. 

5:40 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

6:20 p.m. 

6:40 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 

7:20 p.m. 

7:40 p.m. 

8:00 p.m. 

8:20 p.m. 

8:40 p.m. 

9:00 p.m. 

9:20 p.m. 



40),, 
40),, 
40),, 
40),, 
40),, 
40),, 

40),, 
40),, 
40),, 
40),, 
40),, 
40),, 
40),, 
40),, 

40),, 
40),, 
40),, 
41),, 
40),, 
40),, 



41" 

41' 
41' 
41' 
41' 
418 
418 
41' 
41» 
41" 
42" 
42'° 
42'° 
42" 



32° 5i:4 

32 51.5 

32 51.5 

32 51.6 

32 51.9 

32 52.2 

32 51.4 

32 51.5 

32 52.1 

32 51.8 

32 51.6 

32 51.7 

32 51.8 

32 52.0 

32 51.5 

32 51.5 

32 51.4 

32 51.5 

32 51.2 

32 51.3 



West 

longitudi 

July 22, 1908 



Temper- 
Depth ature 

in in centi- 
meters grade 



Specific gravity 



4?0 



(38), 


32 


28.5 


38, 


32 


26.5 


38, 


32 


23.1 


39, 


32 


21.0 


39. 


32 


18.8 


393 


32 


16.5 


393 


32 


14.6 


39, 


32 


13.1 


39., 


32 


10.4 


39, 


32 


8.8 


39, 


32 


6.0 


40, 


32 


3.5 


40, 


32 


2.7 


40„ 


32 


0.0 


40„ 


31 


58.6 


40' 


31 


56.9 


40' 


31 


.53.8 


40= 


31 


51.9 


40= 


31 


50.0 


40" 


31 


46.9 


40' 


31 


44.6 


40" 


31 


42.9 


40* 


31 


40.0 


40* 


31 


38.5 


40.5' 


31 


36.1 


41« 


31 


32.1 



31 31.1 
31 29.6 



27.1 
25.4 
22.7 
2l!5 
20.0 
18.8 
18.8 



11 

117 

11' 

ir 

11' 
ir 

July 
11' 
11' 
117 
11' 
11' 
11' 
11' 
11' 

July 

ir 
11' 
11' 



17:8 

20.7 
21.4 
22.3 
21.6 
7 20.6 
23, 1908 
" 19.3 
22.0 
20.2 
19.0 
19.4 
20.7 
22.0 
19.4 
1, 1908 
18.6 
21.4 
22.2 



31 12.1 

31 10.0 

31 8.5 

31 5.4 



11 
11 
Aug. 
11 
11 
11 
117 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 

n 
n 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 



22.2 

20.8 

6, 190S 
11.7 
12.1 
12.7 
13.2 
13.7 
14.3 
14.8 
15.4 
15.9 
16.4 
17.1 
17.6 
18.2 
19.2 
19.4 
19.7 
19.9 
20.2 
20.4 
20.8 
21.1 
21.4 
21.8 
20.1 
22.5 
22.9 
23.3 
23.7 
24.2 
24.7 
25.4 
26.0 
26.6 
27.1 
27.1 
27.1 
27.3 
27.6 
27.9 
28.2 
28.5 



20?3 2711 

20.3 2708 

20.3 2715 

20.5 2710 

20.5 2711 

20.5 2718 

20.0 2711 
19.9 2711 

19.7 2709 

19.8 2713 

22.2 2717 
20.5 2705 
20.7 2707 
20.5 2699 

20.3 2709 
20.5 2697 
20.5 2705 
20.5 2707 
20.5 2704 
20.5 2709 

16.25 2712 

16.36 

17.25 2724 

17.9 2720 

18.05 

18.7 

18.8 2706 

20.2 

20.3 

20.45 2725 

20.95 

21.45 

21.85 

21.6 2719 
21.13 2722 
21.42 2727 
21.2 2714 
20.6 2705 
20.38 2726 

20.2 

19.95 

19.5 2717 

19.8 2730 
19.78 _ 

20.1 

21.0 

20.0 

20.1 2720 
20.1 2727 
20.0 

20.0 

19.9 

19.9 

19.3 

19.3 

19.6 

19.1 2727 
18.9 2702 
18.8 2698 
19.1 2712 
19.1 2703 



17?5 

2577 
2574 
2581 
2576 
2577 
2584 

2576 
2576 
2575 
2579 
2583 
2572 
2574 
2566 

2575 
2564 
2572 
2574 
2571 
2575 



2585 
2588 
2592 
2580 
2572 
2591 



4^0 

2375 
2371 
2379 
2368 
2368 
2375 

2382 
2384 
2387 
2389 
2328 
2361 
2358 
2356 

2372 
23.55 
2361 
2364 
2361 
2366 



2347 
2362 
2360 
2353 
2360 
2385 



33.74 
83.70 
33.79 
33.73 
33.74 
33.83 

33.74 
33.74 
33.71 
33.76 
33.81 
33.66 
33.69 
33.59 

33.71 
33.56 
33.66 
33.69 
33.65 
33.71 



2579 2475 33.75h 



2589 
2586 


2464 
2444 


33.'90h 
33.85h 


2573 


2407 


33."68h 


2590 


2382 


33"911i 



33.84h 
33.88h 
33.94h 
33.78h 
33.66h 
33.93h 



2583 
2595 


2401 

2405 


33.81h 
33.98h 


2.586 
2592 


2388 
2395 


33.85h 
33.94h 



2592 
2569 
2565 
2578 
2570 



2420 
2402 
2402 
2407 
2398 



33.94h 
33.63h 
33..58h 
33.75h 
33.64h 



Michael, ct al.: II>jdrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



57 









Table 1, 


. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 
















Po 








Temper- 


Spf 


^cific gravity 


























Water 
samplf 


Time 

• nf 








A 




Depth 


ature 
in centi. 


0" 


17°5 


t° 






North 


West 


S 


S '— 




Salinity 


Qumbei 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17^5 


4?0 


S t*/oo 












Aug. '. 


!6. 1908 














475 


9:40 p.m. 


42" 


31' 


' 3:1 


117 


■=28:9 





19?2 


2700 


2567 


2391 


33.60h 


476 


10:00 p.m. 


42" 


31 


1.5 


117 


29.2 





19.1 


2720 


2586 


2411 


33.85h 


477 


10:20 p.m. 


42'= 


30 


58.1 


117 


29.6 





19.0 


2687 


2554 


2386 


33.44h 


478 


10:40 p.m. 


42" 


30 


57.1 


117 


30.0 





19.0 


2707 


2574 


2404 


33.6911 


479 


11:00 p.m. 


42" 


30 


55.0 


117 


30.4 





18.9 


2702 


2569 


2401 


33.63h 


480 


11:20 p.m. 


42" 


30 


53.5 


117 


30.8 





18.8 


2703 


2570 


2405 


33.64h 


481 


11:40 p.m. 


42" 


30 


50.8 


117 


31.2 





18.7 


2718 


2584 


2422 


33.83h 


482 


11:59 p.m. 


42« 


30 


48.5 


117 
Aug. 2 


31.7 

;7, 1908 





18.7 


2687 


2554 


2394 


33.44h 


483 


12:20 a.m. 


42" 


30 


46.9 


117 


32.1 





18.5 


2721 


2587 


2428 


33.86h 


484 


12:40 a.m. 


42.5" 


30 


44.6 


117 


32.5 





18.4 










485 


1:00 a.m. 


43" 


30 


42.7 


117 


32.9 





18.4 


2700 


2.567 


2411 


33.60h 


486 


1:20 a.m. 


43" 


30 


40.4 


117 


33.3 





18.4 


2701 


2568 


2412 


33.61h 


487 


1:40 a.m. 


43" 


30 


37.1 


117 


33.8 





18.3 


2685 


2552 


2402 


33.42I1 


488 


2:00 a.m. 


43" 


30 


35.8 


117 


33.9 





18.3 


2723 


2588 


2438 


33.89h 


489 


2:20 a.m. 


43" 


30 


33.8 


117 


34.2 





18.3 


2704 


2571 


2419 


33.65h 


490 


2:40 a.m. 


43" 


30 


31.1 


117 


34.3 





18.3 


2707 


2574 


2422 


33.69h 


■191 


3:00 a.m. 


43" 


30 


29.2 


117 


34.5 





18.3 


2692 


2559 


2409 


33.50h 


492 


3:20 a.m. 


43" 


30 


26.5 


117 


34.6 





18.4 


2732 


2597 


2443 


34.OOI1 


493 


3:40 a.m. 


43" 


30 


25.4 


117 


35.1 





18.4 


2681 


2549 


2395 


33.37h 


494 


4:00 a.m. 


43=° 


30 


22.1 


117 


35.6 





18.6 


2697 


2564 


2406 


33.55h 


495 


4:20 a.m. 


43=° 


30 


20.4 


117 


36.1 





18.8 










496 


4:40 a.m. 


43=0 


30 


17.7 


117 


36.6 





18.6 










497 


5:00 a.m. 


43=' 


30 


15.8 


117 


37.1 





18.9 


2719 


2.585 


2419 


33.8411 


498 


5:20 a.m. 


44=1 


30 


13.8 


117 


37.6 





18.9 


2709 


2575 


2409 


33.7111 


499 


5:40 a.m. 


44== 


30 


12.1 


117 


38.1 





18.9 


2715 


2581 


2415 


33.79h 


500 


6:00 a.m. 


44== 


30 


10.0 


117 


38.6 





18.7 


2718 


2584 


2423 


33.83h 


501 


6:20 a.m. 


44= 


30 


7.7 


117 


39.1 





18.8 


2712 


2578 


2413 


33.75h 


502 


6:40 a.ra. 


4423 


30 


5.0 


117 


39.6 





18.7 


2724 


2589 


2429 


33.9011 


503 


7:00 a.m. 


44a 


30 


3.5 


117 


39.7 





18.9 


2688 


2555 


2390 


33.4511 


504 


7:20 a.m. 


44=* 


30 


1.1 


117 


39.8 





18.9 










505 


7:40 a.m. 


44" 


29 


58.8 


117 


39.8 





18.8 


2718 


2584 


2420 


33"83h 


506 


8:00 a.m. 


44=' 


29 


57.2 


117 


39.9 





18.8 


2722 


2588 


2423 


33.8Sh 


507 


8:20 a.m. 


44=3 


29 


55.0 


117 


40.0 





18.9 


2713 


2579 


2413 


33.76h 


508 


8:40 a.m. 


44=° 


29 


52.1 


117 


40.6 





19.0 










509 


9:00 a.m. 


44=6 


29 


49.2 


117 


41.2 





18.95 


2713 


2579 


2410 


33;761i 


510 


9:20 a.m. 


44=6 


29 


48.5 


117 


41.8 





19.0 


2721 


2587 


2417 


33.86h 


511 


9:40 a.m. 


44=7 


29 


45.4 


117 


42.4 





19.0 


2723 


2588 


2418 


33.89h 


512 


10:00 a.m. 


45=^ 


29 


42.7 


117 


42.9 





19.0 


2705 


2572 


2402 


33.66h 


513 


10:20 a.m. 


45=» 


29 


40.8 


117 


43.5 





19.0 


2729 


2594 


2424 


33.96h 


514 


10:40 a.m. 


45= 


29 


36.5 


117 


44.0 





19.0 










515 


11:00 a.m. 


45= 


29 


35.4 


117 


44.6 





18.9 










516 


11:20 a.m. 


45=» 


29 


32.7 


117 


45.1 





18.8 


2703 


2570 


2405 


33;64h 


517 


ll:40a.ra. 


4530 


29 


31.1 


117 


45.7 





18.6 


2721 


2587 


2428 


33.8fih 


518 


12:01 p.m. 


4530 


29 


28.5 


117 


46.2 





18.4 


2704 


2581 


2415 


33.65h 


519 


12:20 p.m. 


45.5'° 


29 


27.7 


117 


47.5 





18.4 


2714 


2580 


2425 


33.7811 


520 


12:40 p.m. 


46" 


29 


23.1 


117 


51.2 





18.4 


2692 


2559 


2406 


33.50h 


521 


1:00 p.m. 


46..5== 


29 


21.1 


117 


52.5 





18.2 


2708 


2574 


2424 


33.7011 


522 


1:20 p.m. 


473: 


29 


18.1 


117 


54.2 





18.2 










523 


1:40 p.m. 


4733 


29 


16.5 


117 


55.8 





18.3 


2708 


2574 


2423 


33."70h 


524 


2:00 p.m. 


47.5== 


29 


13.8 


117 


57.5 





18.2 


2711 


2577 


2429 


33.7411 


525 


2:20 p.m. 


48=* 


29 


11.5 


117 


.59.6 





18.4 


2715 


2581 


2427 


33.7911 


526 


2:40 p.m. 


48« 


29 


9.2 


lis 


O.S 





IS. 8 


'2716 


2582 


2417 


33.8OI1 


527 


3:00 p.m. 


49'= 


29 


6.9 


lis 


2.9 





19.0 


2732 


2597 


2428 


34.OOI1 


528 


3:20 p.m. 


4935 


29 


4.2 


118 


4.6 





19.0 


2733 


2.598 


2429 


34.01h 


529 


3:40 p.m. 


49=" 


29 


2.1 


118 


5.8 





19.0 


2736 


2601 


2432 


34.0511 


530 


4:00 p.m. 


49=° 


28 


59.6 


118 


7.1 





19.0 


2735 


2600 


2431 


34.0411 


531 


4:20 p.m. 


50=' 


28 


56.S 


118 


10.0 





19.0 


2742 


2607 


2437 


34.1 2I1 


532 


4:40 p.m. 


50=- 


28 


55.0 


118 


11.7 





19.0 


2707 


2584 


2404 


33.69h 


533 


5:00 p.m. 


51=' 


28 


52.7 


118 


13.3 





19.4 










534 


5:20 p.m. 


51= 


28 


51.0 


118 


14.6 





19.2 


2738 


2603 


2428 


34.07h 


535 


5:40 p.m. 


51=» 


28 


50.0 


118 

Aug. 2! 


16.2 
3. 1908 





20.2 










536 


6:40 a.ra. 


52=* 


29 


8.3 


117 


17.9 





18.8 


2723 


2588 


2424 


33. soil 


537 


7:00 a.m. 


52=* 


29 


8.0 


118 


17.7 





19.2 


2740 


2605 


2431 


34.1 Oh 



58 



University of Califoniia Puhlicatinns in Zoology 



[Vol. la 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi- 
grade 


0° 

S 

4?0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 

4?0 




ample 
umber 


North 
latitude 


West 
ongitude 


Salinity 
S 0/00 


338 


7:20 a.m. 


51.5=* 


29° 


7r6 


g. 29, 1906 
118° 17:3 





19?2 


2730 


2595 


2421 


33.97h 


539 


7:40 a.m. 


51=» 


29 


7.2 


18 


17.3 





19.4 


2734 


2599 


2420 


34.02h 


540 


8:00 a.m. 


51=» 


29 


7.0 


18 


17.0 





19.6 


2722 


2588 


2403 


33.87h 


541 


8:20 a.m. 


51"' 


29 


7.1 


18 


17.0 





19.5 


2746 


2610 


2429 


34.17h 


542 


8:40 a.m. 


5V' 


29 


7.1 ] 


18 


17.0 





19.8 


2731 


2596 


2406 


33.99h 


543 


9:00 a.m. 


51"° 


29 


7.2 


18 


17.0 





20.0 


2709 


2575 


2380 


33.71h 


544 


9:20 a.m. 


51" 


29 


7.2 


18 


17.0 





20.0 


2729 


2594 


2398 


33.96h 


545 


9:40 a.m. 


5V^ 


29 


7.2 


18 


17.0 





19.9 


2737 


2602 


2410 


34.06h 


546 


10:00 a.m. 


51'= 


29 


7^3 


LIS 


17.0 





20.4 


2743 


2608 


2403 


34.13h 


547 


10:20 a.m. 


51"= 


29 


7.3 


18 


17.0 





19.9 


2713 


2581 


23SS 


33.79h 


548 


10:40 a.m. 


51»» 


29 


7.4 ] 


18 


17.0 





20.0 


2727 


2592 


2397 


33.94h 


549 


10:40 a.m. 


51"' 


29 


7.4 


118 


17.0 


1540 




2793 


2655 




34.76hK 


550 


11:00 a.m. 


51" = 


29 


7.5 


118 


17.0 





26.2 


2731 


2596 


2395 


33.99h 


551 


11:20 a.m. 


51"*-" 


29 


7.5 ] 


18 


17.0 





20.2 


2717 


2583 


2382 


33.81h 


552 


11:40 a.m. 


51"' 


29 


7.6 ] 


18 


17.0 





20.2 


2733 


2598 


2397 


34.01 h 


553 


11:45 a.m. 


51"' 


29 


7.6 


L18 


16.9 


1100 




2792 


2654 




34.74hK 


554 


12:01p.m. 


51"* 


29 


7.7 


18 


16.9 





20.2 


2726 


2591 


2391 


33.92h 


555 


12:20 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


7.7. ] 


18 


16.9 





20.4 


2710 


2576 


2370 


33.73h 


556 


12:30 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


7.8 


18 


16.9 


730 




2782 


2550 




34.62hK 


557 


12:40 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


7.8 


18 


16.9 





20.2 


2731 


2596 


2396 


33.99h 


558 


12:.50p.m. 


51"* 


29 


7.8 


18 


16.9 


.550 




2781 


2643 




34.61hK 


559 


1:00 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


7.9 


18 


16.9 





20.2 


2720 


2586 


2385 


33.85h 


500 


1:20 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


7.9 


L18 


16.9 





20.2 


2706 


2573 


2372 


33.68h 


361 


1 :45 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


S.O 


18 


16.9 


365 


9.8 


2780 


2643 


2669 


34.60hK 


562 


1:45 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.0 


18 


16.9 





20.4 


2720 


2586 


2380 


33.85h 


563 


1:58 p.m. 


51"' 


29 


8.1 


18 


16.9 


275 


10.5 


2767 


2641 


2645 


34.43hK 


564 


2:00 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


S.l 


18 


16.9 





20.6 


2724 


2589 


2379 


33.90h 


565 


2:20 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.2 


L18 


16.9 





20.2 


2741 


2606 


2407 


34.1 Ih 


566 


2:22 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.2 


118 


16.9 


185 


11.6 


2769 


2632 


2627 


34.46hK 


567 


2:40 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.3 


18 


16.9 


a 


20.2 


2733 


259S 


2398 


34.01h 


568 


2:40 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.3 


18 


16.9 


137 


12.3 


2731 


2596 


2576 


33.99hK 


569 


2:54 pm.. 


51»* 


29 


8.4 


18 


16.9 


92 


14.3 


2715 


2581 


2522 


33.79hK 


570 


3:00 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.4 


118 


16.9 





19.06 


2710 


2576 


2406 


33.73h 


571 


3:05 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.5 


18 


16.8 


46 


16.3 


2719 


2585 


2481 


33.84hK 


572 


3:20 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.5 


LIS 


16.8 





20.8 


2729 


2594 


2378 


33.96h 


573 


3:21 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.5 


LIS 


16.8 


1280 




2794 


2636 




34.77I1K 


574 


3:40 p.m. 


51"* 


29 


8.6 


L18 


16.8 





26'.'6 


2718 


2584 


2'3'73 


33.83h 


575 


4:00 p.m. 


51"' 


29 


8.6. 


L18 


16.8 





20.3 


2708 


2574 


2371 


33.7011 


576 


4:20 p.m. 


51.5"' 


29 


8.6 


118 


17.5 





20.5 


2724 


2589 


2380 


33.90h 


577 


4:40 p.m. 


52"* 


29 


8.6 


lis 


18.0 





20.4 


2717 


2583 


2377 


33.81h 


578 


5:00 p.m. 


52" 


29 


8.6 


18 


18.0 





20.4 


2715 


2381 


2376 


33.79h 


579 


5:20 p.m. 


52"' 


29 


8.6 


18 


18.0 





20.15 


2706 


2573 


2374 


33.68h 


580 


5:40 p.m. 


52"' 


29 


8.6 


18 


IS.O 





20.1 


2728 


2593 


2395 


33.95h 


5S1 


6:00 p.m. 


52"' 


29 


8.6 


118 


18.0 





20.2 










582 


7:00 a.m. 


51. .5"' 


29 


Ai 

7.6 


g. 30, 1908 
18 17.5 





20.2 


2728 


2593 


2393 


33.93h 


583 


8:00 a.m. 


51"" 


29 


7.0 


17 


17.0 





20.4 


2728 


2593 


2387 


33.95h 


584 


9:00 a.m. 


51"' 


29 


7.8 


18 


16.9 





19.1 


2731 


2596 


2425 


33.99h 


585 


10:00 a.m. 


51"' 


29 


8.6 


L18 


16.8 





19.1 


2729 


2394 


2424 


33.9611 


586 


11:00 a.m. 


51.5"' 


29 


8.6 


L18 


17.5 





19.3 


2715 


2581 


2404 


33.79h 


587 


12:01 p.m. 


52"' 


29 


8.6 


lis 


18.0 





19.6 


2722 


25S8 


2404 


33.88h 


588 


1:00 p.m. 


51"" 


29 


6.9 


18 


16.2 





18.6 


2723 


2588 


2429 


33.89h 


589 


1:20 p.m. 


51"" 


29 


6.8 


LIS 


13.8 





18.7 


2727 


2392 


2432 


33.94h 


590 


1:40 p.m. 


50"" 


29 


5.3 


18 


12.0 





19.0 


2712 


2578 


2409 


33.75I1 


591 


2:00 p.m. 


50"" 


29 


4.6 


LIS 


S.4 





19.0 


2700 


2567 


2397 


33.60h 


592 


2:20 p.m. 


49"" 


29 


3.7 


IS 


6.6 





19.1 


2708 


2574 


2403 


33.70h 


593 


2:40 p.m. 


49"" 


29 


2.4 


18 


4.6 





19.1 


2695 


2362 


2389 


33.54h 


594 


3:00 p.m. 


48"" 


29 


1.6 


LIS 


2.3 





19.2 


2716 


2582 


2408 


33.80h 


595 


3:20 p.m. 


48"" 


29 


0.4 


18 


0.8 





19.2 


2721 


2587 


2413 


33.86h 


596 


3:40 p.m. 


48"" 


28 


39.4 


17 


59.3 





19.2 


2690 


2557 


2381 


33.4Sh 


597 


4:00 p.m. 


47"" 


28 


.58.6 


17 


56.8 





19.1 


2706 


2513 


2400 


33.68I1 


598 


4:20 p.m. 


47"" 


28 


58.4 


17 


.54.8 





19.0 


2699 


2566 


2396 


33..59h 


599 


4:40 p.m. 


47"' 


28 


57.0 


17 


52.6 





18. S 


2701 


2568 


2403 


33.61h 


600 


5:00 p.m. 


46" 


28 


36.8 


17 


30.0 





18.4 


2721 


2587 


2433 


33.86I1 



Michael, et al.: Ilijdrogmphic Records of Scripps Insliluiion 



59 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — {Continued) 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 




Position 




Depth 

meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi- 
grade 


Spc 


ciflc gravity 




Water 


0° 

s 

4?0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 

S 

4?0 




sample 
number 


North 
latitude 


West 
longitude 


Salinity 
SO/00 


601 


5:20 p.m. 


4637 


28 


56:2 


Aug. 30, 190S 
117° 48:2 





18?2 


2695 


2562 


2411 


33..54h 


602 


5:40 p.m. 


45" 


28 


55.8 


117 


45.6 





18.4 


2702 


2569 


2414 


33.63h 


603 


6:00 p.m. 


45^' 


28 


54.2 


117 


43.2 





18.2 


2685 


2552 


2404 


33.42h 


604 


6:20 p.m. 


44" 


28 


52.9 


117 


40.3 





18.2 


2688 


2555 


2407 


33.45h 


605 


6:40 p.m. 


44.18 


28 


52.3 


117 


38.3 





18.3 


2694 


2561 


2410 


33.53h 


606 


7:00 p.m. 


43=8 


28 


51.6 


117 


35.7 





18.2 


2703 


2570 


2419 


33.64h 


607 


7:20 p.m. 


43S8 


28 


50.2 


117 


33.5 





18.4 


2713 


2579 


2425 


33.76h 


608 


7:40 p.m. 


42M 


28 


49.6 


117 


29.3 





18.4 


2702 


2569 


2414 


33.63h 


609 


8:00 p.m. 


4238 


28 


48.5 


117 


27.6 





18.2 


2688 


2555 


2407 


33.45h 


610 


8:20 p.m. 


41™ 


28 


47.0 


117 


25.4 





18.8 


2704 


2571 


2405 


33.65h 


611 


8:40 p.m. 


4|39 


28 


46.4 


117 


23.3 





19.2 


2724 


2589 


2416 


33.90h 


612 


9:00 p.m. 


403» 


28 


45.7 


117 


20.5 





19.5 


2706 


2573 


2389 


33.68h 


613 


9:20 p.m. 


40» 


28 


44.8 


117 


18.4 





19.6 


2694 


2561 


2377 


33.53h 


614 


9:40 p.m. 


39™ 


28 


44.1 


117 


15.8 





19.6 


2702 


2569 


2383 


33.63h 


615 


10:00 p.m. 


39=» 


28 


43.1 


117 


13.1 





19.6 


2701 


2568 


2381 


33.61h 


616 


10:20 p.m. 


38" 


28 


42.2 


117 


10.1 





19.5 


2701 


2568 


2385 


33.61h 


617 


10:40 p.m. 


38" 


28 


41.2 


117 


8.1 





19.6 


2716 


2582 


2397 


33.80h 


618 


11:00 p.m. 


37" 


28 


40.5 


117 


6.4 





19.6 


2702 


2569 


2383 


33.63h 


619 


11:20 p.m. 


37" 


28 


39.6 


117 


3.9 





19.6 


2702 


2569 


2383 


33.63h 


620 


11:40 p.m. 


36" 


28 


38.7 


117 


1.9 





19.4 


2710 


2576 


2397 


33.7311 


621 


12:01 a.m. 


36" 


28 


37.9 


Aug. 31. 1908 
116 59.1 





19.4 


2709 


2575 


2396 


33.71h 


622 


12:20 a.m. 


35" 


28 


37.0 


116 


56.3 





19.4 


2702 


2569 


2389 


33.63h 


(:23 


12:40 a.m. 


35" 


28 


35.6 


116 


54.2 





19.4 


2717 


2583 


2404 


33.81h 


624 


1:00 a.m. 


34" 


28 


35.2 


116 


50.9 





19.6 


2699 


2566 


2380 


33.59h 


625 


1:20 a.m. 


34" 


28 


34.3 


116 


49.5 





19.6 


2712 


2578 


2393 


33.75h 


626 


1:40 a.m. 


33" 


28 


33.2 


116 


46.3 





19.3 


2700 


2567 


2389 


33.60h 


627 


2:00 a.m. 


33" 


28 


33.0 


116 


44.6 





18.7 


2681 


2549 


2388 


33.37h 


628 


2:20 a.m. 


32" 


28 


32.7 


116 


42.0 





18.7 


2692 


2559 


2399 


33.50h 


629 


2:40 a.m. 


32« 


28 


20.7 


116 


39.7 





18.7 


2713 


2579 


2418 


33.76h 


630 


3:00 a.m. 


31« 


28 


29.4 


116 


36.0 





18.7 


2687 


2554 


2394 


33.44h 


631 


3:20 a.m. 


31« 


28 


29.0 


116 


33.1 





19.0 


2691 


2558 


2387 


33.4911 


632 


3:40 a.m. 


30« 


28 


27.8 


116 


31.4 





19.2 


2710 


2576 


2402 


33.73h 


633 


4:00 a.m. 


30" 


28 


26.8 


116 


29.5 





19.2 


2707 


2574 


2398 


33.6911 


(134 


4:20 a.m. 


30" 


28 


26.1 


116 


28.3 





19.2 


2717 


2583 


2409 


33.81h 


635 


4:40 a.m. 


29" 


28 


25.8 


116 


26.3 





19.0 


2701 


2568 


2398 


33.61h 


636 


5:00 a.m. 


29" 


28 


24.0 


116 


23.3 





19.4 


2702 


2569 


2389 


33.6311 


637 


5:20 a.m. 


28" 


28 


23.8 


116 


22.1 





18.8 


2689 


2556 


2393 


33.4711 


638 


5:40 a.m. 


28" 


28 


23.1 


116 


19.2 





18.8 


2719 


2585 


2420 


33.84h 


639 


6:00 a.m. 


27" 


28 


22.7 


116 


17.1 





18.6 


2711 


2577 


2418 


33.7411 


640 


6:20 a.m. 


27" 


28 


22.1 


116 


16.0 





18.5 


2713 


2579 


2423 


33.7611 


G41 


6:40 a.m. 


26..5" 


28 


21.1 


116 


12.5 





18.0 


2697 


2564 


2419 


33.57h 


642 


7:00 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.4 


2684 


2552 


2423 


33.4011 


643 


7:20 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.4 


2684 


2552 


2423 


33.4011 


644 


7:40 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.4 










645 


8:00 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.3 


2713 


25'79 


2451 


33!76h 


646 


8:20 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.2 


2681 


2549 


2424 


33.37h 


647 


8:40 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.3 


2697 


2564 


2439 


33.57h 


648 


8:50 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 


1430 




2743 


2608 




34.14hK 


649 


9:00 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.4 


2694 


2561 


2432 


33.53h 


650 


9:20 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.6 


2686 


2553 


2420 


33.43I1 


651 


9:40 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.5 


2675 


2543 


2410 


33.28h 


652 


9:48 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 


1100 




2756 


2620 




34.30hK 


653 


10:00 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.8 


2677 


2545 


2405 


33.3111 


654 


10:20 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.7 


2707 


2574 


2436 


33.69h 


655 


10:30 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 


730 




2758 


2622 




34.32hK 


656 


10:40 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





IT-.E) 


2687 


2554 


'2413 


33.44h 


657 


10:58 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 


365 


9.2 


2759 


2623 


2659 


34.33I1K 


358 


11:00 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





18.0 


2685 


2552 


2409 


33.42h 


659 


11:18 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 


185 




2743 


2608 




34.I4I1K 


660 


11:20 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.5 


2682 


2550 


2419 


33.38h 


661 


11:30 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


lO.S 


137 


11.7 


2779 


2642 


2635 


34.58hK 


662 


11:40 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





17.8 


2700 


2567 


2427 


33.60h 


663 


11:43 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 


92 


11.9 


2755 


2619 


2607 


34.29I1K 



60 



University of California Pnhlicaiions in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 









Table 1 


— Ocean Dat.\ — ( 


Contimied) 










Time 
of 
day 


Section 


Po 

North 
latitude 


sition 

-A ^ 

West 
longitude 


Depth 
meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi- 
grade 


Spe 


cificgra\ 


ity 




Water 
sample 
number 


0° 

S 

4^0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 
4?0 


Salinity 
S o/oo 


664 


11:54 a.m. 


26" 


28 


20:8 


Aug. 31, 1908 

116° io:8 


46 


13°3 


2727 


2592 


2554 


33.94hK 


665 


12:01 p.m. 


26" 


28 


20.8 


116 


10.8 





18.6 


2726 


2.591 


2433 


33.93h 


666 


12:20 p.m. 


26" 


28 


19.2 


116 


8.8 





20.0 


2728 


2.593 


2398 


33.95h 


667 


12:40 p.m. 


25" 


28 


17.7 


116 


6.3 





19.6 


2717 


2583 


2398 


33.81h 


668 


1:00 p.m. 


25" 


28 


16.9 


116 


3.8 





20.2 


2693 


2560 


2361 


33.52h 


669 


1:20 p.m. 


24« 


28 


15.8 


116 


1.7 





19.25 


2725 


2590 


2415 


33.91 h 


670 


1:40 p.m. 


24« 


28 


14.7 


116 


0.0 





20.2 


2695 


2562 


2361 


33.54h 


671 


2:00 p.m. 


23.5« 


28 


13.8 


115 


57.5 





20.3 


2729 


2594 


2391 


33.96h 


672 


2:20 p.m. 


23« 


28 


13.1 


115 


55.8 





20.2 


2731 


2596 


2397 


33.99h 


673 


2:40 p.m. 


23" 


28 


12.1 


115 


52.9 





20.1 


2719 


2585 


2387 


33.84h 


674 


3:00 p.m. 


22« 


28 


11.5 


115 


50.8 





20.2 


2720 


2586 


2385 


33.85h 


675 


3:20 p.m. 


21" 


28 


10.4 


115 


47.1 





20.6 


2711 


2577 


2366 


33.74h 


676 


3:40 p.m. 


21" 


28 


9.6 


115 


45.4 





19.5 


2728 


2593 


2411 


33.95h 


677 


4:00 p.m. 


21« 


28 


9.2 


115 


43.8 





20.9 


2722 


2588 


2368 


33.88h 


078 


4:20 p.m. 


20*" 


28 


8.5 


115 


40.8 





20.8 


2718 


2584 


2368 


33.83h 


679 


4:40 p.m. 


20" 


28 


6.9 


115 


39.2 





20.3 


2716 


2582 


2379 


33.80h 


680 


5:00 p.m. 


19« 


28 


6.1 


115 


36.4 





20.6 


2726 


2591 


2380 


33.93h 


681 


5:20 p.m. 


19'- 


28 


5.0 


115 


34.2 





20.0 


2734 


2599 


2403 


34.03h 


682 


5:40 p.m. 


18" 


28 


4.6 


115 


32.1 





20.4 


2714 


2580 


2375 


33.78h 


683 


6:00 p.m. 


18" 


28 


4.2 


115 


30.8 





20.2 










684 


6:20 p.m. 


17'' 


28 


2.7 


115 


26.7 





19.0 


2734 


2599 


2430 


si^OSh 


685 


5:40 a.m. 


16" 


28 


5.1 


Sept. 
115 


. 1908 

20.0 





19.4 


2715 


25S1 


2402 


33.79h 


686 


6:00 a.m. 


16" 


28 


3.7 


115 


18.6 





19.6 


2732 


2.597 


2412 


34.00h 


687 


6:20 a.m. 


15« 


28 


2.1 


115 


17.3 





18.95 










688 


6:40 a.m. 


15« 


28 


0.6 


115 


16.0 





18.4 


2721 


2587 


'2433 


33!83h 


689 


7:00 a.m. 


15« 


27 


59.1 


115 


14.5 





19.5 


2726 


2591 


2410 


33.93h 


690 


7:20 a.m. 


15** = 


27 


57.5 


115 


13.2 





19.4 


2729 


2594 


2415 


33.96h 


691 


7:40 a.m. 


14" 


27 


56.2 


115 


12.1 





19.4 


2720 


2586 


2405 


33.85h 


692 


8:00 a.m. 


14" 


27 


56.0 


115 


11.0 





18.8 


2725 


2590 


2400 


33.91h 


693 


8:20 a.m. 


14« 


27 


55.3 


115 


10.0 





20.1 


2728 


2593 


2396 


33.95h 


694 


8:40 a.m. 


14" 


27 


54.6 


115 


8.9 





20.7 


2712 


2578 


2367 


33.75h 


695 


9:00 a.m. 


14" 


27 


54.2 


115 


8.0 





20.8 










696 


9:20 a.m. 


13.5" 


27 


55.8 


115 


7.5 





20.6 










697 


9:40 a.m. 


13« 


27 


57.6 


115 


7.1 





20.4 










698 


10:00 a.m. 


13« 


27 


58.9 


115 


6.6 





20.6 


2723 


2588 


2381 


33.8911 


099 


10:20 a.m. 


13« 


28 


0.6 


115 


6.3 





20.7 


2727 


2592 


2378 


33.94h 


700 


10:40 a.m. 


13« 


28 


2.1 


115 


6.0 





20.5 


2724 


2589 


2381 


33.90h 


701 


11 :00 a.m. 


13" 


28 


4.3 


115 


5.8 





21.0 


2718 


2584 


2361 


33.83h 


702 


11:20 a.m. 


13" 


28 


6.6 


115 


5.8 





21.2 


2713 


2579 


2352 


33.76h 


703 


11:40 a.m. 


13" 


28 


8.9 


115 


5.6 





21.4 


2727 


2592 


2359 


33.94h 


704 


12:01p.m. 


13« 


28 


11.2 


115 


5.5 





20.8 


2718 


2584 


2367 


33.83h 


705 


12:20 p.m. 


13« 


28 


13.3 


115 


5.3 





21. S 


2717 


2583 


2338 


33.81h 


706 


12:40 p.m. 


13" 


28 


15.3 


115 


6.7 





21.9 


2714 


2580 


2333 


33.78h 


707 


1:00 p.m. 


13" 


28 


17.3 


115 


7.3 





21.4 


2718 


2584 


2350 


33.83h 


708 


1:20 p.m. 


14" 


28 


19.4 


115 


9.5 





19.4 


2678 


2546 


2362 


33.34h 


709 


1:40 p.m. 


14" 


28 


21.4 


115 


10.9 





20.6 


2705 


2572 


2360 


33.66h 


710 


2:00 p.m. 


14«-= 


28 


22.5 


115 


12.2 





20.4 


2693 


2560 


2356 


33.52h 


711 


5:40 a.m. 


14«.5 


28 


22.5 


Sept. 2 
115 


, 1908 

12.2 





19. S 


2716 


2582 


2392 


33.80h 


712 


6:00 a.m. 


14"-= 


28 


22.5 


115 


12^2 





19.4 


2669 


2.537 


2353 


33.21h 


713 


5:20 a.m. 


14« 


28 


24.0 


115 


11.5 





18.8 


2715 


2581 


2417 


33.79h 


714 


5:40 a.m. 


14" 


28 


25.9 


no 


11.2 





18.2 


2720 


2586 


2436 


33.S5h 


715 


6:00 a.m. 


14" 


28 


27.9 


115 


10.9 





18.0 


2691 


2558 


2414 


33.49h 


716 


6:20 a.m. 


14" 


28 


29.5 


115 


10.5 





17..'' 


2713 


2579 


2440 


33.76h 


717 


6:40 a.m. 


14" 


28 


31.0 


115 


10.2 





17.8 


2711 


2577 


2438 


33.74h 


718 


7:00 a.m. 


14" 


28 


32.9 


115 


10.0 





:7.s 


2703 


2570 


2430 


33.64h 


719 


7:20 a.m. 


14" 


28 


34.6 


115 


9.8 





16.9 


2698 


2565 


2448 


33.58h 


720 


7:40 a.m. 


14" 


28 


36.5 


115 


9.4 





16.2 


2709 


2575 


2473 


33.71h 


721 


8:00 a.m. 


14" 


28 


38.2 


115 


9.0 





16.1 










722 


8:20 a.m. 


14" 


28 


40.1 


115 


8.S 





16.2 


2700 


2567 


2464 


33.60h 


723 


8:40 a.m. 


14" 


28 


42.0 


115 


8.4 





17.7 


2717 


2583 


2445 


33.81h 


724 


9:00 a.m. 


14=9 


28 


44.0 


115 


8.0 





17.8 


2707 


2574 


2433 


33.69h 


725 


9:20 a.m. 


14» 


28 


45.9 


115 


7.8 





17.8 


2713 


2579 


2440 


33.76h 



1915] 



Michael, ct ah: HiidrngrapMc Records of Scripps Institulioii 



61 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 


Table 1. — Ocean Data — {Continu 

Position Temper- 

, * , Depth ature 

North West in in eenti- 
latitude longitude meters grade 


ed) 

Spe 


cifie gravity 




Water 
sample 
number 


0° 

S 

4?0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t" 

S 

4^0 


Salinity 
SO/00 


726 


9:40 a.m. 


13^" 


28 


48:0 


Sept. 2, 1908 
115° 7r4 





17?5 


2720 


2586 


2454 


33.8511 


727 


10:00 a.m. 


1338 


28 


50.0 


115 


7.1 





17.0 


2705 


2572 


2451 


33.66h 


728 


10:20 a.m. 


13» 


28 


51.4 


115 


6.9 





18.4 


2716 


2582 


2429 


33.80h 


729 


10:40 a.m. 


13" 


28 


53.9 


115 


6.5 





18.3 


2731 


2596 


2444 


33.99h 


730 


11:00 a.m. 


13" 


28 


56.0 


115 


6.2 





18.6 


2712 


2578 


2419 


33.75h 


731 


11:20 a.m. 


13™ 


28 


58.0 


115 


5.9 





18.7 










732 


11:40 a.m. 


J 33. 


29 


0.7 


115 


.5.5 





18.5 


2'7'23 


2588 


2433 


33!89h 


733 


12:01p.m. 


13=^ 


29 


3.2 


115 


5.0 





19.0 


2737 


2602 


2433 


34.06h 


v34 


12:20 p.m. 


13==^ 


29 


5.2 


115 


4.8 





18.8 










735 


12:40 p.m. 


13^ 


29 


7.2 


115 


4.4 





18.5 










736 


1:00 p.m. 


13" 


29 


9.9 


115 


4.0 





17.8 


2727 


2592 


2454 


33"94h 


737 


1:20 p.m. 


13" 


29 


12.0 


115 


3.8 





18.2 


2734 


2599 


2449 


34.03h 


738 


1 :40 p.m. 


13=' 


29 


14.1 


115 


3.3 





17.7 


2730 


2595 


2459 


33.9811 


739 


2:00 p.m. 


13=' 


29 


16.4 


115 


2.8 





17.6 


2714 


2580 


2446 


33.7811 


740 


2:20 p.m. 


12.5'= 


29 


18.2 


115 


2.5 





17.2 


2710 


2576 


2452 


33.73h 


741 


2:40 p.m. 


12'= 


29 


19.9 


115 


2.3 





17.0 


2716 


2582 


2461 


33.80h 


742 


3:00 p.m. 


12'= 


29 


21.4 


115 


2.0 





17.4 


2693 


2560 


2431 


33.52h 


743 


3:20 p.m. 


(12"=) 


29 


22.5 


115 


2.3 





18.8 


2708 


2574 


2411 


33.7OI1 


744 


3:40 p.m. 


(13") 


29 


23.3 


115 


6.0 





17.2 


2729 


2594 


2470 


33.96h 


745 


4:00 p.m. 


(14'-) 


29 


25.0 


115 


11.2 





17.1 










746 


4:20 p.m. 


(15") 


29 


25.3 


115 


12.7 





16.5 


2713 


2579 


2471 


33J6h 


747 


4:40 p.m. 


(15") 


29 


26.6 


115 


13.7 





16.4 


2733 


2598 


2493 


34.OII1 


748 


5:00 p.m. 


(15'») 


29 


28.0 


115 


15.3 





16.2 


2731 


2596 


2494 


33.9911 


749 


5:20 p.m. 


(15'°) 


29 


29.1 


115 


16.9 





16.6 


2732 


2597 


2486 


34.00h 


750 


5:40 p.m. 


16"' 


29 


30.1 


115 


18.5 





17.2 


2734 


2599 


2474 


34.0311 


751 


6:00 p.m. 


16'° 


29 


31.3 


115 


20.3 





17.2 


2706 


2573 


2447 


33.68h 


752 


6:20 p.m. 


(16.5=») 


29 


32.6 


115 


22.5 





16.2 


2715 


2581 


2478 


33.7911 


753 


6:40 p.m. 


(17==) 


29 


33.6 


115 


24.0 





16.0 


2727 


2592 


2495 


33.94h 


754 


7:00 p.m. 


(17») 


29 


34.7 


115 


25.7 





16.0 


2713 


2579 


2483 


33.76h 


755 


7:20 p.m. 


(17=») 


29 


3.5.6 


115 


26.8 





15.5 


2704 


2571 


2485 


33.65h 


756 


7:40 p.m. 


(18=") 


29 


36.1 


115 


27.8 





15.8 


2709 


2575 


2484 


33.71h 


757 


8:00 p.m. 


(18=») 


29 


36.6 


115 


28.3 





14.4 


2694 


2561 


2498 


33.53h 


758 


4:20 a.m. 


(18=») 


29 


36.5 


Sept. 4 
115 


, 1908 

31.3 





14.8 


2726 


2591 


2522 


33.93h 


759 


4:40 a.m. 


(19=») 


29 


38.5 


115 


34.0 





15.0 










7 60 


5:00 a.m. 


(19=») 


29 


40.0 


115 


36.3 





13.4 


2712 


2.578 


2538 


i'i'Joh 


761 


5:20 a.m. 


20"-« 


29 


41.8 


115 


39.0 





13.0 


2716 


2582 


2548 


33.80h 


762 


5:40 a.m. 


(20=') 


29 


43.6 


115 


41.5 





13.8 


2719 


2585 


2.536 


33.84h 


763 


6:00 a.m. 


(21)=' 


29 


45.0 


115 


43.7 





14.0 


2712 


2578 


2526 


33.7511 


764 


6:20 a.m. 


(21)=' 


29 


46.5 


115 


45.3 





13.4 


2705 


2572 


2530 


33.66I1 


765 


6:40 a.m. 


(21") 


29 


47.9 


115 


47.0 





14.8 


2708 


2574 


2504 


33.70I1 


766 


7:00 a.m. 


(21=«) 


29 


48.1 


115 


47.2 





15.5 


2728 


2593 


2507 


33.9511 


767 


7:20 a.m. 


(21=«) 


29 


48.3 


115 


47.4 





15.6 


2700 


2567 


2480 


33.6OI1 


768 


7:40 a.m. 


22=" 


29 


49.3 


115 


47.6 





15.4 


2709 


2575 


2492 


33.71h 


769 


8:00 a.m. 


22=" 


29 


50.3 


115 


48.3 





15.3 










770 


8:20 a.m. 


22=° 


29 


52.8 


115 


49.3 





15.5 


2716 


2582 


2498 


33.'801i 


771 


8:40 a.m. 


22=^ 


29 


55.0 


115 


50.4 





14.6 


2702 


2569 


2502 


33.6311 


772 


9:00 a.m. 


22=° 


29 


56.8 


115 


51.3 





14.1 


2728 


2593 


2537 


33.95I1 


773 


9:20 a.m. 


(22)=^ 


29 


58.5 


115 


52.0 





14.7 


2705 


2572 


2503 


33.66I1 


774 


9:40 a.m. 


23=* 


30 


0.3 


115 


52.7 





15.2 


2707 


2574 


2494 


33.69h 


775 


10:00 a.m. 


23=' 


30 


2.1 


115 


53.5 





15.2 


2707 


2574 


2494 


33.69h 


776 


10:20 a.m. 


23=' 


30 


3.7 


115 


54.4 





15.6 


2713 


2579 


2491 


33.76h 


777 


10:40 a.m. 


23=' 


30 


6.5 


115 


55.5 





16.1 


2717 


2583 


2484 


33.8II1 


778 


11:00 a.m. 


23= 


30 


7.4 


115 


55.8 





16.8 


2707 


2574 


2452 


33.6911 


779 


11:20 a.m. 


23== 


30 


9.2 


115 


56.7 





17.5 


2712 


2578 


2447 


33.75h 


780 


11:40 a.m. 


23== 


30 


11.4 


115 


57.7 





16.6 


2706 


2573 


2461 


33.68I1 


781 


12:01 p.m. 


24=' 


30 


13.0 


113 


58.3 





16.8 


2711 


2577 


2461 


33.7411 


782 


12:20 p.m. 


24=- 


30 


15.0 


115 


59.3 





17.4 










783 


12:40 p.m. 


24=1 


30 


16.7 


116 


0.0 





17.4 


2678 


2546 


2416 


33"331i 


784 


1:00 p.m. 


(24=°) 


30 


18.5 


116 


0.7 





16.9 


2722 


2588 


2471 


33.88h 


785 


1:20 p.m. 


(24=°) 


30 


20.3 


116 


1.6 





16.7 


2715 


2581 


2469 


33.7911 


786 


1:40 p.m. 


(24=») 


30 


21.7 


116 


2.3 





17.9 


2680 


2548 


2407 


33.3511 


787 


2:00 p.m. 


(25)-° 


30 


23.2 


116 


3.0 





16.0 


2702 


2569 


2472 


33.6311 


788 


2:20 p.m. 


(25)" 


30 


24.7 


116 


3.6 





18.0 


2697 


2564 


2419 


33.5711 



62 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 









Table 1. 


—Ocean DAr.>.— (Continued) 










Time 
of 
day 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi- 
grade 


Specific gravity 




w 


0° 

S 

4?0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 
s 

4^0 




sampTe 
number 


North 
latitude 


West 
longitude 


Salinity 
SO/00 


789 


2:40 p.m. 


(25)'» 


30 = 


'26:2 


Sept. ' 
116' 


4, 1908 
' 4:2 





17?8 


2721 


2587 


2448 


33.86h 


790 


3:00 p.m. 


(25)'» 


30 


27.7 


116 


4.9 





18.0 


2703 


2570 


2425 


33.64h 


791 


3:20 p.m. 


(25)" 


30 


29.0 


116 


5.7 





18.4 


2728 


2593 


2439 


33.95h 


792 


3:40 p.m. 


(25)» 


30 


30.3 


116 


6.0 





17.9 


2713 


2579 


2437 


33.76h 


793 


4:00 p.m. 


(25)" 


30 


31.5 


116 


6.5 





18.0 


2673 


2541 


2397 


33.27h 


794 


4:20 p.m. 


(25)" 


30 


32.3 


116 


6.9 





18.6 










795 


4:40 p.m. 


26" 


30 


34.7 


116 


8.0 





17.7 


2698 


2536 


2426 


33!581i 


796 


5:00 p.m. 


26" 


30 


36.5 


116 


8.9 





17.9 


2694 


2561 


2418 


33.53h 


797 


5:20 p.m. 


26" 


30 


37.7 


116 


9.5 





18.0 


2700 


2567 


2423 


33.60h 


798 


5:40 p.m. 


26" 


30 


39.1 


116 


10.1 





18.1 


2680 


2548 


2402 


32.35h 


799 


6:00 p.m. 


26" 


30 


40.7 


116 


10.9 





18.0 


2723 


2588 


2443 


33.89h 


800 


6:20 p.m. 


26" 


30 


42.2 


116 


11.5 





17.6 


2691 


2558 


2425 


33.49h 


801 


6:40 p.m. 


26" 


30 


43.8 


116 


12.3 





16.2 


2701 


2568 


2466 


33.6111 


802 


7:00 p.m. 


27" 


30 


45.2 


116 


13.0 





17.4 


2685 


2552 


2424 


33.42h 


803 


7:20 p.m. 


27" 


30 


46.5 


116 


13.6 





16.9 


2715 


2581 


2464 


33.79h 


804 


7:40 p.m. 


27'- 


30 


48.0 


116 


14.2 





16.4 


2681 


2549 


2444 


33.37h 


805 


8:00 p.m. 


27" 


30 


49.1 


116 


14.8 





16.2 


2691 


2558 


2457 


33.49h 


806 


8:20 p.m. 


27" 


30 


50.6 


116 


15.5 





15.5 


2710 


2576 


2491 


33.73h 


807 


8:40 p.m. 


27" 


30 


52.2 


116 


16.2 





15.3 


2707 


2574 


2493 


33.69h 


808 


9:00 p.m. 


(27") 


30 


53.6 


116 


17.0 





15.3 


2704 


2571 


2490 


33.65h 


809 


9:20 p.m. 


(27.5") 


30 


55.1 


116 


17.5 





14.4 


2707 


2574 


2512 


33.69h 


810 


9:40 p.m. 


28<i3> 


30 


56.6 


116 


18.2 





14.1 


2697 


2564 


2508 


33.57h 


811 


10:00 p.m. 


28'"' 


30 


56.8 


116 


20.7 





17.5 


2728 


2593 


2461 


33.95h 


812 


10:20 p.m. 


(28.5") 


30 


58.9 


116 


22.5 





17.6 


2705 


2572 


2436 


33.66h 


813 


10:40 p.m. 


29" 


31 


0.3 


116 


23.5 





17.7 


2717 


2583 


2447 


33.81h 


814 


11:00 p.m. 


29" 


31 


2.3 


116 


24.7 





17.0 


2725 


2590 


2470 


33.91h 


815 


11:20 p.m. 


29" 


31 


3.6 


116 


25.2 





17.0 


2704 


2571 


2451 


33.65h 


816 


11:40 p.m. 


29" 


31 


4.8 


116 


25.9 





17.0 


2707 


2574 


2454 


33.69h 


817 


11:59 p.m. 


29" 


31 


6.5 


116 


26.7 





17.0 


2703 


2570 


2450 


33.64h 


818 


12:20 a.m. 


30" 


31 


8.2 


Sept. 5, 1908 
116 27.8 





17.0 


2710 


2576 


2457 


33.73h 


819 


12:40 a.m. 


30" 


31 


9.7 


116 


28.7 





16.9 


2709 


2575 


2458 


33.71h 


820 


1:00 a.m. 


30" 


31 


11.5 


116 


29.7 





17.0 


2700 


2567 


2447 


33.60h 


821 


1:20 a.m. 


30» 


31 


13.2 


116 


30.7 





16.9 


2725 


2590 


2474 


33.91h 


822 


1:40 a.m. 


30» 


31 


14.7 


116 


31.4 





16.5 


2698 


2565 


2456 


33.58h 


823 


2:00 a.m. 


30» 


31 


16.0 


116 


32.3 





15.6 


2702 


2569 


2480 


33.63h 


824 


2:20 a.m. 


31» 


31 


17.6 


116 


33.3 





15.6 


2722 


2588 


2501 


33.88h 


825 


2:40 a.m. 


31' 


31 


19.2 


116 


34.2 





15.1 


2699 


2566 


2489 


33.59h 


826 


3:00 a.m. 


3V 


31 


20.7 


116 


35.0 





15.2 


2706 


2573 


2494 


33.68h 


827 


3:20 a.m. 


31« 


31 


22 2 


116 


35.9 





14.8 


2685 


2552 


2483 


33.42h 


828 


3:40 a.m. 


31' 


31 


23.7 


116 


36.6 





13.8 


2711 


2577 


2528 


33.74h 


829 


4:00 a.m. 


32' 


31 


25.4 


116 


37.7 





14.6 


2700 


2567 


2500 


33.60h 


830 


4:20 a.m. 


32' 


31 


27.0 


116 


38.6 





15.2 


2715 


2581 


2502 


33.79h 


831 


4:40 a.m. 


(32") 


31 


28.5 


116 


39.5 





15.4 


2709 


2575 


2492 


33.71h 


832 


5:00 a.m. 


(32«) 


31 


30.2 


116 


40.5 





15.8 


2693 


2560 


2468 


33.52h 


833 


5:20 a.m. 


(32«) 


31 


31.6 


116 


41.2 





15.5 


2710 


2576 


2492 


33.73h 


834 


5:40 a.m. 


(32') 


31 


33.2 


116 


42.1 





15.9 


2685 


2552 


2458 


33.42h 


835 


6:00 a.m. 


33' 


31 


35.7 


116 


43.3 





16.6 


2701 


2568 


2456 


33.61h 


836 


6:20 a.m. 


33* 


31 


38.0 


116 


44.7 





17.3 


2695 


2562 


2435 


33.54h 


837 


6:40 a.m. 


33* 


31 


40.1 


116 


45.7 





17.9 


2704 


2571 


2428 


33.65h 


838 


7:00 a.m. 


33' 


31 


41.5 


116 


46.5 





17.9 


2720 


2586 


2445 


33.85h 


839 


7:20 a.m. 


34' 


31 


44.1 


116 


48.0 





17.8 


2708 


2574 


2436 


33.70h 


840 


7:40 a.m. 


34' 


31 


46.1 


116 


49.0 





17.7 


2698 


2565 


2427 


33.58h 


841 


8:00 a.m. 


34= 


31 


47.7 


116 


49.7 





17.4 


2682 


2550 


2421 


33.38h 


842 


8:20 a.m. 


34= 


31 


50.1 


116 


51.0 





17.2 


2720 


2586 


2461 


33.85h 


843 


8:40 a.m. 


34= 


31 


50.7 


116 


51.3 





17.0 


2681 


2549 


2430 


33.37h 


844 


9:00 a.m. 


34= 


31 


52.2 


116 


52.1 





16.8 


2694 


2561 


2445 


33.53h 


845 


9:30 a.m. 


35» 


31 


53.8 


116 


53.0 





16.7 


2687 


2554 


2442 


33.44h 


846 


9:40 a.m. 


35' 


31 


55.6 


116 


53.8 





17.4 










847 


10:00 a.m. 


(35,) 


31 


57.8 


116 


55.0 





18.1 


2675 


2543 


2397 


33.'28h 


848 


10:20 a.m. 


(35„) 


32 


0.0 


116 


56.1 





18.2 


2698 


2565 


2415 


33.58h 


849 


10:40 a.m. 


(35o) 


32 


1.8 


116 


57.1 





17.8 


2722 


2588 


2448 


33.88h 


850 


11:00 a.m. 


36, 


32 


3.2 


116 


57.7 





18.4 


2710 


2576 


2422 


33.73h 


851 


11:20 a.m. 


36. 


32 


4.6 


116 


58.5 





18.6 


2721 


2587 


2427 


33.86h 



1915] 



Michael, ct al.: Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



63 









Table 1. 


— OcKAN Dat.\ — (.Continued) 
























Temper- 


Specific gravit.v 












Position 














Water 
sample 


Time 
of 








A 




Depth 


ature 
in centi- 


0* 


1705 


t° 






North 


West 


S 


S— ^- 


s 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4;o 


SO/00 












Sept. 5, 1908 














S52 


11:40 a.m. 


36, 


320 


6:4 


116° 


59:2 





18?6 


2707 


2574 


2414 


33.69h 


853 


12:01p.m. 


(36,0 


32 


7.5 




0.1 





IS. 8 


2717 


2583 


2418 


33.81h 


854 


12:20 p.m. 


(36,) 


32 


8.5 




n.5 





18.6 


2688 


2559 


2397 


33.45h 


855 


12:40 p.m. 


(36,) 


32 


10.5 




1.6 





IS. 2 


2715 


2581 


2432 


33.79h 


856 


1:00 p.m. 


(36.5,) 


32 


12.2 




2 5 





16.4 


2708 


2574 


2468 


33.70h 


857 


1:20 p.m. 


37j 


32 


13.5 




3!o 





16.4 


2712 


2578 


2473 


33.75h 


858 


1 :40 p.m. 


37, 


32 


15.0 




3.7 





IS.O 


2697 


2564 


2419 


33.57h 


859 


2:00 p.m. 


37, 


32 


17.2 




:j.O 





16.8 


2703 


2570 


2454 


33.64h 


860 


2:20 p.m. 


(37.) 


32 


19.8 




6.0 





16.0 


2695 


2562 


2464 


33.54h 


861 


2:40 p.m. 


(37.) 


32 


22.2 




7.0 





15.7 


2707 


2574 


2483 


33.69h 


862 


3:00 p.m. 


38, 


32 


24.2 




8.0 





16.0 


2693 


2560 


2463 


33.52h 


863 


3:20 p.m. 


38, 


32 


26.5 




8.7 





17.4 


2699 


2566 


2435 


33.59h 


864 


3:40 p.m. 


(38). 


32 


28.7 




9.7 





19.0 


2689 


2556 


2387 


33.47h 


865 


4:00 p.m. 


(38), 


32 


31.0 




10.5 





19.6 


2706 


2573 


2386 


33.68h 


866 


4:20 p.m. 


(38,) 


32 


33.3 




11.5 





19.0 


2696 


2563 


2393 


33.55I1 












Peb.^19, 1909 














867 


1:00 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


38.0 




14.0 





13.0 


2678 


2546 


2502 


33.33 


868 


1:20 a.m. 


39, 


32 


37.3 




15.3 





13.2 










869 


1:40 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


38.0 




17.4 





13.5 


2679 


2547 


2503 


33.34 


870 


2:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


38.2 




20.6 





13.4 


2674 


2542 


2500 


33.27 


871 


2:20 a.m. 


41, 


32 


38.8 




23.5 





13.4 










872 


2:40 a.m. 


41s 


32 


39.2 




25.6 





13.5 


26(36 


2534 


2491 


33;i7 


873 


3:00 a.m. 


428 


32 


39.6 




28.4 





13.5 


2669 


2537 


2493 


33.21 


874 


3:20 a.m. 


42s 


32 


40.3 




30.8 





13.4 










875 


3:40 a.m. 


43, 


32 


40.7 




33.2 





13.4 


'2688 


2.555 


251.5 


Ki5 


876 


4:00 a.m. 


43, 


32 


41.0 




35.6 





13.5 


2688 


2555 


2513 


33.45 


877 


4:20 a.m. 


43, 


32 


41.2 




36.9 





13.4 


2693 


2560 


2519 


33.52 


878 


4:40 a.m. 


43, 


32 


41.3 




37.2 





13.4 


2706 


2573 


2531 


33.68 


879 


5:00 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.3 




38.1 





13.6 


2697 


2564 


2518 


33.57 


880 


5:20 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.4 




38.8 





13.5 


2701 


2568 


2523 


33.61 


881 


5:40 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.3 





13.6 










882 


6:00 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 


n 


13.6 


2694 


2561 


2.51.5 


33.53 


883 


6:20 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 





13.6 


2690 


2557 


2512 


33.48 


884 


6:40 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 





13.5 


2695 


2562 


2518 


33.54h 


885 


7:05 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 





13.5 


2693 


2560 


2516 


33.52h 


886 


7:20 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 





13.5 










887 


7:40 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 





13.5 


2691 


2558 


'2514 


33.4911 


888 


8:15 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 





13.6 










889 


8:40 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 





13.6 


2686 


2553 


2.509 


33.43h 


890 


9:00 a,m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 





13.6 


2680 


2548 


2503 


33.3511 


891 


9:05 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 


185 


9.1 


2748 


2612 


2650 


34.20I1K 


892 


9:10 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 


92 


10.4 


2739 


2604 


2619 


34.09hK 


893 


9:20 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 





13.7 










894 


9:27 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 




39.7 


46 


12.1 








........K 


895 


9:40 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.6 




40.6 





13.7 










896 


10:00 a.m. 


44.5, 


32 


42.0 




42.5 





13.7 










897 


10:20 a.m. 


45, 


32 


42.2 




44.2 





13.8 










898 


10:40 a.m. 


45, 


32 


42^6 




45.8 





13.9 










899 


11:00 a.m. 


46, 


32 


42.9 




47.8 





14.1 










900 


11:20 a.m. 


46. 


32 


43.2 




49.6 





14.2 










901 


11:40 a.m. 


46.5„ 


32 


43.6 




52.5 





14.2 


2686 


2553 


2496 


33.'43h 


902 


12:01 p.m. 


47, 


32 


43.9 




53.6 





14.6 


2696 


2563 


2497 


33.55 


903 


12:20 p.m. 


47„ 


32 


44.2 




55.2 





14.3 


2684 


2552 


2492 


33.40h 


904 


12:40 p.m. 


47a 


32 


44.5 




56.8 





14.3 


2693 


2560 


2502 


33.5211 


905 


1:00 p.m. 


48, 


32 


44.9 




59.0 





14.2 


2687 


2554 


2498 


33.44h 


906 


1:20 p.m. 


48, 


32 


45.2 


118 


0.8 





14.3 


2698 


2565 


2505 


33.58h 


907 


1:40 p.m. 


48.5, 


32 


45.5 


118 


2.5 





14.4 


2688 


25.55 


2493 


33.45h 


908 


2:00 p.m. 


49, 


32 


45.9 


118 


4.6 





14.3 


2695 


2562 


2503 


33.54 


909 


2:20 p.m. 


49, 


32 


46.2 


118 


6.9 





14.1 










910 


2:40 p.m. 


50, 


32 


46.5 


118 


9.7 





14.1 


2'706 


2567 


2512 


33!60h 


911 


3:00 p.m. 


50, 


32 


46.8 


118 


10.3 





14.1 


2688 


2555 


2500 


33.45h 


912 


3:20 p.m. 


50, 


32 


47.2 


118 


12.1 





13.7 


2701 


2568 


2520 


33.61h 


913 


3:40 p.m. 


51, 


32 


47.4 


118 


14.8 





13.9 


2682 


2550 


2498 


33.38h 


914 


4:20 p.m. 


51.0 


32 


47.8 


118 


16.0 





13.7 


2695 


2562 


2514 


33.54h 



64 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





Time 

! of 

day 


Section 




Position 


Depth 
meters 


Temper 
ature 

in centi' 
grade 


Specific gravity 




Water 


0° 
. S 

4;o 


17^5 

S 

17?5 


t° 

S 

4^0 




sampi, 
numbei 


North 
latitude 


West 
longitude 


Salinity 
SO/00 


915 


4:40 p.m. 


52„ 


32 


° 48:2 


Feb. 19, 1909 
118° IS.'O 





13?6 


2680 


2548 


2503 


33.3.5h 


916 


5:00 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.4 


118 19.3 





13.6 


2693 


2560 


2515 


33.52h 


917 


5:20 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.7 


118 21.1 





13.4 


2684 


2552 


2511 


33.40h 


918 


5:40 p.m. 


53,„ 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.4 


2683 


2551 


2510 


33.39h 


919 


7:00 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.4 


2686 


2553 


2513 


33.43h 


920 


8:00 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.4 


2684 


25ol 


2510 


33.40h 


921 


9:00 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.4 


2680 


2548 


2507 


33.35h 


922 


10:00 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.1 


2690 


2557 


2521 


33.48h 


923 


11:00 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.0 


2697 


2564 


2531 


33.57 


924 


11:59 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.0 


2686 


2553 


2520 


33.43 


925 


12:50 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


Feb. 20, 1909 
118 23.1 





12.8 










926 


2:00 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.0 


2690 


2557 


2524 


33.48 


927 


3:00 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.0 


2700 


2567 


2533 


33.60h 


928 


4:00 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.0 










929 


5:00 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.0 










930 


6:00 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





12.0 


2693 


2560 


2545 


33.52 


931 


7:00 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 23.1 





13.0 










932 


8:00 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.6 


118 20.2 





13.6 










933 


8:20 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.5 


118 19.5 





13.4 


2680 


2548 


2.506 


33.'35 


934 


8:40 a.m. 


51,0 


32 


48.3 


118 17.4 





13.4 


2688 


2555 


2514 


33.45h 


935 


9:00 a.m. 


51,0 


32 


48.0 


118 15.1 





13.4 


2692 


2559 


2519 


33.50h 


936 


9:20 a.m. 


50,0 


32 


47.6 


118 12.4 





13.5 


2690 


2557 


2515 


33.48h 


937 


9:40 a.m. 


50, 


32 


47.3 


118 9.7 





13.5 


2698 


2565 


2521 


33.58h 


938 


10:00 a.m. 


49o 


32 


46.8 


118 6.4 





13.6 


2687 


2554 


2509 


33.44h 


939 


10:20 a.m. 


49o 


32 


46.4 


118 3.8 





13.6 


2694 


2561 


2515 


33.53h 


940 


10:40 a.m. 


48o 


32 


46.1 


118 1.5 





13.7 


2684 


2552 


2504 


33.40h 


941 


11:00 a.m. 


48o 


32 


45.6 


117 58.6 





14.0 


2696 


2563 


2510 


33.55h 


942 


11:20 a.m. 


47, 


32 


45.2 


117 55.0 





14.0 


2685 


2552 


2498 


33.42 


943 


11:40 a.m. 


47, 


32 


44.9 


117 53.1 





14.1 










944 


12:01p.m. 


46, 


32 


44.5 


117 50.0 





13.8 


2688 


2555 


2506 


33;4.5h 


945 


12:20 p.m. 


45, 


32 


44.1 


117 47.3 





13.6 


2692 


2559 


2513 


33.50h 


946 


12:40 p.m. 


45, 


32 


43.8 


117 44.5 





13.7 


2686 


2553 


2505 


33.43h 


947 


1:00 p.m. 


44, 


32 


43.3 


117 41.5 





13.6 










948 


1:20 p.m. 


44, 


32 


42.9 


117 38.3 





13.7 


2'681 


2549 


2562 


33"37 


949 


1:40 p.m. 


43„ 


32 


42.5 


117 35.1 





13.6 


2688 


2555 


2511 


33.45h 


950 


2:00 p.m. 


43, 


32 


42.2 


117 32.8 





13.6 


2692 


2559 


2515 


33.50h 


951 


2:20 p.m. 


42, 


32 


41.7 


117 29.3 





13.6 


2689 


2556 


2511 


33.47h 


952 


2:40 p.m. 


41, 


32 


41.3 


117 26.1 





13.8 


2692 


2559 


2510 


33.50h 


953 


3:00 p.m. 


41, 


32 


41.0 


117 23.9 





13.8 


2673 


2541 


2491 


33.26 


954 


3:20 p.m. 


40, 


32 


40.8 


117 22.3 





13.8 


2664 


2532 


2483 


33.15h 


955 


3:40 p.m. 


40, 


32 


40.6 


117 20.6 





13.6 


2677 


2545 


2499 


33.28 


956 


4:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


40.2 


117 17.8 





13.8 


2692 


2559 


2510 


33.50 


957 


4:20 p.m. 


(39.) 


32 


38.8 


117 16.5 





13.4 


2665 


2532 


2492 


33.I6I1 


958 


4:40 p.m. 


(39,) 


32 


39.4 


117 14.2 





13.8 


2672 


2540 


2491 


33.26h 


959 


5:00 p.m. 


B 


32 


42.0 


117 14.0 





14.2 


2667 


2535 


2479 


33.24h 


960 


7:00 p.m. 


B 


32 


43.0 


117 13.5 





14.2 


2697 


2564 


2506 


33.57 


961 


8:00 p.m. 


B 


32 


43.0 


117 13.5 





14.0 


2694 


2561 


2508 


33.53 


962 


10:00 a.m. 


(40),o 


32 


51.7 


June 8, 1909 
117 18.0 





18.2 


2727 


2592 


2444 


33.94 


963 


5:00 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.7 


117 18.0 





18.4 


2709 


2575 


2421 


33.71 


964 


9:45 a.m. 


(40),o 


32 


51.7 


June 9, 1909 
117 18.0 





18.6 


2712 


2578 


2418 


33.75 


965 


10:45 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.7 


117 18.0 





18.6 


2720 


2586 


2426 


33.85 


966 


5:00 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.7 


June 10, 1909 
117 18.0 





18.8 


2706 


2573 


2408 


33.68 


967 


10:00 a.m. 


(40)„, 


32 


51.7 


June 11. 1909 
117 18.0 





18.8 


2713 


2579 


2415 


33.76 


968 


11:00 a.m. 


(40),,, 


32 


51.7 


June 14, 1909 
117 18.0 





18.9 


2712 


2578 


2412 


33.75 


969 


7:24 a.m. 


39, 


32 


39.4 


June 15. 1909 
117 13.8 





17.0 


2719 


2585 


2464 


33.84 


970 


8:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 


37.1 


117 14.5 





17.0 


2714 


2580 


2460 


33.78 


971 


9:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


42.0 


117 19.8 





17.1 


2717 


2583 


2461 


33.81 


972 


9:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43 8 


117 22.1 





17.8 


2715 


2581 


2442 


33.79 


973 


10:15 a.m. 


41, 


32 


47.4 


117 26.2 





IS. 3 


2715 


2.581 


2430 


33.79 



]9]5] 



Muliatl, et aL: Hydrographic Becorch of Scripps Institution 



65 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





















Sp 


cific gravity 












Position 




Temper- 




















Water 
sample 


Time 
of 










Depth 


ature 
in centi- 


0' 


1705 


i° 






^ 


orth 


West ' 


s 


S — '— 


S 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4?0 


SO/00 












June 15, 1909 














974 


10:35 a. m 


42,0 


32 


4912 


117° 28:8 





18?3 


2717 


2583 


2431 


33.81 


975 


10:55 a.m 


42,0 


32 


50.8 


117 30.8 





18.3 


2713 


2579 


2427 


33.76 


976 


11:15 a.m 


42.5,0 


32 


52.2 


117 32.5 





18.5 


2708 


2575 


2418 


33.70 


977 


12:40 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.5 


117 30.6 


365 




2740 


2605 




.34.1 OK 


978 


l:10p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.0 


117 29.2 


185 




2737 


2602 




34.06K 


979 


1:15 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.2 


117 28.8 


92 




2714 


2580 




33.78K 


980 


1:30 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.5 


117 28.4 
June 16, 1909 





18.2 


2713 


2579 


2429 


33.76 


981 


3:36 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52.1 


117 32.1 


730 




2760 


2624 




34.35K 


982 


4:00 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.9 


117 32.3 





19.4 


2708 


2574 


2395 


33.70 


983 


4:05 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.9 


117 31.5 


550 




2759 


2623 




34.34K 


984 


6:10 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.7 


117 32.4 





lo'.o 


2708 


2574 


2405 


33.70 


985 


7:30 p.m 


42,0 


32 


50.9 


117 31.8 
June 19. 1909 





18.8 


2711 


2577 


2412 


33.74 


986 


5:40 p.m 


39, 


32 


37.1 


117 14.5 
June 21, 1909 





17.4 


2737 


2602 


2473 


34.06 


987 


5:36 p.m 


42„ 


32 


52.8 


117 32.2 





18.5 


2708 


2574 


2419 


33.70 


988 


5:36 p.m 


42„ 


32 


52.8 


117 32.2 


460 




2764 


2628 




34.40K 


989 


6:00 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 31.3 


365 




2745 


2610 




34.1 6K 


990 


6:15 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.8 


117 30.5 


275 




2751 


2615 




34.24K 


991 


6:36 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.8 


117 29.9 


185 


"g'.i 


2755 


2619 


2656 


34.29K 


992 


6:45 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.7 


117 29.7 





18.4 


2706 


2573 


2417 


33.68 


993 


6:45 p.m 


42,0 


32 


51.7 


117 29.7 


92 


10.5 








K 


994 


8:20 p.m 


43,0 


32 


52.1 


117 33.1 

June 22, 1909 





16.3 


2705 


257'2 


2467 


33.66 


995 


4:40 a.m 


43„ 


32 


53.2 


117 36.5 





18.3 


2706 


2573 


2421 


33.68 


996 


6:20 a.m 


43„ 


32 


52.8 


117 35.7 
June 23, 1909 





17.9 


2704 


2571 


2428 


33.65 


997 


4:45 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





17.5 


2705 


2572 


2439 


33.66 


998 


6:00 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 


185 


9.6 


2733 


2598 


2627 


34.01K 


999 


6:00 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





17.6 


2704 


2571 


2436 


33.65 


1000 


8:00 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 
June 24. 1909 





17.6 


2701 


2568 


2433 


33.61 


1001 


3:45 p.m 


42„, 


32 


52 


117 30 





18.4 


2705 


2572 


2417 


33.66 


1002 


3:55 p.m 


42„, 


32 


52 


117 30 


640 




2750 


2614 




34.22K 


1003 


4:50 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 


460 




2764 


2628 




34.40K 


1004 


5:15 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





i'f.'g 


2705 


2572 


2430 


33.66 


1005 


5:50 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


Ml 30 


365 




2765 


2629 




34.41K 


1006 


6:05 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 


275 




2760 


2624 




34.35K 


1007 


6:30 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





17.9 


2705 


2572 


2430 


33.66 


1008 


7:]0p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





17.6 


2710 


2576 


2442 


33.73 


1009 


8:25 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 

June 25. 1909 





17.5 


2707 


2574 


2441 


33.69 


1010 


3:47 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 


460 




2764 


2628 




34.40K 


1011 


3:55 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





17.95 


2711 


2577 


2434 


33.74 


1012 


4:07 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 


365 




2763 


2627 




34.39K 


1013 


4:25 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 


275 


"s'.'i 


2764 


2628 


2680 


34.40K 


1014 


4:44 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 


460 




2763 


2627 




34.39K 


1015 


6:15 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





17 ".7 


2704 


2571 


2432 


33.65 


1016 


7:00 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





17.7 


2720 


2586 


2449 


33.85? 


1017 


7:45 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 ■ 





17.7 


2704 


2571 


2432 


33.65 


1018 


8:45 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 
June 28, 1909 





17.6 


2702 


2569 


2435 


33.63 


1019 


4 


30 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





19.2 


2707 


2574 


2400 


33.69 


1020 


4 


43 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 


730 




2767 


2631 




34.44K 


1021 


6 


00 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 50 


365 




2758 


2622 




34.32K 


1022 


6 


25 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





19.2 


2710 


2576 


2402 


33.73 


1023 


7 


13 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





19.0 


2707 


2574 


2404 


33.69 


1024 


8 


55 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





19.0 


2708 


2575 


2405 


33.70 












June 29. 1909 














1025 


5:32 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





18.6 


2706 


2573 


2413 


33.68 


1026 


6:35 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 30 





18.7 


2717 


2583 


2421 


33.81 


1027 


11:00 a.m 


(40),„ 


32 


51.7 


117 18.0 

June 30, 1909 





19.7 


2711 


2577 


2390 


33.74 


1028 


10:35 a.m 


(40),o 


32 


51.5 


117 19.1 





19.6 










1029 


11 


00 a.m 


(40),, 


32 


51.5 


117 22.3 





19.8 


2712 


2578 


2388 


SSJS 



66 University of California Puhlications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 

Specific gravity 











Position 






Temper- 






\ 




Water 


Time 




^ 




* 


. 


Depth 


ature 


0° 


17?5 


t° 




sample 


of 




N. 


Drtli 


West 


in 


in centi- 


s 


S 


S 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4?0 


SO/oo 












June 30, 1909 














1030 


11:20 a.m. 


41io 


32° 


5i:3 


117° 


24:8 





19?8 










1031 


11:40 a.m. 


41,0 


32 


51.2 


117 


27.4 





19.6 


2713 


2579 


2394 


33J6 


1032 


12:01p.m. 


42,0 


32 


51.2 


117 


29.9 





19.6 


2713 


2579 


2394 


33.76 


1033 


12:20 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


51.1 


117 


32.4 





19.6 


2718 


2584 


2400 


33.83 


1034 


12:40 p.m. 


43,0 


32 


51.0 


117 


35.0 





19.3 


2707 


2574 


2397 


33.69 


1035 


1:00 p.m. 


43,0 


32 


50.9 


117 


37.4 





19.4 


2710 


2576 


2397 


33.73 


1036 


1:20 p.m. 


44,0 


32 


50.8 


117 


40.0 





19.2 


2710 


2576 


2402 


33.73 


1037 


1:40 p.m. 


45,0 


32 


50.7 


117 


42.7 





19.05 


2717 


2583 


2413 


33.81 


1038 


2:00 p.m. 


45,0 


32 


50.5 


117 


45.5 





18.7 


2711 


2577 


2415 


33.74 


1039 


2:20 p.m. 


46,0 


32 


50.4 


117 


48.1 





18.8 


2711 


2577 


2413 


33.74 


1040 


2:40 p.m. 


46,0 


32 


50.4 


117 


50.8 





19.15 


2711 


2577 


2405 


33.74 


1041 


3:00 p.m. 


47,0 


32 


50.3 


117 


53.4 





19.0 


2717 


2583 


2414 


33.81 


1042 


3:20 p.m. 


47,0 


32 


50.2 


117 


56.2 





18.75 


2710 


2576 


2413 


33.73 


1043 


3:40 p.m. 


48,0 


32 


50.1 


117 


59.0 





18.8 


2718 


2584 


2420 


33.83 


1044 


3:55 p.m. 


48,0 


32 


50.1 


118 


1.7 





19.05 


2709 


2575 


2404 


33.71 


1045 


4:30 p.m. 


49,0 


32 


50.1 


118 


3.1 





18.9 


2718 


2584 


2418 


33.83 


1046 


4:50 p.m. 


49,0 


32 


49.8 


118 


5.4 





18.9 


2716 


2582 


2415 


33.80 


1047 


5:10 p.m. 


50,0 


32 


49.6 


118 


7.6 





18.7 


2713 


2579 


2418 


33.76 


1048 


5:50 p.m. 


50,0 


32 


49.5 


118 


9.7 





18.3 










1049 


6:10 p.m. 


50,0 


32 


49.4 


118 


11.9 





18.3 


2718 


2584 


2432 


33;83 


1050 


6:30 p.m. 


51,0 


32 


49.3 


118 


14.1 





18.5 


2711 


2577 


2421 


33.74 


1051 


6:50 p.m. 


51,0 


32 


49.2 


118 


16.3 





18.8 


2710 


2576 


2411 


33.73 


1052 


7:15 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


49.2 


118 


18.5 





18.7 


2715 


2581 


2420 


33.79 


1053 


7:35 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.8 


118 


20.3 





18.8 


2722 


2588 


2423 


33.88 


1054 


8:00 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.1 


118 
July: 


23.0 
1, 1909 





17.6 


2717 


2583 


2450 


33.81 


1055 


6:00 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.1 


118 


23.0 





17.5 


2721 


2587 


2455 


33.86 


1056 


6:50 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


47.8 


lis 


23.3 





17.2 


2712 


2578 


2453 


33.75 


1057 


7:04 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


47.6 


118 


25.0 





16.5 


2711 


2577 


2469 


33.74 


1058 


7:25 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


47.8 


118 


26.2 





16.7 


2713 


2579 


2466 


33.76 


1059 


7:45 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


47.7 


138 


26.3 





16.7 


2708 


2574 


2461 


33.70 


1060 


8:00 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


48.1 


118 


25.7 





16.9 


2720 


2586 


2469 


33.85 


1061 


8:55 a.m. 


52„ 


32 


47.5 


118 


21.8 





17.4 


2712 


2578 


2448 


33.75 


1062 


10:05 a.m. 


52,0 5 


32 


52.5 


118 


21.5 





19.2 


2715 


2581 


2407 


33.79 


1063 


10:56 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


52.0 


118 


21.5 


825 




2778 


2641 




34.57K 


1064 


11:27 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


52.0 


118 


21.5 


640 




2768 


2631 




34.45K 


1065 


12:12 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


52.0 


118 


21.5 


275 


7.1 


2762 


2626 


2694 


34.37K 


1066 


12:30 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


52.0 


118 


21.5 


365 




2760 


2624 




34.35K 


1067 


1:05 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


54.0 


118 
July 2 


26.0 
, 1909 





20".'4 


2719 


2585 


2380 


33.84 


1068 


4:51 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.6 


118 


20.4 





18.65 


2710 


2576 


2416 


33.73 


1069 


5:11a.m. 


52,0 


From 4:50 to 7:: 


15 a.m 


. 


18.7 


2718 


2584 


2422 


33.83 


1070 


5:40 a.m. 


52,0 


the boat drifted from 


17.65 


2719 


2585 


2451 


33.84 


1071 


5:57 a.m. 


52,0 


the above position to 


16.7 


2717 


2583 


2470 


33.81 


1072 


6:20 a.m. 


52,0 


the following position 


16.6 


2722 


2588 


2478 


33.88 


1073 


7:00 a.m. 


51.5,0 


32 


48.0 


118 


1(.5 





16.6 


2714 


2580 


2470 


33.78 


1074 


7:20 a.m. 


51,0 


32 


47.2 


118 


16.9 





16.8 


2720 


2586 


2470 


33.85 


1075 


7:40 a.m. 


51s 


32 


47.4 


118 


13.5 





17.0 


2714 


2580 


2460 


33.78 


1076 


8:00 a.m. 


50o 


32 


47.0 


118 


10.2 





16.6 


2704 


2571 


2459 


33.65 


1077 


8:20 a.m. 


49, 


32 


46.5 


118 


6.9 





17.2 


2710 


2576 


2452 


33.73 


1078 


8:40 a.m. 


49, 


32 


46.0 


118 


3.5 





17.3 


2715 


2581 


2454 


33.79 


1079 


9:00 a.m. 


48, 


32 


45.5 


118 


0.2 





17.4 


2698 


2565 


2434 


33.58 


1080 


9:20 a.m. 


47e 


32 


45.0 


117 


56.8 





17.6 


2702 


2569 


2434 


33.63 


1081 


9:40 a.m. 


47, 


32 


44.5 


117 


53.5 





17.5 


2700 


2567 


2434 


33.60 


1082 


10:10 a.m. 


46, 


32 


44.5 


117 


50.0 





17.7 


2705 


2572 


2434 


33.66 


1083 


10:43 a.m. 


45, 


32 


43.5 


117 


46.9 





18.5 


2708 


2574 


2418 


33.70 


1084 


11:00 a.m. 


45, 


32 


43.0 


117 


43.4 





18.65 


2712 


2578 


2418 


33.75 


1085 


11:20 a.m. 


44^5 


32 


42.5 


117 


40.2 





19.3 


2706 


2573 


2394 


33.68 


1086 


11:40 a.m. 


43, 


32 


42.0 


117 


36.8 





19.8 


2715 


2581 


2391 


33.79 


1087 


12:01p.m. 
12:40 p.m. 


43, 


32 


41.6 


117 


34.2 





20.2 


2716 


2582 


2383 


33.80 


1088 


42s 


32 


41.2 


117 


32.3 





20.6 


2715 


2581 


2370 


33.79 


1089 


1 :40 p.m. 


42, 


32 


41.2 


117 


32.3 





20.5 


2722 


2588 


2378 


33.88 


1090 


3:00 p.m. 


41s 


32 


40.7 


117 


27.3 





20.. 55 


2714 


2580 


2370 


33.78 


1091 


4:10 p.m. 


4l8 


32 


40.0 


117 


26.0 





20.3 


2720 


2586 


2382 


33.85 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



67 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





Time 

of 

day 


Section 




Position 


Depth 
meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi 
grade 


Specific gravity 




Water 


0° 

S 

4°0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 

4^0 




sampl 
numbe 


North 
latitude 


West 
longitude 


Salinity 
SO/oo 


1092 


4:35 p.m. 


41g 


32 


"40:0 


July 2, 1909 

117° 26:o 





20?4 


2716 


2582 


2376 


33.80 


1093 


3:05 p.m. 


41s 


32 


40.0 


117 26.0 





20.2 


2713 


2579 


2379 


33.76 


1094 


5:30 p.m. 


41, 


32 


40.0 


117 26.0 





20.0 


2711 


2577 


2382 


33.74 


1095 


6:15 p.m. 


41s 


32 


40.0 


117 26.0 





20.15 


2709 


2375 


2377 


33.71 


1096 


7:55 p.m. 


39, 


32 


37.1 


117 14.5 





18.3 


2717 


2583 


2431 


33.81 


1097 


8:13 p.m. 


B 


32 


41.0 


117 13.9 





17.8 


2725 


2590 


2451 


33.91 


1098 


8:20 p.m. 


B 


32 


42.1 


117 14.1 





16.9 


2721 


2587 


2468 


33.86 


1099 


8:33 p.m. 


B 


32 


42.9 


117 12.9 





18.0 


2728 


2593 


2450 


33.95 


1100 


8:42 p.m. 


B 


32 


42.9 


117 11.7 





18.5 


2735 


2600 


2444 


34.04 


1101 


9:00 p.m. 


B 


32 


42.6 


117 10.7 





20.4 


2762 


2626 


2419 


34.37 


1102 


6:00 a.m. 


B 


32 


42.6 


July 3, 1909 
117 10.7 





21.5 


2793 


2655 


2419 


34.76 


1103 


4:45 a.m. 


42„ 


32 


52.0 


Julv 7. 1909 
117 30.0 





19.0 


2718 


2584 


2414 


33.83 


1104 


5:30 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 30.0 





19.1 


2722 


2588 


2416 


33.87 


1105 


6:40 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 30.0 





19.0 


2712 


2578 


2409 


33.75 


1106 


6:10 p.m. 


40u 


32 


53.2 


117 20.0 





19.1 


2720 


2586 


2414 


33.85 


1107 


7:00 p.m. 


40u 


32 


53.2 


117 20.0 





19.3 


2712 


2578 


2402 


33.73 


1108 


8:00 p.m. 


40u 


32 


53.2 


117 20.0 





19.4 


2713 


2379 


2400 


33.76 


1109 


8:30 p.m. 


40u 


32 


53.2 


117 20.0 





19.6 


2716 


2582 


2396 


33.80 


1110 


11:50 a.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


52.0 


Julv 8, 1909 

117 19.2 





19.2 


2717 


2383 


2407 


33.81 


1111 


2:15 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


52.1 


117 18.4 





19.6 


2711 


2577 


2392 


33.74 


1112 


3:28 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


52.3 


Julv 9, 1909 
117 20.0 





18.7 


2713 


2579 


2419 


33.76 


1113 


4:15 a.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


52.3 


117 20.0 





18.8 


2706 


2573 


2407 


33.68 


1114 


5:15 a.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


52.3 


117 20.0 





18.6 


2705 


2572 


2412 


33.66 


1115 


6:28 a.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


52.3 


117 20.0 





18.6 


2720 


2586 


2427 


33.85 


1116 


7:01 p.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


52.3 


117 20.0 





19.0 


2707 


2574 


2403 


33.69 


1117 


7:43 p.m. 


(40 )„ 


32 


52.3 


117 20.0 





18.8 


2709 


2575 


2411 


33.71 


1118 


8:17 p.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


52.3 


117 20.0 





18.9 


2711 


2577 


2411 


33.74 


1119 


11:36 p.m. 


(40),o 


32 


52.3 


117 20.0 





19.0 


2709 


2575 


2406 


33.71 


1120 


12:46 a.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


52.3 


July 10, 1909 
117 20.0 





18.9 


2710 


2376 


2409 


33.73 


1121 


4.26 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 


117 18.0 





19.2 


2718 


2584 


2410 


33.83 


1122 


5:21 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 


117 18.0 





19.1 


2713 


2579 


2408 


33.76 


1123 


6:00 a.m. 


40u 


32 


53.0 


117 18.0 





19.2 


2716 


2582 


2409 


33.80 


1124 


9:00 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


51.8 


117 17.2 





19.9 


2717 


2583 


2390 


33.81 


1125 


9:05 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 17.2 


1 


19.9 


2716 


2582 


2389 


33.80 


1126 


10:00 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


51.8 


July 14, 1909 
117 17.2 





20.1 


2713 


2579 


2381 


33.76 


1127 


10:00 a.m. 


(39,.) 


32 


51.8 


Julv 15, 1909 
117 17.2 





20.8 


2715 


2581 


2363 


33.79 


1128 


10:30 a.m. 


(39,o) 


32 


.50.9 


117 16.5 







2714 


2380 




33.78 


1129 


10:00 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


July 16, 1909 
117 17.2 





20.4 


2718 


2384 


2377 


33.83 


1130 


10:30 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


50.9 


117 16.5 







2718 


2584 




33.83 


1131 


3:15 p.m. 


(39,o) 


32 


50.9 


Julv 19, 1909 
li7 16.5 





20 . 25 


2716 


2582 


2381 


33.80 


1132 


2:00 p.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


50.9 


July 22, 1909 
117 16.5 





20.2 


2716 


2382 • 


2382 


33.80 


1133 


12:01 p.m. 


(39„) 


32 


51.8 


Julv 25, 1909 
117 17.2 





20.2 


2706 


2573 


2371 


33.68 


1134 


12:30 p.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


50.9 


117 16.5 





19.5 


2707 


2574 


2391 


33.69 


1135 


2:00 p.m. 


(39,o) 


32 


50.9 


Julv 27, 1909 

117 16.5 





19.2 


2704 


2571 


2396 


33.65 


1136 


2:30 p.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 17.2 





20.6 


2712 


2378 


2367 


33.75 


1137 


2:40 a.m. 


(39,o) 


32 


51.1 


Aug. 31, 1909 
117 16.7 





19.8 


2690 


2357 


2367 


33.4811 


1138 


3:00 a.m. 


(40),o 


32 


50.1 


117 19.9 





20.0 










1139 


3:20 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


49.7 


117 21.8 





19.9 


269.5 


2562 


2368" 


33.5411 


1140 


3:40 a.m. 


41,0 


32 


48.5 


117 25.5 





20.2 


2701 


2568 


2367 


33.61 h 


1141 


4:00 a.m. 


42„ 


32 


47.7 


117 28.2 





19.95 


2686 


2533 


2360 


33.43h 


1142 


4:20 a.m. 


42, 


32 


46.8 


117 30.8 





20.6 


2710 


2576 


2365 


33.73h 


1143 


4:40 a.m. 


43, 


32 


46.0 


117 33.7 





20.7 


2698 


2565 


2349 


33.58h 


1144 


5:00 a.m. 


43» 


32 


45.1 


117 36.4 





20.2 


2680 


2.548 


2348 


33.35h 


1145 


5:20 a.m. 


44, 


32 


44.3 


117 38.9 





20.1 


2681 


2549 


2331 


33.37h 



68 



Vniversiiy of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 









Table 1. 


—Ocean Data — (Continued) 
























Temper- 


Sp£ 


icific gravity 












POSlLiUIl 














Water 
sample 


Time 
of 








A 




Depth 


ature 
in centi- 


0° 


17°5 








North 


West 


S ■ 


S 


S 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


i7;5 


4?0 


SO/oo 












Aug. 31, 1909 














1146 


5:40 a.m. 


44a 


32° 


43:5 


117° 


4i:8 





20?5 


2691 


2558 


2346 


33.49h 


1147 


6:00 a.m. 


45, 


32 


42.7 


117 


44.5 





19.7 


2678 


2546 


2359 


33.33h 


1148 


6:20 a.m. 


45, 


32 


41.7 


117 


47.3 





18.7 


2681 


2549 


2388 


33.37h 


1149 


6:40 a.m. 


46, 


32 


40.9 


117 


50.2 





18.55 


2679 


2547 


2390 


33.34h 


1150 


7:00 a.m. 


47, 


32 


40.0 


117 


52.9 





18.7 


2682 


2550 


2389 


33.38h 


1151 


7:20 a.m. 


47s 


32 


39.2 


117 


56.6 





18.55 


2681 


2549 


2392 


33.37h 


1152 


7:40 a.m. 


48a 


32 


38.4 


117 


58.3 





18.8 


2678 


2546 


2382 


33.33h 


1153 


8:00 a.m. 


48, 


32 


37.6 


118 


0.8 





18.6 


2699 


2566 


2406 


33.59h 


1154 


8:20 a.m. 


49, 


32 


36.9 


118 


3.2 





18.55 


2687 


2554 


2398 


33.44h 


1155 


8:40 a.m. 


49, 


32 


38.5 


118 


5.3 





18.15 










1156 


9:00 a.m. 


50, 


32 


40.2 


118 


7.6 





19.8 


2682 


2550 


2360 


33!38h 


1157 


9:20 a.m. 


50, 


32 


42.0 


118 


10.0 





20.8 


2699 


2566 


2348 


33.59h 


1158 


9:40 a.m. 


50, 


32 


43.4 


118 


12.0 





21.2 


2712 


2578 


2351 


33.75h 


1159 


10:00 a.m. 


51, 


32 


45.0 


118 


14.0 





21.3 


2707 


2574 


2343 


33.69h 


1160 


10:20 a.m. 


51, 


32 


46.7 


118 


16.1 





21.3 


2701 


2568 


2337 


33.62h 


1161 


10:40 a.m. 


52,, 


32 


48.2 


118 


18.1 





20.6 


2691 


2558 


2348 


33.49h 


1162 


11:00 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


50.0 


118 


20.6 





21.0 


2709 


2575 


2353 


33.71h 


1163 


11:20 a.m. 


52.5,0 


32 


51.6 


118 


22.5 





20.2 


2700 


2567 


2365 


33.60h 


1164 


11:40 a.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.8 


2700 


2567 


2349 


33.60h 


1165 


12:01p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.4 


2687 


2554 


2349 


33.44h 


1166 


12:20 p.m. 


53,1 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.4 


2687 


2554 


2349 


33.44h 


1167 


12:40 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.4 


2700 


2567 


2360 


33.60h 


1168 


1:00 p.m. 


53,, 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.4 










1169* 


1:05 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.6 





20.8 










1170* 


1:10 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


.53.0 


118 


24.6 





20.75 


2722 


2588 


2372 


33.88h 


1171* 


1:15 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


.53.0 


118 


24.7 





20.65 


2724 


2589 


2377 


33.9011 


1172* 


1:20 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


52.9 


118 


24.7 





20.65 


2721 


2587 


2375 


33.86h 


1173 


1:20 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.4 


2701 


2568 


2361 


33.61h 


1174* 


1:25 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


52.8 


118 


24.8 





20.6 


2701 


2568 


2356 


33.62h 


1175 


1:28 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 


550 




2769 


2632 




34.46h 


1176* 


1:30 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


52.8 


118 


24.8 





20.75 


2682 


2550 


2336 


33.38h 


1177* 


1:35 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


52.7 


118 


24.9 





20.8 


2699 


2566 


2349 


33.59h 


1178* 


1:40 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


52.6 


118 


24.9 





20.9 


2702 


2569 


2349 


33.63h 


1179* 


1:45 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


52.6 


118 


25.0 





20.8 


2695 


2562 


2344 


33.54h 


1180 


1:50 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.4 


2724 


2589 


2384 


33.90h 


1181* 


1:50 p.m. 


53,0 5 


32 


52.5 


118 


25.0 





21.2 


2703 


2570 


2343 


33.64h 


1182* 


1:55 p.m. 


53,0 5 


32 


52.5 


118 


25.1 





21.1 


2703 


2570 


2345 


33.64h 


1183* 


2:00 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


52.4 


118 


25.2 





21.3 


2700 


2567 


2337 


33.60h 


1184 


2:00 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.4 


2722 


2588 


2383 


33.88h 


1185 


2:10 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 


460 




2760 


2624 




34.35hK 


1186 


2:20 p.m. 


53,1 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.'4 


2722 


2588 


2382 


33.88h 


1187 


2:21p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 


275 


8.9 


2752 


2616 


2657 


34.25hK 


1188 


2:40 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.4 










1189 


3:00 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.2 


2711 


2577 


2377 


33.75h 


1190 


3:02 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 


92 


9.4 


2717 


2583 


2615 


33.81hK 


1191 


3:10 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 


135 


9.1 


2732 


2597 


2634 


34.00hK 


1192 


3:20 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 





20.2 


2697 


2564 


2361 


33.56h 


1193 


3:25 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 


46 


11.9 


2692 


2559 


2547 


33.50hK 


1194 


3:40 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


52.9 


118 


23.4 





20.4 


2716 


2582 


2376 


33.80h 


1195 


4:00 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


51.3 


118 


21.9 





20.8 


2712 


2578 


2362 


33.75h 


1196 


4:20 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


50.2 


118 


21.0 





21.0 


2713 


2579 


2357 


33.76h 


1197 


4:40 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.5 


118 


21.8 





18.6 


2706 


2573 


2413 


33.68h 


1198 


5:00 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 


23.8 





17.6 


2714 


2580 


2446 


33.78h 


1199 


6:00 p.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 
Sept. ] 


23.8 

I. 1909 





18.2 


2715 


2581 


2432 


33.79h 


1200 


5:00 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


49.0 


118 


23.8 





16.5 


2707 


2574 


2464 


33.69h 


1201 


5:20 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


47.8 


118 


24.5 





17.2 










1202 


5:40 a.m. 


53,0 


32 


47.7 


118 


25.8 





17.2 


2695 


2562 


2436 


nJih 


1203 


6:00 a.m. 


53, 


32 


47.3 


118 


27.3 





16.6 


2695 


2562 


2450 


33.54h 


1204 


6:20 a.m. 


54,0 


32 


48.0 


118 


28.3 





17.2 


2709 


2575 


2450 


33.71h 


1205 


6:40 a.m. 


54,0 


32 


48.8 


118 


30.4 





16.4 


2687 


2554 


2550 


33.44h 


1206 


7:02 a.m. 


54,0 


32 


50.0 


118 


31.3 





18.3 


2692 


2559 


2407 


33.50h 



' Sample taken from ro-wboat off San Clemente Island. 



1915] 



Michael, ct al.: Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



69 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 



Water Time 

sample of 

number day 



1207 
1208 
1209 
1210 
1211 
1212 
1213 
1214 
1215 
1216 
1217 
1218 
1219 
1220 
1221 
1222 
1223 
1224 
1225 
1226 
1227 
1228 
1229 
1230 
1231 
1232 
1233 
1234 
1235 
1236 
1237 
1238 
1239 
1240 
1241 
1242 
1243 
1244 
1245 
1246 
1247 
1248 
1249 
1250 
1251 

1252 
1253 
1254 
1255 
1256 
1257 
1258 
1259 
1260 
1261 
1262 
1263 
1264 
1265 
1266 
1267 
1268 
1269 



7:20 a.m. 

7:22 a.m. 

7:26 a.m. 

7:40 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:20 a.m. 

8:22 a.m. 

8:38 a.m. 

8:40 a.m. 

8:49 a.m. 

8:56 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 

9:02 a.m. 

9:04 a.m. 

9:24 a.m. 

9:44 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
10:20 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:03 a.m. 
11:20 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
11:43 a.m. 
12:01p.m. 
12:08 p.m. 
12:20 p.m. 
12:20 p.m. 
12:30 p.m. 
12:34 p.m. 
12:40 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:20 p.m. 

1:40 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

2:20 p.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

3:20 p.m. 

3:40 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

4:20 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 

2:20 a.m. 
3:00 a.m. 
3:20 a.m. 
3:40 a.m. 
4:00 a.m. 
4:20 a.m. 
4:40 a.m. 
5:00 a.m. 
5:20 a.m. 
5:40 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:20 a.m. 
6:40 a.m. 
7:00 a.m. 
7:20 a.m. 
7:40 a.m. 
8:00 a.m. 
8:20 a.m. 



Section 

54i„ 

54,0 

54,0 

55x0 

55,0 

55,0 

55,0 

55,0 

55i„ 

55,0 

55,0 

55„ 

55,0 

55i„ 

55u 

56„ 

56u 

56,, 

56,2 

56,0 

56u, 

56,, 

56,. 

56,, 

56,2 

56,, 

56,. 

56,. 

56„ 

56,. 

56,, 

56,2 

56,, 

56,, 

55,3 

55,, 

54.5,, 

54,, 

54,. 

54„ 

53.5,, 

53,0 

53,0 

53,0 

53,0 

53,0 

52,0 

53, 

53^ 

54, 

54, 

548 5 

54^ 

54, 

55, 

55, 

55, 

56, 

56, 

57, 

57, 

57e 

58, 



32° 50:4 

32 50.4 

32 50.4 

32 .50.8 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 53.2 

32 55.2 

32 56.8 

32 59.0 



0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
1.4 
3.2 
1.4 
0.0 



33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 

33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
32 58.4 
32 57.0 
32 55.6 
32 54.5 
32 52.0 
32 52.0 
32 52.0 
32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 49.2 

32 46.7 

32 44.9 

32 43.8 

32 42.7 

32 42.5 

32 41.8 

32 40.0 

32 38.6 

32 37.2 

32 37.2 

32 34.7 

32 34.6 

32 32.6 

32 30.6 

32 30.0 

32 28.6 



West 
longitude 

Sept. 1, 1909 
118° 32:0 

118 32.0 

118 32.0 

118 33.6 

118 35.5 

118 35.5 

118 35.5 

118 35.5 

118 35.5 

118 35.5 

118 35.5 

118 35.5 

118 35.5 

118 35.5 

118 36.8 

118 38.3 

118 39.7 

118 40.8 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 41.2 

118 40.0 

118 36.5 

118 33.1 

118 32.5 

118 31.4 

118 30.2 

118 28.8 

118 27.5 

118 26.0 

118 26.0 

118 26.0 

118 26.0 

Sept. 2, 1909 

118 26.0 

118 22.4 

118 24.6 

118 26.2 

118 27.7 

118 28.5 

118 30.0 

118 30.8 

118 32.3 

118 34.0 

118 37.2 

118 37.2 

118 38.4 

118 40.0 

118 43.0 

118 46.2 

118 47.4 

118 48.5 



Temper- 
Depth ature 

in in centi- 
meters grade 



Specific gravitv 
0° 17!5 t° 

4^0 17?5 4?0 





92 

46 







475 

410 



275 

135 



92 

46 













550 





365 



275 

185 



46 

IS 




















































18?6 
9.8 
11.4 
18.7 
19.2 
19.2 



19.2 
9.5 
11.7 
18.6 
18.5 
17.8 
18.8 
17.4 
17.6 

17.6 
17.8 

18.0 

8.5 

9.5 

18.0 

11.0 



2697 
2726 
2691 
2701 
2719 
2704 
2752 
27.53 
2708 
2753 
2753 
2718 



2564 
2.591 
2558 
2568 
2585 
2571 
2616 
2617 
2574 
2617 
2617 
2584 



2404 
2618 
25.56 
2406 
2410 
2396 



2400 
2673 



2701 
2718 
2703 
2707 

2698 
2703 
2764 
2705 
2686 
2762 
2699 
2762 
2764 
2699 
2709 



2568 
2584 
2570 
2574 



2565 
2570 
2628 
2572 
2553 
2526 
2566 
2526 
2528 
2566 
2575 



2410 

2585 
2425 
2413 
2434 

2434 
2435 



2437 
2414 



2421 
2672 
2659 
2421 
2580 



33.57h 

33.92hK 

33.49hK 

33.61h 

33.84h 

33.6511 

34.25hK 

34.26hK 

33.70h 

34.26hK 

34.26hK 

33.83h 

K 

33.61hK 
33.83h 
33.64h 
33.69h 



33.58h 
33.64h 
34.40hK 
33.66h 
33.43h 
34.3 7hK 
33.59h 
34.37hK 
34.40hK 
33..59h 
33.71hK 
K 



18.4 










18.5 










18.6 










18.6 


2718 


2584 


2425 


33.83h 




2720 


2586 




33.8.5h 


19.6 


2718 


2584 


2399 


33.83h 


19.6 


2704 


2571 


2385 


33.6.5h 


19.9 










19.8 


2717 


2583 


2394 


33.81h 


20.9 










21.0 


2717 


2583 


2360 


33.81 h 


20.8 










20.5 










19.9 


2719 


2585 


2392 


33.84h 


19.8 










19.7 










19.8 


2719 


2.585 


2395 


33.8411 


18.0 


2720 


2586 


2441 


33.85h 


16.8 










16.8 










17.7 










17.9 


2720 


2586 


2443 


33.85h 


18.0 










18.4 










18.3 


2701 


2568 


2416 


33.61 h 


18.6 










18.2 










18.3 










18.3 










18.0 










18.2 










18.2 










18.2 












70 



University of California Fublications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 









Table 1. 


— Ocean Data — (Continued) 


























Spe 


cific gravity 




























Water 


Time 




^ 




^ 


— — .^ 


Depth 


ature 






t° 






of 




North 


West 


in 


in centi- 






s 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Sect! 


on latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4?0 


SO/oo 












Sept. : 


, 1909 














1270 


8:40 a.m. 


58, 


32° 


28:o 


118° 


5o:o 





18?2 










1271 


9:00 a.m. 


58. 


32 


26.6 


118 


51.5 





18.4 


2718 


2584 


2430 


33.83h 


1272 


9:20 a.m. 


59, 


32 


25.3 


118 


53.8 





18.2 










1273 


9:40 a.m. 


59, 


32 


24.0 


118 


56.0 





18.3 










1274 


10:00 a.m. 


60, 


32 


22.6 


118 


58.5 





18.4 










1275 


10:09 a.m. 


60. 


32 


22.6 


118 


58.5 





17.5 










1276 


10:17 a.m. 


60. 


32 


22.6 


118 


58.5 


295 


7.6 


2755 


2619 


2680 


34.28hK 


1277 


10:30 a.m. 


60, 


32 


22.6 


118 


58.5 


220 


7.8 


2760 


2624 


2682 


34.35hK 


1278 


10:30 a.m. 


60. 


32 


22.6 


118 


58.5 





18.4 










1279 


10:37 a.m. 


60. 


32 


22.6 


118 


58.5 


145 


8.4 


2748 


2612 


2661 


34.20hK 


1280 


10:40 a.m. 


60. 


32- 


22.6 


118 


58.5 


73 


11.9 


2714 


2580 


2568 


33.78hK 


1281 


10:43 a.m. 


60 


32 


22.6 


118 


58.5 


37 




2706 


2573 




33.68hK 


1282 


11:00 a.m. 


60 


32 


20.6 


119 


1.5 





18.4 


2719 


2585 


2431 


33.84h 


1283 


11:20 a.m. 


61 


32 


18.7 


119 


3.0 





18.2 


2712 


2578 


2429 


33.75h 


1284 


11:40 a.m. 


61 


32 


20.6 


119 


3.8 





18.3 


2721 


2587 


2437 


33.86h 


1285 


12:01p.m. 


60 


32 


21.3 


119 


1.5 





18.3 


2722 


2588 


2436 


33.88h 


1286 


12:20 p.m. 


60 


32 


24.0 


119 


1.7 





18.4 


2720 


2586 


2432 


33.85h 


1287 


12:37 p.m. 


60 


32 


26.0 


119 


2.3 


64 


10.0 


2722 


2588 


2610 


33.88hK 


1288 


12:40 p.m. 


60 


32 


26.0 


119 


2.3 


46 


12.5 


2705 


2572 


2547 


33.66hK 


1289 


12:40 p.m. 


60 


32 


26.0 


119 


2.3 





18.1 


2720 


2586 


2440 


33.85h 


1290 


12:43 p.m. 


60 


32 


26.0 


119 


2.3 


27 


12.6 


2720 


2586 


2559 


33.85hK 


1291 


12:46 p.m. 


60 


32 


26.0 


119 


2.3 


37 


12.1 


2718 


2584 


2568 


33.83hK 


1292 


12:49 p.m. 


60 


32 


26.0 


119 


2.3 


55 


11.6 


2709 


2575 


2569 


33.71hK 


1293 


1:00 p.m. 


60 


32 


26.7 


119 


2.4 





18.1 










1294 


1:20 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 





18.0 










1295 


1:40 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 


365 




2772 


2635 




34.50hK 


1296 


1:40 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 





17.9 


2714 


2580 


2438 


33.78h 


1297 


1:49 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 


325 




2758 


2622 




34.32hK 


1298 


2:00 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 





18.2 


2714 


2580 


2431 


33.78h 


1299 


2:10 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 


230 


8.5 








K 


1300 


2:40 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 


135 


9.1 








K 


1301 


2:40 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 





18.3 


2711 


2577 


2425 


33.74h 


1302 


2:45 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 


92 


10.3 


2720 


2586 


2602 


33.85hK 


1303 


2:47 p.m. 


61 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 


46 


12.1 


2705 


2572 


2555 


33.66hK 


1304 


3:00 p.m. 


60 


32 


29.3 


119 


1.0 





18.4 


2717 


2583 


2429 


33.81h 


1305 


3:20 p.m. 


60 


32 


30.6 


118 


58.5 





18.2 


2717 


2583 


2434 


33.81h 


1306 


3:40 p.m. 


59 


32 


31.3 


118 


57.0 





18.3 


2717 


2583 


2432 


33.81h 


1307 


4:00 p.m. 


59 


32 


33.0 


118 


53.8 





18.4 


2720 


2586 


2431 


33.8511 


1308 


4:20 p.m. 


58 


32 


33.4 


118 


52.3 





18.2 


2717 


2583 


2434 


33.81h 


1309 


4:40 p.m. 


58 


32 


34.6 


118 


50.8 





18.6 


2719 


2585 


2426 


33.84h 


1310 


5:00 p.m. 


58 


32 


35.3 


118 


49.2 





18.4 


2709 


2575 


2422 


33.71h 


1311 


5:20 p.m. 


58 


32 


36.0 


118 


47.6 





18.6 


2712 


2578 


2418 


33.75h 


1312 


5:44 p.m. 


57 


32 


36.6 


118 


45.8 





18.6 


2715 


2581 


2421 


33.79h 


1313 


6:00 p.m. 


57 


32 


37.3 


118 


43.0 





18.6 










1314 


6:20 p.m. 


56 


32 


40.0 


118 


39.2 





18.6 


2722 


2588 


2428 


33.88h 


1315 


6:40 p.m. 


56 


32 


40.0 


118 


.39.2 





18.2 


2712 


2578 


2429 


33.75h 


1316 


7:00 p.m. 


56 


32 


41.3 


lis 


37.6 





18.4 


2711 


2577 


2422 


33.74h 


1317 


7:20 p.m. 


55 


32 


42.6 


118 


35.4 





18.4 


2711 


2577 


2422 


33.74h 


1318 


7:40 p.m. 


55 


32 


43.4 


118 


33.8 





17.2 










1319 


8:00 p.m. 


54 


32 


44.5 


118 


31.6 





17.0 










1320 


8:20 p.m. 


54 


32 


45.2 


118 


30.0 





20.4 




















Sept. 3, 1909 














1321 


5:20 a.m. 


53 


32 


49.2 


118 


23.8 





17.9 










1322 


5:40 a.m. 


52 


32 


48.8 


118 


22.2 





18.2 


2713 


2579 


2429 


33.76h 


1323 


6:00 a.m. 


52 


32 


48.5 


118 


20.3 





19.3 










1324 


6:16 a.m. 


52 


32 


48.5 


118 


20.3 





19.5 










1325 


7:00 a.m. 


51 


32 


48.7 


118 


16.1 





19.0 










1326 


7:30 a.m. 


50 


32 


49.0 


118 


10.5 





18.0 


2716 


2582 


2438 


33.80h 


1327 


8:00 a.m. 


49 


32 


49.3 


118 


4.8 





18.4 










1328 


8:20 a.m. 


49 


32 


49.4 


118 


3.8 





18.0 


2717 


2583 


2439 


33.81h 


1329 


8:40 a.m. 


48 


32 


49.6 


118 


2.3 





18.1 


2700 


2567 


2420 


33.60h 


1330 


9:00 a.m. 


48 


32 


49.8 


118 


1.9 





18.1 


2692 


2559 


2412 


33.50h 


1331 


9:20 a.m. 


48 


32 


50.1 


118 


1.5 





18.2 


2719 


2585 


2437 


33.84h 


1332 


9:40 a.m. 


48 


32 


50.4 


118 


1.0 





18.2 











1915] 



Michael, et al. : Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



71 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 


Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continu 

Position Temper- 

r ^ ^ Depth ature 

North West in in centi- 
latitude longitude meters grade 


ed) 

Sp 


'cific gravity 




Water 
sampU 
Dumbei 


0° 

S 

4?0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 

S • 

4?0 


Snlinity 
SO/00 


1333 


10:00 a.m. 


48,0 


32 


°5i:o 


Sept. 
117 


3, 1909 
°59:6 





18?2 


2723 


2588 


2440 


33.89h 


1334 


10:40 a.m. 


48.0 


32 


51.1 


117 


59.7 





18.2 










1335 


11:00 a.m. 


48,0 


32 


51.2 


117 


59.1 





18.4 










1336 


11:20 a.m. 


48,0 


32 


51.4 


117 


58.4 





18.5 


2712 


2578 


2421 


33.75h 


1337 


11:40 a.m. 


48,0 


32 


51.5 


117 


58.2 





18.5 


2713 


2579 


2423 


33.76h 


1338 


12:01 p.m. 


48,0 


32 


51.5 


117 


57.8 





18.6 


2703 


2570 


2410 


33.64h 


1339 


12:40 p.m. 


47,0 


32 


50.1 


117 


57.0 





18.6 


2719 


2585 


2425 


33.84h 


1340 


1:00 p.m. 


47,0 


32 


52.4 


117 


56.6 





18.8 


2719 


2585 


2421 


33.84h 


1341 


1:20 p.m. 


47,0 5 


32 


52.5 


117 


56.1 





18.8 


2718 


2584 


2420 


33.83h 


1342 


1:40 p.m. 


47„ 


32 


52.8 


117 


55.6 





18.8 


2723 


2588 


2425 


33.8911 


1343 


2:00 p.m. 


47„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


.55.1 





18.9 


2722 


2588 


2421 


33.88h 


1344 


2:20 p.m. 


47„ 


32 


53.2 


117 


54.8 





19.0 


2713 


2579 


2410 


33.76h 


1345 


2:40 p.m. 


47„ 


32 


53.4 


117 


54.3 





18.8 










1346 


3:00 p.m. 


47,1 


32 


53.6 


117 


53.7 





18.9 


2713 


2579 


2413 


33.76h 


1347 


3:20 p.m. 


47„ 


32 


53.8 


117 


53.4 





19.0 


2709 


2575 


2406 


33.71h 


1348 


3:40 p.m. 


47,1 


32 


54.0 


117 


53.0 





19.0 


2705 


2572 


2402 


33.66h 


1349 


4:00 p.m. 


46„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


50.2 





19.2 


2705 


2572 


2397 


33.66h 


1350 


4:20 p.m. 


45„ 


32 


53.6 


117 


47.2 





19.3 


2712 


2588 


2401 


33.75h 


1351 


4:40 p.m. 


45„ 


32 


53.2 


117 


44.1 





18.9 


2711 


2587 


2411 


33.7411 


1352 


5:00 p.m. 


44u 


32 


53.1 


117 


41.1 





19.3 


2716 


2582 


2405 


33.80h 


1353 


5:20 p.m. 


44„ 


32 


52.9 


117 


38.8 





19.7 


2714 


2580 


2394 


33.78h 


1354 


5:40 p.m. 


43„ 


32 


52.6 


117 


34.9 





19.9 


2719 


2585 


2392 


33.84h 


1355 


6:00 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.4 


117 


31.7 





20.0 


2719 


2585 


2390 


33.8411 


1356 


6:20 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





20.1 


2721 


2587 


2388 


33.86h 


1357 


6:40 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





20.2 


2714 


2580 


2380 


33.78h 


1358 


7:00 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


28.0 





19.8 


2704 


2571 


2380 


33.65h 


1359 


7:20 p.m. 


41,0 


32 


51.9 


117 


25.1 





19.6 










1360 


7:40 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.6 


117 


22.4 





18.8 










1361 


8:00 p.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.2 


117 


19.5 





18.8 










1362 


8:20 p.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.0 


117 


17.0 





18.6 










1363 


8:43 a.m. 


(39.5,o) 


32 


51.2 


Sept. 2 
117 


7, 1909 

17.5 





19.4 


2711 


2577 


2398 


33.74h 


1364 


9:10 a.m. 


(39.5,„) 


32 


51.2 


Oct. 4 
117 


, 1909 

17.5 





18.0 


2712 


2578 


2434 


33.75h 


1365 


9:30 a.m. 


(39.5,o) 


32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





18.2 


2720 


2586 


2440 


33.85h 


1366 


9:00 a.m. 


(39.5,o) 


32 


51.2 


Oct. 11. 1909 
117 17.5 





19.0 










1367 


9:20 a.m. 


(39.5,„) 


32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





19.2 










1368 


8:55 a.m. 


(39.5,„) 


32 


51.2 


Oct. 18, 1909 

117 17.5 





19.9 










1369 


9:15 a.m. 


(39..5,„) 


32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





19.9 










1370 


3:00 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


38.5 


Nov. 2 
117 


. 1909 

13.8 





16.4 










1371 


3:30 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


37.6 


117 


1.5.0 





16.6 










1372 


4:00 a.m. 


4O3 


32 


40.5 


117 


17.9 





17.0 










1373 


4:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43.2 


117 


20.9 





17.2 










1374 


5:00 a.m. 


41b 


32 


46.2 


117 


23.9 





17.4 










1375 


5:30 a.m. 


41,0 


32 


49.0 


117 


26.9 





17.4 










1376 


6:00 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.5 










1377 


6:20 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.4 










1378 


7:00 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.4 










1379 


7:30 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.4 










1380 


8:05 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.6 










1381 


8:30 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.6 










1382 


9:00 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.6 










1383 


9:30 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.7 










1384 


10:00 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.8 










1385 


10:20 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


365 




2766 


2630 




34.42hK 


1386 


10:34 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


185 




2750 


2614 




34.22hK 


1387 


11:00 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.9 










1388 


11:30 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


28.0 





18.4 










1389 


12:01 p.m. 


41,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


26.0 





18.8 










1390 


12:47 p.m. 


41„ 


32 


53.2 


117 


24.0 





19.0 










1391 


1:00 p.m. 


40.5,, 


32 


53.8 


117 


22.5 





18.0 










1392 


1:12 p.m. 


40.5,, 


32 


53.8 


117 


22.5 


365 




2761 


2625 




34.36hK 



72 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Table 1. — Ocean Data — {Continued) 



Temper- 
Depth ature 



Specific gravity- 



sample of North West in in centi- S S S Salinity 

number day Section latitude longitude meters grade 4?0 17?5 4°0 S o/oo' 

Nov. 2, 1909 

1393 1:32 p.m. 40.5i, 32° 53:8 117° 22:5 185 2761 2625 34.36hK 

1394 2:00 p.m. 40„ 32 53.0 117 20.9 19.0 

1395 2:30p.m. (39,„) 32 51.1 117 16.2 18.8 

Nov. 3, 1909 

1396 12:30 p.m. (39,„) 32 51.1 117 16.2 17.6 

1397 1:00p.m. (40),„ 32 51.6 117 18.8 18.0 

1398 1:30 p.m. (40),„ 32 51.8 117 22.2 19.2 

1399 2:00p.m. 41,„ 32 51.9 117 25.8 19.8 

1400 2:30 p.m. 42,„ 32 52.0 117 29.3 19.2 

1401 3:05p.m. 42„ 32 52.0 117 30.0 19.2 

1402 4:00p.m. 42^ 32 52.7 117 30.0 18.9 

1403 4:30p.m. 42„ 32 53.2 117 30.0 18.8 

1404 5:00 p.m. 42„ 32 53.6 117 30.0 18.6 

1405 6:00p.m. 42„ 32 54.1 117 30.0 18.0 

Nov. 4, 1909 

1406 8:30a.m. (39„) 32 51.1 117 16.2 17.2 

1407 9:00a.m. (39.5,,) 32 50.5 117 17.5 17.4 

1408 9:30a.m. (40),„ 32 47.6 117 21.1 17.4 

1409 10:00 a.m. 41, 32 4.5.7 117 23.6 17.4 

1410 10:20 a.m. 41, 32 44.4 117 25.4 17.4 

1411 10:40a.m. 41„ 32 43.2 117 26.9 17.4 

1412 11:00 a.m. 42, 32 41.9 117 28.8 17.3 

1413 12:01p.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.3 17.7 

1414 2:00p.m. 428 32 40.6 117 30.3 17.6 

1415 2:05p.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.3 185 9.7 K 

1416 2:16p.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.3 46 11.9 K 

1417 2:20p.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.3 17.6 

1418 2:40 p.m. 41, 32 40.4 117 26.5 17.6 

1419 3:00 p.m. 41, 32 40.2 117 23.2 17.6 

1420 3:12 p.m. 40, 32 40.0 117 22.0 185 9.2 2741 2606 2642 34.11hK 

1421 3:19 p.m. 40, 32 40.0 117 22.0 135 9.8 2736 2601 2627 34.05hK 

1422 3:20p.m. 40, 32 40.0 117 22.0 17.7 

1423 3:24p.m. 40, 23 40.0 117 22.0 92 10.7 K 

1424 3:28p.m. 40, 32 40.0 117 22.0 46 12.8 2698 2565 2542 33.58hK 

1425 3:40 p.m. 40, 32 40.0 117 20.5 17.4 

1426 4:00 p.m. 40, 32 39.6 117 17.6 17.6 

Nov. 5, 1909 

1427 6:10 a.m. B 32 40.0 117 14.0 16.0 

1428 6:40a.m. (39,) 32 39.4 117 16.3 16.6 2691 2558 2446 33.49h 

1429 7:00 a.m. 40, 32 39.6 117 18.5 17.3 2698 2565 2437 33.58h 

1430 7:40 a.m. 41, 32 40.0 117 22.7 17.3 2697 2564 2436 33.57h 

1431 8:00 a.m. 41, 32 40.2 117 24.8 17.4 2701 2568 2437 33.61h 

1432 8:20a.m. 41, 32 40.3 117 27.0 17.5 2703 2571 2437 33.64h 

1433 8:40a.m. 42, 32 40.5 117 29.0 17.4 2700 2567 2437 33.60h 

1434 9:00a.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.3 17.7 2705 2572 2434 33.66h 

1435 10:00a.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.3 17.6 

1436 11:00a.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.3 17.6 

1437 12:01p.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.3 17.6 270U 2567 2431 33.60h 

1438 1:00 p.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.3 17.5 

Dec. 8. 1909 

1439 8:50a.m. (39.5„) 32 51.2 117 17.5 13.6 

Dec. 24. 1909 

1440 8:40a.m. (39..5,„) 32 51.2 117 17.5 14.1 

1441 8:50 a.m. (39..5,„-) 32 51.2 117 17.5 14.1 

Jan. 16, 1910 

1442 10:00a.m. (39.5,„) 32 51.2 117 17.5 13.7 2688 2.555 2508 33.45 

1443 10:15 a.m. (39.5,„) 32 51.2 117 17.5 13.4 2698 2565 2523 33.58 

Feb. 3, 1910 

1444 9:00 a.m. (39.5,„) 32 51.2 117 17.5 12.7 2697 2564 2.545 33.57 

1445 9:20 a.m. (39.5,„) 32 51.2 117 17.5 12.7 2696 2563 2544 33.55 

Feb. 17, 1910 

1446 4:20 a.m. 39, 32 37.1 117 15.2 12.1 

1447 4:42 a.m. 40, 32 37.3 117 18.0 12.4 

1448 5:05a.m. 40, 32 37.6 117 20.7 12.6 

1449 5:20a.m. 40, 32 37.9 117 22.4 12.6 

1450 5:40 a.m. 41, 32 38.2 117 24.9 12.9 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hydrogmphic Records of Scripps Institution 



73 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — {Continued) 



Water 
sample 
number 

1451 
1452 
1453 
1454 
1455 
1456 
1457 
1458 

1459 
1460 
1461 
1462 
1463 
1464 
1465 
1466 
1467 
1468 
1469 
1470 
1471 
1472 
1473 
1474 
1475 
1476 

1477 
1478 
1479 
1480 
1481 
1482 
1483 
1484 
1485 
1486 

1487 
1488 
1489 
1490 
1491 
1492 
1493 
1494 
1495 

1496 
1497 
1498 
1499 
1500 
1501 
1502 
1503 
1504 
1505 
1506 
1507 
1508 
1509 
1510 
1511 



6:00 a.m. 
6:20 a.m. 
8:20 a.m. 
12:40 p.m. 
1 :00 p.m. 
1:40 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
2:20 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 
1:20 p.m. 
1:40 p.m. 
2:20 p.m. 
2:40 p.m. 
3:00 p.m. 
3:10 p.m. 
3:21p.m. 
3:35 p.m. 
3:40 p.m. 
3:48 p.m. 
3:55 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
6:00 p.m. 
6:40 p.m. 
8:40 p.m. 
8:58 p.m. 
9:30 p.m. 

11:00 a.m. 
11:20 a.m. 
11 :40 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 
12:25 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:23 p.m. 

2:22 p.m. 

2:58 p.m. 

4:58 p.m. 

11:05 a.m. 
11:20 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
12:01p.m. 
12:20 p.m. 
12:40 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:20 p.m. 

2:42 p.m. 

9:00 a.m. 

9:10 a.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

9:40 a.m. 

9:50 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
10:50 a.m. 
11:10 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
11:45 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 
12:30 p.m. 

1:40 p.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

3:55 p.m. 



Section 

41, 

42^ 

42s 

41, 

41, 

40„ 
(40)„ 
(39,„) 

(39,„) 
(40),„ 
(40.5),„ 

42i„ 

42,0 

42,0 

42,0 

42,„ 

42.5,„ 

42.5,0 

43,0 

43,0 

43,0 

42,0 

42,0 

42,0 

41,0 
(40),o 

(39,,) 
40, 
40, 
41, 
41, 
42, 
42, 
42, 
42, 
42, 

(39,0 
(39,) 

40, 

40, 

40.5, 

41, 

41, 

42, 

42, 

B 

(39,) 

39, 

39, 
(39,) 
(39,) 

40, 

40g 

40.5„ 

41, 

4I9 

41,0 

42,0 

42,0 

42,0 

42,0 



32° 38:5 
32 38.6 



39.6 

42.4 



32 44.0 
32 47.3 



49.0 
50.5 



West 
longitude meters 
Feb. 17. 1910 
117° 27:2 
28.5 
31.5 
26.6 
24.8 
21.0 
19.0 
17.3 



Temper- 
Depth ature 
in in centi- 



Specific ^avit.v 



4°0 



17?.5 

17?.'; 



4°0 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



32 51.1 

32 51.3 

32 51.5 

32 51.7 

32 51.9 

32 51.9 

32 .52.0 

32 51.8 

32 51.6 

32 51.6 

32 51.5 

32 51.4 

32 51.3 

32 51.2 

32 51.2 

32 51.0 

32 51.0 

32 51.2 

32 37.5 

32 38.0 

32 38.5 

32 39.0 

32 39.5 

32 40.4 

32 40.4 

32 40.4 

32 40.4 

32 40.4 

32 37.5 

32 37.6 

32 37.9 

32 38.3 

32 38.6 

32 38.8 

32 39.2 

32 39.6 

32 40.4 

32 40.1 

32 38.6 

32 37.3 

32 36.6 

32 38.4 

32 39.0 

32 41.5 

32 42.3 

32 43.5 

32 45.1 

32 46.3 

32 47.0 

32 49.2 

32 50.2 

32 50.4 

32 50.6 



117 19.9 

117 22.5 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



28.0 
30.6 
32.1 
32.0 
32.2 
32.5 
32.5 
32.6 
32.8 



117 33.0 

117 31.5 

117 31.5 

117 29.6 



117 
117 



25.0 
17.8 



117 
117 

117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



Mar. 15, 1910 
117 14.3 
117 18.2 
20.5 
22.9 
26.1 
30.3 
31.0 
31.0 
31.0 
117 31.0 
Mar. 16. 1910 
117 14.5 
117 15.8 
117 18.3 
117 20.4 
117 22.5 
117 24.7 
117 27.0 
i:7 27.6 
117 31.2 



117 14.2 

117 14.7 

117 15.5 

117 16.3 

117 16.5 

117 20.1 

117 21.0 

117 22.5 



117 
117 
117 
117 



24.5 
25.6 
26.8 
29.1 



117 29.7 
117 29.4 















365 

275 

185 



92 

46 

18 



















































12?8 

13.1 

13.4 

13.9 

14.1 

13.8 

13.6 

13.6 

13.8 

13.8 

13.9 

14.0 

14.2 2697 

14.1 2689 

2752 

2744 

9.0 2748 

14.2 

9.6 2728 

11.7 

13.6 

13 8 

13^8 2687 

13.4 2699 

13.3 

13.5 

15.6 

15.7 

16.1 

16.0 

16.0 

15.7 2698 

15.4 2696 

15.8 

16.2 

15.6 

15.4 

15.6 

16.0 

16.2 

16.6 

15.8 2705 

15.6 2702 

15.5 

15.4 

15.1 

15.1 2704 

14.1 

14.8 

15.1 

15.0 2702 

15.0 

15.1 2702 

15.0 

14.8 2705 

14.6 

14.8 2704 

14.8 

14.7 

14.7 

14.7 



2564 2506 
2556 2499 

2616 

2609 

2612 2652 

2593 2622 

2554 2.505 

2566 2524 

2565 2475 
2563 2477 

2572 2478 

2569 2481 

2571 2494 

2569 2495 

2569 2492 

2572 2500 
2571 2499 



33.57 

33.47 

34.25K 

34.15K 

34.20K 

33.95Kf 

K 

K 

33"44 
33.59 

33.58 
33.55 

33.66 
33.63 

33"65 

33"63 
33!63 
33.66 
33.'65 



74 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 



Specific gravity 



Water 
sample 
number 

1512 
1513 
1514 
1515 

1516 
1517 
1518 
1519 
1520 
1521 

1522 
1523 
1524 
1525 
1526 
1527 

1528 
1529 
1530 
1531 
1532 
1533 
1534 
1535 

1536 
1537 
1538 
1539 
1540 
1541 
1542 
1543 
1544 
1545 

1546 
1547 
1548 
1549 
1550 
1551 
1552 
1553 
1554 
1555 
1556 
1557 
1558 
1559 
1560 
1561 
1562 
1563 
1564 
1565 
1566 

1567 
1568 
1569 
1570 



4:55 p.m. 
5:40 p.m. 
6:30 p.m. 
7:06 p.m. 

4:20 p.m. 
4:40 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 
5:20 p.m. 
5:40 p.m. 
6:00 p.m. 

8:35 a.m. 
10:15 a.m. 
11:20 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
11:50 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 

1:30 a.m. 
1:40 a.m. 
1:50 a.m. 
2:00 a.m. 
2:10 a.m. 
2:20 a.m. 
2:30 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 

4:50 a.m. 

6:20 a.m. 

8:40 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 

9:20 a.m. 

9:40 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
10:20 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 

5:35 a.m. 

5:45 a.m. 

6:05 a.m. 

6:23 a.m. 

6:40 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

7:20 a.m. 

7:40 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

8:20 a.m. 

9:45 a.m. 
10:25 a.m. 
12:45 p.m. 
12:45 p.m. 
12:45 p.m. 

1:55 p.m. 

2:20 p.m. 

2:20 p.m. 

2:20 p.m. 

2:20 p.m. 

2:20 p.m. 

11:20 a.m. 
12:10 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:25 p.m. 



42,0 
42,0 
42,0 
42,0 

(39,) 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 

40, 

40.5 

4O4 

39, 

39. 

3% 

39, 
393 
39, 
39, 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40e 
39.5, 
39, 
39, 
39- 
(39,) 

B 
B 

(39,) 
40, 
40, 
41, 
41, 
42, 
42, 
43, 
43, 
43, 
43, 
43, 
43, 
43, 
43, 
43, 
43, 
43, 
43, 

40, 
40, 
40; 
40, 



32° 50:6 

32 50.6 

32 50.6 

32 50.6 

32 38.2 

32 35.5 

32 33.0 

32 30.5 

32 27.8 

32 25.5 

32 23.3 

32 22.5 

32 21.7 

32 21.6 

32 22.3 

32 24.2 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.2 

32 23.2 

32 23.2 

32 23.2 



23.2 
21.4 



32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 24.5 

32 26.5 

32 28.5 

32 30.6 

32 32.6 

32 34.8 

32 37.0 

32 39.0 

32 41.1 

32 37.2 

32 37.6 

32- 38.0 

32 38.4 

32 38.9 

32 39.4 

32 39.8 

32 40.2 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 40.7 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 



West in in centi- S - 

longitude meters grade 
lar. 17, 1910 



29:2 

■ 29.2 

■ 29.2 

■ 29.2 

18, 1910 

■ 14.3 

■ 14.5 

■ 14.5 

■ 14.5 

■ 14.5 

■ 14.6 

19, 1910 

■ 19.9 
' 18.8 
' 17.6 

• 17.4 

■ 15.2 

• 14.4 

20. 1910 

• 14.4 

■ 15.1 

• 16.0 

■ 17.0 

■ 17.8 

■ 18.7 

■ 19.7 

■ 18.0 

21. 1910 

■ 22.3 

■ 20.0 

■ 19.7 

■ 19.0 

• 18.3 
' 17.5 

• 16.6 

• 15.8 
15.1 

• 14.5 
16. 1910 

■ 13.85 
14.5 
16.8 
19.2 
21.5 
23.8 
26.2 
28.5 
30.8 
32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

7 32.8 

. 13. 1910 
7 18.2 
7 18.2 
7 18.2 
7 18.2 






























































100 

50 



50 

125 

220 



25 

50 

75 

125 








14^6 
14.6 
14.6 

14.6 

16.0 
15.6 
16.1 
16.5 
16.5 
17.0 

16.4 



2700 
2704 



16.5 

16.7 

16.75 

16.4 

16.7 

16.1 
15.8 
16.0 
16.0 
15.8 
15.7 
16.1 
15.8 



2567 
2571 



2.500 
2504 



2711 

2711 
2711 



2708 
2706 
2711 



2577 
2577 
2577 



2574 
2573 



2576 
2574 



2469 
2464 
2461 



2477 
2475 
2485 

2476 
2481 



2574 
2571 
2575 



2472 
2456 
2455 



2707 

2746 
2747 
2727 
2717 
2725 
2713 
2711 



2610 
2611 
2592 
2583 
2590 
2579 
2577 
2574 



2470 
2479 
2493 
2477 
2511 
2412 
2391 
2384 



2705 
2715 
2691 

2745 
2757 
2717 
2703 
2684 
2712 
2707 



2572 
2581 
2558 
2610 
2621 
2583 
2570 
2552 
2578 
2574 



2578 
2391 
2560 
2642 
2655 
2389 
2506 
2548 
2597 
2603 



33.60 
33.65 



2571 2504 33.65 



2711 2577 2469 33.74 



33.74 
33.74 
33.74 



33.70 
33.68 
33.74 



33.73 
33.70 



33.70 
33.65 
33.71 



2578 2447 33.75 



2574 2491 33.69 



16.2 

16.2 

16.7 

17.0 

17.05 

17.0 

16.6 

17.5 

16.8 

15.3 

17.85 

17.6 

16.1 

16.4 

15.2 

18.9 

19.7 

19.8 

19.9 

19.6 

9.55 
10.8? 
19.8 
11.08 

9.44 

9.34 
19.95 
14.47 
11.44 
10.24 

9.55 

19.75 2705 2572 2383 33.66 

19.8 

20.1 

20.1 2706 2573 2374 33.68 



34.17 

34.19 

33.94 

33.81 

33.91? 

33.76 

33.74 

33.70 



2720 2586 2401 33.85 



33.66 

33.79 

33.49 

34.16? 

34.31 

33.81 

33.64 

33.40 

33.75 

33.69? 



1915] 



Michael, ct al.: Ilijdrographic Records of Scripps Institution 











Table 1 


. — Ocean Dat.a. — {Continued) 
























Temper- 


Spe 


cific gravit.v 












Posinou 














Water 


Time 




^ — 




-^ 


. 


Depth 


ature 


0° 


17?5 


t° 




sample 


of 




North 


West 


in 


in centi- 


s 


S 


S 


Salinit.v 


numbei 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4;o 


17?5 


4?0 


SO/00 












Aug. 13, 1910 














1571 


5:05 p.m. 


40^ 


32 


' 23:4 


117 


°2i:9 





20;3 


2709 


2575 


2373 


33.71 


1572 


5:40 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





20.2 


2710 


2576 


2376 


33.73 


1573 


7:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





20.1 


2709 


2575 


2377 


33.71 












Aug. 14. 191C 














1574 


8:12 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





19.0 


2708 


2574 


2405 


33.70 


1575 


8:12 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18,2 


25 


13.26 


2697 


2564 


2524 


33.57 


1576 


8:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





19.0 










1577 


9:14 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





19.1 


2708 


2.574 


2403 


33;76 


1578 


9:14 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


150 


9.67 


2737 


2602 


2629 


34.06 


1579 


10:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





19.6 


2706 


2573 


2388 


33.68 


1580 


10:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 


550 


6.77 










1581 


10:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 


20 


14.58 


2686 


2553 


2488 


33;43 


1582 


11 :fl5 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





19.7 


2707 


2578 


2386 


33.69 


1583 


11:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 


200 


9.60 


2749 


2613 


2644 


34.21 


1584 


11:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 


75 


10,59 


2703 


2570 


2581 


33.64 


1585 


11:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 


30 


13.26 










1586 


1:50 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





20.4 


2'710 


2.576 


2371 


33;73 


1587 


3:30 p.m. 


•il. 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


800 


5.24 










1588 


3:30 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


350 


8.22 










1589 


3:30 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


125 


10.35 










1590 


3:30 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


50 


11.66 


2687 


2554 


2546 


33.44 


1591 


3:30 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


20 


14.66 


2682 


2550 


2481 


33.38 


1592 


4:20 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


500 


6.66 










1.593 


4:20 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


75 


10.70 


2698 


2565 


2573 


33!58 


1594 


4:20 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


30 


13.40 


2682 


2550 


2507 


33,38 


1595 


4:20 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


10 


20.26 


2703 


2570 


2369 


33.64 


1596 


5:00 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 





20.8 


2710 


2576 


2360 


33.73 


1597 


6:05 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


125 


10.18 










1598 


6:05 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 
Aug. 1 


24.2 

5. 1910 


20 


14.82 










1599 


1 


40 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


117 


19.0 





19.95 


2711 


2577 


2384 


33.74 


1600 


2 


44 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


117 


19.0 


200 


9.29 


2732 


2597 


2631 


34.00? 


1601 


2 


44 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


117 


19.0 


125 


9.63 


2721 


2587 


2614 


33.86 


1602 


2 


44 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


117 


19.0 


75 


9.82 


2730 


2595 


2620 


33.98? 


1603 


2 


44 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


117 


19.0 


50 


10.15 


2710 


2576 


2595 


33.73 


1604 


2 


44 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


117 


19.0 


25 


11.51 


2699 


2566 


2561 


33.59 


1605 


3 


05 p.m. 


40n 


32 


52.8 


117 


19.0 





19.4 


2716 


2582 


?"'02 


33.80 












Aug. 16. 1910 














1606 


10:15 a.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 





20.6 


2709 


2575 


2364 


33.71 


1607 


2:00 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


800 


6.32 










1608 


2:00 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


350 


8.32 










1609 


2:15 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.'2 


125 


9.73 


2'7r7' 


2583 


2609 


sjj.'s'r 


1610 


2:15 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24,2 


50 


1 1 . 25 


2693 


2560 


2559 


33.52 


1611 


2:15 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24,2 


20 


14.46 


2690 


2557 


2494 


33.48 


1612 


2:45 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 





21.0 


2704 


2571 


2348 


33.65 


1613 


5:06 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


500 


7.28 










1614 


5:06 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24,2 


225 


9.26 


2737 


2602 


2637 


34!o6 


1615 


5:06 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


75 


10.24 


2709 


2575 


2592 


33.71 


1616 


5:06 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


30 


12.20 


2686 


2553 


2534 


33.43 


1617 


5:06 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


10 


19.58 


2709 


2575 


2391 


33.71 


1618 


5:22 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 





20.55 


2708 


2574 


2364 


33.70 


1619 


6:15 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 





20.45 


2709 


2575 


2367 


33.71 


1620 


6:57 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 





20.3 


2710 


2576 


2373 


33.73 


1621 


8:07 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





20.3 


2706 


2573 


2368 


33.68 


1622 


8:35 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





20.1 


2712 


2578 


2379 


33.75 












Aug. 17, 1910 














1623 


10:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


20 


14.03 


2679 


2547 


2492 


33.34 


1624 


10:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


15 


14.66 


2685 


2552 


2486 


33.42 


1625 


10:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


10 


17.45 


2694 


2561 


2492 


33.53 


1626 


10:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


5 


20.50 


2706 


2573 


2364 


33.68 


1627 


10:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





20 . 25 


2710 


2576 


2375 


33.73 


1628 


11:18 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


150 


9.75 


2732 


2597 


2639 


34.00 


1629 


11:18 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


75 


10.94 


2703 


2570 


2575 


33.64 


1630 


11:18 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


20 


13.79 










1631 


11 


18 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


5 


20.31 


2705 


2572 


2367 


ss^eii 



76 



University of California Puhlicaiions in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 



Specific gravity 



Water Time 
sample of 

number day 



1632 
1633 
1634 
1635 
1636 
1637 
1638 
1639 
1640 
1641 
1642 
1643 
1644 
1645 
1646 
1647 
1648 
1649 
1650 
1651 
1652 
1653 
1654 
1655 
1656 
1657 
1658 
1659 
1660 



1661 
1662 
1663 
1664 
1665 
1666 
1667 
1668 
1669 
1670 
1671 
1672 
1673 
1674 
1675 
1676 
1677 
1678 
1679 
1680 
1681 
1682 
1683 
1684 
1685 
1686 
1687 
1688 
1689 
1690 
1691 
1692 
1693 
1694 



12:05 p.m. 
12:36 p.m. 
12:36 p.m. 
12:36 p.m. 
12:36 p.m. 
12:36 p.m. 

1:30 p.m. 

1:32 p.m. 

1:32 p.m. 

1:32 p.m. 

1:32 p.m. 

1:32 p.m. 

1:48 p.m. 

1:48 p.m. 

1:48 p.m. 

1:48 p.m. 

2:55 p.m. 

2:55 p.m. 

4:30 p.m. 

5:20 p.m. 

5:20 p.m. 

5:20 p.m. 

5:20 p.m. 

6:15 p.m. 

7:03 p.m. 

7:33 p.m. 

8:05 p.m. 

9:05 p.m. 

9:40 p.m. 

7:40 a.m. 

40 a.m. 

40 a.m. 

40 a.m. 

40 a.m. 

40 a.m. 

55 a.ra. 

55 a.m. 

55 a.m. 

55 a.m. 

55 a.m. 

55 a.m. 
8:10 a.m. 
8:10 a.m. 
8:10 a.m. 
8:10 a.m. 
8:10 a.m. 
8:10 a.m. 
8:25 a.m. 
8:25 a.m. 
8:25 a.m. 
8:25 a.m. 
8:25 a.m. 
8:25 a.m. 
8:40 a.m. 
8:40 a.m. 
8:40 a.m. 
8:40 a.m. 
8:40 a.m. 
8:40 a.m. 
8:53 a.m. 
8:53 a.m. 
8:53 a.m. 
8:.53a.m. 



4O5 
4O5 
4O5 
4O5 
4O5 
40, 
4O5 
4O5 
40, 
4O5 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
4O5 
4O5 
40; 
4O5 
40, 
4O5 
4O5 
41, 
41 5 
41, 
41, 
40, 
40, 

39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39. 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 



32° 23:4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 



West 
longitude i 
Aug. 17. 1910 
117° 18:2 



I centi- S - 



ade 



4?0 



23.4 
23.4 
23.4 



32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



18.2 
18.2 
18.2 
18.2 
18.2 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
24.2 
24.2 
24.2 
24.2 
21.9 
21.9 



32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.3 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.35 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 

32 23.4 



Aug. 18, 1910 
117 14.5 
117 14.5 
117 14.5 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



14.5 
14.5 
14.5 
15.2 
15.2 
15.2 
1.5.2 
15.2 
15.2 
15.8 
15.8 
15.8 
15.8 
15.8 
15.8 
16.6 
16.6 
16.6 
16.6 
16.6 
16.6 
17.2 
17.2 
17.2 
17.2 
17.2 
17.2 
17.8 
17.8 
17.8 
17.8 





150 

100 

75 

50 



20 

15 

10 

5 

125 

75 

50 

30 

550 

150 



550 

200 

150 

100 













25 

20 

15 

10 

5 



25 

20 

15 

10 

5 



25 

20 

15 

10 

5 



25 

20 

15 

10 

5 



25 

20 

15 

10 

5 



25 

20 

15 

10 



2709 
2724 

2708 
2692 
2680 
2707 
2694 
2692 
2699 
2696 
2703 
2722 
2710 



20!3 

9.81 
10.60 
10.46 
11.53 
13.25 
20.4 
13.69 
15.05 
16.11 
19.20 
20.36 

9.71 
10.21 

11.22 2699 

12.76 2694 

2766 

2752 

20.2 2703 

7.93 

8.56 

8.95 

9.76 2721 

20.15 2706 

20.1 2706 

20.0 2703 

20.0 2703 

19.9 2707 
20.0 

12.94 

12.81 

15.91 

18.63 

19.30 

19.30 

12.92 

13.30 

13.90 

16.42 

19.04 

18.90 

13.18 

13.20 

15.74 

18.54 

18.58 

18.60 

12.83 

13.69 

15.46 

16.50 

19.71 

19.71 

13.25 

15.29 

16.17 

16.80 

19.73 

19.75 

13.10 

14.46 

15.83 

19.12 



2574 
2559 
2548 
2574 
2561 
2559 
2566 
2563 
2570 
2588 
2576 
2566 
2561 
2630 
2616 
2570 



2587 
2573 
2573 

2570 
2570 
2574 



2372 
2615 

2588 
2554 
2508 
2367 
2513 
2485 
2466 
2388 
2365 
2615 
2594 
2565 
2531 



2613 
2373 
2375 
2374 
2374 
2381 



Salinity 
SO/00 

33.71 
33.90 

33!70 

33.50 

33.35 

33.69 

33.53 

33.50 

33.59 

33.55 

33.64 

33.88 

33.73 

33.59 

33.53 

34.42 

34.25? 

33.64 



33.86 
33.68 
33.68 
33.64 
33.64 
33.69 



I9i"i] Michael, et al. : Eydrograpliic Records of Scripps InstitiiAion 



11 



Table 1.— Ocean Data— (CoH(i?i«cd) 

















Temper- 


Specific gravity 




Water 
sample 


Time 
of 












Depth 






t* 






N 


orth 


West 


S 


S — '— 


s 




number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4^0 


17°5 


4?0 


so/00 












Aug. 18, 1910 














1695 


8:53 a.in. 


4O5 


32 


23:4 


117' 


17:8 





19?79 










1696 


8:53 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


23.4 


117 


17.8 





19.8 










1697 


9:25 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


23.4 


117 


20.0 


25 


13.98 










1698 


9:25 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


23.4 


117 


20.0 


20 


15.23 










1699 


9:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


20.0 


15 


17.05 










1700 


9:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


20.0 


10 


19.78 










1701 


9:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


20.0 





19.8 










1702 


9:45 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


24.55 


117 


20.0 


25 


13.13 










1703 


9:45 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


24.55 


117 


20.0 


20 


14.79 










1704 


9:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.55 


117 


20.0 


15 


15.54 










1705 


9:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.55 


117 


20.0 


10 


19.74 










1706 


9:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.55 


117 


20.0 





19.85 










1707 


10:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.4 


117 


17.6 


25 


12.95 










1708 


10:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.4 


117 


17.6 


20 


15.05 










1709 


10:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.4 


117 


17.6 


15 


15.44 










1710 


10:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.4 


117 


17.6 


10 


17.97 










1711 


10:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.4 




17.6 





19.5 










1712 


10:27 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.35 


117 


15.35 


25 


13.40 










1713 


10:27 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.35 


117 


15.35 


20 


14.16 










1714 


10:27 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.35 


117 


15.35 


15 


14.98 










1715 


10:27 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.35 


117 


15.35 


10 


15.84 










1716 


10:27 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.35 


117 


15.35 





18.9 










1717 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


25.0 


117 


16.3 


25 


13.97 










1718 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


25.0 


117 


16.3 


20 


14.82 










1719 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


25.0 


117 


16.3 


15 


15.50 










1720 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


25.0 


117 


16.3 


10 


16.62 










1721 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


25.0 


117 


16.3 





19.7 










1722 


12:40 p.m. 


39, 


32 


35.1 


117 


14.8 


25 


11.68 










1723 


12:40 p.m. 


39, 


32 


3.5.1 


117 


14.8 


20 


12.03 










1724 


12:40 p.m. 


39, 


32 


35.1 


117 


14.8 


15 


12.58 










1725 


12:40 p.m. 


39, 


32 


35.1 


117 


14.8 


10 


13.70 










1726 


12:40 p.m. 


39, 


32 


35.1 


117 


14.8 





18.6 




















June 14. 1911 














1727 


2:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


64 


9.65 










1728 


3:25 a.m. 


40, 


From 2:14 to 5: 


15 a.m. 





17.0 


2714 


2580 


2459 


33.78 


1729 


3:30 a.m. 


40, 


the boat drifted 


110 


9.40 










1730 


3:30 a.m. 


40, 


from th 


e above 


73 




2705 


2572 




33.66 


1731 


3:30 a.m. 


40, 


position 


toth 


6 


46 


12.. 55 


2695 


2562 


2536 


33.54 


1732 


3:30 a.m. 


40, 


following position 


27 


14.20 










1733 


5:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.2 


117 


21.6 





16.9 


2708 


'2574 


2455 


33.70 


1734 


6:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





16.8 


2709 


2575 


2458 


33.71 


1735 


8:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


137 


9.40 


2742 


2606 


2639 


34.12 


1736 


8:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


92 




2722 


2588 




33.88 


1737 


8:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


13 


16.65 


2704 


2571 


2458 


33.65 


1738 


8:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


7 


16.70 










1739 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


110 


9.50 










1740 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


73 




2706 


2573 




33.68 


1741 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


46 


11.00 










1742 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


27 


13.40 










1743 


9:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


64 


9.75 


2706 


2573 


2598 


33.68 


1744 


9:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


4 


17.05 


2703 


2570 


2448 


33.64 


1745 


9:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


46 


11.25 


2689 


2556 


2556 


33.47 


1746 


9:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


37 




2693 


2560 




33.52 


1747 


9:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


16 


15.80 


2697 


2564 


2470 


33..57 


1748 


9:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


82 


9.40 


2712 


2578 


2610 


33.75 


1749 


9:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


11 


16.60 










1750 


9:. 35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


6 


16.85 


2700 


2567 


2450 


33.60 


1751 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





17.0 


2717 


2583 


2462 


33.81 


1752 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


From 10:00 to 11:59 


137 


9.45 


2729 


2594 


2625 


33.96 


1753 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the 


boat 




92 


9.60 


2707 


2574 


2601 


33.69 


1754 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from 


the 


13 


16.90 


2699 


2566 


2448 


33.59 


1755 


10:15 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


110 


9.60 










1756 


10:15 a.m. 


40, 


t 


the following 


73 


10.20 


2700 


2567 


258.5 


33.60 


1757 


10:15 a.m. 


40, 


position 






27 


13.40 


2690 


2557 


2515 


33.48 



78 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 



Water 
sample 
number 

1758 
1759 
1760 
1761 
1762 

1763 

1764 
1765 
1766 
1767 
1768 
1769 
1770 
1771 
1772 
1773 
1774 
1775 
1776 
1777 
1778 
1779 
1780 
1781 
1782 
1783 
1784 
1785 
1786 
1787 
1788 
17S9 
1790 
1791 
1792 
1793 
1794 
1795 
1796 
1797 
1798 
1799 
1800 
1801 
1802 
1803 
1804 
1805 
1806 
1807 
1808 
1809 
1810 
1811 
1812 
1813 
1814 
1815 
1816 
1817 
1818 
1819 
1820 



10:30 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:59 a.m. 

1:30 a.m. 
1:30 a.m. 
1:30 a.m. 
1:30 a.m. 
1:30 a.m. 
2:00 a.m. 
2:00 a.m. 
2:00 a.m. 
2:00 a.m. 
2:23 a.m. 
3:20 a.m. 
3:20 a.m. 
3:20 a.m. 
3:22 a.m. 
3:25 a.m. 
3:25 a.m. 
3:25 a.m. 
3:25 a.m. 
3:55 a.m. 
3:55 a.m. 
3:55 a.m. 
3:55 a.m. 
4:23 a.m. 
4:23 a.m. 
4:23 a.m. 
4:23 a.m. 
4:23 a.m. 
4:40 a.m. 
4:40 a.m. 
4:40 a.m. 
4:40 a.m. 
5:07 a.m. 
5:50 a.m. 
5:50 a.m. 
5:50 a.m. 
5:50 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:15 a.m. 
6:15 a.m. 
6:15 a.m. 
6:15 a.m. 
6:25 a.m. 
7:05 a.m. 
7:35 a.m. 
7:35 a.m. 
7:35 a.m. 
7:45 a.m. 
7:45 a.m. 
7:45 a.m. 
7:55 a.m. 
7:55 a.m. 
8:05 a.m. 
8:20 a.m. 
9:05 a.m. 
9:05 a.m. 



40, 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 

4O5 
40, 
4O5 
4O5 
4O5 
40^ 
4O5 
4O5 
40j 
4O5 
40, 
40s 
40, 
4O5 
40„ 
4O3 
4O5 
40s 
4O5 
4O5 
4O3 
40, 
4O5 
40, 
4O5 
40, 
4O5 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 



West 

longitude 

June 14, 1911 



Temper- 
Depth ature 

in in centi- 
meters grade 



Specific gravity 



0° 
4?0 



117° 20:4 

June 15, 1911 

117 19.2 



32° 

32 

Prom 1:30 to 4:10 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 23.6 117 18.5 
32 22.7 117 19.2 
From 4:20 to 6:25 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 23.5 117 18.9 
32 22.7 117 19.2 
From 7:05 to 9:25 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



7 

82 

55 







137 

92 

13 

110 
73 
46 
27 


82 
22 
18 


46 
37 
16 

9 
64 
37 
11 

6 



137 

92 

13 

7 

110 

73 

46 

27 


82 
55 
22 
18 
92 
46 
16 

9 
64 
37 
11 

6 





137 

92 

13 

no 
73 

27 

55 

7 







17?05 

9.10 

11.35 

17.0 2714 

17.01 2720 

16.07 2718 

9.40 2731 

9.6 

16.55 2725 

16.75 2699 

9.70 2712 

2703 

11.20 2691 

13.15 2696 

16.5 2707 

9.70 

2702 
2700 

16.5 

10.65 

11.10 

15.15 2700 

16.15 2699 

9.80 2709 

11.20 2690 

15.95 2700 

16.55 2717 

16.7 2715 

9.40 

9.60 

16.00 2697 

16.65 2697 

9.50 

9.. 55 2713 

10.50 2699 

12.80 2687 

16.6 

9.40 2713 

10.7? 2694 

15.00 

15.60 

9.50 2730 

10.3? 2697 

15.80 

16.45 2697 

9.75 2723 

12.20 2687 

16.60 2697 

16.70 2701 
16.5 
16.8 

9.40 

9.50 
16.80 

9.50 

9.65 
13.10 
10.70 
16.85 
16.8 
16.7 
15.95 
16.75 



2710 
2733 
2731 
2702 
2733 
2706 
2695 



2710 
2705 
2697 
2697 



i7;5 



2580 2459 
2586 2465 

2584 2485 

2596 2628 

2590 2479 

2566 2450 
2578 2604 

2570 

2558 2559 

2563 2526 

2574 2464 

2569 ........ 

2576 

2567 2488 

2566 2466 

2575 2600 
2557 2558 

2567 2470 
2583 2473 

2581 2468 



2564 
2564 

2579 
2566 

2554 



2579 
2561 



2595 

2564 

2564 

2588 
2554 
2564 
2568 



2466 
2451 

2608 
2578 
2525 

2611 

2570 



2626 
2580 



2455 
2615 
2536 

2452 
2454 



2576 
2598 
2596 
2569 
2598 
2573 
2562 



2460 
2630 
2626 
2453 
2629 
2599 
2527 



2576 
2572 
2564 
2564 



2460 
2457 
2467 
2449 



33.78 
33.85 



33.83 
33.99 



33.91 
33.59 
33.75 
33.64 
33.49 
33.55 
33.69 



33.63 

33.60 



33.60 
33.59 
33.71 
33.48 
33.60 
33.81 
33.79 



33.56 
33.56 



33.76 
33.59 
33.44 



33.76 
33..53 



33.97 
33.57 



33.57 
33.89 
33.44 
33.57 
33.61 



33.73 
34.01 
33.99 
33.63 
34.01 
33.68 
33.54 



33.73 
33.66 
33.57 
33.57 



If 15] Michael, et al. : Hijdrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



79 



Table 1.— Ocean Datx— (Continued) 





















Specific gravity 


















Temper- 
ature 




















^ 




Depth 




17?5 
S 


^ 




sampU 


: of 




North 


West 


S 


S 


Salinity 
SO/00 


numbei 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4;o 


17?5 


4;o 












June 15. 191] 


L 












1821 


9:12 a.m. 


4O5 










82 


9°50 










1822 


9:12 a.m. 


40; 










64 


10.25 


2702 


2569 


2585 


33.63 


1823 


9:12 a.m. 


40, 










11 


10.65 


2706 


2573 


2461 


33.68 


1824 


9:20 a.m. 


40, 










37 


12.40 


2690 


2557 


2534 


33.48 


1825 


9:20 a.m. 


4O5 










16 


16.45 


2695 


2562 


2453 


33.54 


1826 


9:20 a.m. 


•10; 










9 


16.65 


2696 


2563 


2450 


33.55 


1827 


9:25 a.m. 


40; 


32' 


' 23f2 


117* 


' 18:6 





16.7 


2703 


2570 


2456 


33.64 


1828 


9:55 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.4 


17 


15.70 










1829 


9:55 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.4 


11 


16.55 










1830 


9:. 55 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.4 


5 


16.65 










1831 


9:55 a.m. 


39.. 


32 


23.2 




17.4 





16.7 










1832 


9:55 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.4 


20 


14.40 










1833 


9:55 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.4 


12 


15.65 










1834 


9:55 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.4 


8 


16.45 










1835 


10:20 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


16.2 


17 


14.90 










1836 


10:20 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


16.2 


11 


15.70 










1837 


10:20 a.Jii. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


16.2 


5 


16.65 










1838 


10:20 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


16.2 





16.6 










1839 


10:20 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


16.2 


20 


14.50 










1840 


10:20 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


16.2 


12 


15.65 










1841 


10:20 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.2 


117 


16.2 


8 


16.40 










1842 


10:45 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


15.5 


17 


14.90 










1843 


10:45 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


15.5 


11 


16.40 










1844 


10:45 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


15.5 


5 


16.70 










1845 


10:45 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


15.5 





16.9 










1846 


10:45 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


15.5 


20 


14.40 










1847 


10:45 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


15.5 


12 


16 . 75 










1848 


10:45 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


15.5 


8 


16.50 










1849 


11:05 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


14.9 


17 


16.30 










1850 


11:05 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


14.9 


11 


16.65 










1851 


11:05 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


14.9 


5 


16.75 










1852 


11:05 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


14.9 





16.9 










1853 


11:05 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


14.9 


20 


16.40 










1854 


11:05 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


14.9 


12 


16.65 










1855 


11:05 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 


117 


14.9 


8 


16.75 










1856 


11:25 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.1 


117 


14.1 


17 


15.95 










1857 


11:25 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.1 


117 


14.1 


11 


15.40 










1858 


11:25 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.1 


117 


14.1 





16.60 










1859 


11 :2o a.m. 


39, 


32 


23.1 


117 


14.1 





16.8 










1860 


11 :25 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.1 


117 


14.1 


20 


13.00 










1861 


11:25 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.1 


117 


14.1 


12 


15.50 










1862 


11:25 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.1 


117 


14.1 


8 


16.70 




















June 16, 1911 














1863 


1:53 a.m. 


40; 


32 


23.5 


117 


IS.O 





16.9 


2713 


2579 


2460 


33.76 


1864 


1:53 a.m. 


40; 


From 1:48 to 3.4 





137 


9.50 


2728 


2593 


2623 


33.95 


1865 


1:53 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. thi 


e boat 




92 


9.75 


2712 


2578 


2604 


33.75 


1866 


1:53 a.m. 


40; 


drifted from the 


13 


16.55 


2700 


2567 


2456 


33.60 


1867 


2:04 a.m. 


40; 


above position 


110 




2714 


2580 




33.78 


1869 


2:04 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


27 


13.20 


2686 


2553 


2515 


33.43 


1870 


2:15 a.m. 


40; 


position 




82 




2698 


2565 




33.58 


1871 


2:15 a.m. 


40, 










55 


10.95 










1872 


2:15 a.m. 


40; 










7 


16.65 


2707 


2574 


2460 


33.69 


1873 


2:30 a.m. 


40; 













16.6 


2705 


2572 


2460 


33.66 


1874 


2:45 a.m. 


40, 













16.7 


2704 


2571 


2457 


33.65 


1875 


3:25 a.m. 


39; 













16.8 


2712 


2578 


2462 


33.75 


1876 


3:25 a.m. 


39; 










46 


11.20 


2693 


2560 


2561 


33.52 


1877 


3:25 a.m. 


39; 










18 


15.40 


2694 


2561 


2477 


33.53 


1878 


3:25 a.m. 


39, 










6 


16.80 










1879 


3:35 a.m. 


39; 










82 


9.80 


2716 


2582 


2607 


33.80 


1880 


3:35 a.m. 


39; 










64 


10.40 


2700 


2567 


2581 


33.60 


1881 


3:35 a.m. 


39; 










11 


16.60 


2700 


2567 


2454 


33.60 


1882 


3:40 a.m. 


39, 










37 


12.00 


2688 


2555 


2541 


33.45 


1883 


3:40 a.m. 


39; 










16 


15.95 










1884 


3:40 a.m. 


39; 










9 


16.70 


2705 


2572 


2457 


33.66 



80 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 









Table 1.— Ocean Data — {Continued) 


























Specific gravity 


















Temper- 
ature 
in centi- 










Wntpr 










;^ 




Depth 


n° 


17?5 
S 


^ 




sample 


of 




North 


West 


S 


S 




number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4°0 


17?5 


4^0 


so/00 












June : 


16. 1911 












1885 


3:45 a.m. 


39, 


32 


" 22:7 


117 


°17:i 





16?7 


2716 


2582 


2468 


33.80 


1886 


4:12 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


23.5 


117 


18.0 


137 


9,45 


2739 


2604 


2635 


34.09 


1887 


4:12 a.m. 


40, 


From 4: 


12 to 6: 


20 


92 


9.70 


2701 


2568 


2594 


33.61? 


1888 


4:12 a.m. 


40, 




a.m. the boat 




13 


16.40 


2721 


2587 


2480 


33.86 


1889 


4:15 a.m. 


40, 




drifte 


d from the 





16.8 


2710 


2576 


2460 


33.73 


1890 


4:30 a.m. 


40, 




above 


position 


110 


9.55 


2728 


2593 


2622 


33.95 


1891 


4:30 a.m. 


40, 




to the 


follow! 


"g 


73 


9.75 










1892 


4:30 a.m. 


40, 




position 




27 


12.90 


2696 


2563 


2531 


33.55 


1893 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 










82 


9.65 


2727 


2592 


2620 


33.94? 


1894 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 










55 


10.40 


2713 


2579 


2593 


33.76 


1895 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 










7 


16.85 


2704 


2571 


2454 


33.65 


1896 


4:45 a.m. 


40, 













16.8 


2703 


2570 


2453 


33.64 


1897 


5:38 a.m. 


40, 










46 


10.50 










1898g 


5:38 a.m. 


40, 










18 


15.40 










1899g 


5:38 a.m. 


40, 










6 


16.90 


2698 


2565 


2446 


33.58 


1900g 


5:45 a.m. 


40, 













16.6 










1901g 


5:55 a.m. 


40, 










82 


9.80 


2712 


2.578 


2603 


33.75 


1902 


5:55 a.m. 


40, 










64 




2702 


2569 




33.63 


1903g 


5:55 a.m. 


40, 










n 


16.40 


2697 


2564 


2457 


33.57 


1904g 


6:10 a.m. 


40, 










37 


11.15 










1905g 


6:10 a.m. 


40, 










16 


15.40 


2700 


2567 


2482 


33.60 


1906g 


6:10 a.m. 


40, 










9 




2697 


2564 




33.57 


1907 


6:20 a.m. 


39.5, 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.5 





r6.8 


2716 


2582 


2466 


33.80? 


1908g 


7:48 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


18.0 


137 


9.. 55 


2744 


2609 


2639 


34.15 


1909g 


7:48 a.m. 


40, 


Prom 6:45 to 9:43 


92 


9.60 










1910g 


7:48 a.m. 


40, 




a.m. the boat 




13 




2700 


2.567 




33.60 


1911 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 




drifted from the 





16.8 


2693 


2560 


2454 


33.52 


1912g 


8:02 a.m. 


40, 




above 


positio 


n 


110 


9.60 


2718 


2584 


2613 


33.83 


1913g 


8:02 a.m. 


40, 




to the follow! 


mg 


73 


9.85 


2714 


2580 


2604 


33.78 


1914g 


8:02 a.m. 


40, 




position 




27 


13.55 


2697 


2564 


2520 


33.57 


1915g 


8:10 a.m. 


40, 










82 


9.70 


2715 


2581 


2607 


33.79 


1916g 


8:10 a.m. 


40, 










55 


10.40 


2717 


2583 


2598 


33.81 


1917g 


8:10 a.m. 


40, 










7 


16.50 


2704 


2571 


2461 


33.65 


1918 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 













16.95 


2707 


2574 


2453 


33.69 


1919 


9:25 a.m. 


39, 










46 


10.50 


2702 


2569 


2582 


33.63 


1920 


9:25 a.m. 


39, 










18 


15.70 


2716 


2582 


2493 


33.80 


1921 


9:25 a.m. 


39, 










6 


16.85 


2718 


2584 


2466 


33.83 


1922 


9:35 a.m. 


39, 










82 


9.75 


2733 


2598 


2624 


34.01 


1923 


9:35 a.m. 


39, 










64 


10.10 


2709 


2575 


2595 


33.71 


1924 


9:35 a.m. 


39, 










11 


16.50 










1925 


9:40 a.m. 


39, 










37 


11.15 


2712 


2578 


2580 


33.75 


1926 


9:40 a.m. 


39, • 










16 


15.90 


2714 


2580 


2486 


33.78 


1927 


9:40 a.m. 


39, 










9 


15.60 


2712 


2578 


2467 


33.75 


1928 


9:43 a.m. 


39, 


32 


23.0 


117 


17.4 





17.0 


2722 


2588 


2462 


33.88 


1929 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.6 


117 


18.7 


17 


16.25 










1930 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.6 




18.7 


11 


16.60 










1931 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.6 




18.7 





17.10 










1932 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.6 




18.7 





17.1 










1933 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.6 




18.7 


20 


16.00 










1934 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.6 




18.7 


12 


16.50 










1935 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.6 




18.7 


8 


16.80 










1936 


10:20 a.m. 


39.5, 


32 


24.7 




17.5 


17 


16.30 










1937 


10:20 a.m. 


39.5, 


32 


24.7 




17.5 


11 


16.60 










1938 


10:20 a.m. 


39.5, 


32 


24.7 




17.5 


5 


17.00 










1939 


10:20 a.m. 


39.5, 


32 


24.7 




17.5 





17.05 










1940 


10:20 a.m. 


39.5, 


32 


24.7 




17.5 


20 


16.30 










1941 


10:20 a.m. 


39.5, 


32 


24.7 




17.5 


12 


16.50 










1942 


10:20 a.m. 


39.5, 


32 


24.7 




17.5 


8 


16.75 










1943 


10:30 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.7 




17.0 


17 


16.20 










1944 


10:30 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.7 




17.0 


11 


16.45 










1945 


10:30 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.7 




17.0 


5 


16.95 










1946 


10:30 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.7 




17.0 





16.95 










1947 


10:30 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.7 




17.0 


20 


15. 75 











g Indicates that the gas content of the sample was determined; see Table 3. 



1915] Michael, et al.: II ijd roc/ rapine Records of Scripps Institution 81 









T.\BLE 1. 


— OCE.\N Dat.\— I 


[Continued) 










Time 
! of 
: day 


Section 


PO! 




Depth 
meters 


Temper- 
ature 
in centi- 
1 grade 


.Specific gravity 




Watei 
samplt 
n umbel 


0° 
S 

4;o 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 

4?0 




North 
latitude 


We.st 
loriKitude 


Salinity 
SO/oo 


1948 


10:30 a.m. 


39, 


32° 24:7 


June 16, 1911 
117°17;0 12 


16°30 










1949 


10:30 a.m. 


39-, 


32 24.7 


117 17.0 


8 


16.70 










1 950 


10:40 a.m. 


39j 


32 24.7 


117 16.4 


17 


14.40 










1951 


10:40 a.m. 


39; 


32 24.7 


117 16.4 


11 


16.30 










1952 


10:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 16.4 





16.60 










1953 


10:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 16.4 





16.8 










1954 


10:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 16.4 


20 


14.85 










1955 


10:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 16.4 


12 


16.30 










1956 


10:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 16.4 


8 


16.55 










1957 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 15.4 


17 


16.30 










1958 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 15.4 


11 


1 6 . 55 










1959 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 15.4 


■:> 


16.70 










1960 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 15.4 





16.8 










1961 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 15.4 


20 


16.20 










1962 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 15.4 


12 


16.55 










1963 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.7 


117 15.4 


8 


16.75 










1964 


11:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.1 


117 15.2 


17 


16.50 










1965 


11:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.1 


117 15.2 


11 


16.75 










1966 


ll:lua.m. 


39, 


32 24.1 


117 15.2 


5 


16.85 










1967 


11:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.1 


117 15.2 





16.9 










1968 


11:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.1 


117 15.2 


20 


16.25 










1 969 


11 :15 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.1 


117 15.2 


12 


16.65 










1970 


11:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.1 


117 15.2 


8 


16.75 










1971 


1:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 21.6 


June 17, 1911 
117 20.5 137 


9.65 


2730 


2595 


2624 


33.97 


1972 


1 :40 a.m. 


40, 


From 1:30 to 3:55 


92 


9.75 


2716 


2582 


2608 


33.80 


1073 


1:40 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the 


boat 


13 


17.0 


2700 


2567 


2446 


33.60 


1974 


1:45 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 





17.2 


2719 


2585 


2459 


33.84 


1975 


2:00 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


110 


9.60 


2732 


2597 


2625 


34.00 


1976 


2:00 a.m. 


40. 


to the following 


73 


10.35 


2703 


2570 


2585 


33.64 


1977 


2:00 a.m. 


40, 


position 




27 


13.20 


2694 


2561 


2523 


33.53 


1978 


2:12 a.m. 


40, 






82 


9.95 


2703 


2570 


2592 


33.64 


1979 


2:12 a.m. 


40, 






55 


1 1 . 05 


2696 


2563 


2566 


33.55 


1980 


2:12 a.m. 


40, 






7 


17.15 


2702 


2569 


2444 


33.63 


1981 


2:25 a.m. 


40, 









17.1 


2704 


2571 


2447 


33.65 


1982 


3:25 a.m. 


40. 






137 


9.40 


2740 


2605 


2637 


34.10 


1983 


3:25 a.m. 


40. 






92 


9,60 


2709 


2575 


2604 


33.71 


1984 


3:25 a.m. 


40, 






13 


16.60 


2696 


2563 


2451 


33.55 


1985 


3:35 a.m. 


40, 






46 


11.90 


2696 


2563 


2550 


33.55 


1986 


3:35 a.m. 


40, 






18 


15.30 


2698 


2565 


2482 


33.58 


1987 


3:35 a.m. 


40, 






6 


17.15 


2702 


2569 


2445 


33.63 


1988 


3:45 a.m. 


40. 






82 


10.20 


2705 


2572 


2589 


33.66 


1989 


3:45 a.m. 


40. 






64 


11.15 


2701 


2568 


2569 


33.61 


1990 


3:45 a.m. 


40. 






11 


16.65 


2699 


2566 


2453 


33.59 


1991 


3:55 a.m. 


40, 






37 


12.50 


2695 


2562 


2538 


33..54 


1992 


3:. 55 a.m. 


40, 






16 




2700 


2567 




33.60 


1993 


3:55 a.m. 


40, 






9 


16.85 


2700 


2567 


2449 


33.60 


1994 


4:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 20.7 


117 20.0 





17.1 


2702 


2569 


2446 


33.63 


1995 


4:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 


117 21.2 


92 


9.80 


2703 


2570 


2595 


33.64 


1996 


4:30 a.m. 


40. 


From 4:30 to 6:10 


13 


17.15 


2702 


2569 


2445 


33.63 


1997 


4:35 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the 


boat 





17.1 


2702 


2569 


2446 


33.63 


1998 


4:45 a.m. 


40. 


drifted from the 


110 


9.65 


2721 


2587 


2615 


33.86 


1999 


4.45 a.m. 


40. 


above p( 


3sition 


73 


10.15 


2700 


2567 


2586 


33.60 


2000 


4:45 a.m. 


40. 


to the following 


27 


13.85 


2693 


2560 


2510 


33.52 


2001 


4:50 a.m. 


40, 


position 




82 


9.95 










2002 


4:50 a.m. 


40, 






55 


10.95 


2689 


2556 


2562 


33.47 


2003 


4:50 a.m. 


40, 






7 


17.15 


2711 


2577 


2453 


33.74 


2004 


5:00 a.m. 


40. 









17.1 


2701 


2568 


2445 


33.61 


2005 


5:54 a.m. 


40, 






46 


11.45 


2704 


2571 


2566 


33.65 


2006 


5:54 a.m. 


40, 






18 


15.60 


2704 


2571 


2483 


33.65 


2007 


5:54 a.m. 


40, 






6 


17.05 


2704 


2571 


2448 


33.65 


2008 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 






82 


10.10 


2710 


2576 


2596 


33.73 


2009 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 






64 


11.20 


2701 


2568 


2568 


33.61 


2010 


6:00 a.m. 


4(1, 






11 


17.05 


2705 


2572 


2450 


33.66 



82 University of California F'ublications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Table 1. — Ocean Data — {Continued) 

Specific gravity 
Temper- 



Water Time , '■ > Bepth ature 0° IT^S 

sample of North West in in centi- S ■ S 1 

number day Section latitude longitude meters grade 4?0 17?5 

June 17. 1911 

2011 6:05 a.m. 40, 37 12?50 2709 2575 

2012 6:05 a.m. 40, 16 16.40 2701 2568 

2013 6:05 a.m. 40. 9 17.05 2701 2568 

2014 6:10 a.m. 40, 32° 2i:0 117° 20:2 17.0 2705 2572 

2015 6:55 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 16.9 2712 2578 
2016g 7:05 a.m. 40, From 6:55 to 8:45 137 9.35 2736 2601 

2017g 7:05 a.m. 40. a.m. the boat 92 9.60 

2018g 7:05 a.m. 40, drifted from the 13 17.00 2700 2567 

2019e 7:18 a.m. 40, above position 110 9.70 

2020g 7:18 a.m. 40, to the following 73 9.90 2704 2571 

2021 7:18 a.m. 40, position 27 13.80 

2022 V :30 a.m. 40, 82 9.55 2710 2576 
2023g 7:30 a.m. 40, 55 10.85 2698 2565 
2024" 7:30 a.m. 40, 7 17.00 2702 2569 

2025 7:38 a.m. 40, 16.9 2707 2574 

2026 8:30 a.m. 40, 16.9 2710 2576 
2027g 8:30 a.m. 40, 46 11.40 2695 2562 
2028 8:30 a.m. 40, 18 16.65 2702 2569 
2029g 8:30 a.m. 40, 6 17.00 2700 2567 
2030 8:35 a.m. 40. 82 9.70 2705 2572 

2031g 8:35 a.m. 40, 64 10.85 

2032 8:35 a.m. 40, 11 17.00 2702 2.569 

2033g 8:45 a.m. 40, 37 12.40 2690 2557 

2034g 8:45 a.m. 40, 16 16.45 2695 2562 

203.5g 8:45 a.m. 40, 32 21.4 117 20.2 9 16.95 2706 2573 

2036 8:55 a.m. 40, 32 21.5 117 20.2 16.95 2698 2565 

2037 10:15 a.m. 40. 32 22.4 117 19.9 17.05 2702 2569 

2038 10:20 a.m. 40, 5 32 22.5 117 19.1 17.0 2705 2572 

2039 10:25 a.m. 40, 32 22.6 117 18.3 17.05 2704 2571 

2040 10:30 a.m. 39.5^ 32 22.7 117 17.5 17.15 2708 2574 

2041 10:3oa.m. 39^ 32 22.S 117 16.7 17.2 2705 2572 

2042 10:40 a.m. 39, 32 22.9 117 15.9 17.15 2702 2569 

2043 10:45 a.m. 39, 32 23.0 117 15.1 2707 2574 

2044 10:50 a.m. 39, 32 23.2 117 14.5 17.7 2707 2574 

2045 11:20 a.m. 39, 32 24.4 117 14.5 17.8 2707 2574 

June 18, 1911 

2046 2:00a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 137 9.50 2740 2605 

2047 2:00 a.m. 40, From 2:00 to 3:55 92 9.80 2720 2586 

2048 2:00 a.m. 40, a.m. the boat 13 16.70 2700 2567 

2049 2:00 a.m. 40, drifted from the 17.2 2705 2572 

2050 2:10 a.m. 40, above position 110 9.65 2727 2.592 

2051 2:10 a.m. 40, to the following 73 10.00 2706 2573 

2052 2:10 a.m. 40, position 27 12.90 2696 2563 

2053 2:20 a.m. 40, 82 9.90 2709 2575 

2054 2:20 a.m. 40, 55 10.0? 2697 2564 

2055 2:20 a.m. 40, 7 16.90 2706 2573 

2056 2:35 a.m. 40, 17.1 2707 2574 

2057 3:35 a.m. 40, 46 11.15 2707 2574 

2058 3:35 a.m. 40. 18 14.50 2696 2563 

2059 3:35 a.m. 40. 6 16.95 2700 2.567 

2060 3:40 a.m. 40, 82 2703 2570 

2061 3:40 a.m. 40. 64 10.75 2700 2567 

2062 3:40 a.m. 40, 11 16.75 2703- 2570 

2063 3:40 a.m. 40. 16.95 2704 2571 

2064 3:50 a.m. 40, 37 12.05 2692 2559 

2065 3:50 a.m. 40. 16 14.85 2695 2562 

2066 3:50 a.m. 40. 32 22.2 117 18.8 9 16.80 2720 2586 

2067 4:05a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 137 9.55 

2068 4:05 a.m. 40, From 4:05 to 5:45 92 9.75 2723 2588 

2069 4:05 a.m. 40, a.m. the boat 13 16.65 2701 2568 

2070 4:05 a.m. 40, drifted from the 17.0 2711 2577 

2071 4:15 a.m. 40, above position 110 9.50 

2072 4:15 a.m. 40, to the following 73 9.90 2717 2583 

2073 4:15 a.m. 40, position 27 12.70 2693 2560 

g, Indicates that the gas content of the sample was determined; see Table 3. 



2551 


33.71 


2461 


33.61 


2446 


33.61 


2451 


33.66 


2460 


33.75 


2634 


34.05 


2446 


33!'60 


2.594 


33!65 


2605 


33"73 


2571 


33.58 


2448 


33.63 


2455 


33.69 


2458 


33.73 


2559 


33.54 


2455 


33.63 


2446 


33.60 


2598 


33.66 


2447 


33;63 


2535 


33.48 


2454 


33.54 


2453 


33.68 


2445 


33.58 


2448 


33.63 


2451 


33.66 


2449 


33.65 


2450 


33.70 


2447 


33.66 


2444 


33.63 




33.69 


'2435 


33.69 


2434 


33.69 


2635 


34.10 


2611 


33.85 


2453 


33.60 


2446 


33.66 


2620 


33.94 


2594 


33.68 


2531 


33.55 


2598 


33.71 


2585 


33.57 


2453 


33.68 


2451 


33.69 


2575 


33.69 


2498 


33..55 


2448 


33.60 




33.64 


2575 


33.60 


2454 


33.64 


2451 


33.65 


2544 


33.50 


2490 


33.54 


2470 


33.85 


2615 


33.89 


2455 


33.61 


2456 


33.74 


2606 


iiJi 


2532 


33.52 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hijdrographic Records of Scnpj)s Insfifufion 



83 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 


Table 1. — Ocean D 

Position 


\TA — {Continu 

Temper- 
Depth ature 

in in centi- 
meters errade 


ed) 

Specific gra\ 


ity 




Water 
sample 
number 


0° 

S 

4^0 


17!5 
S 


t° 

S 

4^0 




North West ' 
latitude longitude 


Salinity 
SO/00 


2074 


4:25 a.m. 


4O5 


June 18, 1911 

82 


9?70 


2724 


2589 


2616 


33.90 


2075 


4:25 a.m. 


40, 




55 


10.40 


2700 


2567 


2581 


33.60 


2076 


4:25 a.m. 


40, 




7 


16.70 


2705 


2572 


2457 


33.66 


20,7 


4:35 a.m. 


40, 







17.0 


2705 


2572 


2451 


33.66 


2078 


4:50 a.m. 


40, 







17.0 


2718 


2584 


2463 


33.83 


2079 


5:27 a.m. 


40, 




46 


11.15 


2694 


2561 


2562 


33.53 


2080 


5:27 a.m. 


40, 




18 


14.45 


2690 


2557 


2493 


33.48 


2081 


5:27 a.m. 


40, 




6 


17.00 


2705 


2572 


2451 


33.66 


2082 


5:30 a.m. 


40. 




82 


9.65 


2719 


2585 


2612 


33.84 


2083 


5:30 a.m. 


40, 




64 


10.20 


2703 


2570 


2588 


33.64 


2084 


5:40 a.m. 


40, 







1 7 . 05 


2723 


2588 


2469 


33.89 


2085 


5:42 a.m. 


40, 




37 


11.90 


2696 


2563 


2550 


33..55 


2086 


5:42 a.m. 


40, 




16 


15.50 


2697 


2564 


2478 


33.57 


2087 


5:42 a.m. 


40, 


32° 22:2 117° 18f8 


9 


16.95 


2699 


2566 


2447 


33.!59 


2088 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


137 


9.50 










2089 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 


From 6:00 to 7:30 


92 


9.65 


2721 


2587 


2614 


33.86 


2090 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


13 


16.75 


2701 


2568 


2453 


33.61 


2091 


6:08 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


110 


9.55 


2728 


2593 


2622 


33.95 


2092 


6:08 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


73 


9.95 


2709 


2575 


2597 


33.71 


2093 


6:08 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


27 


13.40 


2691 


2558 


2517 


33.49 


2094 


6:08 a.m. 


40, 


position 


82 


9.70 


2731 


2596 


2622 


33.99 


2095 


6:10 a.m. 


40, 




55 


10.95 


2708 


2574 


2580 


33.70 


2096 


6:10 a.m. 


40, 




7 


17.15 


2717 


2583 


2460 


33.81 


2097 


7:00 a.m. 


40, 







17.1 










2098 


7:20 a.m. 


40, 




82 


9.80 


2730 


2595 


2621 


33!98 


2099 


7:20 a.m. 


40, 




64 


10.90 


2718 


2584 


2591 


33.83 


2100 


7:20 a.m. 


40, 




11 


17.05 


2719 


2585 


2464 


33.84 


2101 


7:25 a.m. 


40, 




37 


11.80 


2709 


2575 


2565 


33.71 


2102 


7:25 a.m. 


40, 




16 


16.50 


2714 


2580 


2472 


33.78 


2103 


7:25 a.m. 


40, 




9 


17.25 


2711 


2577 


2451 


33.74 


2104 


7:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.2 117 18.8 





17.3 


2720 


2586 


2458 


33.85 


2105 


4:35 a.m. 


40, 


June 20. 1911 
32 23.5 117 18.0 





17.2 


2700 


2567 


2441 


33.60 


2106 


4:35 a.m. 


40, 


From 4:35 to 6:40 


137 


9.60 


2725 


2590 


2617 


33.91 


2107 


4:35 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


92 


9.70 


2713 


2579 


2608 


33.76 


2108 


4:35 a..m 


40, 


drifted from the 


13 




2704 


2571 




33.65 


2109 


4:35 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


7 


17.05 


2701 


2568 


2446 


33.61 


2110 


4:55 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


110 


9.60 


2719 


2585 


2614 


33.84 


2111 


4:55 a.m. 


40, 


position 


46 


11.40 


2699 


2566 


2563 


33.59 


2112 


4:55 a.m. 


40, 




37 


12.40 


2689 


2556 


2533 


33.47 


2113 


4:55 a.m. 


40, 




27 


13.15 


2694 


2563 


2524 


33.53 


2114 


5:20 a.m. 


40, 







17.0 


2702 


2569 


2448 


33.63 


2115 


6:09 a.m. 


39, 




82 


9.65 


2722 


2588 


2615 


33.88 


2116 


6:09 a.m. 


39, 




55 


10.00 


2716 


2582 


2603 


33.80 


2117 


6:09 a.m. 


39, 




22 




2696 


2563 




33.55 


2118 


6:09 a.m. 


39, 




18 


16.45 


2698 


2565 


24.57 


33..58 


2119 


6:10 a.m. 


39, 







16.9 


2705 


2572 


2453 


33.66 


2120 


6:23 a.m. 


39, 




73 


9.90 


2720 


2586 


2609 


33.85 


2121 


6:23 a.m. 


39, 




46 


11.10 


2697 


2564 


2565 


33.57 


2122 


6:23 a.m. 


39, 




16 


15.45! 


2699 


2566 


2481 


33.59 


2123 


6:23 a.m. 


39, 




9 


16.85 


2700 


2567 


2449 


33.60 


2124 


6:35 a.m. 


39, 




64 


10.00 


2720 


2586 


2607 


33.85 


2123 


6:35 a.m. 


39, 




37 


11.65 


2692 


2559 


2551 


33.50 


2126 


6:35 a.m. 


39, 




11 


16.85 


2710 


2576 


2459 


33.73 


2127 


6:35 a.m. 


39, 


32 23.0 117 17.2 


6 


16.95 


2701 


2568 


2448 


33.61 


2128 


7:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 117 18.0 





17.1 


2702 


2569 


2446 


33.63 


2129 


7:40 a.m. 


40, 


From 7:05 to 9:35 


137 


9.60 


2726 


2591 


2620 


33.93 


2130 


7:40 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


92 


9.85 


2716 


2585 


2607 


33.80 


2131 


7:40 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


13 


16.50 


2700 


2567 


2457 


33.60 


2132 


7:40 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


7 


17.15 


2706 


2573 


2449 


33.68 


2133 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 





17.15 


2706 


2573 


2449 


33.68 


2134 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 


position 


110 




2725 


2590 




33.91 


2135 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 




46 


n".'35 










2136 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 




37 


12.00 


2692 


2559 


2544 


33.50 



84 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — {Continued) 



















Temper- 


Spe 


cific gravity 


























Water 


Time 




^ 




-*■ 


. 


Depth 


ature 












of 




N< 


iHh 


West 


in 


in centi- 


S 




s 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4?0 


SO/00 












June 20, 1911 














23 37 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 










27 


13?40 


2701 


2568 


2526 


33.61 


2138 


9:10 a.m. 


39^ 










82 


9.70 










2139 


9:10 a.m. 


39^ 










55 


10.65 










2140 


9:10 a.m. 


39, 










22 


14.70 










2141 


9:10 a.m. 


39, 










18 


15.30 


2700 


2567 


2485 


33.60 


2142 


9:20 a.m. 


39, 










73 


10.10 


2721 


2587 


2606 


33.86 


2143 


9:20 a.m. 


39, 










46 


11.60 










2144 


9:20 a.m. 


39, 










16 


15.50 


2704 


2571 


2485 


33.(35 


2145 


9:20 a.m. 


39, 










9 


16.70 


2690 


2.557 


2443 


33.48 


2146 


9:35 a.m. 


39, 


32° 


23;6 


117° 


17:0 





17.3 










2147 


10:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 


20.0 


117 


17.4 





17.5 


2702 


2569 


2436 


33.63 


2148 


10:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 


20.0 


117 


17.4 





17.5 




















June 


21, i9n 












2149 


5:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





17.1 


2713 


2579 


2457 


33.76 


2150 


6:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.6 


117 


20.9 





17.0 


2706 


2573 


2452 


33.68 


2151 


8:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


1290 


3.50 










2152 


8:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


20.7 


1240 


3.60 


2770 


2633 


2743 


34.47 


2153 


8:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


20.7 


1230 


3.60 


2771 


2634 


2744 


34.48 


2162 


11:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 


19.7 


460 


7.80 


2742 


2607 


2664 


34.12 


2163 


11:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 


19.7 


275 


9.05 










2164 


11:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 


19.7 


185 


9.20 










2165 


11:15 a.m. 


40. 


,S2 


22.3 


117 


19.7 


33 


13.. 55 


2705 


2.572 


2527 


33.66 


2166 


1:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


550 


6.45 


2758 


2622 


2699 


34.32 


2167 


1:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


545 




2759 


2623 




34.34 


2168 


1:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


540 


6.. 55 


2764 


2628 


2703 


34.40 


2169 


1:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


530 


6.70 


2757 


2621 


2694 


34.31 


2170 


1 :25 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


460 


7.35 


2739 


2604 


2668 


34.09 


2171 


1:25 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


365 


7.90 


2754 


2618 


2674 


34.27 


21 7-^ 


1 :25 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


275 


8.90 


2758 


2622 


2662 


34.32 


2173 


1 :25 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 
.Tune 2 


19.2 
2, 191] 


185 


9.55 


2731 


2596 


2626 


33.99 


2174 


1 :40 a.m. 


39, 


32 


25.2 


117 


14.9 


U 


17.2 


2716 


2582 


2456 


33.80 


2175 


2:00 a.m. 


39, 


32 


26.4 


117 


16.3 





17.4 










2176 


2:20 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


27.7 


117 


17.8 





17.5 










2177 


2:40 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


29.0 


117 


19.2 





17.6 


2715 


2581 


2446 


33.79 


2178 


3:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


30.2 


117 


20.9 





17.3 










2179 


3:20 a.m. 


40e 


32 


31.6 


117 


22.3 





17.05 










2180 


3:40 a.m. 


41, 


32 


32.8 


117 


23.7 





17.1 


2701 


2568 


2446 


33.61 


2181 


4:00 a.m. 


41t 


32 


34.1 


117 


25.2 





17.2 










2182 


4:20 a.m. 


41, 


32 


35.3 


117 


26.7 





17.2 










2183 


4:40 a.m. 


42, 


32 


36.6 


117 


28.1 





17.15 


2719 


2.585 


2462 


33.84 


2184 


5:00 a.m. 


42, 


32 


37.8 


117 


29.6 





17.15 










2185 


5:30 a.m. 


42s 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


137 


8.95 


2724 


2589 


2628 


33.90 


2186 


5:30 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


92 


9.80 


2711 


2577 


2602 


33.74 


2187 


5:30 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


13 


17.20 


2708 


2574 


2448 


33.70 


2188 


5:30 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


7 


17.20 


2703 


2570 


2443 


33.64 


2189 


5:35 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 





17.15 


2706 


2573 


2449 


33.68 


2190 


5:40 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


110 


9.40 


2712 


2578 


2609 


33.75 


2191 


5:40 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


46 


11.55 


2689 


2556 


2.550 


33.47 


2192 


5:40 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


37 


13.00 


2698 


2565 


2531 


33.58 


2193 


5:40 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


27 


14.25 


2715 


2581 


2522 


33.79 


2194 


6:00 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 





17.1 


2709 


2575 


2453 


33.71 


2195 


7:00 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


82 


10.00 


2708 


2574 


2596 


33.70 


2196 


7:00 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


55 


11.40 


2697 


2564 


2560 


33.57 


2197 


7:00 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


22 


16.05 










2198 


7:00 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


18 


17.15 


2710 


2576 


2453 


33.73 


2199 


7:07 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


73 


10.45 


2714 


2580 


2595 


33.78 


2200 


7:07 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


46 


11.85 


2692 


2559 


2547 


33.50 


2201 


7:07 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


16 


17.15 


2699 


2566 


2442 


33..59 


2202 


7:07 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


9 


17.15 


2712 


2578 


2455 


33.75 


2203 


7:15 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


11 


17.15 


2722 


2588 


2463 


33.88 


2204 


7:15 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 


6 


17.15 


2701 


2568 


2443 


33.61 


2205 


7:18 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 


117 


32.0 





17.15 


2704 


2571 


2445 


33.65 


2206 


8:00 a.m. 


42„ 


32 


44.0 


117 


31.4 





17.1 


2707 


2574 


2451 


33.69 



1915] Micliael. et al.: Htidroymphic Records of Scripps Institution 85 









Table 1 


.—Ocean Dat.\— 


[Continued) 


























Specific grai 


'ity 












Po 


sition 






Temper- 




















Water 


Time 
; of 








A 




Depth 


ature 


0* 


17°5 






sampit 




North 


West 


S 


s — '— 


g 


Salinity 
SO/oo 


number da3' 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters grade 


4^0 


17?5 


4?0 












June 


23, 1911 












2207 


8:20 a.m. 


42„ 


32 


°46:8 


117 


°30;9 





17?2 










2208 


8:40 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


49.6 


117 


30.4 





17.35 










2209 


9:15 a.m. 


42„, 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


137 


S.90 


2726 


2.591 


2631 


33.93 


2210 


9:15 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


92 


9.65 


2707 


2574 


2600 


33.69 


2211 


9:15 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


13 


17.35 


2706 


2573 


2443 


33.68 


2212 


9:15 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


7 


17.40 


2704 


2571 


2439 


33.65 


2213 


9:20 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





]7.5 


2706 


2573 


2440 


33.68 


2214 


9:30 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


110 


9 . 45 


2727 


2.592 


2624 


33.94 


2215 


9:30 a.m. 


42„, 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


46 


1 1 . 05 


2694 


2561 


2565 


33.53 


2216 


9:30 a.m. 


42,,, 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


37 


11.95 


2693 


2560 


2546 


33.52 


2217 


9:30 a.m. 


42,,, 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


27 


13.20 


2695 


2562 


2525 


33.54 


2218 


10:05 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


82 


9.80 


2710 


2576 


2602 


33.73 


2219 


10:05 a.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


55 


10.85 


2691 


2558 


2565 


33.49 


2220 


10:05 a.m. 


42,,, 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


22 


1 4 . 50 


2700 


2567 


2502 


33.60 


2221 


10:05 a.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


18 


15.95 


2698 


2565 


2469 


33.58 


2222 


10:15 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


73 


10.20 


2708 


2574 


2592 


33.70 


2223 


10:15 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


46 


11.05 


2694 


2561 


2565 


33..53 


2224 


10:15 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


16 


15.. 55 


2698 


2565 


2477 


33.58 


2225 


10:15 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


9 


17.45 


2706 


2573 


2441 


33.68 


2226 


10:30 a.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


64 


10.35 


2703 


2570 


2584 


33.64 


2227 


10:30 a.m. 


42„, 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


37 


11.90 


2695 


2562 


2549 


33..54 


2228 


10:30 a.m. 


42,,, 


32 


.52.0 


117 


30.0 


11 


17.40 


2707 


2574 


2443 


33.69 


2229 


10:30 a.m. 


42,,, 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


5 


17.45 


2704 


2571 


2440 


33.65 


2230 


10:33 a.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





17.6 


2712 


2578 


2444 


33.75 


2231 


10:40 a.m. 


42„, 


32 


51.0 


117 


30.7 





17.6 










2232 


11:00 a.m. 


43,„ 


32 


51.8 


117 


33.6 





17.55 


2711 


2577 


2444 


33^74 


2233 


11:20 a.m. 


43,,, 


32 


51.6 


117 


36.4 





17.8 










2234 


11:40 a.m. 


44,0 


32 


51.4 


117 


39.0 





17.8 










2235 


11 :52 a.m. 


44„, 


32 


51.3 


117 


40.5 


92 


9.. 50 


2715 


25.81 


2612 


33J9 


2236 


11:52 a.m. 


44,0 


32 


51.3 


117 


40.5 


55 


11.05 


2707 


2574 


2578 


33.69 


2237 


11:52 a.m. 


44,„ 


32 


51.3 


117 


40.5 


27 


14.40 


2704 


2571 


2508 


33.65 


2238 


12:15 p.m. 


44,0 


32 


51.3 


117 


40.5 


37 


11.95 


2704 


2571 


2557 


33.65 


2239 


12:15 p.m. 


44,„ 


32 


51.3 


117 


40.5 


18 


16.10 


2721 


2587 


2487 


33.86 


2240 


12:15 p.m. 


44,„ 


32 


51.3 


117 


40.5 


9 


17.20 


2721 


2587 


2460 


33.86 


2241 


12:15 p.m. 


44,0 


32 


51.3 


117 


40.5 





18.0 


2710 


2576 


2432 


33.73 


2242 


1:00 p.m. 


45,0 


32 


50.8 


117 


45.7 





17.4 


2714 


2580 


2450 


33.78 


2243 


1:20 p.m. 


46,0 


32 


.50.7 


117 


48.4 





17.2 


2705 


2572 


2445 


33.66 


2244 


1:40 p.m. 


46,0 


32 


50.4 


117 


51.4 





16.8 


2703 


2570 


2452 


33.64 


2245 


1 :50 p.m. 


47,0 


32 


50.3 


117 


52.9 


92 


9.90 


2722 


2588 


2611 


33.88 


2246 


1:50 p.m. 


47,0 


32 


50.3 


117 


52.9 


55 


12.00 


2697 


2564 


2548 


33.57 


2247 


1:50 p.m. 


47,., 


32 


50.3 


117 


52.9 


37 


13.30 


2690 


2557 


2517 


33.48 


2248 


1:55 p.m. 


47,,, 


32 


50.3 


117 


52.9 


27 


14.85 










2249 


1:55 p.m. 


47,„ 


32 


50.3 


117 


52.9 


18 


15.40 


2694 


2561 


2478 


33".53 


2250 


1:55 p.m. 


47,„ 


32 


50.3 


117 


52.9 


9 


16.15 


2689 


2556 


2456 


33.47 


2251 


1 :55 p.m. 


47,„ 


32 


50.3 


117 


52.9 





16.9 


2700 


2567 


2447 


33.60 


2252 


2:20 p.m. 


47,0 


32 


50.1 


117 


.55.5 





16.9 


2708 


2574 


2456 


33.70 


2253 


2:40 p.m. 


48,,, 


32 


49.8 


117 


58.3 





17.0 


2699 


2566 


2446 


3 3. .59 


2254 


3:00 p.m. 


48,0 


32 


49.6 


118 


1.2 


(1 


17.1 


2695 


2562 


2438 


33..54 


2255 


3:20 p.m. 


49„, 


32 


49.5 


118 


3.9 





16.9 


2698 


2565 


2447 


33..58 


2256 


3:21p.m. 


49,„ 


32 


49.5 


118 


3.9 


92 


10.30 


2709 


2575 


2.593 


33.71 


2257 


3:21p.m. 


49,0 


32 


49.5 


118 


3.9 


55 


11.40 


2698 


2565 


2562 


33.58 


2258 


3:21p.m. 


49,0 


32 


49.5 


118 


3.9 


37 


13.10 


2691 


2558 


2522 


33.49 


2259 


3:35 p.m. 


49,0 


32 


49.5 


118 


3.9 


37 


12.90 


2695 


2562 


2529 


33.54 


■2260 


3:35 p.m. 


49,„ 


32 


49.5 


118 


3.9 


18 


15.05 


2696 


2563 


2486 


33..55 


2261 


3:45 p.m. 


49,0 


32 


49.5 


lis 


3.9 





16.15 


2697 


2564 


2463 


33.57 


2262 


4:20 p.m. 


50,„ 


32 


49.2 


118 


7.8 





16.6 


2699 


2566 


2454 


33.59 


2263 


4:40 p.m. 


50,0 


32 


48.9 


118 


10.1 





16.8 


2709 


2575 


2459 


33.71 


2264 


5:00 p.m. 


50,„ 


32 


48.7 


118 


12.3 





16.2 


2700 


2567 


2463 


33.60 


2265 


5:43 p.m. 


51,0 


32 


48.3 


118 


17.2 





16.0 


2703 


2570 


2471 


33.64 


2266 


6:30 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.1 


118 


19.1 





15.9 


2703 


2570 


2475 


33.64 


2267 


6:45 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.0 


118 
June 2; 


21.4 
S. 1911 





15..S5 










226S 


6:10 a.m. 


52,,, 


32 


50.0 


118 


20.3 


92 


9.60 


2715 


2581 


2609 


33.79 


2269 


6:10 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


50.0 


118 


20.3 


55 


11.80 


2700 


2567 


2557 


33 Oil 



86 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 









Table 1. — Ocean Dat.\ — (Continued) 


























Specific gravity 












Position 






Temper- 




















Water 
sample 


Time 
of 












Depth 


ature 
in centi. 


0° 


1705 








^ 


orth 


West 


S 


S — — 


s 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17^5 


4?0 


SO/00 










June 2 


3, 1911 














2270 


6:10 a.m. 


52,0 


32° 


5o:o 1 


18° 


20:3 


37 


14?85 










2271 


6:10 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


50.0 1 


8 


20.3 





17.0 


2708 


2.574 


2454 


33;"76 


2272 


6:18 a.m. 


52„ 


32 


50.0 1 


8 


20.3 


27 


15.35 


2699 


2566 


2483 


33..59 


2273 


6:18 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


50.0 1 


8 


20.3 


18 


16.95 


2703 


2570 


2449 


33.64 


2274 


6:18 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


50.0 1 


8 


20.3 


9 


17.00 


2701 


2568 


2448 


33.61 


2275 


7:05 a.m. 


52u 


32 


55.5 1 


8 


19.6 





17.15 


2710 


2576 


2452 


33.73 


2276 


7:40 a.m. 


52i2 


32 


59.4 1 


8 


19.3 





17.5 


2701 


2568 


2435 


33.61 


2277 


8:05 a.m. 


52,j 


33 


2.2 1 


S 


19.0 





17.45 


2712 


2578 


2447 


33.75 


2278 


8:30 a.m. 


52,3 


33 


5.0 1 


8 


18.7 





16.65 


2704 


2571 


2457 


33.65 


2279 


8:45 a.m. 


52,3 


33 


6.9 1 


8 


18.6 





16.65 


2700 


2567 


2455 


33.60 


2280 


9:00 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


8.7 1 


8 


18.4 





16.5 


2701 


2568 


2457 


33.61 


2281 


9:15 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


10.4 1 


8 


18.2 





16.2 


2710 


2576 


2474 


33.73 


2282 


9:25 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


11.5 1 


8 


18.2 





16.0 


2694 


2561 


2464 


33.53 


2283 


9:35 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


12.8 1 


18 


18.1 





16.2 


2697 


2564 


2462 


33.57 


2284 


9:45 a.m. 


52,5 


33 


13.8 1 


8 


18.0 





16.4 


2699 


2566 


2460 


33..59 


2285 


9:55 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


15.0 1 


8 


18.0 





16.2 


2697 


2564 


2461 


33.57 


2286 


10:05 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


16.4 1 


8 


17.7 





16.2 


2699 


2566 


2464 


33.-59 


2287 


10:16 a.m. 


52,„ 


33 


17.5 1 


8 


17.6 





17.7 


2703 


2570 


2433 


33.64 


2288 


10:25 a.m. 


52,„ 


33 


18.7 1 

Jun 


8 


17.6 
4, 1911 





18.3 


2701 


2568 


2415 


33.61 


2289 


5:55 a.m. 


51,6 


33 


19.4 1 


V 


16.7 


92 


9.50 


2716 


2582 


2613 


33.80 


2290 


5:55 a.m. 


51c 


33 


19.4 1 


8 


16.7 


55 


10.90 


2698 


2565 


2571 


33.58 


2291 


5:55 a.m. 


51,„ 


33 


19.4 1 


8 


16.7 


37 


13.15 


2694 


2561 


2524 


33.53 


2292 


5:55 a.m. 


51,,, 


33 


19.4 1 


8 


16.7 


27 


15.. 50 


2697 


2564 


2478 


33.57 


2293 


5:55 a.m. 


51,„ 


33 


19.4 1 


8 


16.7 





17.2 


2713 


2579 


2453 


33.76 


2294 


6:10 a.m. 


51,0 


33 


19.4 ] 


8 


16.7 


18 


16.65 


2703 


2570 


2456 


33.64 


2295 


6:10 a.m. 


51,,, 


33 


19.4 1 


8 


16.7 


9 


17.05 


2705 


2572 


2450 


33.66 


2296 


6:25 a.m. 


51„ 


33 


18.6 1 


8 


16.3 


92 


10.30 


2719 


2585 


2601 


33.84 


2297 


6:25 a.m. 


51,,, 


33 


18.6 1 


8 


16.3 


55 


10.90 


2701 


2568 


2573 


33.61 


2298 


6:25 a.m. 


51,,, 


33 


18.6 1 


8 


16.3 


37 


12.90 


2688 


2555 


2525 


33.45 


2299 


6:25 a.m. 


51,„ 


33 


18.6 1 


8 


16.3 


27 


15.35 


2696 


2563 


2481 


33..55 


2300 


6:25 a.m. 


51,0 


33 


18.6 1 


8 


16.3 





17.1 










2301 


6:30 a.m. 


51,,, 


33 


18.6 1 


8 


16.3 


18 


16.45 


2708 


2574 


2466 


33j6 


2302 


6:30 a.m. 


51,,, 


33 


18.6 1 


18 


16.3 


9 


17.05 


2703 


2570 


2447 


33.64 


2304 


6:50 a.m. 


51,8 


33 


17.7 1 


8 


16.5 


55 


10.95 


2695 


2562 


2568 


33.54 


2305 


6:50 a.m. 


51,« 


33 


17.7 1 


8 


16.5 


37 


13.50 


2697 


2564 


2521 


33.57 


2306 


6:50 a.m. 


51, „ 


33 


17.7 1 


L8 


16.5 


27 


14.75 


2700 


2567 


2497 


33.60 


2307 


6:50 a.m. 


51,,, 


33 


17.7 1 


8 


16.5 





17.0 


2702 


2569 


■2449 


33.63 


2308 


7:00 a.m. 


51,. 


33 


17.7 1 


8 


16.5 


18 


15.40 


2689 


2556 


2473 


33.47 


2309 


7:00 a.m. 


51,0 


33 


17.7 1 


8 


16.5 


9 


16.60 


2710 


2576 


2464 


33.73 


2310 


7:40 a.m. 


52,, 


33 


14.3 1 


8 


19.0 





16.1 










2311 


7:52 a.m. 


52,, 


33 


13.5 11 


8 


19.6 


92 


9.55 










2312 


7:52 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


13.5 1 


8 


19.6 


55 


10.30 


2703 


2570 


2590 


33.'64 


2313 


7:52 a.m. 


52,j 


33 


13.5 1 


8 


19.6 


37 


12.00 


2695 


2562 


2547 


33..54 


2314 


7:52 a.m. 


52,5 


33 


13.5 1] 


8 


19.6 


27 


13.45 


2713 


2579 


2537 


33.76 


2315 


7:52 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


13.5 1 


8 


19.6 





16.9 


2707 


2574 


2454 


33.69 


2316 


8:00 a.m. 


52„ 


33 


13.5 1 


8 


19.6 


18 


15.95 


2706 


2573 


2475 


33.68 


2317 


8:00 a.m. 


52,, 


33 


13.5 1] 


8 


19.6 


9 


16.60 


2700 


2567 


2456 


33.60 


2318 


9:02 a.m. 


53,. 


33 


8.4 1 


8 


23.6 


92 


9.45 


2725 


2590 


2622 


33.91 


2319 


9:02 a.m. 


53„ 


33 


8.4 1 


8 


23.6 


55 


11.20 


2707 


2574 


2575 


33.69 


2320 


9:02 a.m. 


53„ 


33 


8.4 1 


8 


23.6 


37 




2695 


2562 




33..54 


2321 


9:02 a.m. 


53,, 


33 


8.4 11 


8 


23.6 


27 




2694 


2561 




33.53 


2322 


9:10 a.m. 


53„ 


33 


8.4 1 


8 


23.6 





17.5 


2706 


2573 


2440 


33.68 


2323 


9:10 a.m. 


53,. 


33 


8.4 1 


8 


23.6 


18 


17.15 


2710 


2576 


2453 


33.73 


2324 


9:10 a.m. 


53„ 


33 


8.4 1 


8 


23.6 


9 


17.25 


2705 


2572 


2445 


33.66 


2325 


9:45 a.m. 


53,3 


33 


4.2 11 


8 


26.8 


92 


9.55 


2719 


2585 


2614 


33.84 


2326 


9:45 a.m. 


53,, 


■33 


4.2 1] 


8 


26.8 


55 


11.50 


2704 


2571 


2566 


33.65 


2327 


9:45 a.m. 


53„ 


33 


4.2 1 


8 


26.8 


37 


13.00 


2707 


2574 


2540 


33.69 


2328 


9:45 a.m. 


53,3 


33 


4.2 1] 


8 


26.8 


27 


14.20 


2703 


2570 


2512 


33.64 


2329 


9:45 a.m. 


53,3 


33 


4.2 1] 


8 


26.8 





18.7 


2709 


2575 


2414 


33.71 


2330 


9:55 a.m. 


53,3 


33 


4.2 1 


8 


26.8 


18 


14.. 55 


2701 


2568 


2502 


33.61 


2331 


9:55 a.m. 


53,3 


33 


4.2 1] 


8 


26.8 


9 


16.75 


2699 


2566 


2451 


33.59 


2332 


10:07 a.m. 


54,, 


33 


2.3 11 


8 


28.2 


92 


9.60 


2718 


2584 


2612 


33.83 


2333 


10:07 a.m. 


54,, 


33 


2.3 V 


8 


28.2 


55 


10.95 


2707 


2574 


2579 


33.69 



1915] 



Michael, et ah: Ilijdrographic Records of Scripps Institulion 



87 









Table 1 


. — Ocean Dat.\ — {Continued) 


























Specific gravity 












Po 








Temper- 










Watei 


Time 






isuion 




Depth 


0° 


17?5 
S 


"* 




sample 


of 




■^orth 


West 


ature 
in eenti- 


S 


S 


Salinity 
SO/00 


numbei 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


; grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4;o 












Junes 


!4. 1911 














2334 


10:07 a.m. 


54,. 


33 


° 2:3 


118 


°28:2 


37 


12?20 


2699 


2566 


2548 


33.59 


2335 


10:07 a.m. 


54„ 


33 


2.3 


118 


28.2 


27 


12.90 


2704 


2571 


2538 


33.65 


2336 


10:07 a.m. 


54,, 


33 


2.3 


118 


28.2 





18.95 


2708 


2574 


2405 


33.70 


2337 


30:15 a.m. 


54,, 


33 


2.3 


lis 


28.2 


18 


14.40 


2700 


2567 


2505 


33.60 


2338 


10:15 a.m. 


54,, 


33 


2.3 


118 


28.2 


9 


15.75 


2697 


2564 


2472 


33.57 


2339 


10:30 a.m. 


54,,, 


33 


2.6 


118 


30.8 


92 


9.60 


2721 


2587 


2616 


33.86 


2340 


10:30 a.m. 


54„ 


33 


2.6 


118 


30.8 


55 


11.00 


2705 


2572 


2575 


33.66 


2341 


10:30 a.m. 


54„ 


33 


2.6 


118 


30.8 


37 


11.75 


2703 


2570 


2559 


33.64 


2342 


10:30 a.m. 


.54,, 


33 


2.6 


lis 


30.8 


27 


12.20 


2700 


2567 


2548 


33.60 


•2343 


10:30 a.m. 


■54,, 


33 


2.6 


118 


30.8 





18.4 


2708 


2574 


2420 


33.70 


2344 


10:40 a.m. 


54„ 


33 


2.6 


118 


30.8 


18 


14.05 


2700 


2567 


2511 


33.60 


2345 


10:40 a.m. 


54,3 


33 


2.6 


118 


30.8 


9 


15.65 


2720 


2586 


2496 


33.85 


2346 


10:40 a.m. 


54,,, 


33 


2.6 


118 


30.8 


5 


16.60 


2710 


2576 


2464 


33.73 


2347 


11:00 a.m. 


55,, 


33 


2.9 


118 


33.3 


92 


9.60 


2721 


2587 


2615 


33.86 


2348 


11:00 a.m. 


55„ 


33 


2.9 


118 


33.3 


55 


10.90 


2712 


2578 


2585 


33.75 


2349 


11:00 a.m. 


55„ 


33 


2.9 


118 


33.3 


37 


11.50 


2700 


2567 


2561 


33.60 


2350 


11:00 a.m. 


55,3 


33 


2.9 


118 


33.3 


27 


12.10 


2702 


2569 


2553 


33.63 


2351 


11:10 a.m. 


55,3 


33 


2.9 


118 


33.3 


18 


13.50 


2702 


2569 


2524 


33.63 


2352 


11:10 a.m. 


55,3 


33 


2.9 


118 


33.3 


9 


15.00 


2705 


2572 


2497 


33.66 


2353 


11:10 a.m. 


55,3 


33 


2.9 


118 


33.3 


5 


17.20 


2706 


2573 


2446 


33.68 


2354 


11:10 a.m. 


55,3 


33 


2.9 


118 


33.3 





17.75 


2710 


2576 


2437 


33.73 


2355 


11:35 a.m. 


55,, 


33 


2.0 


118 


35.0 





16.1 


2707 


2574 


2474 


33.69 


2356 


11:35 a.m. 


55,, 


33 


2.0 


118 


35.0 


18 


13.80 


2705 


2572 


2522 


33.66 


2357 


11:35 a.m. 


55,. 


33 


2.0 


118 


35.0 


9 


14.20 


2704 


2571 


2.514 


33.65 


2358 


11:35 a.m. 


55,, 


33 


2.0 


118 


35.0 


5 


15.65 


2707 


2574 


2485 


33.69 


2359 


3:45 p.m. 


52,„ 


32 


50.0 


118 


20.3 





18.65 


2710 


2576 


2416 


33.73 


2360 


4:30 p.m. 


52,„ 


32 


50.0 


118 

June 2 


20.3 

6. 1911 





18.5 


2705 


2572 


2414 


33.66 


2361 


4:00 a.m. 


40-, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 





17.9 


2711 


2577 


2435 


33.74 


2362 


5:45 a.m. 


403 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


137 


9.65 










2363 


5:45 a.m. 


4O3 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


110 


9.80 


2726 


2591 


2617 


33.93 


2364 


6:05 a.m. 


4O3 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 





18.0 


2708 


2574 


2430 


33.70 


2365 


6:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 





17.9 


2706 


2573 


2430 


33.68 


2366 


7:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





17.95 


2710 


2576 


2434 


33.73 


2367 


8:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


21.8 


117 
June 2 


20^5 
7. 1911 





18.05 


2704 


2571 


2427 


33.65 


2368 


6:00 a.m. 


395 


32 


23.2 


117 


14.7 


37 


10 . 55 


2699 


2566 


2579 


33..59 


2369 


6:00 a.m. 


39, 


32 


23.2 


117 


14.7 


27 


12.70 


2694 


2561 


2532 


33.53 


2370 


6:15 a.m. 


393 


32 


23.2 


117 


14.7 


18 


14.45 


2699 


2566 


2500 


33..59 


2371 


6:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 


23.2 


117 


14.7 


9 


17.75 


2706 


2573 


2434 


33.68 


2372 


6:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 


23.2 


117 


14.7 





18.0 


2710 


2576 


2432 


33.73 


2373 


6:35 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.9 


117 


15.2 


46 


10.45 










2374 


6:35 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.9 


117 


15.2 


27 


12.40 


2695 


2.562 


2539 


33.54 


2375 


6:45 a.m. 


393 


32 


22.9 


117 


15.2 


18 


14.50 


2706 


2573 


2509 


33.68 


2376 


6:45 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.9 


117 


15.2 


9 


17.85 


2701 


2568 


2427 


33.61 


2377 


6:45 a.m. 


393 


32 


22.9 


117 


15.2 





17.8 


2708 


2574 


2434 


33.70 


2378 


7:16 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.6 


117 


1.5.6 


55 




2703 


2570 




33.64 


2379 


7:16 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.6 


117 


15.6 


37 


ir.'75 


2715 


2581 


2572 


33.79 


2380 


7:20 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.6 


117 


15.6 


46 


10.85 


2699 


2566 


2572 


33..59 


23S1 


7:20 a.m. 


393 


32 


22.6 


117 


15.6 


27 




2696 


2563 




33.55 


2382 


7:25 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.6 


117 


15.6 


18 


15.60 


2702 


2569 


2481 


33.63 


2383 


7:25 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.6 


117 


15.6 


9 


17.85 


2712 


2578 


2437 


33.75 


2384 


7:25 a.m. 


393 


32 


22.6 


117 


15.6 





17.9 


2713 


2579 


2435 


33.76 


2385 


7:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.2 


117 


16.1 


64 


10.10 


2723 


2588 


2608 


33.89 


2386 


7:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.2 


117 


16.1 


46 


10.90 


2700 


2567 


2573 


33.60 


2387 


7:50 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.2 


117 


16.1 


37 


11.15 


2696 


2563 


2565 


33..55 


2388 


7:50 a.m. 


39. 


32 


22.2 


117 


16.1 


27 


13.50 


2696 


2563 


2.519 


33..55 


2389 


7:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.2 


117 


16.1 


18 


15.95 


2699 


2566 


2470 


33.59 


2390 


7:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.2 


117 


16.1 


9 


17.75 


2705 


2572 


2431 


33.66 


2391 


7:. 55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22^2 


117 


16.1 





17.65 


2706 


2573 


2437 


33.68 


2392 


8:. 50 a.m. 


39, 


32 


21.6 


117 


17.0 


92 


10.35 


2704 


2571 


2585 


33.65 


2393 


8:50 a.m. 


39. 


32 


21.6 


117 


17.0 


55 


10.85 


2697 


2564 


2571 


33.57 


2394 


9:00 a.m. 


39, 


32 


21.6 


117 


17.0 


37 


11.40 


2702 


2569 


2565 


33.63 


2395 


9:00 a.m. 


39. 


32 


21.6 


117 


17.0 


27 


13 . 55 


2697 


2564 


2519 


33.57 



University of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





















Specific gra\ 


it.v 


















Temper- 
in centi- 












Time 
o£ 












Depth 




17^5 
S 


f ^ 




sample 




North 


West ' 


S 


s 




number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4!0 


17?5 


4^0 


so/oo 












June 27, 1911 












2396 


9:05 a.m. 


39, 


32 


°2i:6 


117 


"17:0 


18 


14°95 


2699 


2566 


2492 


33.59 


2397 


9:05 a.m. 


39, 


32 


21.6 


117 


17.0 


9 


17.80 


2702 


2569 


2429 


33.63 


2398 


9:05 a.m. 


39, 


32 


21.6 


117 


17.0 





17.8 


2707 


2574 


2434 


33.69 


2399 


9:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.9 


117 


18.1 


92 


10.90 










2400 


9:45 a.m. 


40. 


32 


20.9 


117 


18.1 


55 




2701 


2568 




33.61 


2401 


9:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.9 


117 


18.1 


37 


13.30 


2699 


2566 


2526 


33.59 


2402 


9:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.9 


117 


18.1 


27 


14.70 


2705 


2572 


2503 


33.66 


2403 


9:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.9 


117 


18.1 


18 


16.60 










2404 


9:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.9 


117 


18.1 


9 


17.85 


2703 


2570 


2429 


33.64 


2405 


9:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.9 


117 


18.1 





17.9 


2706 


2573 


2429 


33.68 


2406 


10:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.2 


117 


19.0 


92 


9.80 


2695 


2562 


2587 


33.54? 


2407 


10:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.2 


117 


19.0 


55 


11.90 


2697 


2564 


2551 


33.57 


2408 


10:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.2 


117 


19.0 


37 


13.00 


2700 


2567 


2533 


33.60 


2409 


10:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.2 


117 


19.0 


27 


15.35 


2698 


2565 


2482 


33.58 


2410 


10:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.2 


117 


19.0 


IS 


16.20 










2411 


10:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.2 


117 


19.0 


9 


17.75 


2708 


2574 


2436 


33.70 


2412 


10:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.2 


117 


19.0 





17.8 


2708 


2574 


2435 


33.70 


2413 


11:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


19.6 


117 


19.8 


92 


9.85 


2711 


2577 


2602 


33.74 


2414 


11:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


19.6 


117 


19.8 


55 


12.00 


2699 


2566 


2551 


33.59 


2415 


11:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


19.6 


117 


19.8 


37 


13.70 










2416 


11:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


19.6 


117 


19.8 


27 


14.90 


2696 


2563 


2491 


33.55 


2417 


11:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


19.6 


117 


19.8 


18 


16.10 










2418 


11:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


19.6 


117 


19.8 


9 


17.55 


2712 


2578 


2445 


33.75 


2419 


11 :50 a.m. 


40. 


32 


19.6 


117 


19.8 





17.6 


2710 


2576 


2442 


33.73 


2420 


1:30 p.m. 


40, 


32 


18.3 


117 


21.8 


92 


9 . 50 










2421 


1:30 p.m. 


40, 


32 


18.3 


117 


21.8 


55 


11.75 


2694 


2561 


2551 


33.53 


2422 


1:40 p.m. 


40, 


32 


18.3 


117 


21.8 


37 


12.60 










2423 


1:40 p.m. 


40, 


32 


18.3 


117 


21.8 


27 


14.95 


2703 


2570 


2497 


33.64 


2424 


1 :50 p.m. 


40, 


32 


18.3 


117 


21.8 


18 


15.20 










2425 


1 :50 p.m. 


40, 


32 


18.3 


117 


21.8 


9 


17.10 


2704 


2571 


2449 


33.65 


2426 


1:50 p.m. 


40, 


32 


18.3 


117 


21.8 





17.6 


2711 


2577 


2443 


33.74 


2427 


2:50 p.m. 


41, 


32 


19.7 


117 


22.8 


92 


10.05 










2428 


2:50 p.m. 


41, 


32 


19.7 


117 


22.8 


55 


11.40 


2701 


2568 


2564 


33.61 


2429 


3:00 p.m. 


41, 


32 


19.7 


117 


22.8 


37 


12.80 










2430 


3:00 p.m. 


41, 


32 


19.7 


117 


22.8 


18 


15.40 


2698 


2565 


2482 


33.58 


2431 


3:10 p.m. 


41, 


32 


19.7 


117 


22.8 


27 


14.30 










2432 


3:10 p.m. 


41, 


32 


19.7 


117 


22.8 


9 


17.55 


2710 


2576 


2442 


33.73 


2433 


3:17 p.m. 


41, 


32 


19.7 


117 


22.8 





18.0 


2707 


2574 


2429 


33.69 


2434 


3:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.0 


117 


21.1 


92 


9.95 










2435 


3:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.0 


117 


21.1 


55 


11.30 


2699 


2566 


2564 


33.59 


2436 


4:05 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.0 


117 


21.1 


37 


12.75 










2437 


4:05 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.0 


117 


21.1 


27 


14.20 


2695 


2562 


2504 


33.54 


2438 


4:15 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.0 


117 


21.1 


18 


16.95 










2439 


4:15 p.m. 


40. 


32 


21.0 


117 


21.1 


9 


17.75 


2704 


2571 


2432 


33.65 


2440 


4:15 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.0 


117 


21.1 





18.1 


2711 


2577 


2431 


33.74 


2441 


4:35 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.6 


117 


20.2 


92 


9.80 










2442 


4:35 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.6 


117 


20.2 


55 


11.20 


2703 


2570 


2569 


33.64 


2443 


4:45 p.m. 


40. 


32 


21.6 


117 


20.2 


37 


11.95 










2444 


4:45 p.m. 


40. 


32 


21.6 


117 


20.2 


27 


13.65 


2693 


2560 


2514 


33.52 


2445 


4:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.6 


117 


20.2 


18 


15.45 










2446 


4:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.6 


117 


20.2 


9 


17.60 


2702 


2569 


2434 


33.63 


2447 


4:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.6 


117 


20.2 





18.1 










2448 


5:05 p.m. 


40,5 


32 


22.5 


117 


19.2 


92 


9.90 










2449 


5:05 p.m. 


40,5 


32 


22.5 


117 


19.2 


55 


10.70 


2698 


2565 


2574 


33.58 


2450 


5:15 p.m. 


40.5 


32 


22.5 


117 


19.2 


37 


11.95 










2451 


5:15 p.m. 


40,3 


32 


22.5 


117 


19.2 


27 


13.00 


2689 


2556 


2523 


33.47 


2452 


5:25 p.m. 


40.5 


32 


22.5 


117 


19.2 


18 


16.50 










2453 


5:25 p.m. 


40.5 


32 


22.5 


117 


19.2 


9 


17.75 


2702 


2569 


2429 


33.63 


2454 


5:25 p.m. 


40..5 


32 


22.5 


117 
Tune 2 


19.2 
i. 1911 





18.15 


2722 


2588 


2439 


33.88 


2455 


6:00 a.m. 


395 


32 


24.7 


117 


15.6 


27 


12.70 










2450 


6:00 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.7 


117 


15.6 


18 


13.70 


2698 


2565 


2518 


33.58 


2457 


6:10 a.m. 


395 


32 


24.7 


117 


15.6 





17.80 










2458 


6:10a.m. 


395 


32 


24.7 


117 


15.6 





17.8 


2716 


2582 


2443 


33.80 



1915] 



Michael, et ah: Hydrograpliic Records of Scripps Institufion 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 



Water 
sample 
number 

2459 
2460 
2461 
2462 
2463 
2464 
2465 
2466 
2467 
2468 
2469 
2470 
2471 
2472 
2473 
2474 
2475 
2476 
2477 
2478 
2479 
24S0 
2481 
2482 
2483 
2484 
2485 
2486 
2487 
2488 
2489 
2490 
2491 
2492 
2493 
2494 
24^5 
2496 
2497 
2498 
2499 
2500 
2501 
2502 
2503 
2504 
2505 
2506 
2507 
2508 
2509 
2510 
2511 
2512 
2513 
2514 
2515 
2516 
2517 
2518 
2519 
2520 
2521 
2522 



6:30 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

6:40a.m. 

6:40 a.m. 

6:40 a.m. 

6:45 a.m. 

6:45 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

7:07 a.m. 

7:07 a.m. 

7:12 a.m. 

7:12 a.m. 

7:12 a.m. 

7:35 a.m. 

7:35 a.m. 

7:42 a.m. 

7:42 a.m. 

7:47 a.m. 

7:47 a.m. 

7:47 a.m. 

8:08 a.m. 

8:08 a.m. 

8:12 a.m. 

8:12 a.m. 

8:15 a.m. 

8:15 a.m. 

8:15 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 

9:05 a.m. 

9:05 a.m. 

9:10 a.m. 

9:10 a.m. 

9:10 a.m. 

9:20 a.m. 

9:20 a.m. 

9:26 a.m. 

9:26 a.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

9:30 a.m. 

9:50 a.m. 

9:50 a.m. 

9:56 a.m. 

9:56 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
] 0:20 a.m. 
10:20 a.m. 
10:25 a.m. 
10:25 a.m. 
10:30 a.m. 
10:30 a.m. 
10:30 a.m. 
10:45 a.m. 
10:45 a.m. 
]0:55 a.m. 
10:55 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:20 a.m. 



39, 

39, 

39, 

39j 

39, 

39, 

39, 

39, 

39, 

39- 

39^ 

39, 

39, 

39, 

39..5, 

39..55 

39.5, 

39.5, 

39.5, 

39..53 

39.5, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 



sition 



Temper- < — 
Depth ature 

in centi- S - 



Specific gravity 



24:2 
24.2 
24.2 
24.2 
24.2 
24.2 



32 24.2 

32 23.8 

32 23.8 

32 23.8 

32 23.8 

32 23.8 



23.8 
23.8 



32 23.6 

32 23.6 

32 23.6 

32 23.6 

32 23.6 

32 23.6 

32 23.6 

32 23.0 

32 23.0 

32 23.0 



23.0 
23.0 



32 23.0 

32 23.0 

32 26.5 

32 26.5 

32 26.5 



32 26.5 

32 26.5 

32 26.5 

32 26.5 

32 26.1 

32 26.1 



26.1 
26.1 



32 26.1 

32 26.1 

32 25.7 

32 2.5.7 

32 25.7 

32 25J 

32 25.7 

32 25.7 

32 25.3 

32 25.3 

32 25.3 

32 25.3 

32 25.3 

32 25.3 

32 25.3 

32 24.7 

32 24.7 

32 24.7 

32 24.7 

32 24.7 

32 24.7 

32 24.7 

32 24.2 



West 
longitude meters grad 
June 28, 1911 
117° 16:4 



16.4 
16.4 
16.4 
16.4 
16.4 
16.4 
16.7 



16.7 
16.7 
16.7 
117 16.7 
117 16.7 
117 16.7 
117 17.5 
117 17.5 
117 17.5 
117 17.5 



17.5 
17.5 
17.5 
18.5 
18.5 
18.5 
18.0 
18.5 
18.5 
18.5 
18.5 



117 18.5 

117 18.5 

117 18.5 

117 18.5 



18.5 
18.5 
19.0 
19.0 
19.0 
19.0 
19.0 
19.0 
19.0 
19.5 
19.5 
19.5 



117 19.5 

117 19.5 

117 19.5 

117 19.5 

117 20.0 

117 20.0 



20.0 
20.0 
20.0 



117 20.0 



20.0 
20.8 
20.8 
20.8 
20.8 
20.8 
20.8 
20.8 




92 
55 
37 

18 

9 


92 
55 
37 
27 
18 

9 


64 
55 
37 
27 
18 

9 


82 
55 
37 
27 
18 . 

9 


92 
55 
37 
27 
18 

9 


92 
55 
37 
27 
18 

9 


92 
55 
37 
27 
18 

9 



2561 

2578 



2573 
2573 



2571 
2576 



2569 
2567 



2706 
2713 



2573 
2579 



2570 
2572 



2574 
2574 



2709 



2575 
2575 



2576 2595 33.73 



2540 
2432 



2572 2425 



2576 2596 



2558 2533 



9?95 

10.20 2710 

10.21 

12.30 2694 

18.1 2712 

14.60 

18.10 2705 

9 8.5 

10.20 2710 

10. SO 

12.40 2691 

15.00 

18.00 2706 

18.0 2706 
9.90 

10.10 2709 

11.60 

13.90 

16.65 

18.15 2704 

18.1 2710 
9.90 

10.80 2699 2566 257 

11.45 

13.50 2695 2562 251 

15.50 

17.95 2702 



2428 
2428 



00 2567 2516 



2421 
2430 



2426 
2423 



2428 
2433 



2569 2583 



18.0 2700 

10.25 

10., o 2704 

11.45 

14.70 2698 

16.65 

17.95 
18.1 

10.05 

10.50 2702 

12.55 

15.50 2692 

17.60 

18.00 2703 

18.15 2705 

10.00 

10.80 2700 

12.50 

14.60 2698 

17.20 

18.05 2708 

18.2 2708 

9.90 

11.10 2700 2567 2568 

12.65 

14.70 2699 2566 2496 

17.20 

18.00 2709 



2425 
2425 



2431 
2425 



2431 
2426 



18.2 

9.95 

11.60 2691 2558 2552 

12.85 

14.45 2693 2560 2497 

16.70 

18.00 

18. 



.Salinity 
SO/oo 



33.53 
33.75 



33.66 
33.73 
33^49 



33.68 
33.68 



33.71 
33.60 



33.65 
33.73 



33.-59 
33;.54 



33.63 
33.60 



33.65 
33..58 



33.68 
33.76 



33.63 
33.56 



33.64 
33.66 



33.60 

33.58 



33.70 
33.70 



33.60 
33^59 



33.71 
33.71 



33.49 
33!52 



117 21.8 92 



2421 
2.595 



33.66 
33.65 



90 



Vniversiiy of California Fublications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 



Water Time 

sample of 

number day 



2523 
2524 
2525 
2526 
2527 
2528 
2529 
2530 
2531 
2532 
2533 
2534 
2535 
2536 
2537 
2538 
2539 
2540 
2541 
2542 
2543 
2544 
2545 
2546 

2547 
2548 
2549 
2550 
2551 
2552 
2553 
2554 
2555 
2556 
2557 
2558 
2559 
2560 
2561 
2562 
2563 
2564 
2565 
2566 
2567 
2568 
2569 
2570 
2571 
2572 
2573 
2574 
2575 
2576 
2577 
2578 
2579 
2580 
2581 
2582 
2583 
2584 
2585 
2586 



11:20 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
12:50 p.m. 
12:50 p.m. 
12:55 p.m. 
12:55 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:05 p.m. 

1 :05 p.m. 

1 :48 p.m. 

1:48 p.m. 

1 :55 p.m. 

1:55 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

2:04 p.m. 

2:04 p.m. 

6:35 a.m. 
6:35 a.m. 
6:45 a.m. 
6:45 a.m. 
6:50 a.m. 
6:50 a.m. 
6:55 a.m. 
6:55 a.m. 
6:55 a.m. 
7:35 a.m. 
7:35 a.m. 
7:40 a.m. 
7:40 a.m. 
7:45 a.m. 
7:45 a.m. 
7:50 a.m. 
7:50 a.m. 
7:50 a.m. 
8:15 a.m. 
8:15 a.m. 
8:22 a.m. 
8:22 a.m. 
8:30 a.m. 
8:30 a.m. 
8:35 a.m. 
8:35 a.m. 
8:35 a.m. 
8:53 a.m. 
8:53 a.m. 
9:00 a.m. 
9:00 a.m. 
9:12 a.m. 
9:12 a.m. 
9:18 a.m. 
9:18 a.m. 
9:18 a.m. 
9:35 a.m. 
9:35 a.m. 
9:40 a.m. 
9:40 a.m. 



41 5 

■ilj 
-H5 
41-, 
41; 
41<-. 
4l6 
41o 
41„ 
41„ 
4l6 
41, 
41, 
41. 
40„ 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40„ 

40; 

40: 
40; 

40; 



32° 24:2 

32 24.2 

32 24.2 

32 24.2 

32 24.2 

32 24.2 

32 22.9 

32 22.9 

32 22.9 

32 22.9 

32 22.9 

32 22.9 

32 22.9 

32 £2.9 

32 22.9 

32 21.6 

32 21.6 

32 21.6 

32 21.6 

32 21.6 

32 21.6 

32 21.6 

32 21.6 

32 21.6 

32 26.6 

32 26.6 

32 26.6 

32 26.6 

32 26.6 

32 26.6 

32 26.6 

32 26.6 

32 26.6 

32 29.0 

32 29.0 

32 29.0 

32 29.0 

32 29.0 

32 29.0 

32 29.0 

32 29.0 

32 29.0 

32 30.6 

32 30.6 

32 30.6 

32 30.6 

32 30.6 

32 30.6 

32 30.6 

32 30.6 

32 30.6 

32 32.3 

32 32.3 

32 32.3 

32 32.3 

32 32.3 

32 32.3 

32 32.3 

32 32.3 

32 32.3 

32 33.2 

32 33.2 

32 33.2 

32 33.2 



longitude 
June 28, 1911 
117° 21:8 
117 21.8 
117 21.8 
117 21.8 
117 21.8 
117 21.8 
117 23.6 



Temper- 
Depth ature 

in in centi- 
meters grade 



Specific gravity 



4;o 



Salinity 
SO/00 



23.6 
23.6 
23.6 
23.6 
23.6 
23.6 
23.6 
23.6 
25.4 
25.4 
25.4 
25.4 
25.4 
25.4 
25.4 
25.4 
25.4 
29, 1911 
25.6 185 
25.6 
25.6 
25.6 
25.6 
25.6 
25.6 
25.6 



117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 23.4 

117 23.4 

117 23.4 

117 23.4 

117 23.4 

117 21.9 

117 21.9 

117 21.9 

117 21.9 

117 21.9 

117 21.9 



18 

9 



185 

137 

92 

55 

37 

27 

18 

9 



185 

137 



137 
92 
55 
37 



23.4 
23.4 
23.4 
23.4 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



21.9 
21.9 
21.9 
20.4 
20.4 
20.4 
20.4 
20.4 
20.4 
20.4 
20.4 
20.4 
19.4 
19.4 
19.4 
19.4 



18 

9 



92 

55 

37 

27 

18 

9 



185 

137 

185 

137 

92 

55 

37 

18 

9 



185 

137 

92 

55 

37 

27 

18 

9 



137 

92 

55 

37 



11?35 2698 

13.10 

14.10 2696 

16.85 

17.90 2701 

18.0 2708 

10.40 

11.70 2695 

13.40 

15.10 2701 

17.00 

17.75 

17.8 2709 

8.70 

9.35 2718 

10.40 

12.00 2694 

13.80 

14.75 2698 

16.60 

17.55 2703 

17.6 2706 

8.65 

9.50 2718 

8.70 

9.50 2721 

10.30 

12.00 2695 

13.45 

14.90 2693 

16.15 

17.25 2701 

17.2 2708 

10.60 

12.15 2691 

12.80 

14.90 2699 

17.25 

17.25 2701 

17.2 2707 

8.75 

9.30 2715 

9.55 

9.70 2725 

10.10 

11.10 2713 

13.00 

14.85 2700 

16.90 

17.45 2704 

17.35 2701 

9.40 

9.75 2728 

10.00 

10.95 2695 

12.05 

13.20 2695 

16.05 

17.75 2700 

17.8 2704 

9.50 2706 

9.90 

10.. 55 

12.90 2686 



2565 


2562 


33.58 


2563 


2.507 


33^55 


2568 
2574 


2424 
2430 


ii'.'ei 

33.70 


2562 


2553 


33.'54 


2568 


2491 


33;61 


2576 


2436 


33!'71 


2584 


2617 


33.'83 


2561 


2547 


33.53 


2565 


2494 


33!.58 


2570 
2573 


2436 
2438 


33"64 
33.68 


2584 


2615 


33!83 


2587 


2617 


33.86 


2.562 


2547 


33.54 


2560 


2488 


33^52 


2568 
2574 


2440 
2448 


33.61 
33.70 


2558 


2540 


33.49 


2566 


2493 


33^59 


2568 
2574 


2440 
2447 


33.61 
33.69 


2581 


2614 


33.79 


2.590 


2616 


33!91 


2579 


2582 


33.76 


2.567 


2495 


33.60 


2571 
2568 


2439 

2438 


33.65 
33.61 


2593 


2620 


33.9.5 


2562 


2567 


33..54 


2562 


2523 


33.54 


2567 
2571 
2573 


2429 
2431 
2603 


zs.m 

33.65 
33.68 



2553 2522 33.43 



1915] 



Mivhacl . ft (iL: Hijdrogrdphic Records of Scripps Institulioii 



91 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 


Position 

Nortli West 
latitude longitude 


Depth 
meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi- 
grade 


Specific grav 


ity 




Water 
sample 
number 


0° 

s 

4^0 


17!5 

S 

17?5 


t° 

S 

4^0 


Salinity 
SO/00 


2587 


9:45 a.m 


40j 


32 = 


33:2 


June^2 


9, 1911 

19:4 


27 


13°70 










2588 


9:45 a.m 


40j 


32 


33.2 


117 


19.4 


9 


18.15 


2709 


2575 


2428 


33.71 


2589 


9:50 a.m 


40, 


32 


33.2 


117 


19.4 


18 


16.60 


2693 


2560 


2448 


33.52 


2590 


9:50 a.m 


40, 


32 


33.2 


117 


19.4 





18 . 05 


2705 


2572 


2426 


33.66 


2591 


10:15 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.1 


117 


18.6 


92 


9.85 










2592 


10:15 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.1 


117 


18.6 


55 


11.55 


2702 


2569 


2562 


33.63 


2593 


10:25 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.1 


117 


18.6 


37 


12.60 










2594 


10:25 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.1 


117 


18.6 


27 


14.95 


2702 


2569 


2494 


33.63 


2595 


10:30 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.1 


117 


18.6 


18 


17.80 










2596 


10:30 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.1 


117 


18.6 


9 


18.10 


2701 


2568 


2421 


33.61 


2597 


10:30 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.1 


117 


18.6 





18.0 


2705 


2572 


2427 


33.66 


2598 


10:45 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.8 


117 


17.8 


92 


9.70 










2599 


10:45 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.8 


117 


17.8 


55 


10.80 


2697 


2564 


25,1 


33.57 


2600 


10:50 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.8 


117 


17.8 


37 


11.00 










2601 


10:50 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.8 


117 


17.8 


27 


12.30 


2693 


2560 


2539 


33.52 


2502 


10:55 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.8 


117 


17.8 


18 


16 . 25 










2603 


10:55 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.8 


117 


17.8 


9 


18.30 


2714 


2580 


2429 


33.78 


2604 


10:55 a.m 


40, 


32 


34.8 


117 


17.8 





18.15 


2704 


2571 


2423 


33.65 


2605 


11:20 a.m 


39, 


32 


36.7 




16.1 


46 


10.95 










2606 


11:20 a.m 


39, 


32 


36.7 


117 


16.1 


27 


11.75 


2697 


2564 


2554 


33.57 


2607 


11:25 a.m 


39, 


32 


36.7 


117 


16.1 


IS 


1 3 . 00 










2608 


11:25 a.m 


39, 


32 


36.7 


117 


16.1 


9 


17.20 


2708 


2574 


2448 


33.70 


2609 


11:25 a.m 


39, 


32 


36.7 


117 


16.1 





17.2 


2704 


2571 


2444 


33.65 


2610 


11:50 a.m 


93, 


32 


37.4 


117 


14.6 


27 


11.40 










2611 


11:50 a.m 


39, 


32 


37.4 




14.6 


18 


12.50 


2696 


2563 


2538 


33.55 


2612 


11 :55 a.m 


39, 


32 


37.4 




14.6 


9 


16.55 










2613 


11:55 a.m 


39, 


32 


37.4 


117 


14.6 


5 


17.45 


2707 


2574 


2442 


33.69 


26U 


11:55 a.m 


39, 


32 


37.4 


117 


14.6 





17.7 


2714 


2580 


2443 


33.78 


2615 


12:36 p.m 


B 


32 


42.14 


117 


13.95 





17.7 


2713 


2579 


2442 


33.76 


2616 


12:40 p.m 


B 


32 


42.6 


117 


12.9 





17.75 


2707 


2574 


2435 


33.69 


2617 


12:44 p.m 


B 


32 


42.9 


117 


12.9 





18.0 


2708 


2574 


2430 


33.70 


2618 


12:48 p.m 


B 


32 


43.0 


117 


12.2 





18.2 


2711 


2577 


2428 


33.74 


2619 


12:52 p.m 


B 


32 


42.9 


117 


11.6 





18.45 


2713 


2579 


2424 


33.76 


2620 


1:05 p.m 


B 


32 


42.4 


117 


10.3 





18.4 


2714 


2580 


2425 


33.78 


2621 


4:15 a.m 


40^ 


32 


22.3 


Aug. 8, 1911 
117 17.9 





19.8 










2622 


5:10 a.m 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 


17.9 





19.8 










2623 


6:10 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


18.0 





19.4 


2717 


2583 


2404 


33.81 


2624 


6:55 a.m 


•to. 


32 


23.5 


117 


IS.O 





19.75 










2625 


7:20 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


18.0 





19.75 










2626 


8:30 a.m 


39j 


32 


22.8 


117 


17.3 





19.95 


2702 


2569 


2374 


33.63 


2627 


8:45 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


18.0 


174 


9.90 










2628 


8:45 a.m 


40j 


32 


23.5 


117 


18.0 


82 


10.65 


2704 


2571 


2581 


33.65 


2629 


9:00 a.m 


40, 


From 8:45 to IC 


:02 


137 


10.05 


2722 


2588 


2608 


33.88 


2630 


9:00 a.m 


40, 


a.m. th 


e boat 




64 


11.10 


2705 


2572 


2574 


33.66 


2631 


9:10 a.m 


40, 


c 


rifted from 


the 


101 


10.25 










2632 


9:10 a.m 


40, 


above 


position 


46 


11.75 


2691 


2558 


2548 


33.49 


2633 


9:19 a.m 


40, 


to the following 


64 


10.90 


2701 


2568 


2574 


33.61 


2634 


9:19 a.m 


4O5 


position 




27 


13.55 


2696 


2563 


2518 


33.55 


2635 


9:25 a.m 


4O5 










41 


11.65 


2694 


2561 


2553 


33.53 


2636 


9:25 a.m 


40, 










18 


14.35 


2685 


2552 


2492 


33.42 


2637 


9:32 a.m 


39, 










27 


13.75 


2684 


2552 


2503 


33.40 


2638 


9:32 a.m 


39, 










11 


17.55 


2692 


2559 


2425 


33.50 


2639 


9:38 a.m 


39, 










16 


15.90 


2691 


2558 


2463 


33.49 


2640 


9:38 a.m 


39, 










7 


19.90 


2709 


2575 


2383 


33.71 


2641 


9:42 a.m 


39, 










9 


19.00 


2685 


2552 


2384 


33.42 


2642 


9:42 a.m 


39, 










4 


20.05 










2643 


9:50 a.m 


39, 













20.1 










2644 


9:55 a.m 


39, 










92 


10.20 


2709 


2575 


2594 


33.71 


2645 


9:55 a.m 


39, 


32 


22.8 


117 


17.0 


82 


10.75 










2649 


10:25 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


17.8 


46 


11.05 










2650 


10:35 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.6 


37 


11.50 










2651 


10:35 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.6 


27 


12.20 










2652 


10:40 a.m 


39..55 


32 


23.2 


117 


17.5 





20.4 


2709 


2575 


2369 


33.71 



92 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 











Table 1 


. — Ocean Data — (Continue 


d) 














Pc 






Temper- 
ature 


Specific gravity 




Water 


Time 




sition 


Depth 


0° 


17?5 


f 




sample 


of 




North 


West 


in 


in centi- 


s 


S 


S 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 
Aug. 9, 1911 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17°5 


4?0 


SO/oo 


2653 


3:35 a.m. 


40, 


32° 2217 


117° 19:2 





19?95 


2715 


2581 


2387 


33.79 


2654 


4:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 21 is 


117 18.8 





19.85 


2700 


2567 


2375 


33.60 


2655 


4:50 a.m. 


40s 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 





20.0 










2656 


5:43 a.m. 


40, 


From 4: 


45 to 7:08 


137 


9.90 


'2'719 


2585 


2608 


33!84 


2657 


.5:43 a.m. 


40-, 


a.m. tl 


e boat 


110 


10.10 


2706 


2573 


2592 


33.68 


2658 


5:48 a.m. 


40; 


drifted from the 





20.0 


2706 


2573 


2377 


33.68 


2659 


5:55 a.m. 


40, 


above 


position 


92 


10.10 


2703 


2570 


2589 


33.64 


2660 


5:55 a.m. 


40, 


to the 


'ollowing 


82 


10.60 


2701 


2568 


2579 


33.61 


2661 


6:05 a.m. 


40, 


position 


73 


10.70 










2662 


6:05 a.m. 


40, 






64 


11.45 


2700 


2567 


2563 


33"60 


2663 


6:08 a.m. 


40, 






55 


11.55 


2692 


2559 


2553 


33.50 


2664 


6:08 a.m. 


40, 






46 


11.75 


2689 


2556 


2546 


33.47 


2665 


6:15 a.m. 


40, 






37 


12.00 


2707 


2574 


2559 


33.69 


2666 


6:15 a.m. 


40, 






27 


12.65 


2697 


2564 


2536 


33.57 


2667 


6:20 a.m. 


40,, 






23 


12.85 


2698 


2565 


2533 


33.58 


2668 


6:20 a.m. 


40., 






18 


13.65 


2685 


2552 


2506 


33.42 


2669 


6:25 a.m. 


40, 






16 


13.80 


2692 


2559 


2509 


33.50 


2670 


6:25 a.m. 


40, 






11 


19.35 


2721 


2587 


2408 


33.86 


2671 


6:30 a.m. 


40, 






9 


19.95 


2694 


2561 


2366 


33.53 


2672 


6:30 a.m. 


40, 






7 


20.00 


2705 


2572 


2376 


33.66 


2673 


6:35 a.m. 


40, 






6 


20.10 


2698 


2565 


2366 


33.58 


2674 


6:35 a.m. 


40, 






4 


20.15 


2707 


2574 


2374 


33.69 


2675 


6:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 


117 18.5 





20.0 


2709 


2575 


2380 


33.71 


2676 


7:17 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 





19.6 


2703 


2570 


2384 


33.64 


2677 


8:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 


117 18.5 





20.05 


2705 


2572 


2375 


33.66 


2678 


9:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.3 


117 20.2 





20.15 


2703 


2570 


2370 


33.64 










Aug. 10, 1911 












2679 


3 


45 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 


117 21.2 





20.8 


2719 


2585 


2367 


33.84 


2680 


4 


52 a.m. 


40. 


32 21.3 


117 21.5 





20.65 


2705 


2572 


2358 


33.66 


2681 


6 


00 a.m. 


40., 


32 22.5 


117 20.5 





20.7 


2713 


2579 


2365 


33.76 


2682 


6 


10 a.m. 


40. 


32 22.4 


117 21.2 


137 


9.80 


2727 


2592 


2618 


33.94 


2683 


6 


10 a.m. 


40, 


Prom 6:07 to 7:57 


110 


10.00 


2709 


2575 


2597 


33.71 


2684 


6 


23 a.m. 


40. 


a.m. the boat 


92 


10.40 


2702 


2569 


2583 


33.63 


2685 


6 


23 a.m. 


40, 


drifte 


1 from the 


82 


10.80 










2686 


6 


30 a.m. 


40. 


above 


position 


9 


20.70 










2687 


6 


30 a.m. 


40. 


to the following 


64 


11.35 


2693 


2.560 


2558 


33!52 


2688 




03 a.m. 


40, 


position 


55 


11.95 


2687 


2554 


2540 


33.44 


2689 


7 


03 a.m. 


40, 






46 


12.50 


2686 


2553 


2528 


33.43 


2690 


7 


12 a.m. 


40, 






37 


13.30 


2693 


2560 


2520 


33.52 


2691 


7 


12 a.m. 


40, 






27 


14.35 


2686 


2553 


2492 


33.43 


2692 




30 a.m. 


40. 






23 


15.30 


2686 


2553 


2471 


33.43 


2693 


7 


40 a.m. 


40. 






5 


20.65 










2694 


7 


40 a.m. 


40, 






18 


16.55 


2689 


2556 


244.5 


33I7 


2695 


7 


43 a.m. 


40, 






16 


17.50 










2696 


7 


43 a.m. 


40, 






11 


20.65 


2703 


2.570 


23.57 


33.64 


2697 


7 


46 a.m. 


40, 






9 


20.70 


2701 


2568 


2353 


33.61 


269S 


7 


46 a.m. 


40. 






7 


20.75 


2700 


2567 


2350 


33.60 


2699 


7 


51 a.m. 


40. 






5 


20.75 


2699 


2566 


2349 


33..59 


2700 


7 


51 a.m. 


40, 






4 


20.75 


2687 


2554 


2338 


33.44 


2701 


7 


53 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.3 


117 20.0 





20.6 


2702 


2569 


2357 


33.63 


2702 


9 


46 a.m. 


41, 


32 18.7 


117 24.5 





20.15 


2706 


2573 


2373 


33.68 


2703 


10 


27 a.m. 


41, 


32 18.2 


117 24.7 


1420 


3.40 










2704 


10 


27 a.m. 


41, 


From 10 


:15 a.m. to 


1370 


3.45 


2772 


2635 


2747 


34.50 


2705 


11 


20 a.m. 


41, 


l:55p 


m. the boat 


1100 


4.95 










2706 


11 


20 a.m. 


41. 


drifte 


d from the 


730 


6.20 


2752 


2616 


2695 


34.25 


2707 


12 


47 p.m. 


41, 


above 


position 





19.8 


2705 


2572 


2381 


33.66 


2708 


12 


50 p.m. 


41, 


to the following 


185 


10.05 


2712 


2578 


2599 


33.75 


2709 


12 


50 p.m. 


41, 


position 


137 


10.10 










2711 


1 


00 p.m. 
15 p.m. 
1 5 p.m. 
25 p.m. 
25 p.m. 


41. 






185 


10.10 


2714 


2580 


2600 


33.78 


2712 


1 


41. 






110 


10.10 


2704 


2571 


2590 


33.65 


2713 


1 


41, 






92 


10.60 


2701 


2568 


2579 


33.61 


2714 


1 


41, 






73 


10.70 


2695 


2562 


2571 


33.54 


2715 


1 


41, 






55 


11.75 


2696 


2563 


2553 


33.55 



1915] 



Mkliad . ft al.: Ilydnxjraphic Kccords of Srripps Inslihitiini 



93 









Table 1.— Ocean Data— (Contmiti 


d) 














Position 




Temper- 


Specific gravity 




















Water 


Time 




< ^ — ' — ' > 


Depth 


ature 


0° 


17?5 


t° 




sample 


of 




North West 


in 


in centi- 


S 


S 


s 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4^0 


SO/00 








Aug. 10, 1911 












2716 


1:34 p.m 


41. 




46 


i2;io 


2694 


2561 


2544 


33.53 


2717 


1:34 p.m 


■4I4 




37 


13.35 










271S 


1:40 p.m 


41. 




27 


15.10 










2719 


1:40 p.m 


41, 




23 


17.05 


2690 


2557 


2435 


33!48 


2720 


1:43 p.m 


41. 




IS 


18.00 










2721 


1:43 p.m 


41. 




14 


18.80 


2719 


2585 


2422 


33!84 


2722 


1:48 p.m 


41. 


32° 19:1 117° 24:3 
Aug. 11, 191 





20.2 


2703 


2570 


2369 


33.64 


2723 


6:00 a. m 


40. 


32 20.6 117 21.3 





20.4 


2717 


2583 


2377 


33.81 


2724 


6:50 a.m 


40. 


32 20.9 117 21.1 


1280 


3.95 










2725 


6:50 a. m 


40. 


32 20.9 117 21.1 


1235 


4.05 


2766 


2630 


2734 


3iA2 


2726 


7:48 a.m 


40, 


32 20.5 117 21.2 





20.15 


2706 


2573 


2373 


33.68 


2727 


7:56 a.m 


40. 


32 20.9 117 21.1 


825 


5.20 










2728 


7:56 a.m 


40. 


32 20.9 117 21.1 


550 


6.45 


2743 


2608 


2683 


34!l4 


2729 


8:30 a.m 


40. 


From 7:56 to 9:15 


365 


8.70 










2730 


8:30 a.m 


40. 


a.m. the boat 


275 


9.20 


2732 


2597 


'2(333 


34.00 


2731 


8:52 a.m 


40. 


dri f ted from the 


1S5 


9.70 










2732 


8:52 a.m 


40. 


above position 


137 


9.90 










2733 


9:05 a.m 


40. 


to the following 


110 


10.05 










2734 


9:05 a.m 


40. 


position 


92 


10.40 


2704 


2.571 


2585 


33!65 


2735 


9:15 a.m 


40. 


32 20.0 117 20.5 





20.5 


2705 


2572 


2362 


33.66 


2736 


9:30 a.m 


40, 


32 20.9 117 21.1 


73 


10.95 


2697 


2564 


2569 


33.57 


2737 


9:30 a.m 


40. 


32 20.9 117 21.1 


55 


11.50 


2692 


2559 


2554 


33.50 


2738 


9:40 a.m 


40. 


From9:27 to 10:00 


46 


12.25 


2692 


2559 


2539 


33.50 


2739 


9:40 a.m 


40. 


a.m. the boat 


37 


13.90 


2697 


2564 


2512 


33.57 


2740 


9:45 a.m 


40. 


drifted from the 


27 


15.10 










2741 


9:45 a.m 


40. 


above po.sition 


18 


16.90 


2694 


2561 


2442 


33;53 


2742 


9:53 a.m 


40. 


to the following 


23 


15.40 


2713 


2579 


2496 


33.76 


2743 


9:53 a.m 


40, 


position 


14 


17.40 


2695 


2562 


2431 


33.54 


2744 


9:58 a.m 


40, 


32 20.6 117 20.6 


9 


20.20 


2700 


2567 


2366 


33.60 


2745 


10:53 a.m 


40,5 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


460 


7.70 










2746 


10:53 a.m 


40.5 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


365 


8.50 


2"748 


2612 


2(358 


34.26 


2747 


11:15 a.m 


40. 


From 10:40 a.m. to 


275 


9.70 










2748 


11:15 a.m 


40. 


1 2 : 1 5 p.m. the boat 


185 


9.80 


2723 


2588 


2614 


33"89 


2749 


11:34 a.m 


40, 


drifted from the 


137 


9.80 


2718 


2584 


2610 


33.83 


2750 


11:34 a.m 


40, 


above position 


110 


10.30 


2695 


2562 


2578 


33.54 


2751 


11:46 a.m 


40, 


to the following 


92 


10.45 


2699 


2566 


2579 


33.59 


2752 


11:46 a.m 


40, 


position 


73 


11.10 


2694 


2561 


2563 


33.53 


2753 


11:55 a.m 


40, 




55 


11.40 


2696 


2563 


2560 


33.55 


2754 


11:55 a.m 


40, 




46 


12.80 


2691 


2558 


2527 


33.49 


2755 


11:58 a.m 


40, 







20.75 


2706 


2573 


2357 


33.68 


2756 


12:03 p.m 


40, 




37 


13.50 










2757 


12:03 p.m 


40, 




27 


15.80 


2701 


2568 


2475 


33761 


2758 


12:07 p.m 


40, 




23 


16.10 


2695 


2562 


2462 


33.54 


2759 


12:07 p.m 


40, 




14 


19.40 


2701 


2568 


2388 


33.61 


2760 


12:12 p.m 


40, 




IS 


17.00 


2698 


2565 


2444 


33.58 


2761 


12:12 p.m 


40, 


32 21.1 117 18.7 


9 


20.60 


2707 


2574 


2362 


33.69 


2762 


12:48 p.m 


39; 


32 23.5 117 17.4 


9 




2708 


2574 




33.70 


2763 


12:48 p.m 


39.. 


32 23.5 117 17.4 


101 


io'.'io 


2699 


2566 


2580 


33.59 


2764 


12:59 p.m 


39.. 


From 12:45 to 1:38 


92 


10.70 


2704 


2571 


2580 


33.65 


2765 


12:59 p.m 


39, 


p.m. the boat 


82 


10.85 


2699 


2566 


2573 


33.59 


2766 


1:05 p.m 


39, 


drifted f rotii the 


110 


10.35 


2698 


2565 


2580 


33.58 


2767 


1:05 p.m 


39= 


above position 


73 


11.30 


2701 


2568 


2566 


33.61 


2768 


1:15 p.m 


39, 


to the following 


55 


11.80 


2693 


2560 


2549 


33.52 


2769 


1 : 1 5 p.m 


395 


position 


46 


12.25 


2688 


2555 


2537 


33.45 


2770 


1:20 p.m 


39-. 




37 


12.90 


2691 


2558 


2525 


33.49 


2771 


1:20 p.m 


39., 




27 


15.10 


2691 


2558 


2481 


33.49 


2772 


1:25 p.m 


395 







20.1 


2711 


2577 


2379 


33.74 


2773 


1:27 p.m 


39, 




23 


18.20 


2703 


2570 


2420 


33.64 


2774 


1:27 p.m 


395 




14 


20.70 


2700 


2567 


2352 


33.60 


2775 


1:32 p.m 


39, 




18 




2709 


2575 




33.71 


2776 


1:32 p.m 


39, 


32 22.7 117 16.7 


9 


20.70 


2701 


2568 


2351 


33.61 


2777 


2:02 p.m 


39= 


32 23.9 117 17.0 


82 


10.60 











94 



University of California Fuilications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi- 
grade 


Specific gravity 




Water 
sample 
number 


0° 
S 

4;o 


17?5 
S 


4?0 




North 
latitude 


West 
longitude 


Salinity 
SO/00 


2778 


2:02 p.m. 


39, 


32 


23:9 


Aug. 11, 1911 
117° 17:0 


73 


10°95 


2698 


2565 


2570 


33.58 


2779 


2:06 p.m. 


39, 


From 1:58 to 2: 


25 


55 


11.35 


2702 


2569 


2566 


33.63 


2780 


2:06 p.m. 


395 


p.m. the boat 




46 


12.45 


2687 


2554 


2530 


33.44 


2781 


2:12 p.m. 


39, 


drifted from the 


37 


13.45 


2691 


2558 


2515 


33.49 


2782 


2:12 p.m. 


39^ 


above 


position 


27 


15.40 


2689 


2556 


2472 


33.47 


2783 


2:18 p.m. 


39^ 




the 


following 


23 


16.30 


2691 


2558 


2453 


33.49 


2784 


2:18 p.m. 


39, 


position 




14 


20 . 20 


2701 


2568 


2367 


33.61 


2785 


2:23 p.m. 


395 










18 


17.20 


2695 


2562 


2436 


33.54 


2786 


2:23 p.m. 


39, 










9 


20 . 50 


2706 


2573 


2363 


33.68 


2787 


2:25 p.m. 


39, 


32 


23.6 


117 


16.2 





20.8 


2709 


2575 


2358 


33.71 


2788 


2:38 p.m. 


395 


32 


24.2 


117 


16.5 


64 


11.00 


2695 


2562 


2566 


33.54 


2789 


2:38 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 


117 


16.5 


55 


11.25 


2693 


2560 


2559 


33.52 


2790 


2:46 p.m. 


39, 


From 2:37 to 3: 


08 


46 


11.95 


2682 


2550 


2510 


33.38 


2791 


2:46 p.m. 


39, 


p.m. the boat 




37 


13.25 


2682 


2550 


2510 


33.38 


2792 


2:53 p.m. 


39, 


drifted from the 


27 


14.50 


2695 


2562 


2497 


33.54 


2793 


2:53 p.m. 


39, 


above 


position 


18 


16.40 


2693 


2560 


2453 


33.52 


2794 


2:58 p.m. 


39, 


1 


the 


Collowine 


23 


15.70 


2694 


2561 


2471 


33.53 


2795 


2:58 p.m. 


39, 


position 




14 


18.70 


2697 


2564 


2402 


33..57 


2796 


3:00 p.m. 


39, 













20.85 


2705 


2572 


2353 


33.66 


2797 


3:05 p.m. 


39, 


32 


23.0 


117 


16.0 


9 




2702 


2569 




33.63 


2798 


4:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 


Aug. 1 
117 


2. 1911 
15.0 





19.6 










2799 


4:45 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 


117 


15.0 


27 


14.40 


2686 


2553 


2490 


33!43 


2800 


4:45 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 


117 


15.0 


18 


16.25 


2694 


2561 


2457 


33.53 


2801 


4:53 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 


117 


15.0 


23 


15.90 


2687 


2554 


2459 


33.44 


2802 


4:53 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 


117 


15.0 


14 


18.85 


2695 


2562 


2396 


33.54 


2803 


4:58 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 


117 


15.0 


9 




2700 


2567 




33.60 


2804 


5:12 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.6 


117 


15.8 


23 


14.50 


2684 


2552 


2486 


33.40 


2805 


5:12 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.6 


117 


15.8 


14 


]9.70 


2700 


2567 


2379 


33.60 


2806 


5:14 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.6 


117 


15.8 





20.4 


2703 


2570 


2363 


33.64 


2807 


5:16 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.6 


117 


15.8 


9 


20.15 


2700 


2567 


2367 


33.60 


2808 


6:55 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


31.4 


117 


21.5 


330 


9.00 


2729 


2594 


2633 


33.96 


2809 


6:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


31.4 


117 


21.5 


185 


9.90 


2727 


2592 


2616 


33.94 


2810 


7:15 a.m. 


40^ 


32 


31.4 


117 


21.5 


137 


10.10 


2708 


2574 


2594 


33.70 


2811 


7:15 a.m. 


40,, 


32 


31.4 


117 


21.5 


110 


10.15 


2706 


2573 


2591 


33.68 


2812 


7:25 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


92 


10.20 


2693 


2560 


2578 


33.52 


2813 


7:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


73 


11.10 


2692 


2559 


2561 


33.50 


2814 


7:33 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


55 


11.75 


2686 


2553 


2544 


33.43 


2815 


7:33 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


46 


12.35 


2684 


2552 


2531 


33.40 


2816 


7:40 a.m. 


40e 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


37 


13.10 


2683 


2551 


2515 


33.39 


2817 


7:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


27 


14.10 


2684 


2552 


2496 


33.40 


2818 


7:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


23 


14.70 


2686 


2553 


2485 


33.43 


2819 


7:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


14 


16.45 


2700 


2567 


2458 


33.60 


2820 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


IS 


15.35 


2686 


2553 


2470 


33.43 


2821 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 


9 


18.45 


2691 


2558 


2402 


33.49 


2822 


7:52 a.m. 


40, 


32 


30.8 


117 


21.5 





20 . 75 


2703 


2570 


2354 


33.64 


2823 


8:38 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


110 


10.70 


2700 


2567 


2576 


33.60 


2824 


8:38 a.m. 


40; 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


92 


10.80 


2701 


2568 


2575 


33.61 


2825 


8:45 a.m. 


40: 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2. 


73 


11.10 


2700 


2567 


2569 


33.60 


2826 


8:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


64 


]1.35 


2698 


2565 


2562 


33.58 


2827 


8:52 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


46 


12.00 


2691 


2558 


2543 


33.49 


2828 


8:52 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


37 


12.50 


2696 


2563 


2538 


33.55 


2829 


8:58 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


27 


13.40 


2686 


2553 


2511 


33.43 


2830 


8:58 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


18 


15.25 


2689 


2556 


2476 


33.47 


2831 


9:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 





20.8 


2707 


2574 


2356 


33.69 


2832 


9:03 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


23 


15.00 


2692 


2559 


2484 


33.50 


2833 


9:03 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


14 


16. .50 


2691 


2558 


2448 


33.49 


2834 


9:07 a.m. 


40. 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


9 


16.90 


2692 


2559 


2440 


33.50 


2835 


9:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 


31.9 


117 


20.5 


575 


7.05 










2836 


9:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 


o].9 


117 


20.5 


365 


8.65 


2752 


'26r6 


2660 


34^25 


2837 


9:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


31.5 


117 


19.3 


185 


10.00 


2727 


2592 


2614 


33.94 


2838 


9:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


31.5 


117 


19.3 


92 


10.60 


2700 


2567 


2578 


33.60 


2839 


30:07 a.m. 


40, 


32 


31.5 


117 


19.3 


55 


11.80 


2692 


2559 


2549 


33.50 



1915] 



Michael, ft al.: Ilijdrofjraphic Records of Scrijyps Institution 



95 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 



Water 
sample 
number 

2840 
2841 
2842 
2843 
2844 
2845 
2846 
2847 
2848 
2849 
2850 
2851 
2852 
2853 
2854 
2855 
2856 
2857 
2858 
2S59 
2860 
2861 
2862 
2S63 
2864 
2865 
2866 
2867 
2868 
2869 
2870 
2871 
2872 
2873 
2874 
2875 
2876 
2877 
2878 



Temper 
Depth ature _ 



Specific gravity 



10:07 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. 
10:13 a.m. 
10:13 a.m. 
10:18 a.m. 
10:46 a.m. 
10:46 a.m. 
10:53 a.m. 
10:53 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:05 a.m. 
11 :05 a.m. 
11:10 a.m. 
11:10 a.m. 
11:12 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
11:41 a.m. 
11 :45 a.m. 
11 :45 a.m. 
11:50 a.m. 
11 :.50 a.m. 
11 :55 a.m. 
12:32 p.m. 
12:32 p.m. 
12:38 p.m. 
12:38 p.m. 
12:40 p.m. 
12:43 p.m. 
12:43 p.m. 
12:57 p.m. 
12:57 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

1:05 p.m. 

2879 6:00 a.m. 

2880 7:00 a.m. 

2881 10:00 a.m. 



2882 
2883 
2884 
2885 
2886 
2887 
2888 

2889 
2890 
2891 
2892 
2893 

2894 
2895 
2896 
2897 
2898 
2899 



6:00 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

7:30 a.m. 

9:30 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01p.m. 

10:30 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 
12:45 p.m. 

25 a.m. 
00 a.m. 
10 p.m. 
35 p.m. 
30 p.m. 
:45 p.m. 



40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40, 
40, 
40, 

40; 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40- 
40, 

40; 

40, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 

39; 

39, 
39, 

39; 

39, 
39, 
39, 

39, 
39- 
39, 
39- 
39^ 
39, 
39, 
39, 

39; 

(40,,) 

(40,,,) 

(41„) 

61 „„ 
61, .J) 

(62:,,) 

(63„) 
(65,,) 
(65.5,,) 



32° 3i:5 
31.5 
31.5 
31.5 
31.5 
33.6 
33.6 
33.fi 
33.6 
33.6 
33.6 
33.6 
33.6 
33.6 
33.6 
33.6 
34.0 
34.0 
34.0 
34.0 
34.0 
32 34.0 
32 34.0 
32 34.0 
34.0 
34.0 
32 37.3 
37.3 
37.3 
37.3 
37.3 
37.3 
37.3 
37.1 
37.1 



32 



\¥est in in centi- S 

longitude meters grade 4°0 

Aug. 12, 1911 
117=19:3 37 




37.1 
37.1 



32 37.1 

33 1.0 
33 2.5 
33 14.0 



11 



34 4.0 

34 4.5 

34 5.5 

34 8.0 

34 17.7 

34 20.0 

34 22.0 

34 26.0 

34 25.0 

34 25.0 

34 25.0 

34 26.0 

34 22.0 

34 12.5 

34 0.0 

33 58.0 

34 1.0 
34 0.5 



117 18.0 

li; 

11^ 

li; 

117 

Hi 

11/ 

ii; 

117 



11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 

117 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
Aug. 
11 
11 
11 



19:3 

19.3 
19.3 
19.3 
19.3 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 



18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
16.9 
16.9 
16.9 
16.9 
16.9 
16.9 
16.9 
16.9 
16.9 
16.9 
16.0 
16.0 
16.0 
16.0 
16.0 
16.0 
16.0 
14.9 
14.9 
14.9 
14.9 
14.9 
14.9 
j. 1911 
18.3 
19.1 
26.6 
.\ug. 17, 1911 
119 5.0 
119 6.5 
119 11.0 
119 15.0 
119 24.4 
119 27.5 

119 35.0 

Aug. 18. 1911 

120 15.0 
120 17.7 
120 22.0 
120 25.0 
120 15.0 

.'iug. 19. 1911 
119 40.5 
119 32.0 
119 30.0 

119 30.0 

120 0.0 
120 2.0 



IS 

9 

110 

92 

73 

55 

46 

37 

27 

18 

14 

9 



73 

55 

46 

37 



27 

18 

23 

14 

9 

42 

33 

23 

14 



18 

9 

27 

18 

23 

14 



9 




















12?90 2682 

20.1 2708 

13.60 2684 

15.75 2691 

1 7 . 45 2690 

10.30 2710 

10.70 2702 



11.00 
11.90 
12.30 
12.60 
13.30 
14.60 
16.00 
17.40 
21.2 



2697 
2692 
2689 
2686 
2687 
2686 
2692 
2704 
2712 
11.10 2692 
11.75 2691 
12.20 2688 
12.95 2683 
21.2 2710 
13.10 2690 
13.90 2683 
13.80 2684 
14.80 2692 
17.05 2693 
11.20 2704 
12.00 2684 
12.70 2699 
13.75 2699 
20.45 2695 
12.90 2691 
15.70 2699 
12.10 2698 
13.40 2701 
12.20 2691 



14.10 

20.0 

17.45 



2688 
2709 
2695 



21.75 

20.4 

20.2 

14.6 
14.2 
15.0 
15.6 
18.0 
19.8 
19.8 

18.4 
17.4 
16.6 
15.8 
18.75 

19.7 

18.2 
20 . 25 
19.2 
15.5 
14.8 



17?5 



2.550 
2574 
2552 
2558 
2,557 
2576 
2569 
2564 
2559 
2556 
2553 
2554 
2553 
2559 
2571 
2578 
2559 
2558 
2555 
2551 
2576 
2557 
2551 
2552 
2559 
2560 
2571 
2552 
2566 
2566 
2562 
2558 
2566 
2565 
2568 
2558 
2555 
2575 
2562 



4?0 

2518 
2376 
2506 
2467 
2425 
2593 
2578 
2568 
2546 
2535 
2526 
2514 
2486 
2461 
2440 
2351 
2561 
2548 
2536 
2517 
2349 
2521 
2498 
2501 
2488 
2438 
2571 
2536 
2.537 
2517 
2354 
2525 
2476 
2548 
2526 
2539 
2499 
2380 
2430 



33.38 
33.70 
33.40 
33.49 
33.48 
33.73 
33.63 
33.57 
33.50 
33.47 
33.43 
33.44 
33.43 
33.50 
33.65 
33.75 
33.50 
33.49 
33.45 
33.39 
33.73 
33.48 
33.39 
33.40 
33.50 
33.52 
33.65 
33.40 
33 59 
33.59 
33..54 
33.49 
3 3. .59 
33.58 
33.61 
33.49 
33.45 
33.71 
33..54 



96 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 





Time 
of 
day Section 


Table 1. — Ocean D 

Position 


iTA — {Continu 

Temper- 
Depth ature 

meters grade 


ed) 

Specific gravity 




Water 
sample 
number 


0° 

S 

4?0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 
S 

4;o 




North 
latitude 


West 
longitude 


Salinity 
SO/00 


2900 


5:35 a.m. 


72,, 


34 


' 0:5 


Aug. 2 
120 


0, 1911 

' 2:0 


14?6 










2901 


5:45 a.m. 


72!^ 


34 


1.0 


120 


2.0 





14.6 










2902 


5:55 a.m. 


7224 


34 


1.6 


120 


2.1 





14.9 










2903 


1:15 |i.m. 


72,3 


33 


52.8 


120 


7.0 





17.5 










2904 


3:06 a.m. 


74,, 


33 


53.0 


Aug. 2 
120 


1, 1911 
9.1 24 


12.80 


2692 


2559 


2528 


33.50 


2905 


3:06 a.m. 


74j3 


33 


53.0 


120 


9.1 


15 


14.80 


2706 


2573 


2502 


33.68 


2906 


3:10 a.m. 


74,3 


33 


53.0 


120 


9.1 





15.4 


2712 


2578 


2495 


33.75 


2907 


3:15 a.m. 


74.,, 


33 


53.0 


120 


9.1 


18 


13.25 










2908 


3:15 a.m. 


74,3 


33 


53.0 


120 


9.1 


9 


14.85 


2692 


2559 


2487 


33"56 


2909 


3:37 a.m. 


74,3 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


110 


9.35 


2719 


2585 


2617 


33.84 


2910 


3:37 a.m. 


74.3 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


73 


9.60 










2911 


3:46 a.m. 


74., 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


55 


10. .55 


2702 


2.569 


2.581 


33.63 


2912 


3:46 a.m. 


74.., 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


46 


11.30 


2696 


2563 


2561 


33.55 


2913 


3:46 a.m. 


74,, 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 





16.4 


2696 


2563 


2456 


33.55 


2914 


3:55 a.m. 


74^3 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


37 


11.65 


2690 


2557 


2549 


33.48 


2915 


3:55 a.m. 


74,, 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


27 


12.00 


2723 


2588 


2574 


33.89 


2916 


4:01 a.m. 


74,, 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


23 


12.15 


2720 


2586 


2568 


33.85 


2917 


4:01a.m. 


74., 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


14 


14.15 


2686 


2553 


2496 


33.43 


2918 


4:07 a.m. 


74,3 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


18 


13.35 


2685 


2552 


2511 


33.42 


2919 


4:07 a.m. 


74.3 


33 


53.2 


120 


10.2 


9 


15.95 


2711 


2577 


2481 


33.74 


2920 


4:28 a.m. 


74,3 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


165 


9.05 


2718 


2584 


2621 


33.83? 


2921 


4:28 a.m. 


74,3 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


137 


9.35 


2743 


2608 


2641 


34.14 


2922 


4:45 a.m. 


74., 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


110 


9.75 


2730 


2595 


2621 


33.97 


2923 


4:45 a.m. 


74,3 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


64 


9.80 


2709 


2575 


2601 


33.71 


2924 


4:58 a.m. 


74,3 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


46 


10.70 


2716 


2582 


2592 


33.80 


2925 


4:58 a.m. 


74a 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


37 


10.80 


2696 


2563 


2570 


33..55 


2926 


5:07 a.m. 


74., 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


27 


1 1 . 75 


2700 


2567 


2557 


33.60 


2927 


5:25 a.m. 


74,, 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


23 


12.15 


2703 


2570 


2552 


33.64 


2928 


5:25 a.m. 


74s3 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


14 


15.55 


2710 


2576 


2490 


33.73 


2929 


5:30 a.m. 


74,3 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 


18 


14.00 










2930 


5:35 a.m. 


74:^ 


33 


53.0 


120 


10.7 





16.6 


2700 


2567 


2455 


33.60 


2931 


6:23 a.m. 


75,. 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


365 


7.40 


2746 


2610 


2673 


34.17 


2932 


6:23 a.m. 


75.. 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


185 


8. SO 










2933 


6:25 a.m. 


75„ 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 





16.5 


2715 


2581 


2472 


33.79 


2934 


6:50 a.m. 


75,. 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


137 


9.20 


2730 


2595 


2631 


33.97 


2935 


6:50 a.m. 


75„ 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


92 


9.50 


2716 


2582 


2613 


33.80 


2936 


7:00 a.m. 


75„ 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


64 


10.10 


2699 


2566 


2585 


33.59 


2937 


7:00 a.m. 


75„ 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


46 


10.50 


2718 


2584 


2.596 


33.83 


2938 


7:10 a.m. 


75,. 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


37 


10.90 


2712 


2578 


2585 


33.75 


2939 


7:10 a.m. 


75,. 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


27 


11.45 


2710 


2576 


2573 


33.73 


2940 


7:15 a.m. 


75.. 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


23 


11.90 


2699 


2566 


2553 


33.59 


2941 


7:15 a.m. 


75., 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


14 


14.00 


2703 


2570 


2516 


33.64 


2942 


7:22 a.m. 


-5,, 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


18 


12.30 


2694 


2561 


2540 


33.53 


2943 


7:22 a.m. 


75.. 


33 


51.3 


120 


12.8 


9 


15.60 


2693 


2560 


2472 


33.52 


2944 


8:15 a.m. 


-5,, 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


735 


5.15 










2945 


8:15 a.m. 


"5.. 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


550 


6.40 


2756 


2620 


2697 


iZzo 


2946 


8:50 a.m. 


■5,. 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


365 


7.70 










2947 


8:50 a.m. 


■5., 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


185 


9.10 


2748 


2612 


2649 


34.20 


2948 


9:00 a.m. 


-5.. 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 





16.0 


2698 


2565 


2467 


33.58 


2949 


9:00 a.m. 


■5.. 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


137 


9.20 


2739 


2604 


2640 


34.09 


2950 


9:09 a.m. 


-5.. 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


92 


9.30 


2734 


2599 


2633 


34.02 


2951 


9:20 a.m. 


"5„ 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


73 


9.40 


2727 


2592 


2624 


33.94 


2952 


9:20 a.m. 


"5~, 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


55 


10.45 


2713 


2579 


2593 


33.76 


2953 


9:25 a.m. 


■5„ 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


46 


10.60 


2701 


2568 


2579 


33.61 


2954 


9:25 a.m. 


'5„ 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


37 


10.75 


2699 


2566 


2574 


33.59 


2955 


9:30 a.m. 


"5., 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


27 


10.90 


2705 


2572 


2578 


33.66 


2956 


9:30 a.m. 


"0., 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


18 


14.70 


2694 


2561 


2492 


33.53 


2957 


9:36 a.m. 


"5,, 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


23 


11.25 


2703 


2570 


2569 


33.64 


2958 


9:36 a.m. 


"5,. 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


14 


15.80 


2697 


2564 


2471 


33.57 


2959 


9:41 a.m. 


"5., 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 


9 


15.90 


2693 


2560 


2465 


33.52 


2960 


11:40 a.m. 


"5.. 


33 


49.6 


120 


16.2 





16.0 










296T 


3:10 p.m. 


"9.„ 


33 


39.3 


120 


33.0 


1280 


3.70 










2962* 


3:10 p.m. 


(■9,0 


33 


39.3 


120 


33.0 


1100 


4.30 











* Owing to an unusual drift, the recorded depths relative to water samples 2961-2965 are too 
great. Judging from the inclination of the cible, tney should be multiplied by about 0.8. 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Ilijdrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



97 



Table 1. — Ocean Data 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 


Position 

North West 
latitude longitude 


Depth 

meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi- 
grade 


Specific gravity 




Water 


0° 
S 

4;o 


17?5 

S 

17^5 


f 

S- 

4^0 


Salinity 
SO/00 


2963 


3:10 p.m. 


79.„ 


33° 


39:3 


Aug. 2 
120° 


1, 1911 
33:0 





isn 


2702 


2569 


2492 


33.63 


2964 


4:24 p.m. 


79,„ 


33 


39.3 


120 


33.0 


915 


4.80 










2965 


4:24 p.m. 


79^ 


33 


39.3 


120 


33.0 


730 


5.40 










2966 


6:10 a.m. 


67„ 


33 


23.0 


Aug. 2 
119 


2. 1911 

37.0 





15.2 










2967 


10:40 a.m. 


65,. 


33 


16.0 


119 


27.0 





17.4 










2968 


4:00 p.m. 


51,0 


33 


22.0 


Aug. 2 

lis 


3, 1911 
16.0 





20.7 


2719 


2585 


2371 


33.84 


2969 


4:26 p.m. 


51„ 


33 


22.0 


118 


16.0 





21.2 


2720 


2586 


2358 


33.85 


2970 


7:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


Aug. 2 
117 


4, 1911 

21.2 


92 


12.80 


2695 


2562 


2531 


33.54 


2971 


7:45 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


137 




2720 


2586 




33.85 


2972 


8:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


110 


li.jio 










2973 


8:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


137 


11.25 


2746 


2610 


2611 


34.17 


2974 


8:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


55 


15.05 


2704 


2571 


2495 


33.65 


2975 


8:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


73 




2706 


2573 




33.68 


2976 


8:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


46 


16.50 


2689 


2556 


2446 


33.47 


2977 


8:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


73 


13.40 


2694 


2561 


2519 


33.53 


2978 


8:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





19.15 










2979 


9:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





19.15 










2980 


9:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


27 


19.1 










2981 


9:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


37 


18.45 


2701 


2568 


2412 


33.61 


2982 


9:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


9 


19.15 










2983 


9:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 


IS 


19.15 










2984 


10:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





19.3 


2696 


2.563 


2385 


33.5.5 


2985 


11:15 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





19.3 


2705 


2572 


2394 


33.66 


2986 


1:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





19.3 


2707 


2574 


2396 


33.69 


2987 


3:07 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





19.4 


2712 


2578 


2399 


33.75 


2988 


7:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


Oct. 25, 1911 
117 19.2 





19.2 


2712 


2578 


2404 


33.75 


2989 


7:20 a.m. 


40j 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


92 


13.15 


2715 


2581 


2545 


33.79 


2990 


7:20 a.m. 


40= 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


137 


10.95 


2719 


2584 


2590 


33.84 


2991 


7:29 a.m. 


40, 


32. 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


55 


14.70 


2683 


2551 


2482 


33.39 


2992 


7:38 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


73 


13.80 










2993 


7:38 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


110 


12.10 


2698 


2565 


2548 


33.58 


2994 


8:00 a.m. 


■10, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


27 


18.10 


2708 


2574 


2428 


33.70 


2995 


8:00 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


46 


14.85 


2705 


2572 


2500 


33.66 


2996 


8:03 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


9 


19.25 










2997 


8:08 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


185 


10.75 


2729 


2594 


2603 


33.96 


2998 


8:08 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


275 


9.65 










2999 


8:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


137 


19.2 





19.5 










3000 


9:55 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 





20.1 










3001 


11:00 a.m. 


40j 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 





20.2 


2710 


2576 


2376 


33.73 


3002 


1:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 





19.9 










3003 


7:45 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


22.7 


Oct. 
117 


26, 1911 

19.2 550 




2763 


2627 




34.39K 


3004 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 





19.2 










3005 


8:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


460 




2758 


2622 




34.32K 


3006 


8:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


365 




2764 


2628 




34.40K 


3007 


9:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


275 




2747 


2611 




34.1 9K 


3008 


9:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 





19.1 


2708 


2574 


2403 


33.70 


3009 


9:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 


185 


10.0 


2722 


2588 


2609 


33.88K 


3010 


12:30 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 


19.2 





19.4 


2711 


2577 


2398 


33.74 


3011 


7:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


Oct. 2 
117 


7, 1911 
21.2 





18.6 


2704 


2571 


2411 


33.65 


3012 


ll:.59a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





19.2 


2711 


2577 


2403 


33.74 


3013 


9:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


Oct. 2 
117 


8, 1911 

19.2 





18.8 


2697 


2564 


2399 


33.57 


3014 


4:55 p.m. 


39, 


32 


29.5 


Nov. 2 
117 


9. 1911 

13.5 





16.0 










3015 


4:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


Nov. 30, 1911 
117 18.0 


137 




2727 


2592 




33.94 


3016 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.1 


117 


18.8 


55 




2703 


2570 




33.64 


3017 


4:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.1 


117 


18.8 





16.1 










3018 


5:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


21.8 


117 


21.1 





16.0 











98 



Uiiiversity of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — {Continued) 



lition 



3019 8:10 a.m. 

3020 9:30 a.m. 



3021 
3022 
3023 
3024 
3025 
3026 
3027 

3028 
3029 

3030 
3031 
3032 
3033 
3034 
3035 
3036 
3037 

3038 
3039 
3040 
3041 
3042 
3043 
3044 
3045 
3046 
3047 
3048 

3049 
3050 
3051 
3052 
3053 
3054 
3055 
3056 
3057 
3058 
3059 
3060 
3061 
3062 
3063 
3064 
3065 
3066 
3067 
3068 
3069 
3070 
3071 
3072 
3073 
3074 
3075 
3076 
3077 
3078 
3079 



3:45 a.m. 
3:50 a.m. 
4:08 a.m. 
4:25 a.m. 
6:30 a.m. 
8:07 a.m. 
8:53 a.m. 

4:45 a.m. 
5:30 a.m. 

4:05 a.m. 
5:00 a.m. 
5:12 a.m. 
6:10 a.m. 
7:15 a.m. 
9:00 a.m. 
9:38 a.m. 
10:48 a.m. 

4:13 a.m. 
4:13 a.m. 
4:20 a.m. 
4:32 a.m. 
4:48 a.m. 
6:01 a.m. 
6:22 a.m. 
7:41 a.m. 
8:05 a.m. 
8:55 a.m. 
8:55 a.m. 

3:27 a.m. 

3:27 a.m. 

5:26 a.m. 

5:26 a.m. 

5:35 a.m. 

5:35 a.m. 

5:43 a.m. 

5:43 a.m. 

5:45 a.m. 

6:40 a.m. 

8:42 a.m. 

8:52 a.m. 

8:56 a.m. 

8:56 a.m. 

9:02 a.m. 

9:07 a.m. 

9:42 a.m. 

9:42 a.m. 

9:48 a.m. 

9:52 a.m. 

9:52 a.m. 

9:58 a.m. 

9:58 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
12:25 p.m. 
12:25 p.m. 
12:35 p.m. 
12:35 p.m. 
12:45 p.m. 
12:45 p.m. 
12:55 p.m. 



4O5 
4O5 

4O5 
40, 
40, 
40, 
4O5 
4O4 
40, 

40. 
40, 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
4O5 
4O5 
4O5 

40, 
40, 
4O5 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 
40. 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 



32° 23:5 

32 23.5 

32 22.7 

32 22.7 

32 22.5 

32 22.2 

32 22.6 

32 22.0 

32 22.4 



22.4 
22.4 



32 23.5 
32 22.6 



32 



i.5 



32 21.5 

32 20.2 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 22.7 

32 22.7 

32 22.7 

32 22.7 

32 22.6 

32 22.6 

32 22.3 

32 22.2 

32 22.4 

32 21.9 

32 20.8 

32 20.8 



25 



West 

longitude 

STov. 30. 19H 

117° i8:o 

117 18.0 
Dec. 1, 1911 

117 19.2 

117 19.2 

117 19.5 

117 19.6 

117 19.2 

117 19.3 

117 21.2 
Dec. 2, 1911 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 
3ec. 27, 1911 

117 18.0 

117 18.1 

117 18.1 

117 18.3 

117 18.5 

117 18.0 

117 18.0 

117 19.2 

)ec. 28, 1911 

117 19.2 

117 19.2 

117 19.2 

117 19.0 

117 18.9 

117 18.4 

117 18.3 



Temper- 
Depth ature 

in in centi- 
meters grade 



Specific gravity 



137 

137 

92 

15.2 

15.6 

15.0 

15.0 

15.1 



21.2 
21.4 
21.8 
21.8 



Feb. 9, 1912 

32 23.5 117 18.0 
From 3:25 to 6:50 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 21.7 

32 23.5 

32 23.1 

32 23.1 

32 23.1 

32 23.0 

32 23.0 

32 22.7 



117 18.0 

117 18.0 

117 17.8 

117 17.8 

117 17.8 

117 17.7 

117 17.7 

117 19.2 



From 9:40 to 10:56 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 
32 22.6 117 19.0 
32 22.4 117 21.2 
From 11 :20 a.m. to 
1 :00 p.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



4?0 



16?1 

16.5 

2715 

16.5 

2702 

16.5 2701 

16.1 

16.0 

16.4 

16.8 

16.6 



2725 

. 2719 

. 2723 

I 15.2 

I 15.6 

I 15.0 

I 15.0 

I 15.1 

137 

92 2728 

73 2715 

46 2702 

14.8 2705 

110 2723 

14.8 

92 2701 

14.8 

110 2706 

82 2717 

92 11.70 

137 10.40 

55 14.45 2704 

73 12.30 2712 

27 15.05 

46 14.85 

9 15.05 

37 15.05 

15.0 

15.0 

S3 11.85 2721 

14.9 

27 14.90 

64 12.60 

18 15.05 

37 14.90 

92 13.30 2712 

137 11.15 

73 12.65 

27 15.15 

46 14.00 

9 15.05 

37 15.05 

15.1 

92 12.45 

137 10.85 2736 

.55 12.95 

73 13.60 

27 15.20 

46 14.30 

9 15.10 



2569 
2568 



2590 
2585 
2588 



2.593 
2581 
2569 
2572 
2588 



2568 



2573 
2583 



2571 
2578 



2507 
2558 



Salinity 
SO/00 



33.63 
33.61 



33.91 
33.84 
33.89 



33.95 
33.79 
33.63 
33.66 
33.89 



33.61 



33.68 
33.81 



33.65 
33.75 



2587 2576 33.86? 



2578 2539 33.79 



2609 34.05 



1915] 



Michael, ct ah: TTudrdf/raphic Records of Seripps Instil iilio}) 



9!) 









Table 1.— Oce.\n DAT\—(Continitcd) 




















Specific gravity 










Position 




Temper- 




















Watei 
sampl. 








Depth 


ature 
in centi- 










; of 




North West 


S 


S 


,s 


Salinity 


number day 


Section 


latitude longitude 


meters 


1 grade 


4;o 


17°5 


4;o 


SO/oo 








Feb. 9, 1912 














30S0 


12:55 p.m. 


40, 




37 


15? 05 










3081 


1:00 p.m. 


40, 


32° 21:75 117° 20:4 

Feb. 10, 1912 





15.2 










3082 


3:48 a.m. 


4O5 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


92 


11.60 










3083 


3:48 a.m. 


4O5 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


137 


10.10 


2747 


2611 


2632 


34.19? 


3084 


4:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


00 


12.90 










3085 


4:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


73 


12.00 










3086 


4:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


27 


14.95 










3087 


4:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


46 


13.45 










3088 


4:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


9 


15.05 










3089 


4:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


37 


14.20 


2703 


2570 


2512 


33.64 


3090 


11:16 a.m. 


(390 


32 39.8 117 14.1 
Mar. 23, 1912 





14.5 


2710 


2576 


2512 


33.73? 


3091 


3:12 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 117 18.0 


83 


10.80 










3092 


3:14 a.m. 


40, 


From 3:00 to 6:00 





14.4 










3093 


3:26 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


64 


11.50 










3094 


3:36 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


46 


13.30 










3095 


3:46 a.m. 


■iO, 


above position 


37 


14.00 










3096 


3:56 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


27 


14.35 










3097 


4:02 a.m. 


40, 


position 


18 


14.40 










3098 


4:11 a.m. 


40, 




9 


14.40 










3099 


4:16 a.m. 


40, 




5 


14.40 










3100 


4:28 a.m. 


40, 




137 


9.. 55 


2734 


2.599 


2629 


34.02 


3101 


4:52 a.m. 


40, 




82 


10.80 










3102 


5:03 a.m. 


40, 




64 


11.20 










3103 


5:15 a.m. 


40, 




46 


13.40 










3104 


5:21 a.m. 


40, 




37 


13.85 










3105 


5:23 a.m. 


40, 







14.4 










3106 


5:27 a.m. 


40, ' 




27 


14.25 










3107 


5:36 a.m. 


40, 




18 


14.35 










3108 


5:41a.m. 


40, 




9 


14.40 










3109 


5:46 a.m. 


40, 




5 


14.40 










3110 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 18.5 


137 


9.65 










3111 


6:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 117 18.0 


82 


10.15 










3112 


6:57 a.m. 


40, 


From 6:40 to 7:45 


64 


10.90 










3113 


7:07 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


27 


14.05 










3114 


7:12 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


37 


1 3 . 75 










3115 


7:21 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


27 


14.10 










3116 


7:26 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


18 


14.35 










3117 


7:31 a.m. 


40, 


position 


9 


14.45 










31 IS 


7:35 a.m. 


40, 




5 


14.45 










3119 


7:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 24.0 117 18.0 





14.4 


2714 


2580 


2518 


33.78 


3120 


8:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


73 


10.90 










3121 


8:21 a.m. 


40, 


From 8:12 to 9:20 





14.4 


2713 


2579 


2517 


33.76? 


3122 


8:32 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


82 


10.45 


2724 


2589 


2603 


33.90? 


3123 


8:41 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


64 


11.50 










3124 


8:47 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


46 


1 2 . 75 










3125 


8:53 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


37 


13.75 










3126 


9:01a.m. 


40, 


position 


27 


14.15 










3127 


9:05 a.m. 


40, 




18 


14.45 










3128 


9:11 a.m. 


40, 




9 


14 . 45 










3129 


9:13 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.2 117 18.5 


5 


14.45 










3130 


10:02 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 


82 


10.45 










3131 


10:11a.m. 


40,, 


From 9:52 to 10:55 


64 


11.70 










3132 


10:12 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 





14.8 










3133 


10:17 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


46 


12.90 










3134 


10:25 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


37 


13.65 










3135 


10:31a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


27 


14.15 










3136 


10:37 a.m. 


40, 


position 


18 


14.40 










3137 


10:42 a.m. 


40, 




9 


14.50 










3138 


10:48 a.m. 


40, 




.5 


14.60 










3139 


10:52 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.75 117 20.5 
Mar. 24. 1912 


137 


9.10 










3140 


3:22 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


82 


10.50 


2719 


2585 


2598 


33,84? 



100 University of California Puhlications in Zoology [Vol. 15 









Table 1 


. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 






















Spe 


cific gravii 


Iv 










Position 




Temper- 




















Water 


Time 






-A .^ 


Depth 


ature 






t° 




sample 


of 




North 


West 


in 


in centi- 


S 


S 


•S 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 
Mar. 24. 1912 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17^5 


4?0 


SO/00 


3141 


3:40 a.m. 


40, 


From 3:15 to 6:30 


46 


12!95 










3142 


3:42 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. th 


e boat 





14.8 










3143 


3:47 a.m. 


40,, 


drifted from the 


37 


14.15 










3144 


3:53 a.m. 


40, 


above 


position 


27 


14.35 










3145 


4:06 a.m. 


40, 


to the : 


following 


18 


14.40 










3146 


4:16 a.m. 


40. 


positio 


■n 


5 


14.45 










3147 


4:22 a.m. 


40, 






137 


9.95 










3148 


4:30 a.m. 


40, 






9 


14.45 










3149 


4:47 a.m. 


40, 






83 


10.55 










3150 


5:02 a.m. 


40, 






64 


11.55 










3151 


5:42 a.m. 


40, 






64 


11.40 










3152 


5:49 a.m. 


40, 






46 


13.20 










3153 


5:55 a.m. 


40, 






37 


14.10 










3154 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 






27 


14.25 










3155 


6:06 a.m. 


40, 






18 


14.35 










3156 


6:09 a.m. 


40, 






9 


14.55 










3157 


6:14 a.m. 


40, 






5 


14.85 










3158 


6:18 a.m. 


40, 






137 


9.50 










3159 


6:21 a.m. 


40, 









14.6 


2707 


2574 


2507 


33.691 


3160 


6:30 a.m. 


40, 


32° 21:2 


117° 10:5 


5 


14.50 










3161 


8:07 a.m. 


40, 


32 21.3 


117 19.0 





14. S 


2707 


2574 


2503 


33.69 3 


3162 


8:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 21.8 


117 18.6 





14.7 










3163 


8:58 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.3 


117 18.6 





14.8 


2699 


2566 


2495 


33.59 


3164 


9:18 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 


117 18.6 





14.95 


2701 


2568 


2494 


33.61 


3165 


9:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.6 


117 18.7 





15.0 










3166 


10:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.6 


117 19.0 





15.0 


2699 


2566 


2491 


33.59 


3167 


10:27 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.6 


117 19.3 





15.0 


2699 


2566 


2491 


33..59 


3168 


10:56 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.6 


117 19.6 
Apr. 26, 1912 





15.0 










3169 


3:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


83 


9.90 










3170 


3:55 a.m. 


40, 


Froin 3:00 to 5:10 


64 


11.10 


2706 


2573 


2575 


33.68 


3171 


4:05 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. til 


le boat 


46 


11.80 


2699 


2566 


2555 


33.59 


3172 


4:20 a.m. 


40,, 


drifted from the 


37 


12.20 










3173 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 


above 


position 


27 


12.80 


2696 


2563 


2532 


33.55 


3174 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 


to the 


following 





15.0 


2706 


2573 


2498 


33.68 


3175 


4:48 a.m. 


40, 


position 


IS 


14.10 










3176 


4:57 a.m. 


40, 






9 


14.20 


2704 


2571 


2513 


33.65 


3177 


5:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 21.9 


117 18.2 


5 


14.. 55 


2700 


2567 


2501 


33.60 


3178 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


83 


9.35 










3179 


6:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


64 


9.80 










3180 


6:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


46 


11.10 


2703 


2570 


2572 


33.63 


3181 


6:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


37 


11.75 


2707 


2574 


2564 


33.69 


3182 


6:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


27 


13.85 










3183 


6:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


18 


14.00 










3184 


7:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


9 


14.55 










3185 


7:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


5 


14.55 


2701 


2568 


2502 


33.61 


3186 


7:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 





14.9 










3187 


8:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


110 


9.15 










3188 


8:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


137 


9.05 


2735 


2600 


2638 


34.04 


3189 


8:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


110 


9.25 










3190 


8:45 a.m. 


40, 


From 8:45 to 10:10 


137 


8.90 










3191 


9:00 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


82 


9.35 










3192 


9:10 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


64 


11.15 


2701 


2568 


2569 


33.61 


3193 


9:30 a.m. 


40, 


above 


position 


46 


12.60 


2698 


2565 


2538 


33.58 


3194 


9:35 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


37 


13.05 


2701 


2568 


2533 


33.61 


3195 


9:45 a.m. 


40, 


position 


27 


14.40 


2704 


2571 


2508 


33.65 


3196 


9:55 a.m. 


40, 






18 


14.60 


2708 


2574 


2508 


33.70 


3197 


10:00 a.m. 


40, 






9 


14.85 


2704 


2571 


2499 


33.65 


31 98 


10:05 a.m. 


40, 






5 


15.00 


2701 


2568 


2493 


33.61 


3199 


10:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 19.0 
Julv 16. 1912 





15.1 










3200 


12:22 p.m. 


43, 


32 47.4 


117 34.7 





21.9 










3201 


12:35 p.m. 


43, 


32 47.2 


117 33.2 





21.7 










3202 


12:42 p.m. 


42, 


32 46.8 


117 32.1 





21.5 











1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hijdrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



101 









Table 1 


— Ocean Data — (Contimu 


d) 
























Temper- 


Specific gravity 


























Water 


Time 




^ — 




A 





Depth 


ature 






t° 






of 




North 


West 


in 


in centi- 


S 


S 


s 


Salinitv 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4°0 


17?5 


4°0 


SO/00 












July 16, 1912 














3203 


12:50 p.m 


42^ 


32' 


46:5 


117' 


30:95 





20?9 










3204 


12:58 p.m 


42„ 


32 


46.3 


117 


29.75 





20.75 










3205 


1:05 p.m 


42„ 


32 


46.05 


117 


28.7 





21.0 










3206 


1:12 p.m 


41.5s, 


32 


45.S 


117 


27.5 





21.1 










3207 


1:20 p.m 


4I9 


32 


45.5 


117 


26.45 





21.05 










3208 


1:28 p.m 


41g 


32 


45.3 


117 


25.3 





20.2 










3209 


1:35 p.m 


41» 


32 


44.95 


117 


24.25 





20.2 










3210 


1:42 p.m 


41a 


32 


44.75 


117 


23.05 





19.9 










3211 


1:50 p.m 


40, 


32 


44.5 


117 


21.9 





19.8 










3212 


1:57 p.m 


40, 


32 


44.2 


117 


20.75 





19.8 










3213 


2:04 p.m 


40. 


32 


44.0 


117 


19.6 





19.3 










3214 


2:11 p.m 


40o 


32 


43.7 


117 


1S.4 





19.3 










3215 


2:15 p.m 


40, 


32 


43.55 


117 


17.8 





19.5 










3216 


2:19 p.m 


(39,) 


32 


43.4 


117 


17.3 





19.2 




















July 17, 1912 














3217 


6:37 a.m 


(39,) 


32 


43.0 


117 


16.8 





18.6 


2707 


2574 


2414 


33.69 


3218 


6:45 a.m 


(39,) 


From 6:30 to 7: 


45 


23 


11.90 


2719 


2585 


2573 


33.84 


3219 


6:50 a.m 


(39,) 


a.m. th 


e boat 




18 


12.14 


2708 


2574 


2557 


33.70 


8220 


6:55 a.m 


(39,) 


drifted from the 


14 


12.97 


271S 


2584 


2551 


33.83 


3221 


6:55 a.m 


(39,) 


B 


bove position 


9 


13.40 


2710 


2576 


2535 


33.73 


3222 


7:00 a.m 


(39,) 


1 


the following 





16.43 


2714 


2580 


2473 


33.78 


3223 


7:45 a.m 


(39.) 


position 




37 


11.20 


2718 


2584 


2584 


33.83 


3224 


7:45 a.m 


(39,) 


32 


43.5 


117 


17.1 





19.0 


2705 


2572 


2402 


33.66 


3225 


8:40 a.m 


40, 


32 


43.7 


117 


18.3 





19.0 


2707 


2574 


2404 


33.69 


3226 


8:40 a.m 


40, 


32 


43.7 


117 


18.3 


61 


10.62? 2726 


2591 


2603 


33.93 


3227 


9:14 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 





19.4 


2718 


2584 


2404 


33.831 


3228 


9:14 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


76 


9.96 


2714 


2580 


2603 


33.78 


3229 


9:35 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


61 


9.97 


2707 


2574 


2596 


33.691 


3230 


9:35 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


46 


10.52 


2710 


2576 


2589 


33.73 


3231 


9:45 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


30 


11.35 


2699 


2566 


2564 


33.59 


3232 


9:45 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


21 


12.28 










3233 


9:50 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


12 


14,38 


2719 


2585 


2522 


33.84 


3234 


9:50 am 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


6 


18.04 


2714 


2580 


2435 


33.78 


3235 


10:10 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.5 


117 


21.6 





20.4 


2704 


2571 


2364 


33.65 


3236 


10:10 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.5 


117 


21.6 


92 


9.77 


2719 


2585 


2609 


33.84 


3237 


10:40 a.m 


41. 


32 


45.0 


117 


24.0 





19.8 


2712 


2578 


2388 


33.75 


323? 


11:15 a.m 


41, 


From 10: 


40 to 11:59 


240 


8.87 










3239 


ll:15a.m 


41, 


a.m. th 


e boat 




330 


8.48 










3240 


11:30 a.m 


41, 


t 


rifted from the 


137 


9.64 










3241 


11:30 a.m 


41, 


above position 


185 


9.44 










3242 


11:40 a.m 


41, 


t 


the following 


64 


10.06 










3243 


11:45 a.m 


41, 


position 




27 


11.60 










3244 


11 :45 a.m 


41, 










37 


11.10 










3245 


11:50 a.m 


41, 










9 


18.24 










3246 


11:50 a.m 


41, 


32 


46.25 


117 
July 2 


22.4 
2, 1912 


18 


13.00 










3247* 


6:10 a.m 


(39,) 


32 


43.2 


117 


16.7 





20.2 


2718 


2584 


2383 


33.83 


3248* 


6:30 a.m 


(39,) 


32 


43.0 


117 


16.0 





20.3 


2730 


2595 


2392 


33.97 


3249 


6:30 a.m 


(39,) 


32 


43.4 




16.8 


6 


17.32 


2703 


2570 


2441 


33.64 


3250 


6:39 a.m 


(39,) 


32 


44.4 


117 


17.0 


6 


17.32 


2721 


2587 


2458 


33.86 


3251 


6:55 a.m 


(39,) 


32 


44.4 


117 


16.7 


6 


17.05 










3252 


7:30 a.m 


(39,) 


32 


43.5 


117 


17.1 





20.0 


2720 


2586 


2390 


33.85 


3253 


8:30 a.m 


40, 


32 


43.7 


117 


18.3 





20.0 


2724 


2589 


2394 


33.90 


3254 


8:30 a.m 


40, 


32 


43.7 


117 


18.3 


61 


10.60 


2720 


2586 


2597 


33.85 


3255 


9:00 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 





19.9 


2713 


2579 


2387 


33.76 


3256 


9:00 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


70 


10.50 


2726 


2591 


2605 


33.93 


3257 


9:30 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.5 


117 


21.6 





20.3 


2712 


2578 


2375 


33.75 


3258 


9:30 a.m 


40, 


32 


44.5 


117 


21.6 


92 


10.30 


2722 


2588 


2604 


33.88 


3259 


10:20 a.m 


41, 


32 


45.0 


117 


24.1 





20.5 


2716 


2582 


2373 


33.80 


3260 


10:20 a.m 


41, 


32 


45.0 


117 


24.1 


355 


8.40 


2752 


2616 


2664 


34.25 


3261 


11:20 a.m 


41, 


32 


45.5 


117 


26.4 





20.5 


2711 


2577 


2368 


33.74 


3262 


12:10 p.m 


41, 


32 


45.5 


117 


26.4 





20.5 


2712 


2578 


2369 


33.75 


3263 


5:56 p.m 


B 


32 


42.6 


117 


13.55 





19.9 


2720 


2586 


2393 


33.85 


* Collections 


made from a rowboat inside the 


kelp 


off Poin 


; Loma 









102 



Vniversity of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 


Position 


Depth 
meters 


Temper- 
ature 

in centi- 
grade 


Specific gravity 




Water 
sample 
number 


0° 

S 

4?0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 

s 

4?0 




Nortli West 
latitude longitude 


Salinity 
SO/oo 


3264 


5:56 p.m 


B 


July 22, 1912 
32° 42:6 117=13:55 


7 


19?30 










3265 


6:06 p.m 


B 


32 43.0 117 13.6 


7 


19.00 


2707 


2574 


2385 


33.69 


3266 


8:15 p.m 


B 


32 42.4 117 10.6 





20.7 










3267 


3:40 a.m 


39, 


July 24. 1912 

32 24.4 117 14.3 





19.8 










3268 


3:47 a.m 


39, 


32 23.6 117 14.0 





20.0 










3269 


3:55 a.m 


39, 


32 23.0 117 14.5 





20.2 










3270 


4:00 a.m 


39, 


32 22.8 117 15.1 





19.6 










3271 


4:05 a.m 


39, 


32 22.8 117 15.9 





19.4 










3272 


4:10 a.m 


39b 


32 22.75 117 16.7 





19.5 










3273 


4:15 a.m 


39, 


32 22.7 117 17.3 





19.7 










3274 


4:35 a.m 


40, 


32 22.45 117 20.45 





20.0 










3275 


4:40 a.m 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 





19.6 










3276 


4:52 a.m 


40, 


From 4:40 to 6:50 





19.9 


2724 


2589 


2397 


33.90? 


"3277 


5:20 a.m 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


5 


19 . 35 


2715 


2581 


2403 


33.79 


3278 


5:25 a.m 


40, 


drifted from the 


5 


19.35 


2717 


2583 


2405 


33.81 


3279 


5:45 a.m 


40, 


above position 


9 


19.2 










3280 


5:50 a.m 


40, 


to the following 


9 


19.2 


2715 


2.581 


2407 


33.79 


3281 


5:52 a.m 


40, 


position 





19.8 


2711 


2577 


2387 


33.74 


3282 


6:05 a.m 


40, 




18 


16.00 


2711 


2577 


2480 


33.74 


3283 


6:10 a.m 


40, 




18 


15.80 


2713 


2579 


2487 


33.76 


3284 


6:21 a.m 


40, 




27 


13.20 










3285 


6:26 a.m 


40, 




27 


13.60 


2709 


2575 


2.530 


33.71 


3286 


7:00 a.m 


40, 


32 22.8 117 19.7 





19.95 


2712 


2578 


2384 


33.75 


3287 


7:37 a.m 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 


46 


11.65 


2703 


2570 


2562 


33.64 


3288 


7:42 a.m 


40, 


From 7:35 to 9:50 


46 




2707 


2574 




33.69 


3289 


7:55 a.m 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


55 


10.10 


2724 


2589 


2609 


33.90 


3290 


8:00 a.m 


40, 


drifted from the 


55 




2728 


2593 




33.95 


3291 


8:00 a.m 


40, 


above position 





19.8 


2716 


2582 


2392 


33.80 


3292 


8:20 a.m 


40, 


to the following 


92 


9.90 


2721 


2587 


2610 


33.86 


3293 


8:25 a.m 


40, 


position 


92 


10.05 


2726 


2591 


2612 


33.93 


3294 


8:45 a.m 


40, 




46 


12.00 


2701 


2568 


2553 


33.61 


3295 


8:50 a.m 


40, 




46 


11.90 


2701 


2568 


2555 


33.61 


3296 


9:00 a.m 


40, 







20.0 


2707 


2574 


2378 


33.69 


3297 


9:05 a.m 


40, 




137 


9.65 


2726 


2591 


2619 


33.93 


3298 


9:10 a.m 


40, 


32 22.2 117 19.3 


137 


9.70 


2729 


2594 


2621 


33.96 


3299 


10:05 a.m 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 





20.15 


2720 


2586 


2386 


33.85 


3300 


10:10 a.m 


40, 


From 10:05 to 11:43 


137 


9.60 


2730 


2595 


2624 


33.97 


3301 


10:15 a.m 


40. 


a.m. the boat 


137 


9.65 


2729 


2594 


2622 


33.96 


3302 


10:35 a.m 


40, 


drifted from the 


185 


9.40 


2737 


2602 


2634 


34.06 


3303 


10:40 a.m 


40, 


above position 


185 


9.40 










3304 


11:00 a.m 


40, 


to the following 





20.2 


2720 


2586 


2385 


33.85 


3305 


ll:10a.m 


40, 


position 


275 


8.70 


2769 


2632 


2676 


34.46 


3306 


ll:15a.m 


40,, 


32 22.5 117 19.15 


275 


8.70 


2762 


2626 


2669 


34.37 


3307 


12:01 p.m 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 





20.4 


2720 


2586 


2379 


33.85 


3308 


12:10 p.m 


40, 


From 12:01 to 2:48 


365 


8.25 


2771 


2634 


2685 


34.48 


3309 


12:15 p.m 


40, 


p.m. the boat 


365 


8.25 


2764 


2628 


2678 


34.40 


3310 


1:05 p.m 


40, 


drifted from the 





20.4 


2712 


2578 


2372 


33.75 


3311 


1:30 p.m 


40, 


above position 


365 


8.20 


2766 


2630 


2681 


34.42 


3312 


1 :35 p.m 


40, 


to the following 


365 


8.40 


2775 


2638 


2686 


34.53 


3313 


1 :55 p.m 


40, 


position 


27 


13.70 


2705 


2572 


2524 


33.66 


3314 


2:00 p.m 


40, 




27 


13.50 


2710 


2576 


2533 


33.73 


3315 


2:05 p.m 


40, 







20.4 


2721 


2587 


2380 


33.86 


3316 


2:41 p.m 


40, 


32 21.4 117 19.0 





20.4 


2712 


2578 


2372 


33.75 


3317 


3:05 p.m 


39, 


32 22.75 117 16.8 





20.4 










3318 


3:10 p.m 


39, 


32 23.2 117 16.25 





20.7 










3319 


3:15 p.m 


39, 


32 23.5 117 1.5.8 





20.7 










3320 


3:20 p.m 


39, 


32 23.8 117 15.25 





20.6 










3321 


3:25 p.m 


39, 


32 23.4 117 14.8 





20.8 










3322* 


3:33 p.m 


39, 


32 23.4 117 14.0 





20,0 










3323* 


3: 35 p.m 


39, 


32 23.4 117 14.0 





20.6 










3324 


3:36p.m 


39, 


32 23.4 117 14.0 





20.6 










3325 


3:47 p.m 


39, 


32 24.4 117 14.3 





20.5 











• Observations taken about 60 feet apart on either side of a current streak extending to 
the southeast from the south end of South Coronado Island. 



1915] 



Michael, ct (iL: II>j(]r(i(jr(iplnc Rr cords of Srrii>i)s Instilulion 



103 









Table 1. — Ocean n at a— (Cojitiiiued) 




















Specific gravity 










Position 




Temper- 




















Water 
sample 


Time 
1 of 






Bepth 


ature 
in centi- 












North West 


S- • 


S — — 




Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4°0 


SO/oo 


3326 


3:09 a.m. 


39, 


32° 24:4 117° 14;3 





20?0 










3327 


3:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 23.6 117 14.0 





20.35 










3328 


3:21a.m. 


39, 


32 23.0 117 14.35 





20.4 










3329 


3:28 a.m. 


39, 


32 22.8 117 15.2 





19.6 










3330 


3:35 a.m. 


39, 


32 22.75 117 16.25 





19.5 










3331 


3:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 22.75 117 17.0 





19.8 










3332 


3:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.6 117 18.6 





19.6 










3333 


4:00 a.m. 


40,, 


32 22.5 117 20.0 





19.9 










3334 


4:07 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 





19.9 










3335 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 


55 


10.85? 


' 2713 


2579 


2586 


33.76 


3336 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 


From 4:07 to 5:45 a.m. 


55 




2717 


2583 




33.81 


3337 


4:55 a.m. 


40, 


tho boat drifted 


73 


10.00 


2720 


2586 


2607 


33.85 


3338 


4:55 a.m. 


40, 


from the above 


73 


10.00 


2721 


2587 


2608 


33.86 


3339 


5:20 a.m. 


40, 


position to the 





19.7 


2721 


2587 


2399 


33.86 


3340 


5:20 a.m. 


40, 


following position 


73 


10.00 


2722 


2588 


2609 


33.88 


3341 


5:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 21.3 117 19.4 


73 


10.10 


2729 


2594 


2614 


33.96 


3342 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 





20.0 


2725 


2589 


2395 


33.91 


3343 


6:35 a.m. 


40, 


From 6:00 to 9:50 


55 




2707 


2574 




33.69 


3344 


6:40 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


55 




2711 


2577 




33.74 


3345 


6:55 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 





20.0 


2709 


2575 


2380 


33.71 


3346 


7:55 a.m. 


40. 


above position 





19.7 


2710 


2576 


2389 


33.73 


3347 


8:35 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


275 


8. SO 


2751 


2615 


2657 


34.23 


3348 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 


position 


27o 


8.90 


2746 


2610 


2652 


34.17 


3349 


9:10 a.m. 


40, 







20.05 


2712 


2578 


2380 


33.75 


3350 


9:20 a.m. 


40, 




365 


8.15 


2752 


2616 


2668 


34.25 


3351 


9:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 21.45 117 19.4 


365 


8.5? 


2757 


2621 


2667 


34.31 


3352 


10:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 





20.25 


2716 


2582 


2381 


33.80 


3353 


10:35 a.m. 


40, 


From 10:30 a.m. to 


5 


19.80 


2710 


2576 


2386 


33.73 


3354 


10:35 a.m. 


40, 


12:26 p.m. the boat 


5 


19.90 


2717 


2583 


2391 


33.81 


3355 


11:15 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


.5 


19.95 


2708 


2574 


2380 


33.70 


3356 


11:20 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


5 


19.95 


2714 


2580 


2386 


33.78 


3357 


11:30 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


9 


19.50 


2708 


2574 


2392 


33.70 


3358 


11:35 a.m. 


40, 


position 


9 


19.55 


2712 


2578 


2394 


33.75 


3359 


11:45 a.m. 


40, 




IS 


15.95 


2699 


2566 


2469 


33.59 


3360 


11:50 a.m. 


40, 




IS 


15.6? 


2708 


2574 


2487 


33.70 


3361 


12:01p.m. 


40, 




27 


13.75 


2699 


2566 


2517 


33.59 


3362 


12:06 p.m. 


40, 




27 


13.50 


2693 


2560 


2516 


33.52 


3363 


12:12 p.m. 


40, 







20.8 


2716 


2582 


2365 


33.80 


3364 


12:12 p.m. 


40, 




37 


12.10 


2705 


2572 


2555 


33.66 


3365 


12:17 p.m. 


40, 


32 22.3 117 18.4 


37 


12.10 


2697 


2564 


2.547 


33.57 


3366 


1:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 





19 . 65 










3367 


1:00 p.m. 


40, 


From 12:55 p.m. to 


o 


19.65 


2713 


2579 


2394 


33.76 


3368 


1 :15 p.m. 


40, 


1:50 p.m. the boat 


55 


10.. 55 


2716 


2582 


2594 


33.80 


3369 


1:20 p.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


■10 


10.55 










3370 


1:30 p.m. 


40, 


above position to 


73 


10.20 










3371 


1 :35 p.m. 


40, 


following position 


73 


10.20 


2712 


2578 


2.597 


33.75 


3372 


1:44 p.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 117 19.8 





20.3 


2708 


2574 


2371 


33.70 


3373 


2:20 p.m. 


39, 


32 24.1 117 16.0 





20.5 










3374 


2:25 p.m. 


39, 


32 24.3 117 15.4 





20.3 










3375 


2:26 p.m. 


39, 


32 24.4 117 15.25 





19.95 










3376 


2:29 p.m. 


39, 


32 24.0 117 15.2 





19.9 










3377* 


2:40 p.m. 


39, 


32 23.4 117 14.0 





19.7 










3378* 


2:40 p.m. 


39, 


32 23.4 117 14.0 





21.2 










3379 


3:00 p.m. 


39, 


32 24.0 117 14.2 





21.2 










3380 


3:07 p.m. 


39, 


32 24.4 117 14.3 
July 26, 1912 





20.9 










3381 


3:07 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.4 117 14.3 





20.4 










3382 


3:12 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.0 117 14.2 





20.5 










3383 


3:25 a.m. 


39, 


32 23.0 117 14.35 





19.8 










3384 


3:30 a.m. 


39, 


32 22.9 117 15.0 





19.3 










3385 


3:35 a.m. 


39, 


32 22.8 117 16.0 





19.4 










3386 


3:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 22.75 117 16.8 





19.6 










3387 


3:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.6 117 18.5 





19.6 











Current streak observations. See water samples 3322 and 3323. 



104 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 















Temper- 


Specific gravity 






















Water 
sample 


Time 
of 








Depth 


ature 
in centi- 












North 


West 


S 


S 


.S 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4?0 


SO/00 








July 26, 1912 














3388 


4:05 a.m. 


40, 


32° 22;4 


117° 21:2 





i9;8 


2712 


2578 


2388 


33.75 


3389 


4:27 a.m. 


40, 


From 4:05 


to 6:37 


185 


9.40 


2751 


2615 


2649 


34.23 


3390 


4:32 a.m. 


40. 


a.m. the 


boat 


185 


9.60 


2744 


2609 


2638 


34.15 


3391 


5:00 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 





19.4 


2712 


2578 


2399 


33.75 


3392 


5:40 a.m. 


40, 


above pc 


)sition 


275 


8 . 75 


2750 


2614 


2657 


34.22 


3393 


6:00 a.m. 


40. 


to the following 





19.65 










3394 


6:20 a.m. 


40. 


position 




137 


9.40 


2739 


2604 


2636 


34.09? 


339.5 


6:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.05 


117 20.9 


137 




2714 


2580 




33.78? 


3396 


7:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 


117 21.2 


365 


8.10 


2749 


2613 


2665 


34.21 


3397 


7:05 a.m. 


40. 


From 6:50 to 9:47 





19.9 










3398 


7:45 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the 


boat 


5 


19.75 


2712 


2578 


2389 


33.75 


3399 


7:50 a.m. 


40. 


drifted from the 


5 




2709 


2575 




33.71 


3400 


8:00 a.m. 


40, 


above position 





19.7 


2710 


2576 


2389 


33.73 


3401 


8:45 a.m. 


40, 


to the follo-n-ing 


9 


19.35 


2711 


2577 


2399 


33.74 


3402 


8:50 a.m. 


40, 


position 




9 




2712 


2578 




33.75 


3403 


9:00 a.m. 


40. 






n 


20.0 


2716 


2582 


2386 


33.80 


3404 


9:00 a.m. 


40. 






18 


16.00 


2686 


2553 


2455 


33.43? 


3405 


9:05 a.m. 


40. 






18 


16.00 


2700 


2567 


2469 


33.60? 


3406 


9:15 a.m. 


40. 






27 


14.15 


2720 


2586 


2507 


33.85 


3407 


9:20 a.m. 


40. 






27 


14.10 


272.J 


2590 


2534 


33.91 


3408 


9:30 a.m. 


40. 






37 


12.50 










3409 


9:35 a.m. 


40. 


32 21.95 


117 19.5 


37 


12.50 


2723 


2588 


2564 


33.89 


3410 


10:07 a.m. 


40. 


32 22.4 


117 21.2 


46 


11.15 


2717 


2583 


2584 


33.81 


3411 


10:12 a.m. 


40. 


From 10:05 a.m. to 


46 


11.15 


2720 


2586 


2587 


33.85 


3412 


10:12 a.m. 


40. 


12:14 p.] 


m. the boat 





20.3 


2715 


2581 


2378 


33.79 


3413 


10:27 a.m. 


40. 


drifted from the 


55 


10.30 


2723 


2588 


2605 


33.89 


3414 


10:32 a.m. 


40s 


above position 


55 


10.35 


2728 


2593 


2609 


33.95 


3415 


11:00 a.m. 


4O5 


to the following 





20.3 


2717 


2583 


2379 


33.81 


3416 


11:30 a.m. 


40, 


position 




73 


10.15 


2723 


2588 


2608 


33.89 


3417 


11:35 a.m. 


40. 






73 


10.15 


2727 


2592 


2612 


33.94 


3418 


11:54 a.m. 


40, 






92 


10.00 


2714 


2580 


2602 


33.78 


3419 


11:59 a.m. 


40, 






92 


10.00 


2713 


2579 


2601 


33.76 


3420 


11:59 a.m. 


40, 









20.6 


2710 


2o76 


2365 


33.73 


3421 


12:15 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.3 


117 19.0 





20.6 










3422 


12:20 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.25 





20.7 










3423 


12:25 p.m. 


39, 


32 23.7 


117 17.4 





20.4 










3424 


12:30 p.m. 


39, 


32 23.8 


117 16.5 





20.0 










3425 


12:35 p.m. 


39, 


32 24.1 


117 15.7 





20.4 










3426 


12:39 p.m. 


39, 


32 24.2 


117 15.05 





20.4 










3427 


12:49 p.m. 


39, 


32 23.4 


117 14.75 





20.0 










3428 


12:55 p.m. 


39, 


32 23.25 


117 14.3 





19.4 










3429* 


1:20 p.m. 


39, 


32 23.4 


117 14.0 





18.8 


2702 


2569 


2404 


33.63 


3430* 


1:20 p.m. 


39, 


32 23.4 


117 14.0 





20.6 


2708 


2574 


2363 


33.70 


3431 


1:31p.m. 


39, 


32 24.4 


117 14.3 
July 27, 1912 





21.1 










3432 


4:15 a.m. 


39, 


32 24.4 


117 14.3 





20.4 










3433 


4:25 a.m. 


39, 


32 23.4 


117 14.0 





20.3 










3434 


4:28 a.m. 


39, 


32 23.0 


117 14.35 





20.3 










3435 


4:32 a.m. 


39, 


32 22.9 


117 14.8 





19.6 










3436 


4:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 22.8 


117 15.8 





19.3 










3437 


4:50 a.m. 


39, 


32 22.75 


117 17.15 





19.5 










3438 


5:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.65 


117 18.4 





19.2 










3439 


5:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.6 


117 19.75 





19.5 










3440 


5:20 a.m. 


40. 


32 22.4 


117 21.2 





20.1 


2710 


2576 


2378 


33.73 


3441 


5:45 a.m. 


40, 


From 5:20 to 7:33 


92 


9.80 










3442 


6:05 a.m. 


40. 


a.m. the 


boat 





20.2 


2707 


2574 


2373 


33.69 


3443 


6:07 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


46 


10.45 










3444 


6:12 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


46 




2702 


2569 




33.63 


3445 


6:25 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


37 


11. 05 










3446 


6:30 a.m. 


40, 


position 




37 


11.05 


2696 


2563 


2566 


33.55 


3447 


6:45 a.m. 


40, 






185 


8.95 










3448 


6:.50a.m. 


40. 






185 


9.15 


2751 


2615 


2652 


34.23 



' Current streak observations. See water samples 3322 and 3323. 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hydrograpltic Records of Scriirps Institution 



105 





• 




Table 1.- 


-Ocean Data— (Continued) 






















Temper- 


Spe 


cific gravity 
























Water 


Time 




^ — 






Depth 


ature 


0° 


n°5 


t° 






of 




North 


West 


in 


in centi- 


S 


S 


s 


Salinity 


number 


dav 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4^0 


17^5 


4?0 


S 0/00 












July 27, 1913 














3449 


7:00 a.m. 


40, 


32' 


' 22:15 


117° 19:.55 





19°0 


2714 


2580 


2411 


33.78 


3450 


8:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.1 


117 20.5 





19.4 


2716 


2582 


2403 


33.80 


3451 


8:09 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.1 


117 20.5 


137 


9.50 


2728 


2.593 


2624 


33.95 


3452 


8:14 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.1 


117 20.5 


137 


9.50 










3453 


9:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 





19.2 


2711 


2577 


2403 


33.74 


3454 


9:46 a.m. 


40, 


From 9:22 


a.m. to 


550 


6.30 


2765 


2629 


2707 


34.41 


3455 


9:55 a.m. 


40, 


] 


12:08 p. 


m. the boat 





20.0 


2721 


2587 


2391 


33.86 


3456 


10:45 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


IS 


15.5 


2709 


2575 


2490 


33.71 


3457 


11:20 a.m. 


40, 


above position to 





19.8 


2722 


2588 


2397 


33.88 


3458 


11:40 a.m. 


40, 


following position 


275 


8.80 










3459 


11:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


21.35 


117 20.5 


275 


8.85 


2761 


2625 


2666 


34.36 


3460 


12:45 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 20.4 





20.0 


2716 


2582 


2386 


33.80 


3461 


12:50 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 20.0 


137 


9.50 










3462 


1:34 p.m. 


40.5 


32 


22.5 


117 18.8 





19.9 










3463 


1 :42 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.0 


117 17.7 





19.8 










3464 


1:52 p.m. 


39, 


32 


23.5 


117 16.4 





19.6 










3465 


1:57 p.m. 


395 


32 


23.8 


117 15.6 





20.0 










3466 


2:02 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 


117 15.05 





20.0 










3467 


2:11p.m. 


39, 


32 


23.4 


117 14.75 





19.4 










3468 


2:14 p.m. 


39, 


32 


23.0 


117 14.35 





19.0 










3469* 


2:17 p.m. 


39, 


32 


23.4 


117 14.0 





19.2 










3470* 


2:17 p.m. 


395 


32 


23.4 


117 14.0 





21.1 










3471 


2:19 p.m. 


39, 


32 


23.5 


117 14.0 





21.1 










3472 


2:27 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 14.3 





20.7 










3473 


7:00 p.m. 


39^ 


32 


24.4 


117 14.3 





19.2 


2708 


2574 


2400 


33.70 


3474 


9:00 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 14.3 
July 38, 1913 





19.9 


2708 


2574 


2382 


33.70 


3475 


1:00 a.m. 


39= 


32 


24.4 


117 14.3 





19.4 


2707 


2573 


2394 


33.69 


3476 


5:10 a.m. 


395 


32 


24.4 


117 14.3 





19.1 


2708 


2574 


2403 


33.70 


3477 


7:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 14.3 





19.2 


2715 


2581 


2407 


33.79 


3478 


8:10 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 


5 


20.45 


2723 


2588 


2380 


33.89 


3479 


8:15 p.m. 


40. 


From 8:00 to 10:24 


5 


20.45 


2721 


2587 


2379 


33.86 


3480 


8:25 p.m. 


40. 




p.nj. the 


! boat 





20.4 


2719 


2585 


2378 


33.84 


3481 


8:26 p.m. 


40. 




drifted from the 


9 


18.3 


2724 


2589 


2438 


33.90 


3482 


8:26 p.m. 


40, 




above position 


9 




2716 


2582 




33.80 


3483 


8:40 p.m. 


40. 




to the following 


18 


14.0 


2707 


2574 


2520 


33.69 


3484 


8:.52p.m. 


40. 




position 


27 


11.75 


2713 


2579 


2570 


33.76 


3485 


8:58 p.m. 


40. 








27 


11.85 


2715 


2581 


2570 


33.79 


3486 


9:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


20.75 


117 19.2 





20.1 


2714 


2580 


2382 


33.78 


3487 


10:45 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.75 


117 20.6 


37 




2704 


2571 




33.65 


3488 


10:50 p.m. 


40, 


From 10:38 p.m. on 


37 


11.25 


2704 


2571 


2570 


33.65 


3489 


11:00 p.m. 


40, 




the 28th to 1:45 





20.1 


2710 


2576 


2378 


33.73 


3490 


11:15 p.m. 


40, 




a.m. on 


the 29th 


46 


10.75 










3491 


11:35 p.m. 


40. 




the boat drifted 


55 


10.6 




















July 29, 1912 














3492 


12:10 a.m. 


40, 




from the above 


73 


10.1 


2716 


2582 


2601 


33.80 


3493 


12:15 a.m. 


40. 




position to the 


73 




2715 


2581 




33.79 


3494 


12:25 a.m. 


40, 




following position 


92 


'9.75 


2712 


2578 


2605 


33.75 


3495 


12:45 a.m. 


40. 











19.9 


2715 


2581 


2389 


33.79 


3496 


12:50 a.m. 


40, 








137 


9.45 


2739 


2604 


2636 


34.09 


3497 


12:50 a.m. 


40, 








137 


9.45 










3498 


1:15 a,m. 


40, 








185 


9.35 


2746 


2610 


2644 


34.18 


3499 


1:20 a.m. 


40, 








185 


9.35 


2755 


2619 


2652 


34.28 


3500 


1:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


19.95 


117 19.0 





19.6 


2716 


2582 


2397 


33.80 


3501 


2:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


21.65 


117 21.0 





19.85 


2710 


2576 


2385 


33.73 


3502 


2:55 a.m. 


40, 


From 2:02 to 4:05 


185 


9.25 


2749 


2613 


2649 


34.21 


3503 


2:55 a.m. 


40, 




a.m. boat drifted 


185 


9.25 


2748 


2612 


2648 


34.20 


3504 


3:30 a.m. 


40. 




from above position 


275 


8.40 


2751 


2615 


2663 


34.23 


3505 


3:35 a.m. 


40. 




to following position 


I 275 


8.50 


2749 


2613 


2660 


34.21 


3506 


3:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


21.1 


117 19.5 





19.5 


2705 


2572 


2389 


33.66 


3507 


8:07 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 


46 


10.45 


2697 


2564 


2577 


33.57 



' Current streak observations. See water samples 3322 and 3323. 



106 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 











Table 1 


—Ocean Data— {Continued) 






















Temper- 


Specific grayity 












Posinou 












Water 
sample 


Time 
of 








A 


Depth 


ature 
in centi- 


0* 


1705 








North 


West 


S 


S — '— 


S 


Salinity 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 


4;o 


17?5 


4!0 


SO/00 












Julv 29. 1912 














3508 


8:12 p.m. 


40< 


From 7:5 


8 to 10:30 


46 


10?45 


2699 


2566 


2579 


33.59 


3509 


8:12 p.m. 


40^ 


p.m. th 


e boat 





20.2 


2708 


2574 


2374 


33.70 


3510 


9:30 p.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


5 


19.8 


2706 


2573 


2382 


33.68K 


3511 


9:42 p.m. 


40, 


above position 


9 


19.4 


2706 


2573 


2393 


33.68K 


3512 


9:55 p.m. 


40. 


t 


the following 


18 


15.3 


2710 


2576 


2495 


33.73K 


3513 


10:07 p.m. 


40, 


position 


27 


13.3 


3703 


3570 


3530 


33.64K 


3514 


10:25 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21:8 


117° 19f75 





19.7 


2709 


2575 


2388 


33.71 


3515 


10:45 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.0 


117 20.8 


37 


11.7 


2714 


2580 


2572 


33.78K 


3516 


11:00 p.m. 


40^ 


32 


23.0 


117 20.7 


46- 


11.0 


2697 


2564 


2568 


33.57K 


3517 


11:15 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.55 


117 20.5 


55 


10.5 


2702 


2569 


2582 


33.63K 


3518 


11:32 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.55 


117 20.25 
Jul.v 30, 1912 


73 


10.15 


2710 


2576 


2581 


33.73K 


3519 


12:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.75 


117 20.7 


92 


9.85 


2711 


2577 


2602 


33.74K 


3520 


12:29 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


23.7 


117 20.6 


137 


9.5 


2733 


2598 


2629 


34.01K 


3521 


12:36 a.m. 


40j 


32 


23.6 


117 20.5 





19.4 


2710 


2576 


2397 


33.73 


3522 


1:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 20.3 


185 


9.2 


2750 


2614 


2650 


34.22K 


3523 


1:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.1 


117 20.0 


275 


8.8 








K 


3524 


2:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.0 


117 19.9 





19.0 


2'7b6 


2573 


2403 


33.68 


3525 


2:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.5 


117 19.1 


365 


8.3 


2752 


2616 


2665 


34.25K 


3526 


3:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.25 


117 18.8 





18.8 


2705 


2572 


2410 


33.66 


3527 


7:50 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 





19.6 


2706 


2573 


2387 


33.68 


3528 


8:00 p.m. 


40, 


From 5 : 5 


to 11:46 


55 


10.6 


2704 


2571 


2582 


33.6.5K 


3529 


8:07 p.m. 


40, 


p.m. th 


e boat 


73 


10.0 


2707 


2574 


2595 


33.69K 


3530 


8:25 p.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


92 


9.6 


2712 


2578 


2607 


33.75K 


3531 


8:42 p.m. 


40, 


s 


bove position 


137 


9.4 


2735 


2600 


2632 


34.04K 


3532 


8:55 p.m. 


40. 


t 


the following 





19.4 


2709 


2575 


2396 


33.71 


3533 


9:05 p.m. 


40. 


position 


185 


9.05 


2746 


2610 


2649 


34.17K 


3534 


9:32 p.m. 


40. 








275 


8.8 


2755 


2619 


2661 


34.29K 


3535 


9:55 p.m. 


40. 











19.4 


2710 


2576 


2397 


33.73 


3536 


10:07 p.m. 


40, 








365 


8.0 


2756 


2620 


2674 


34.30K 


3537 


10:50 p.m. 


40, 








550 




2757 


2621 




34.31K 


3538 


10:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.2 


117 19.7 
July 31, 1913 





ig'.'i 


2706 


2573 


2393 


33.68 


3539 


12 


07 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 20.0 





19.5 


2711 


2577 


2395 


33.74 


3540 


12 


10 a.m. 


40, 


From 12: 


Ql to 2:20 


275 


8.75 


2744 


2609 


2650 


34.1.5K? 


3541 


12 


42 a.m. 


40, 




.m. th 


e boat 


185 


9.1 


2747 


2611 


2649 


34.19K 


3542 




07 a.m. 


40. 


t 


rifted from the 


5 


19.55 








K 


3543 




10 a.m. 


40. 


s 


bove position 





19.6 


2710 


2576 


2391 


33.73 


3544 




17 a.m. 


40. 


t 


the following 


9 


17.0 


2705 


2572 


2451 


33.6fiK 


3545 




31 a.m. 


40. 


position 


18 


14.9 


2696 


2563 


2490 


33.55K 


3546 




37 a.m. 


40, 








27 


13.85 


2693 


2560 


2509 


33.52K 


3547 




50 a.m. 


40, 








37 


12.6 


2690 


2557 


2530 


33.48K 


3548 


2 


02 a.m. 


40, 








46 


11.5 


2694 


2561 


2.556 


33.53K 


3549 


2 


12 a.m. 


40, 











19.8 


2710 


2576 


2386 


33.73 


3550 


2 


14 a.m. 


40, 


32 


21.75 


117 19.0 


55 


10.65 


2699 


2566 


2576 


33.59K 


3551 


2 


43 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.9 


117 19.3 


73 


10.15 


2706 


2573 


2.590 


33.6,SK 


3552 


2 


58 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.8 


117 19.2 


92 


9.55 


2710 


2576 


2606 


33.73K 


3553 


3 


15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.65 


117 19.05 


137 


9.45 


2721 


2587 


2618 


33.86K 


3554 


3 


27 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 18.9 





19.3 


2709 


2575 


2398 


33.71 












Aug. 1, 1912 














3555 


8:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 


550 




2753 


2617 




34.26K 


3556 


8:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.0 





19.5 


2708 


2574 


■2'39'2 


33.70 


3557 


9:05 a.m. 


40., 


32 


22.5 


117 20.6 





19.7 


2706 


2573 


2385 


33.68 


3558 


10:00 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 





19.9 


2711 


2577 


2385 


33.74 


3559 


11:25 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 





20.2 


2712 


2578 


2378 


33.75 


3560 


12:40 p.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 





20.15 


2713 


2579 


2380 


33.76 


3561 


1:44 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 


275 


9.35 


2750 


2614 


2647 


34.22K 


3562 


2:02 p.m. 


40. 


32 


22.3 


117 20.9 





20.5 


2718 


2584 


2375 


33.83 


3563 


2:13 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 20.7 


185 


9.. 55 


2743 


2608 


2638 


34.14K 


3564 


2:38 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.2 


117 20.3 


137 


9.6 


2726 


2591 


2620 


33.93K 


3565 


2:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.2 


117 20.1 


92 


10.05 


2705 


2572 


2592 


33.66K 


3566 


3:07 pm.. 


40, 


32 


22!l 


117 19.9 





20.3 


2709 


2575 


2372 


33.71 


3567 


3:45 p.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 


37 


11.8 


2689 


2556 


2545 


33.47K 


3568 


3:57 p.m. 


40. 


32 


22.3 


117 21."l 


18 


14.2 


2700 


2567 


2509 


33.60K 


3569 


4 


05 p.m. 


40. 


32 


22.2 


117 21.05 





20.6 


2712 


2578 


2367 


33.75 



1915] 



Michael, ft al.: Ilijdrographic Eccords of Scripps Institution 



107 





Time 
of 
day 


Section 


Table 1. — Ocean Da 
Position 


T\ — (Continut 

Temper- 
Depth ature 

in in centi- 
meters grade 


3d) 

Specific gravity 




Water 
sample 
number 


0° 

S 

4^0 


17?5 

S 

17?5 


t° 

4°0 




North 
latitude 


West 
longitude 


S 0/00 
Salinity 


3570 


4:07 p.m. 


40< 


32° 


22;2 


Aug. 1, 1912 
117° 21:05 


365 


8?2 


2755 


2619 


2670 


34.29K 


3571 


4:45 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.9 


117 20.8 


275 


8.7 


2756 


2620 


2663 


34.30K 


3572 


5:03 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.8 


117 20.6 





20.4 


2711 


2577 


2371 


33.74 


3573 


5:37 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 


185 


9.45 


2745 


2610 


2641 


34.16K 


3574 


6:02 p.m. 


40, 


Frc 


)m 5:35 to 7:49 


137 


9.55 


2733 


2598 


2628 


34.01K 


3575 


6:15 p.m. 


40. 


r 


).m. th 


le boat 





20.2 


2707 


2574 


2373 


33.69 


3576 


6:20 p.m. 


40, 


d 


Irifted from the 


92 


9.8 


2704 


2571 


2596 


33.65K 


3577 


6:35 p.m. 


40, 




,bove 


position 


73 


10.15 


2703 


2570 


2588 


33.64K 


3578 


6:53 p.m. 


40, 


t 


the : 


following 


55 


10.8 


2691 


2558 


2565 


33.49K 


3579 


7:05 p.m. 


40, 


F 


lo.sition 





20.2 


2710 


2576 


2376 


33.73 


3580 


7:10 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.2 


117 17.9 


365 


8.0 


2754 


2618 


2672 


34.27K 


3581 


1:28 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


Aug. 2, 1912 
117 21.2 


5 


20.35 


2706 


2573 


2368 


33.68K 


3582 


1:35 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.1 





20.5 


2724 


2589 


2380 


33.90 


35S3 


1:40 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 21.0 


9 


20.15 


2720 


2586 


2386 


33.85K 


3584 


1:50 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 20.8 


550 




2757 


2621 




34.31K 


3585 


3:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 


735 




2763 


2627 




34.39K 


3586 


3:15 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.3 


117 20.9 





20.6 


2714 


2580 


2369 


33.78 


3587 


4:15 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.8 


117 19.9 





20.4 


2718 


2584 


2377 


33.83 


3588 


4:45 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.6 


117 19.4 


46 


11.35 


269S 


2565 


2563 


33.58K 


3589 


5:20 p.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 


117 20.6 


37 


12.0 


2704 


2571 


2556 


33.65K 


3590 


5:32 p.m. 


4O5 


Frr 


im 5:2 


10 to 6:10 


27 


13.5 


2699 


2566 


2522 


33.59K 


3591 


5:40 p.m. 


40,, 


I 


i.m. the boat 





20.0 


2712 


2578 


2383 


33.75 


3592 


5:43 p.m. 


40, 


(1 


Irifted from the 


18 


15.2 


2694 


2561 


2482 


33.53K 


3593 


5:50 p.m. 


40, 


a 


bove 


position to 


9 


19.95 


2711 


2577 


2383 


33.74K 


3594 


6:00 p.m. 


40, 


following position 


5 


20.1 


2714 


2580 


2382 


33.78K 


3595 


6:05 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.75 


117 20.0 





20.4 


2711 


2577 


2371 


33.74 


3596 


6:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.2 


Aug. 3, 1912 
117 20.5 


.550 




2760 


2624 




34.35K 


3597 


6:40 a.m. 


40, 


From6:C 


(7 to 8:21 





20.0 


2715 


2581 


2386 


33.79 


3598 


7:02 a.m. 


40, 


a 


,.m. th 


le boat 


5 


19.6 


2707 


2574 


2388 


33.69K 


3599 


7:35 a.m. 


40, 


d 


Irifted from the 


9 


19.4 


2711 


2577 


2398 


33.74K 


3600 


7:45 a.m. 


40, 


above 


position 


IS 


15.75 


2693 


2560 


2479 


33.52K 


3601 


7:52 a.m. 


40, 


t 


t h e 


following 





19.7 


2717 


2583 


2396 


33.81 


3602 


7:55 a.m. 


40, 


position 


27 


13.4 


2690 


2557 


2515 


33.48K 


3603 


8:06 a.m. 


40, 


32 


21.fi 


117 20.45 


37 


12.0 


2691 


2.558 


2543 


33.49K 


3604 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 21.2 


46 


11.4 


2694 


2561 


2558 


33.53K 


3605 


8:52 a.m. 


40, 


From 8:40 to 10:53 


55 


10.9 


2699 


2566 


2572 


33.59K 


3606 


9:05 a.m. 


40, 


a 


,.m. th 


e boat 


92 


9.95 


2722 


2588 


2610 


33.88K 


3607 


9:17 a.m. 


40, 


d 


Irifted from the 


185 


9.5 


2742 


2607 


2638 


34.1 2K 


3608 


9:45 a.m. 


40, 


above 


position to 


365 


8.25 


2754 


2618 


2668 


34.27K 


3609 


10:20 a.m. 


40. 


following position 


550 




2754 


2618 




34.27K 


3610 


10:22 a.m. 


40, 


32 


21.9 


117 18.55 





19.8 


2710 


2576 


2383 


33.73 


3611 


5:00 a.m. 


'^c-n) 


34 


26.7 


Aug. 18, 1912 
120 26.6 





15.4 










3612 


6:00 a.m. 


(783„) 


34 


31.2 


120 31.5 





12.9 










3613 


7:00 a.m. 


(793,) 


34 


36.0 


120 34.3 





11.9 










3614 


8:00 a.m. 


(V9,,) 


34 


40.8 


120 37.1 





12.2 










3615 


9:00 a.m. 


(80),s 


34 


45.5 


120 39.0 





12.6 










3616 


10:00 a.m. 


(80)3, 


34 


52.0 


120 40.0 





11.8 










3617 


11:00 a.m. 


(80)3e 


35 


1.0 


120 40.0 





12.3 










3618 


11:55 a.m. 


(8O3S) 


35 


8.2 


120 38.7 





13.6 










3619 


1:00 p.m. 


81, 30 


35 


9.0 


120 44.0 





14.4 










3620 


2:00 p.m. 


(823,) 


i,j 


10.5 


120 48.7 





12.7 










3621 


3:00 p.m. 


(83)3. 


35 


16.0 


120 55.5 





12.6 










3622 


4:00 p.m. 


83,„ 


35 


22.2 


120 .55.0 





13.4 










3623 


4:55 p.m. 


(83„) 


35 


26.2 


120 55.0 





12.2 










3624 


5:00 a.m. 


84,4,, 


35 


27.2 


Aug. 19. 1912 
120 59.5 





12.5 










3625 


5:30 a.m. 


84,„, 


35 


27.0 


121 0.1 





12.5 










3626 


6:00 a.m. 


(85„) 


35 


28.4 


121 2.6 





12.2 










3627 


7:00 a.m. 


(86,3) 


35 


33.5 


121 8.7 





11.8 










3628 


8:00 a.m. 


(S7„) 


35 


39.0 


121 16.0 





11.8 










3629 


9:00 a.m. 


(88„) 


35 


42.8 


121 20.0 





11.4 










3630 


10:00 a.m. 


(S9„3) 


35 


48.2 


121 23.0 





11.9 











108 



University of California PiMications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — {Continued) 



Water Time 

sample of 

number day 



3631 
3632 
3633 
3634 
3635 
3636 
3637 
3638 

3639 
3640 
3641 
3642 
3643 
3644 
3645 
3646 
3647 
3648 
3649 
3650 
3651 



11:00 a.m. 
12:01p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

6:03 p.m. 

5:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:15 p.m. 

5:05 p.m. 



Section 

(90,,) 
(91„) 
(92«) 

(93:») 

(95,0 
(95,3) 

96:1, 

95m 

(95,,) 

95,j 

95,5 

97<5») 

(98„) 

(99„) 

(100,,) 

(101)« 

(101)« 

(102«,) 

(102^) 

(102,,) 

(102,,) 



3652 11:00 a.m. (102:„) 

3653 12:01p.m. (103„) 



3654 
3655 
3656 
3657 
3658 
3659 
3660 
3661 
3662 
3663 
3664 
3665 
3666 
3667 

3668 
3669 
3670 
3671 
3672 
3673 
3674 
3675 
3676 
3677 

3678 
3679 
3680 
3681 
3682 
3683 
3684 

3685 
3686 
3687 
3688 
3689 



5:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

5:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

5:22 a.m. 
1:00 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
3:00 p.m. 
4:00 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 
6:00 p.m. 

4:00 a.m. 
7:00 a.m. 
8:00 a.m. 
9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 



35° 55:0 
36 0.5 



(104,,) 
(105„) 
(106,0 
(107,0 
(108,0 
(108),, 
(108,,) 
(109,,) 
(109,,) 
(110,0 
(111,0 
(III7O 
(lllvO 
(111.0 

(iHtO 

(112,0 
(112,0 

11480 

(115,0 
(116,0 
(117),3.= 
116,, 
(117)., 
(117,,) 

(118,,) 

(122,,) 

(123,0 

(124,0 

(125),„ 

(125),„, 

(124„3) 

(122,„) 
125„, 
(122,,,) 
(121,,,) 
(122,,,) 



We.st 

longitude 

Aug. 19, 1912 

121° 29:0 



Temper- 
Depth ature 

in in centi- 
meters grade 



Specific gravity 



4^0 



Salinity 
SO/00 



6.0 
12.2 
16.0 
23.0 



36 31.3 

36 38.3 

36 36.3 

36 44.0 

36 50.5 

36 56.8 

36 59.0 

37 4.8 



37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 
37 

37 
37 

37 

37 

3( 

37 

37 

38 

38 

38 

38 

38 

38 30.5 

38 30.5 

38 30.5 

38 30.5 



9.0 
16.0 
21.1 
28.9 
32.4 
40.0 
45.8 

49.1 
50.5 

53.0 
56.5 
57.9 

58.5 

59.0 

7.3 

14.3 

17.7 
22.7 
28.1 



38 
38 
38 
38 
38 
38 
38 
39 
39 
39 

39 

40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 

40 
40 
40 
41 
41 



121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 



34.7 
38.7 
46.0 
52.7 
55.5 
58.0 
57.0 



Aug. 20, 1912 
121 52.7 



121 
121 
122 
122 
122 



55.0 

57.0 

3.2 

11.3 

17.0 



122 22.0 
122 25.9 
122 25.2 



122 
122 
122 
122 
Aug. 



30.0 
31.3 
31.3 
31.7 

3, 1912 



122 28.0 

122 37.0 

Aug. 24. 1912 

122 39.5 

122 46.0 

122 52.0 

122 56.7 

123 1.4 

122 58.0 

123 0.0 



30.5 
33.4 
35.7 
42.2 
46.2 
50.0 
57.5 
0.7 
7.3 
13.6 

17.8 
6.9 
10.6 
15.0 
23.8 
28.6 
34.3 

48.0 

46.5 

44.0 

1.2 

5.5 



123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
Aug. 2 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 
123 



4.1 

6.9 
11.2 
14.8 
14.8 
14.8 
14.8 
i. 1912 
14.S 
20.0 
21.7 
28.3 
33.1 
38.2 



123 45.0 
123 42.4 
123 44.2 
123 47.3 
Aug. 26, 1912 
123 47.8 



124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 

Aug. ; 

124 
124 
124 
124 
124 



9.1 
15.5 
21.8 
24.0 
26.5 
22.0 
18, 1912 
10.0 
24.8 
10.0 
7.4 
11.0 



12^4 
12.2 
12.3 
12.4 
11.6 
11.4 
10.5 
12.0 

11.2 
11.8 
11.7 
13.0 
12.5 
12.7 
12.3 
12.0 
11.9 
12.8 
12.8 
12.5 
12.4 

15.6 
13.4 

11.4 
10.2 
9.8 
10.3 
12.8 
12.0 
12.4 
12.4 
12.4 
11.3 
11.0 
11.0 
11.0 
11.0 

11.0 
11.4 
12.3 
13.5 
13.6 
15.2 
15.0 
16.4 
15.6 
15.6 

11.6 
12.0 
12.3 
11.2 
11.0 
11.5 
12.4 

11.9 

12.0 
12.2 
12.5 
12.2 



1915] Michael, et al. : Hyrlrographic Records of Scripps Institution 109 

Table 1. — Ocean Data — {Continued) 



lition Temper 



Specific gravity 



Water 
sample 


Time 
of 




'"n 


orth 


West 


Depth 




number 


day 


Section 


latitude 


longitude 


meters 


grade 












Aug. 28, 1912 






3690 


11:00 a.m. 


(122),,, 


4r 


' 13:3 


124° 7:8 





12?8 


3691 


12:01p.m. 


(121,,=) 


41 


19.5 


124 5.8 





13.8 


3692 


1:00 p.m. 


(121,,.) 


41 


28.5 


124 5.0 





14.6 


3693 


2:00 p.m. 


(121,,.) 


41 


34.7 


124 7.2 





14.8 


3694 


3:00 p.m. 


(122,„) 


41 


44.2 


124 11.8 





15.4 


3695 


4:00 p.m. 


(122,,,) 


41 


44.0 


124 11.0 
Aug. 29. 1912 





11.8 


3696 


7:00 a.m. 


(123),,, 


41 


50.5 


124 15.0 





11.8 


3697 


8:00 a.m. 


(123),,, 


41 


56.8 


124 14.0 





11.7 


3698 


9:00 a.m. 


(123.5,.„ 


) 42 


0.2 


124 17.5 





11.7 


3699 


10:00 a.m. 


125„, 


42 


8.4 


124 23.3 





11.9 


3700 


11:00 a.m. 


125,a 


42 


14.7 


124 25.5 





11.9 


3701 


12:01p.m. 


125,-, 


42 


22.7 


124 27.0 





12.7 


3702 


1:00 p.m. 


126,,, 


42 


28.0 


124 30.0 





12.7 


3703 


2:00 p.m. 


125,., 


42 


35.6 


124 25.3 





12.7 


3704 


3:00 p.m. 


126,3, 


42 


42.0 


124 28.4 





11.3 


3705 


3:15 p.m. 


126,,, 


42 


44.0 


124 30.5 





11.2 


3706 


4:00 p.m. 


126,2, 


42 


44.0 


124 30.0 
Aug. 30, 1912 





11.3 


3707 


6:00 a.m. 


126..5,,, 


42 


45.8 


124 32.5 





11.4 


3708 


7:00 a.m. 


127,30 


42 


50.7 


124 36.0 





11.6 


3709 


8:00 a.m. 


126,,, 


42 


58.0 


124 29.5 





12.2 


3710 


9:00 a.m. 


125,33 


43 


5.3 


124 27.0 





12.2 


3711 


10:00 a.m. 


125,3, 


43 


12.0 


124 25.5 





12.4 


3712 


11:00 a.m. 


125,3, 


43 


19.0 


124 2.5.5 

Sept. 4. 1912 





12.2 


3713 


11:00 a.m. 


(123,3,) 


43 


23.7 


124 17.3 


u 


15.1 


3714 


12:01p.m. 


(123,3,) 


43 


23.7 


124 17.3 





16.2 


3715 


1:00 pm.. 


(123,3,) 


43 


23.7 


124 17.3 


u 


15.9 


3716 


2:00 p.m. 


124,3, 


43 


21.2 


124 20.0 





14.9 


3717 


3:00 p.m. 


126,3, 


43 


26.2 


124 28.5 





15.2 


3718 


4:00 p.m. 


123,3, 


43 


33.5 


124 15.5 





14.5 


3719 


5:00 p.m. 


123,„ 


43 


39.0 


124 14.0 





14.2 


3720 


6:00 p.m. 


122,,, 


43 


48.0 


124 12.0 
Sept. 5, 1912 





14.4 


3721 


4:00 a.m. 


121,30 


45 


0.0 


124 4.0 
Sept. 6, 1912 





14.2 


3722 


9:00 a.m. 


(118,™) 


46 


11.5 


123 51.0 
Sept. 7, 1912 





15.8 


3723 


9:00 a.m. 


(118„o) 


46 


11.5 


123 51.0 





15.8 


3724 


12:01p.m. 


(118„o) 


46 


11.5 


123 51.0 





15.6 


3725 


3:00 p.m. 


(118,™) 


46 


11.5 


123 51.0 
Sept. 8, 1912 





15.6 


3726 


9:00 a.m. 


(118,™) 


46 


11. .5 


123 51.0 
Sept. 9, 1912 





15.6 


3727 


11:00 a.m. 


(129),,, 


46 


14.7 


124 1.5 





15.8 


3728 


12:01p.m. 


121,,, 


46 


14.0 


124 6.3 





15.8 


3729 


1:00 p.m. 


121,,, 


46 


19.5 


124 5.0 





15.8 


3730 


2:00 p.m. 


121,,, 


46 


23.0 


125 5.0 





15.8 


3731 


3:00 p.m. 


121„4 


46 


29.5 


124 5.0 





14.8 


3732 


4:00 p.m. 


121l,3 


46 


33.0 


124 7.0 





14.6 


3733 


5:00 p.m. 


122,,, 


46 


41.5 


124 10.5 





14.2 


3734 


6:00 p.m. 


122,,, 


46 


45.0 


124 10.0 
Sept. 10, 1912 





14.4 


3735 


4:00 a.m. 


127,,, 


47 


44.5 


124 33.0 





14,5 


3736 


6:00 a.m. 


128,,, 


47 


55.0 


124 41.0 





14.5 


3737 


7:00 a.m. 


129„3 


48 


6.5 


124 44.5 





14.5 


3738 


8:00 a.m. 


129,„ 


48 


11.5 


124 46.5 





14.2 


3739 


9:00 a.m. 


129,,, 


48 


15.0 


124 43.6 





14.4 


3740 


10:00 a.m. 


129,.3, 


48 


22.7 


124 45.0 





14.2 


3741 


11:00 a.m. 


127,,, 


48 


23.7 


124 36.4 





12.8 


3742 


12:01p.m. 


(127,,,.,) 


48 


22.5 


124 36.0 





13.7 


3743 


1:00 p.m. 


(127,,,,) 


48 


22.5 


124 36.0 
Sept. 11, 1912 





13.7 


3744 


4:00 a.m. 


(127,,,,) 


48 


22.5 


124 36.0 





10.4 


3745 


6:00 a.m. 


129,,, 


48 


23.7 


124 44.7 





10.4 


3746 


7:00 a.m. 


129,,, 


48 


17.0 


124 47.0 





14.1 



110 



University of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data — (Continued) 



Water 
sample 
number 

3747 
3748 
3749 
3750 
3751 
3752 
3753 
3754 
3755 
3756 
3757 
3758 
3759 
3760 

3761 
3762 
3763 
3764 
3765 
3766 
3767 
3768 
3769 
3770 
3771 
3772 
3773 
3774 
3775 

3776 

3778 
3779 
3780 
3781 
3782 
3783 
3784 
3785 
3786 
3787 
378S 

3789 
3790 
3791 
3792 

3793 
3794 
3795 
3796 
3797 
3798 
3799 
3800 
3801 
3802 
3803 
3804 
3805 
3806 
3807 



day 

8:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 

9:00 p.m. 
11;.59 p.m. 

4:00 a.m. 

5:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

4:00 a.m. 

0:00 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 
0:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 

4:00 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 



Section 

130,„ 

129,„ 

128.5„, 

128,« 

127,s> 

12.5,,, 

125„, 

124,,3 
(121,,.) 
(121,,,) 
(122),«, 

123„„ 

123,;, 

122„3 

120„„ 

120,,, 
(120),„., 

120,«5 

120,„ 

120,,3 
(120,„) 
(120,«,) 
(120,,,) 
(120,,,) 
(120.5,5s) 

121i,, 
(121),„ 
(121),«, 

121,M 

(124),,, 

126,33 

127,31 

126,^ 

126,3, 

127,,5 

126,,4 

125,K 

124„ 
(123),,, 
(123),,, 
(122,,,) 
(122,,,) 

(123,0,) 
(124,„) 
(125),„, 
125i„ 

(118)01 

(lis,,) 

118„ 
(117,=.) 

117« 
(117),., 
(115„) 
(113,„) 
(112,.) 
(110,,) 
(109,.) 
(108,,) 
(108„) 
(108.5,..) 
(105,,) 



48° io:o 

48 .5.0 
47 55.7 
51.5 
46.0 
38.0 
27.0 



17.0 
9.0 

7.0 

1.0 

55.0 



46 50.0 
46 35.0 



10.0 
1.0 
52.5 
46.5 
40.0 
34.0 
26.5 
20.5 



45 13.0 
45 7.0 
45 2.0 
55.5 
49.0 
42.0 
31.0 



26.0 
4.5 

57.3 
42 40.5 
42 33.0 



25.5 
18.0 
10.5 
3.0 
57.0 
51.0 
45.0 
45.0 



40 45.0 
40 38.0 



31.0 
22.0 



34.6 
21.0 
14.3 
7.5 
0.7 
53.9 
47.1 
38 40.3 
38 33.5 



26.7 
19.9 
13.1 
6.3 
59.5 
53.0 



West 
longitude 
Sept. 11, 1912 
124° 49:2 
124 46.0 
124 42.5 
124 40.0 



Temper- 
Depth ature 

in in centi- 
meters grade 



Specific gravity 



4°0 



124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 



33.0 
27.0 
25.0 
19.5 
6.0 
6.0 
11.5 
14.0 
14.0 
10.0 



Sept. 12, 1912 
124 0.3 
123 59.0 



124 
124 
123 
123 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 
124 



0.5 
0.0 
.59.0 
.59.0 
0.0 
2.0 
1.0 
0.5 
2.5 
4.0 
6.5 
6.5 
7.0 



Sept. 13, 1912 
124 20.0 
124 30.0 



124 
124 
124 
124 
124 



33.0 
32.0 
30.0 
33.0 
28.0 



124 25.0 

124 20.5 

124 17.0 

124 16.0 

124 11.0 

124 11.0 

Sept. 16, 1912 

124 16.0 

124 22.0 

124 26.0 

124 24.0 

Sept. 17, 1912 

123 49.0 

123 .50.0 

123 48.0 

123 44.0 



123 
123 
123 
123 



44.0 
43.0 
37.0 
27.0 



123 21.0 
123 11.5 



123 
123 
123 
123 

122 



3.5 

0.0 
0.0 
2.5 

45.0 



14^5 
14.5 
14.4 
15.2 
16.4 
16.2 
16.2 
16.2 
16.2 
15.6 
15.6 
15.6 
15.5 
15.5 

14.0 
14.0 
14.5 
14.6 
14.4 
14.7 
14.8 
14.8 
14.9 
15.2 
15.2 
15.0 
14.8 
14.0 
14.0 

11.8 
12.0 
10.4 
12.0 
11.8 
12.8 
14.4 
14.6 
14.8 
14.8 
15.6 
15.6 
15.4 

13.5 
14.5 
13.8 
10.4 

11.4 
11.4 
11.4 
10.9 
11.8 
12.6 
14.0 
14.3 
15.0 
15.5 
15.0 
15.1 
14.8 
14.9 
14.4 



1915] 



Michael, ef ah: Hijdrographie Records of Scripps Instil ution 



ni 



Table 1. — Ocean Data- 



Water Time 
sample of 

number day 



-{Concluded) 
Temper- f — 



Specific gravity 



3808 
3809 
3810 
3811 
3812 
3813 
3814 
3815 
3816 

3817 
3818 
3819 
3820 
3821 
3822 
3823 
3824 
3825 
382e 
3827 
3828 

3829 
3830 
3831 
3832 
3833 
3834 
3835 
3836 
3837 
3838 
3839 
3840 



9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

8:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 
12:01p.m. 

1:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 



Section 

(102„,.,) 
(102„) 
(102:5„) 
103,5 
(101)„ 
(101)^ 
(100)„ 
98m 
97,50, 

96,, 
96..4 

(95.5;,) 

(95),.. 
(94„) 
(92„) 
(91«) 
(90„) 
(89.„) 
(88.,) 
87., 
(85.,) 

81,,, 
(78.5,„) 
75,,„, 
73,," 

7128 

6S„, 

67,, 

66„, 

65.,, 

64,,, 
(63^) 
(60,,) 



47:5 
40.0 
33.0 
26.0 
19.0 
12.0 
5.0 
57.0 
56.0 

34.0 
30.0 
26.7 
19.0 
13.0 
7.0 
1.0 
.55.0 
49.0 
43.0 
37.0 
31.0 

31.3 

28.0 

24.7 

21.5 

1S.2 

15.0 

13.5 

12.0 

] 0.5 

9.0 

8.0 

6.0 



West 

longitude 

Sept. 20, 191: 

122° 31:0 



Depth 

in in centi- 
meters grade 



4;o 



122 

122 
122 
122 
122 
122 
122 
122 



31.5 
32.5 

29.0 
2(i.(l 
2(i.O 
20.0 
12.0 
4.0 



121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 
121 7.0 
^ept. 23. 1012 
120 45.0 
120 32.5 
120 20.0 



59.0 
57.5 
55.5 
50.0 
42.0 
35.5 
30.0 
25.0 
21.0 
14.0 



120 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 
119 



7.4 
54.0 
42.0 
36.5 
31.0 
25.5 
20.0 
16.0 
10.0 



Salinity 
SO/00 



15?0 
15.0 
15.6 
15.0 
14.7 
13.6 
13.6 
12.9 
14.2 

13.0 
12.0 
13.2 
11.3 
12.2 
12.6 
13.4 
13.5 
13.2 
13.1 
13.3 
14.0 

15.4 
14.2 
15.4 
16.0 
15.6 
16.0 
16.5 
16.4 
16.4 
16.3 
16.6 
15.8 



112 Universiti/ of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



EXPLANATION OF TABLE 2, PART A 

The observations of temperature and the determinations of specific 
gravity and salinity tabulated in this part were all made by \Vm. 
T. Skilling, Professor of Physics and Physical Geography in the San 
Diego Normal School, by means of a salinometer purchased from 
Queen and Co., Philadelphia. The hydrometer was graduated to 
0.001 and the specific gravity was estimated to 0.0001. As the instru- 
ment was lost before being calibrated, and as the specific gravities 
were found to be systematically lower by approximately 0.0008 than 
those determined since 1908 relative to the same locations, they have 
been increased by this amount. This may, therefore, be regarded as 
a very crude calibration correction and, while the results are tabulated 
to 0.0001, the average error is doubtless three or four times as great. 
The results, in spite of the large error involved, clearly reveal the 
difference in seasonal variation in salinity between the bay and the 
ocean. 

First column. — Water sample numbers entered with respect first to location, 
second to time. 

Second column. — Date. 

Third column. — Time when the sample was collected entered to the nearest 
minute. 

Fourth column. — Temperature in situ. 

Fifth, sixth, and seventh columns. — Specific gravity of sample under atmo- 
spheric pressure, the 1.0 being omitted; for meaning of symbols see page 48. 

Eighth column. — Salinity per mille determined with a salinometer as described 
above. 



1915] Michael, et al. : Hydrograph iv Records of Scripps Instilulion 113 



Table 2. — Data Relative to San Diego Bay 
Part A — Preliminary Observations 

Surface Observations made from Coroiiado Pier, 32° 40;4 N 117° 10;7 W 

Specific gravity 



Water 






Time 


Temperatuie 


0° 


17?5 


t° 




samtjle 






of 


in 


S 


s 


S 


Salinit: 


number 


Date 




da.v 


centigrade 


4°0 


17°5 


4?0 


S o/oo 




1903 














Bl 


June 


28 


12:35 p.m. 


19?9 










B2 


June 


28 


6:00 p.m. 


20.5 










B3 


June 


29 


6:42 a.m. 


17.8 










B4 


June 


29 


1:10 p.m. 


19.7 










B5 


June 


30 


7:45 a.m. 


19.0 










B6 


June 


30 


2:00 p.m. 


20.7 










B7 


June 


30 


9:30 p.m. 


20.3 










B8 


July 


1 


8:18 a.m. 


19.5 


275 


261 


243 


34.2 


B9 


July 


1 


3:00 p.m. 


21.3 


275 


261 


238 


34.2 


BIO 


Julv 


1 


11:00 p.m. 


20 . 5 


274 


260 


240 


34.1 


Bll 


July 


2 


9:00 a.m. 


18.1 










B12 


July 


2 


4:15 p.m. 


21.6 










B13 


Julv 


2 


9:30 p.m. 


21.0 


271 


258 


235 


33.7 


B14 


July 


3 


10:20 a.m. 


21.5 










Bio 


July 


5 


6:00 p.m. 


20.0 


270 


257 


237 


33.6 


B16 


July 


6 


1:20 p.m. 


20.4 










B17 


July 


6 


7:30 p.m. 


19.8 


274 


260 


242 


34.1 


B18 


July 


7 


3:00 p.m. 


22.0 










B19 


July 


7 


7:10 p.m. 


21.4 


276 


262 


239 


34.3 


B20 


July 


11 


10:50 a.m. 


18.0 


271 


258 


243 


33.7 


B21 


July 


13 


1:00 p.m. 


19.0 










B22 


Julv 


13 


6:00 p.m. 


18.5 










B23 


July 


15 


8:00 a.m. 


19.5 










B24 


July 


15 


11:00 p.m. 


20.5 


270 


257 


236 


33.6 


B2.5 


July 


16 


1:00 p.m. 


22.5 










B26 


July 


18 


4:00 p.m. 


21.5 










B27 


July 


20 


1:30 p.m. 


21.0 










B28 


July 


20 


6:00 p.m. 


21.5 










B29 


Julv 


21 


9:30 a.m. 


20.2 










B30 


July 


21 


2:30 p.m. 


22.0 










B31 


July 


22 


8:40 a.m. 


19.5 










B32 


July 


22 


2:30 p.m. 


22.5 


274 


260 


234 


34.1 


B33 


July 


22 


8:30 p.m. 


18.6 


273 


259 


243 


34.0 


B34 


Julv 


23 


8:30 a.m. 


18.2 


272 


259 


244 


33.8 


B35 


July 


23 


1:40 p.m. 


20.2 


275 


261 


242 


34.2 


B36 


Julv 


23 


8:30 p.m. 


17.7 


271 


258 


244 


33.7 


B37 


Julv 


25 


11:40 a.m. 


20.0 


273 


259 


240 


34.0 


B38 


July 


25 


5:20 p.m. 


21.5 


272 


259 


235 


33.8 


B39 


July 


27 


10:00 a.m. 


16.2 


272 


2.59 


248 


33.8 


B40 


Julv 


27 


11:00 p.m. 


14.8 


270 


257 


250 


33.6 


B41 


July 


28 


9:10 a.m. 


16.0 


269 


256 


246 


33.5 


B42 


July 


28 


12:30 p.m. 


17.5 










B43 


July 


29 


8:40 a.m. 


15.9 


268 


2.55 


245 


33.4 


B44 


Juiy 


29 


1:15 p.m. 


18.5 


269 


256 


240 


33.5 


B45 


Julv 


30 


8:15 a.m. 


16.5 


269 


256 


245 


33.5 


B46 


July 


30 


2:10 p.m. 


19.4 


271 


258 


240 


33.7 


B47 


July 


31 


8:45 a.m. 


18.2 


271 


2.58 


242 


33.7 


B48 


Julv 


31 


3:20 p.m. 


21.0 


270 


257 


234 


33.6 


B4S) 


Aug. 


1 


9:50 a.m. 


19.6 


274 


260 


242 


34.1 


B50 


Aug. 


1 


4:20 p.m. 


21.4 


275 


261 


238 


34.2 


B.51 


Dee. 


21 


10:45 a.m. 


14.6 


270 


257 


250 


33.6 


B52 


Dec. 


22 


10:30 a.m. 


14.8 


269 


256 


249 


33.5 


B53 


Dec. 


23 


11:15 a.m. 


15.0 


267 


254 


246 


33.2 


B.54 


Dec. 


25 


5:00 p.m. 


15.1 


269 


256 


248 


33.5 


Bo5 


Dec. 


26 


3:45 p.m. 


15.6 


270 


257 


248 


33.6 


B56 


Dec. 


28 


1:35 p.m. 


15.5 


270 


257 


248 


33.6 


B57 


Dec. 


29 


11:20 a.m. 


14.7 


270 


257 


250 


33.6 


B58 


Dec. 

1904 


31 


2:00 p.m. 


15.4 


269 


256 


247 


33.5 


B59 


.Tan. 


1 


4:40 p.m. 


15.5 


269 


256 


247 


33.5 


B60 


Jan. 


2 


3:00 p.m. 


15.5 


270 


257 


248 


33.6 



114 



University of California Puhlications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



Table 2. — Data Relative to San Diego Bay — (Continued) 
Part A — Preliminary Observations 

Surface Observations made from Coronado Pier, 32° 4014 N 117° lOf 

Specific gravity 



Water 






Time 


Temperature 


0° 


17°5 


t° 




sample 






of 


in 


s 


S 


S 


Salinity 


number 


Date 




day 


centigrade 


4^0 


17?5 


4°0 


SO/oo 




1904 
















B61 


May 


27 


4:40 p.m. 


21 ?2 


270 


257 


2.34 


33.6 


B62 


May 


28 


4:30 p.m. 


20.8 


269 


256 


234 


33.5 


B63 


June 


2 


11:00 a.m. 


19.9 


273 


259 


240 


34.0 


B64 


June 


4 


4:40 p.m. 


20.2 


271 


258 


238 


33.7 


B65 


June 


6 


10:40 a.m. 


19.4 


271 


258 


240 


33.7 


B66 


June 


7 


4:50 p.m. 


21.2 


270 


257 


234 


33.6 


B67 


June 


8 


4:25 p.m. 


21.6 


272- 


259 


235 


33.8 


B68 


June 


9 


4:25 p.m. 


22.0 


271 


258 


233 


33.7 


B69 


June 


10 


4:30 p.m. 


22.4 


271 


258 


232 


33.7 


B70 


June 


11 


4:00 p.m. 


21^7 










B71 


June 


12 


3:45 p.m. 


22.5 


2 71 


258 


231 


'33.7' 


B72 


June 


14 


4:45 p.m. 


22^0 










B73 


June 


15 


4:15 p.m. 


19.0 


271 


2.58 


'241 


'3377 


B74 


June 


16 


4:00 p.m. 


19.S 


275 


261 


243 


34.2 


B75 


June 


17 


4:00 p.m. 


18.0 


269 


256 


241 


33.5 


B76 


June 


18 


4:25 p.m. 


19.3 


269 


256 


238 


33.5 


B77 


June 


20 


4:00 p.m. 


19.5 


269 


256 


237 


33.5 


B78 


June 


21 


4:00 p.m. 


20.5 


270 


257 


236 


33.6 


B79 


June 


22 


4:00 p.m. 


10.0 


269 


256 


237 


33.5 


B80 


June 


23 


4:15 p.m. 


20.0 


270 


257 


237 


33.6 


B81 


June 


24 


4:00 p.m. 


20.2 


272 


259 


230 


33.8 


B82 


June 


25 


4:00 p.m. 


20.9 


274 


260 


239 


34.1 


B83 


June 


27 


4:00 p.m. 


20.4 


275 


261 


241 


34.2 


B84 


June 


28 


4:10 p.m. 


20.5 


274 


260 


240 


34.1 


B85 


June 


29 


4:00 p.m. 


19.2 


272 


259 


241 


33.8 


B86 


June 


30 


4:00 p.m. 


17.2 










B87 


July 


1 


4:00 p.m. 


19.0 










B88 


Jul'y 


2 


4:00 p.m. 


19.8 


275 


'261 


243 


'3I2 


B80 


Jul'y 


3 


4:00 p.m. 


19.5 


273 


259 


241 


34.0 


BOO 


Jul'y 


4 


5:50 p.m. 


20.0 


275 


261 


242 


34.2 


B91 


July 


5 


4:00 p.m. 


20.5 


272 


259 


238 


33.8 


B92 


Jul'y 


6 


4:10 p.m. 


21.5 


274 


260 


237 


34.1 


B93 


July 


7 


5:15 p.m. 


21.5 


274 


260 


237 


34.1 


B94 


July 


8 


4:40 p.m. 


22.5 










B95 


July 


9 


4:00 p.m. 


20 . 5 










B96 


July 


10 


4:00 p.m. 


16.0 


270 


257 


247 


'33s 


B97 


Jul'y 


11 


4:00 p.m. 


17.0 


274 


260 


249 


34.1 


B98 


July 


12 


4:00 p.m. 


19.2 


273 


2.59 


242 


34.0 


B99 


Jul'y 


13 


4:00 p.m. 


20.0 


272 


250 


239 


33.8 


BlOO 


JulV 


14 


4:00 p.m. 


21.0 


275 


261 


239 


34.2 


BlOl 


Jul'y 


17 


4:00 p.m. 


22.0 










B102 


Jufv 


18 


4:00 p.m. 


22.0 










B103 


JulV 


19 


4:20 p.m. 


21.4 


276 


'262 


239 


U.3 


B104 


Jul'v 


20 


4:10 p.m. 


21.0 


273 


2.50 


237 


34.0 


B105 


Jul'y 


21 


4:20 p.m. 


21.5 


272 


250 


235 


33.8 


B106 


Jul'y 


22 


4:15 p.m. 


22.4 


274 


260 


235 


34.1 


B107 


Jul'y 


23 


4:10 p.m. 


20.5 


271 


258 


237 


33.7 


BIOS 


Jul'y 


24 


5:20 p.m. 


20.5 


274 


260 


240 


34.1 


BlOO 


July 


25 


4:20 p.m. 


21.2 


271 


258 


235 


33.7 


BllO 


Jul'y 


26 


4:20 p.m. 


22.5 


274 


290 


234 


34.1 


Bill 


Jul'y 


27 


5:10 p.m. 


23.5 










B112 


July 


29 


5:25 p.m. 


23.0 


274 


260 


233 


UA 


Surface Observat 


ions made in 


Glorietta Bij 


?ht, 32' 


' 40:6 N, 


117° io:ow 




190,' 


1 














BUS 


June 


28 


12:45 p.m. 


23?9 


289 


275 


244 


36.0 


B114 


June 


28 


6:00 p.m. 


24.4 


287 


273 


241 


35.7 


Bllo 


June 


29 


7:00 a.m. 


22.6 


285 


271 


245 


35.5 


BH6 


June 


29 


1:30 p.m. 


22.3 


282 


268 


242 


35.1 


B117 


June 


30 


7:45 a.m. 


22.3 











Iflo] Mirlnirl. rt al.: Iltidrographic Records of Srripps Institution 115 

Table 2.— Data Relative to San Diego Bky— {Continued) 

Fart A — Preliminary Observations 

.Surface Observations made in Glorietta Bight, 32° 40;6 N, 117° 10:0 W 

Specific gravity 



Water 






Time 


Temperatur( 


0° 


17?5 


t° 




nuSber 






of 


in 


s 


S 


S 


Snlinit: 
SO/oc 




Date 


day 


centigrade 


4?0 


i7;5 


4?0 




1903 














B118 


June 30 


2:00 p.m. 


24!0 


283 


269 


238 


35.2 


B 119 


June 30 


9:30 p.m. 


23.5 


284 


270 


241 


35.3 


B 120 


Julv 


1 


8:30 a.m. 


22.6 


287 


273 


246 


35.7 


B121 


JulV 


1 


3:00 p.m. 


23.4 


289 


275 


246 


36.0 


B122 


Jiilv 


1 


11:00 p.m. 


23.5 


286 


272 


243 


35.6 


B123 


Julv 


2 


9:30 a.m. 


23.2 


280 


266 


236 


34.8 


B 124 


Julv 


2 


4:30 p.m. 


23^7 


283 


269 


240 


35.2 


B125 


Jul'v 


2 


9:30 p.m. 


23.6 


282 


268 


239 


35.1 


B126 


Jul'v 


3 


10:20 a.m. 


24.5 


286 


272 


240 


35.6 


B127 


JulV 


3 


5:30 p.m. 


24.6 


285 


271 


239 


35.5 


B128 


JulV 


3 


9:30 p.m. 


24.0 


281 


267 


236 


35.0 


B12ft 


JulV 


4 


8:00 a.m. 


22.6 


283 


269 


242 


35.2 


B130 


JulV 


5 


l:00ij.m. 


23.9 


283 


269 


239 


35.2 


B131 


JulV 





6:00 p.m. 


24.9 


280 


266 


232 


34.8 


B 132 


July- 


6 


1:30 p.m. 


25.0 


284 


270 


236 


35.3 


B133 


JulV 


6 


7:30 p.m. 


24.3 


281 


267 


235 


35.0 


B134 


Julv 


7 


3:00 p.m. 


25.0 


285 


271 


237 


35.5 


B135 


JulV 


7 


7:30 p.m. 


24.8 


283 


269 


236 


35.2 


B136 


JulV 


11 


10:40 a.m. 


25.3 


284 


270 


235 


35.3 


B137 


July 


13 


1:00 p.m. 


24.5 


286 




239 


35.6 


B 138 


JulV 


13 


6:00 p.m. 


26.7 


286 


272 


233 


35.6 


B 130 


JulV 


16 


9:00 a.m. 


26.4 










BUO 


Julv 


16 


2:20 p.m. 


26.6 


286 


272 


233 


35!6 


B141 


JulV 


17 


8:15 a.m. 


25.8 


286 




235 


35.6 


B142 


JulV 


18 


9:00 a.m. 


26.0 


284 


270 


233 


35.3 


BUS 


JulV 


18 


4:15 p.m. 


26.0 


291 




239 


36.2 


B144 


JulV 


20 


2:15 p.m. 


25.3 


290 


276 


241 


36.1 


B14o 


JulV 


20 


6:15 p.m. 


25.8 


284 


270 


234 


35.3 


B146 


JulV 


21 


9:00 a.m. 


24.0 


288 


274 


243 


35.8 


B147 


JulV 


21 


1:00 p.m. 


24.4 


288 


274 


241 


35.8 


B148 


JulV 


22 


8:30 a.m. 


23.8 


288 


274 


243 


35.8 


B140 


JulV 


22 


2:40 p.m. 


26.3 


288 


274 


236 


35.8 


B 1.50 


JulV 


22 


8:00 p.m. 


25.4 


285 


271 


236 


35.5 


B1.51 


JulV 


23 


9:00 a.m. 


24.6 


286 




239 


35.6 


B1.52 


JulV 


23 


2:00 p.m. 


25.7 


290 


276 


240 


36.1 


B 1.53 


JulV 


23 


8:00 p.m. 


25.4 


285 


271 


236 


35.5 


B154 


July 


24 


1:30 p.m. 


26.0 


284 


270 


233 


35.3 


B 1.55 


Julv 


25 


11:20 a.m. 


25.0 


284 


270 


236 


35.3 


B 156 


JulV 


25 


4:10 p.m. 


26.5 


285 


271 


232 


35.5 


B157 


JulV 


26 


7:00 a.m. 


24.0 


285 


271 


240 


35.5 


B158 


JulV 


27 


10:30 a.m. 


23.8 


282 


268 


238 


35.1 


B 159 


JulV 


27 


9:00 p.m. 


24.0 


281 


267 


236 


35.0 


B160 


JulV 


28 


8:30 a.m. 


23.0 


282 


268 


240 


35.1 


B 161 


JulV 


28 


1:00 p.m. 


23.8 


284 


270 


240 


35.3 


B162 


July 


29 


9:10 a.m. 


23.9 


284 


270 


239 


35.3 


B163 


Julv 


29 


1:45 p.m. 


23.3 


278 


274 


236 


34.6 


B 164 


July 


30 


8:30 a.m. 


22.7 


282 


268 


241 


35.1 


B 165 


July 


30 


2:40 p.m. 


23.5 


279 


265 


236 


34.7 


B166 


July 


31 


9:20 a.m. 


22.8 


283 


269 


242 


35.2 


B167 


July 


31 


4:00 p.m. 


24.0 


280 


266 


235 


34.8 


B 168 


Aug. 


1 


10:20 a.m. 


22.9 


286 


272 


244 


35.6 


B169 


Aug. 


1 


4:50 p.m. 


23.6 


279 


265 


236 


34.7 


B170 


Dee. 


19 


10:45 a.m. 


13.4 


272 


259 


254 


33.8 


B171 


Dee. 


21 


10:15 a.m. 


13.4 


273 


259 


255 


34.0 


B172 


Dee. 


22 


9:50 a.m. 


13.5 










Bl-3 


Dee. 


23 


10:45 a.m. 


13.9 


272 


259 


253 


33.8 


B174 


Dec. 


25 


4:00 p.m. 


13.5 


274 


260 


256 


24.1 ■ 


B 175 


Dec. 


26 


4:15 p.m. 


13.3 


274 


260 


257 


34.1 


B176 


Dec. 


28 


4:00 p.m. 


14.2 


276 


262 


257 


34.3 


B177 


Dec. 


28 


4:30 p.m. 


14.6 











116 



Vnivirsity of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



Table 2. — Data Relative to San Diego Bay — (Cantinued) 
Fart A — Preliminary Observations 

Surface Observations made in Glorietta Bight, 32° 40:6 N, 117° 1( 

Specific gravity 



Water 






Time 


Temperature 


0° 


17?5 


t° 




sample 






of 


in 


s ■ 






Salinity 


number 


Date 
1903 




(lay 


centigi'ade 


4?0 


17?5 


4°0 


SO/oo 


B178 


Dec. 


29 


11:40 a.m 


13?4 


276 


262 


258 


34.3 


B179 


Dec. 

1904 


31 


2:25 p.m 


14.5 


275 


261 


2.55 


34.2 


B180 


Jan. 


2 


2:40 p.m 


14.7 


275 


261 


255 


34.2 


B181 


May 


27 


4:00 p.m 


24.0 


285 


271 


240 


.35.5 


B182 


May 


28 


4:00 p.m 


23.5 


281 


267 


238 


35.0 


B183 


June 


2 


11:20 a.m 


23.2 


281 


267 


239 


35.0 


B184 


June 


4 


4:15 p.m 


23.7 


284 


270 


240 


35.3 


B185 


June 


6 


11:00 a.m 


24.0 


284 


270 


239 


35.3 


B186 


June 


7 


4:25 p.m 


23.4 


286 


272 


243 


35.6 


B187 


June 


8 


4:00 p.m 


24.0 


283 


269 


238 


35.2 


B188 


June 


9 


4:00 p.m 


25.1 


284 


270 


236 


35.3 


B189 


June 


10 


4:00 p.m 


27.3 


286 


272 


231 


35.6 


B190 


June 


11 


4 : 1 5 p.m 


26.0 


283 


269 


232 


35.3 


B191 


June 


12 


4:25 p.m 


25.3 


282 


268 


233 


35.1 


B192 


June 


14 


4:25 p.m 


25.2 


282 


268 


234 


35.1 


B193 


.Tune 


15 


4:45 p.m 


25.1 


284 


270 


236 


35.3 


B194 


June 


16 


4:30 p.m 


25.3 


284 


270 


235 


35.3 


B195 


June 


17 


4:30 p.m 


25.0 


283 


269 


235 


35.2 


B196 


June 


18 


4:35 p.m 


25,4 


285 


271 


235 


3.5.5 


Surface 


Observations made from ( 


ilorietta Boat-house, 


32° 40: 


■ N, 117 


10:5 W 




1904 
















B197 


June 


20 


7:00 a.m 


23;8 










B198 


June 


21 


7:00 a.m 


22.2 










B199 


June 


21 


4:00 p.m 


24.0 










B200 


June 


22 


7:00 a.m 


23.0 










B201 


June 


22 


4:00 p.m 


24.0 










B202 


June 


23 


7:00 a.m 


23.0 










B203 


June 


23 


4:00 p.m 


24.0 










B204 


.June 


24 


7:00 a.m 


23.0 










B205 


June 


24 


4:00 p.m 


24.2 










B206 


June 


25 


7:00 a.m 


23.0 










B207 


June 


25 


4:00 p.m 


24.0 










B20S 


June 


27 


7:00 a.m 


23.0 










B209 


June 


27 


4:00 p.m 


23.8 










B210 


June 


28 


7:00 a.m 


23.0 










B211 


June 


28 


4:00 p.m 


24.0 










B212 


June 


29 


7:00 a.m 


22.7 










B213 


June 


29 


4:00 p.m 


23.8 










B214 


June 


80 


7:00 a.m 


22.9 










B215 


June 


30 


4:00 p.m 


25.2 










B216 


July 


1 


7:00 a.m 


22.9 










B217 


July 


1 


4:00 J). m 


24.3 










B218 


July 


3 


4:00 p.m 


24.5 










B219 


July 


4 


7:00 a.m 


23.0 










B220 


July 


4 


4:00 p.m 


23 . 5 










B221 


July 


5 


7:00 a.m 


23.5 










B222 


July 


5 


4:00 p.m 


24.5 










B223 


July 


6 


7:00 a.m 


23.0 










B224 


July 


6 


4:00 p.m 


24.6 










B225 


July 


7 


7:00 a.m 


23.5 










B226 


July 


7 


4:00 p.m 


24.5 










B227 


July 


8 


7:00 a.m 


23.5 










B228 


July 


8 


4:00 p.m 


25.0 










B229 


July 


9 


7:00 a.m 


22.3 










B230 


July 


9 


4:00 p.m 


25.0 










B231 


July 


10 


7:00 a.m 


23.5 










B232 


Julv 


10 


4:00 p.m 


25.0 










B233 


July 


11 


7:00 a.m 


23.5 











1915] Michael, ef al.: Hiidrographic Records of Scrrpps Institution 117 

Table 2. — Data Relative to San Diego Bay — (Continued) 
Part A — Preliminary Observations 

Surface Observations made from Glorietta Boat-house, 32° 40;7 N, 117° lo;5 W 

.Specific gravity 



Water 






Time 


Temperatur 


sample 






of 




number 


Date 
1904 


day 


centierade 


B284 


Julv 


11 


4:00 p.m. 


25 ?0 


B23t 


Julv 


12 


7:00 a.m. 


23.5 


B236 


Julv 


12 


4:00 p.m. 


25.0 


B237 


Julv 


13 


7:00 a.m. 


23.6 


B 238 


Julv 


13 


4:00 p.m. 


25.5 


B23n 


Julv 


14 


7:00 a.m. 


23.0 


B240 


Julv 


14 


4:00 p.m. 


24.0 


B241 


Julv 


15 


7:00 a.m. 


23.0 


B242 


Julv 


17 


7:00 a.m. 


23.0 


B243 


Julv 


17 


4:00 p.m. 


24.0 


B244 


Julv 


IS 


7:00 a.m. 


23.0 


B24.T 


Julv 


18 


4:00 p.m. 


24.0 


B246 


Julv 


19 


7:00 a.m. 


23.0 


B247 


Julv 


19 


4:00 p.m. 


23.5 


B248 


Julv 


20 


7:00 a.m. 


23.5 


B249 


Julv 


20 


4:00 p.m. 


24.0 


B 250 


Julv 


21 


7:00 a.m. 


23.2 


B251 


Julv 


21 


4:00 p.m. 


24.8 


B 252 


Julv 


22 


7:00 a.m. 


24.0 


B 253 


July 


22 


4:00 p.m. 


25.0 


B254 


July 


23 


7:00 a.m. 


24.5 


B 255 


Julv 


23 


4:00 p.m. 


25.2 


B256 


July 


24 


7:00 a.m. 


24.5 


B257 


Julv 


24 


4:00 p.m. 


25.2 


B 25S 


July 


25 


7:00 a.m. 


25.0 


B259 


July 


25 


4:00 p.m. 


25.8 


B260 


July 


26 


7:00 a.m. 


25.0 


B261 


July 


26 


4:00 p.m. 


25.8 


B262 


Julv 


27 


7:00 a.m. 


25.0 


B263 


July 


27 


4:00 p.m. 


25 . 8 


B264 


Julv 


28 


7:00 a.m. 


25.0 


B 265 


Julv 


29 


7:00 a.m. 


25 . 


B266 


Julv 


29 


4:00 p.m. 


26.0 



Surface Observations made from National City Pier, 32° 40;0 N, 117° T'.OW 

1903 

B267 July 2 4:00 p.m. 23?3 291 277 248 36.2 

B26S July 3 5:00 p.m. 24.2 293 279 247 36.5 

B269 July 4 8:00 a.m. 23.9 289 275 244 36.0 

B270 July 4 6:45 p.m. 24.5 294 280 247 36.6 

B271 Julv 5 4:45 p.m. 25.0 293 279 245 36.5 

B272 .Julv 7 2:30 p.m. 25.5 296 282 246 36.8 

B273 Julv 8 9:30 a.m. 24.5 295 281 248 36.7 

B274 Julv 8 10:00 a.m. 24.0 293 279 247 36.5 

B275 .July 9 10:15 a.m. 24.5 291 277 244 36.2 

B276 Julv 12 11:35 a.m. 25.0 289 275 241 36.0 

B277 July 16 1:00 p.m. 25.5 293 279 243 36.5 

B278 Julv 18 9:45 a.m. 25.0 295 281 246 36.7 

B279 July 19 6:00 p.m. 26.0 294 280 242 36.6 

B280 July 22 9:30 a.m. 25.0 293 279 245 36.5 

Surface Observations made in mid-cliannel near the Coronado Ferry Slip, 
32° 42:i7Ivr, 117° 10:33 W 





1903 














B281 


Dec. 21 


12:30 p.m. 


]4?8 


269 


256 


249 


33.5 


B282 


Dec. 22 


9:25 a.m. 


14.5 


270 


257 


250 


33.6 


B283 


Dec. 22 


12:01p.m. 


15.0 


270 


257 


249 


33.6 


B284 


Dec. 23 


10:10 a.m. 


14.6 


271 


258 


251 


33.7 


B285 


Dee. 23 


12:01p.m. 


14.8 


268 


255 


248 


33.3 



118 



University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



Table 2. — Data Relative to San Diego Bay — {Continued) 
Part A — Preliminary Observations 

Surface Observations made in mid-channel near the Coronado Ferrv Slip, 
32°42;i7N, 117° 10r33W 

Specific gravity 



Water 
sample 
number 
B286 
B287 
B288 
B289 
B290 
B291 
B292 



Date 
Dec. 2.5 
Dec. 26 
Dec. 28 
Dec. 29 
Dec. 29 
Dec. 31 
Dec. 31 



of 

day 

3:30 p.m 

3:50 p.m 

12:01 p.m 

11:00 a.m 

12:15 p.m, 

1:45 p.m 

3:40 p.m 



Temperatur 
centigrade 
14?1 
14.6 
13.7 
13.5 
13.6 
13.1 
13.6 



4°0 
270 
271 
272 
273 
273 



17?S 

17?5 
257 
258 
259 
259 
259 



S- 



4?0 
251 
251 
2.54 
255 
2.55 



Salinity 
S o/oo 
33.6 
33.7 
33.8 
34.0 
34.0 



33.8 



Surface Observations made from the Coronado Ferry Slip, 32° 41^9 X, 117° 10;3 W 



B293 
B294 
B295 
B296 
B297 
B298 
B299 
B300 
B301 
B302 
B303 
B304 
B305 
B306 
B307 
B30S 
B309 
B310 
B3n 
B312 
B313 
B314 
B315 
B316 
B317 
B318 



1904 

June 21 

.Tune 22 

June 23 

June 24 

June 27 

June 29 

June 30 

July 1 

July 2 

Julv 3 

July 5 

July 6 

July 7 

July 8 

Julv 9 

July 10 

Julv 11 

Julv 12 

July 13 

July 14 

July 17 

July 19 

July 21 

July 23 

Julv 25 

July 27 



4:25 p.m, 
10:30 a.m 
6:00 p.m 
12:01 p.m, 
2:15 p.m 
3:15 p.m 
11:40 a.m 
4:50 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:40 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m, 
4:30 p.m, 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 
4:30 p.m 



19?9 
21.0 
19.4 

22.2 
21.2 
22.0 
20.4 
22.0 
22.0 
21.0 
22.2 
22.0 
22.0 
23.0 
23.0 
22.8 
22.5 
22.0 
21.5 
20.0 
21.0 
22.0 
22.0 
23.0 
22.8 
23.0 



l^l-'j] Michael, et al.: Ili/droyrnphic Records of Scripps Iitslilution 119 



EXPLANATION OF TABLE 2, TART B 
On August SO, 1912, a series of temperature and salinity observa- 
tions was commenced for the purpose of determining the relation 
between the seasonal variation in San Diego Bay and in the ocean. 
The bay observations were, for the most part, made in Glorietta Bight 
where the influence of the ocean is least, and the ocean observations 
were made from Coronado Pier which, while being only about half a 
mile west of Glorietta Bight, is scarcely, if at all, contaminated by 
bay water because of a jetty which, being located at the mouth of the 
bay about three miles west of Coronado Pier, directs the outgoing 
tides to the south. In addition, bay samples taken for other special 
purposes are tabulated in this part. 

First column. — Water sample numbers entered with respect first to location, 
second to time. 

Second colnmn. — Date. 

Third column. — Time when the sample was collected entered to the nearest 
minute. 

Fourth column. — Tide; falling, rising, high, and low tides being indicated by 
the letters F, E, H, and L. 

Fifth column. — Depth entered to the nearest 0.1 meter. 

Sixth column. — Temperature in situ. 

Seventh, eighth, and ninth column.^. — Specific gravity of sample under atmo- 
spheric pressure, the 1.0 being omitted; for meaning of symbols see page 48. 

Tenth column. — Salinity per mille determined from pycnometer measurements 
(see p. 28). 



120 



University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



Table 2. — Data Relative to San Diego Bay — (Continued) 

Part B — Special Bay Data 

Observations made from Coronado Pier, 32° 4014 N, 117° 10:7 W 















Tem- 


Specific gravity 


























Water 






Time 




Depth 


in 


0° 


17!5 


t° 




sample 






of 




in 


centi- 


S 


s 


,s 


Salinity 


number 


Date 
1912 


day 


Tide 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4?0 


SO/00 


B319 


Sept. 


7 


11:45 a.m 


F 





19?2 


2714 


2580 


2406 


33.77 


B320 


Sept. 


14 


2:45 p.m 


F 





18.6 


2715 


2581 


2422 


33.78 


B321 


Sept. 


21 


8:00 a.m 


F 





19.2 


2719 


2585 


2411 


33.83 


B322 


Oct. 


5 


2:45 p.m 


R 





17.2 


2710 


2671 


2451 


33.72 


B323 


Oct. 


12 


9:45 a.m 


H 





18.0 


2723 


2589 


2444 


33.89 


B324* 


Oct. 


1.5 


7:55 a.m 







17.5 


2713 


2579 


2447 


33.76 


B32o* 


Oct. 


15 


8:00 a.m 




0.2 


17.6 


2720 


2586 


2452 


33.85 


B326* 


Oct. 


15 


8:05 a.m 







17.5 


2710 


2576 


2444 


33.72 


B327 


Oct. 


19 


11:00 a.m 


f" 





17.8 


2704 


2571 


2431 


33.65 


B328* 


Oct. 


20 


8:20 a.m 




0.2 


18.2 


2711 


2577 


2428 


33.74 


B329* 


Oct. 


20 


8:30 a.m 







18.1 


2720 


2586 


2440 


33.85 


B330* 


Oct. 


20 


8:40 a.m 







18.2 


2714 


2580 


2431 


33.77 


B331 


Oct. 


27 


11:50 a.m 







17.6 


2715 


2581 


2447 


33.78 


B332 


Nov. 


3 


1:15 p.m 


f" 





15.2 


2688 


2555 


2477 


33.45 


B333 


Nov. 


11 


2:00 p.m 


F 





16.4 


2711 


2577 


2471 


33.73 


B334 


Nov. 


18 


12:10 p.m 


H 





14.8 


2706 


2573 


2502 


33.68 


B335 


Nov. 


24 


11:15 a.m 


F 





14.9 


2690 


2557 


2481 


33.47 


B336 


Dec. 


8 


11:30 a.m 


F 





13.8 


2703 


2570 


2520 


33.64 


B337 


Dee. 


15 


11:00 a.m 


H 





13.4 


2695 


2562 


2520 


33.54 


B338 


Dee. 


22 


11:30 a.m 


F 





12.6 


2687 


2554 


2529 


33.44 


B339 


Dec. 


29 


12:30 p.m 


H 





12.2 


2691 


2558 


2541 


33.49 


* Supplem 


enta 


ry observa 


tions 


made at 


La .Jolla (32° 


51:2 N, 


117° 17 


5W) to 


compare the effects of deser 


t wine 


s blowing from 


Oct. 12 to Oct 


16. 






Observations made 


in Glorietta Bight, 32 


°4o:6N, 117° lorow 




B340 


191 
Aug. 


30 


1:45 p.m 


H 





23? 2 


2830 


2691 


2407 


35.22 


B341 


Sept. 


7 


11:25 a.m 


F 





21.2 


2829 


2690 


2462 


35.20 


B342 


Sept. 


14 


2:30 p.m 


F 


n 


22.6 


2800 


2662 


2460 


34.84 


B343 


Sept. 


21 


7:45 a.m 







23.2 


2806 


2668 


2385 


34.92 


B344 


Oct. 


5 


2:30 p.m 


R 





19.0 


2792 


2654 


2485 


34.74 


B345t 


Oct. 


12 


9:25 a.m 


H 





18.6 


2794 


2656 


2497 


34.77 


B346t 


Oct. 


19 


10:50 a.m 


F 





19.8 


2809 


2670 


2481 


34.96 


B347t 


Oct. 


27 


12:05 p.m 







19.0 


2803 


2665 


2496 


34.88 


B348 


Nov. 


3 


1:30 p.m 


f" 





16.0 


2800 


2662 


2565 


34.84 


B349 


Nov. 


11 


2:20 p.m 


F 





17.2 


2730 


2595 


2470 


33.97 


B350 


Nov. 


18 


12:30 p.m 







14.7 


2799 


2661 


2593 


34.84 


B351 


Nov. 


24 


11:. 30 a.m 







15.2 


2787 


2649 


2577 


34.68 


B352t 


Dec. 


2 


12:01 p.m 


h' 





14.8 


2728 


2593 


2522 


33.95 


B353 


Dec. 


8 


12:01 p.m 


F 





13.7 


2733 


2598 


2551 


34.01 


B354 


Dec. 


15 


11:20 a.m 


H 





13.2 


2755 


2619 


2582 


34.28 


B355 


Dec. 


22 


11:45 a.m 


F 





12.4 










B3.56 


Dec. 


29 


12:45 p.m 


H 





11.2 


2752 


2616 


2617 


34.24 


t Compare 


with water sa 


mples 


B 323 to B 331. 










} Taken at Coronado Fer 


ry Slit 


(32° 4i:9N, 11 


7° 10:3 W). 








Obsen 


'ations made o 


ff Nat 


onal City Pier, 


32° 40:0 N, 11- 


° 7;o W 




1908 


















B 357 


Julv 


14 


1:15 p.m 


R 





27?9 


2928 


2785 


2359 


36.44 


B358 


July 


14 


2:15 p.m 


R 





27.4 


2934 


2791 


2378 


36.52 


B359 


July 


14 


3:15 p.m 


R 





26.9 


2902 


2759 


2363 


36.12 


B360 


July 


14 


4:15 p.m 


R 





26.4 


2924 


2781 


2400 


36.40 


B361 


July 


14 


5:45 p.m 


H 





25.2 


2891 


2748 


2404 


35.97 


Observations made to I 


)etern 


ine Tidal Effects, 32° 4311 N, 117° li:4 W 


B362 


1911 

May 7 


11:45 a.m 


L 





17?5 


2755 


2619 


2485 


34.28 


B363 


May 


7 


6:25 p.m 


H 





17.7 


2761 


2625 


2488 


34.36 


B364 


May 


8 


12:25 p.m 


L 





17.5 


2739 


2604 


2472 


34.09 



I 



1915] Michael, et al. : Hijdrograph k Records of Scripp.s Instil itl ion 121 

T.iBLE 2. — D.\T.\ Relative to San Diego Bay — (Continued) 
Part BSpecial Bay Data 



Observa 


tions made to Determine Ti<l 


al Effects, 32° 43:i N, 11 


7° 11:4 \V 














Tem- 


Specific gravity 


























Water 






Time 




Depth 


in 


0° 


17?5 


t" 




sample 






of 




in 


centi- 


S 


S- 


S 


Salinity 


number 


Date 


day 


Tide 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4?0 


S *5. no 


B365 


1911 
May S 


6:50 p.m. 


H 





17?8 


2765 


2629 


2490 


34.41 


B366 


May 


9 


1:10 p.m. 


L 





17.4 


2740 


2605 


2474 


34.10 


B367 


May 


9 


7:20 p.m. 


H 





17.2 


2742 


2607 


2483 


34.12 


B36S 


Ma3' 


10 


1:40 p.m. 


L 





17.6 


2754 


2618 


2484 


34.27 


B369 


May 


10 


7:45 p.m. 


H 





18.5 


2750 


2614 


2457 


34.22 


B370 


May 


11 


8:40 a.m. 


H 





18.1 


2756 


2620 


2473 


34.30 


B3-1 


Mav 


11 


2:05 p.m. 


L 





17.4 


2724 


2589 


2459 


33.90 


B372 


Maj- 


12 


9:20 a.m. 


H 





17.5 


2743 


2608 


2475 


34.14 


B373 


May 


12 


2:25 p.m. 


L 





18.9 


2756 


2620 


2453 


34.30 


B374 


May 


13 


10:00 a.m. 


H 





18.4 


2749 


2613 


2459 


34.21 


B375 


May 


13 


2:45 p.m. 


L 





17.8 


2766 


2630 


2489 


34.42 


B376 


May 


14 


10:40 a.m. 


H 





17.8 


2777 


2641 


2502 


34.57 


B377 


May 


14 


3:00 p.m. 


L 





17.6 


2758 


2622 


2487 


34.32 


B378 


May 


15 


6:00 a.m. 


L 





18.1 


27.54 


2618 


2471 


34.27 


B379 


May 


15 


1:00 p.m. 


II 





18.0 


2759 


2623 


2479 


34.34 


B380 


May 


16 


6:00 a.m. 


L 





18.5 


2758 


2622 


2465 


34.32 


B381 


May 


16 


2:00 p.m. 


H 





18.2 


2776 


2639 


2490 


34.55 


B382 


May 


17 


6:30 a.m. 


L 





18.6 


2762 


2626 


2466 


34.37 


B383 


May 


17 


3:00 p.m. 


H 





18.9 


2779 


2642 


2475 


34.58 


B384 


May 


18 


7:00 a.m. 


L 





19.2 


27.59 


2623 


2448 


34.34 


B385 


May 


18 


4:00 p.m. 


H 





18.6 


2783 


2646 


2476 


34.63 


B386 


May 


19 


7:30 a.m. 


L 





19.6 


2778 


2641 


2456 


34.57 


B387 


May 


19 


4:30 p.m. 


H 





19.1 


2767 


2631 


2459 


34.43 


B388 


Mav 


20 


8:40 a.m. 


L 





19.9 


2783 


2645 


2453 


34.63 


B389 


May 


20 


4:40 p.m. 


H 





19.2 


2773 


2636 


2461 


34.51 


B390 


May 


21 


9:40 a.m. 


L 





18.9 


2793 


2655 


2488 


34.76 


B391 


May 


21 


5:00 p.m. 


H 





19.7 


2765 


2629 


2440 


34.41 


B392 


May 


22 


10:30 a.m. 


L 





19.8 


2768 


2631 


2440 


34.45 


B393 


May 


22 


5:23 p.m. 


H 





19.6 


2745 


2610 


2424 


34.16 


B394 


May 


23 


11:30 a.m. 


L 





20.0 


2761 


2625 


2430 


34.36 


B 395 


Mav 


23 


6:00 p.m. 


TI 





19.4 


2768 


2631 


2451 


34.45 


B396 


MaV 


24 


12:10 p.m. 


L 





19.8 


27.54 


2618 


2426 


34.27 


B397 


May 


24 


6:30 p.m. 


H 





18.9 


2752 


2616 


2449 


34.25 


B398 


May 


25 


1:00 p.m. 


L 







2758 


2622 




34.32 


B399 


May 


25 


7:00 p.m. 


H 





18.9 


2752 


2616 


2449 


34.25 


B400 


May 


26 


1:30 p.m. 


L 





18.7 


2755 


2619 


2458 


34.29 


R401 


May 


26 


7:40 p.m. 


H 





18.2 


2741 


2606 


2456 


34.11 



Observations made in the Mouth of False Bay, 32° 45;3 X, 117° 1510 W 





1910 
















B402 


July 20 


2:00 p.m. 


... 0.2 


28?8 


2728 


2593 


2142 


33.95 


B403 


July 20 


2:05 p.m. 


... 0.5 


26.8 


2719 


2583 


2198 


33.84 


B404 


Julv 20 


2:10 p.m. 


... 0.5 


29.1 


2745 


2610 


2150 


34.16 


B405 


July 20 


2:15 p.m. 


... 0.7 


29.4 


2802 


2664 


2194 


34.88 


B406 


July 20 


2:20 p.m. 


... 0.3 


31.4 


2749 


2613 


2084 


34.21 


B407 


Julv 20 


2:25 p.m. 


... 1.0 


26.4 


2727 


2592 


2216 


33.94 


B408 


Julv 20 


2:30 p.m. 


... 0.4 


25.2 


2720 


2586 


2243 


33.85 


B409 


Jul'v 20 


2:35 p.m. 


... 0.7 


27.0 


2724 


2589 


2196 


33.90 


B410 


July 20 


2:40 p.m. 


... 0.7 


26.4 


2719 


2585 


2209 


33.84 


B411 


July 20 


2:45 p.m. 


... 0.7 


25.9 


2725 


2590 


2226 


33.91 


B412 


July 20 


2:50 p.m. 


... 0.3 


22 . 3 


2714 


2580 


2323 


33.78 


B413» 


July 20 


3:55 p.m. 





29.0 


2853 


2712 


22.56 


35.51 


B414* 


July 20 


4:00 p.m. 





29.0 


2856 


2715 


2257 


35..55 


* Taken at the 


east end of F 


alse Bay 


(32° 47 


5 N, 117 


12:5 W) 







122 Vnivcrsitu of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



EXPLANATION OF TABLE 2, PART C 
This part includes all the miseellaneoiis observations made in San 
Diego Bay which have only an indirect bearing upon the special 
investigations tabulated in parts A and H, or upon the ocean work. 

First column. — Witter sample numbers entered in chronological order irrespec- 
tive of location. 

Second coltinm. — Time ivlien the sample was collected entered to the nearest 
minute. 

Third and fourth columns. — Latitude and longitude entered to the nearest 0;01. 

Fifth column. — Depith from which the sample was taken entered to the 
nearest meter. 

Sitth column. — Temjierature in situ. 

Seventh, eighth, and ninth columns. — Specific gravity of sample under atmos- 
pheric pressure, the 1.0 being omitted; for meaning of symbols see page 48. 

Tenth column. — Salinity per mille determined from pycnometer measurements 
(see p. 28) unless followed by the letter c. in which case Mohr's titrimetric 
method was used (see p. 32). 



1915] 



Michael, rt al.: Ilijdrnijraphic Records of Scripps [ iisliliition 



123 



LE 2. — Data Relative to San Diego Bay — (Continued) 
Part C — Miscellaneous Bay Data 

Tern- Specific gravity 



Water 


Time 




I u 


^j^^'"" 




Depth 


peraiure 


0° 


17?5 


t° 
















sample 


of 


North 




West 


in 


centi- 


S 


S 


S 


.Salinity 


number 


day 


la 


titude 


lo 


ngitude 
July 18 


meters 
1908 


grade 


4?0 


17?5 


4?0 


S o/oo 


B415 


8:30 a.m. 


32 


42:60 




° io:90 





20?8 


2789 


2651 


2434 


34.71 


B416 


0:00 a.m. 


32 


42.17 




• 10.33 





20.0 


2737 


2602 


2407 


34.06 


B417 


10:30 a.m. 


32 


40.77 




■ 10.50 





24.3 










B418 


12:45 ji.m. 


32 


42.60 




■ 10.90 
Julv 17 



1909 


18.0 


2735 


2600 


2456 


34.04 


B419 


8:05 a.m. 


32 


42.60 




■ 10.70 





20.8 


2759 


2623 


2406 


34.33 


B420 


8:12 a.m. 


32 


42.45 




■ 10.50 





21.5 


2771 


2632 


2399 


34.49 


B421 


8:22 a.m. 


32 


42.40 




■ 10.35 





21.4 


2780 


2643 


2410 


34.60 


B422 


8:32 a.m. 


32 


42.17 




■ 10.33 





20.8 


2757 


2621 


2403 


34.31 


B423 


8:42 a.m. 


32 


41.85 




10.15 





22.3 


2800 


2662 


2405 


34.85 


B424 


10:10 a.m. 


32 


40.77 




• 10.50 





23.6 


2869 


2727 


2436 


35.70 


B425 


12:10 p.m. 


32 


40.60 




10.00 
July 21 




1909 


24.3 


2847 


2706 


2391 


35.43 


B426* 


8:54 a.m. 


32 


47.28 




• 15.00 





24.6 


2804 


2666 


2345 


.34.90 


B427 


9:15 a.m. 


32 


46.97 




14.68 





24.4 


2808 


2669 


2351 


34.95 


B428 


9:50 a.m. 


32 


46.62 




14.34 





24.8 


2803 


2665 


2335 


34.89 


B429 


10:16 a.m. 


32 


46.63 




14.00 





24.0 


2786 


2648 


2342 


34.68 


B430 


10:50 a.m. 


32 


47.28 




13.98 





24.4 


2809 


2670 


2351 


34.96 


B431 


11:22 a.m. 


32 


47.02 




13.74 





23.5 


2770 


2633 


2342 


34.47 


B432 


11:37 a.m. 


32 


46.60 




13.36 





22.2 


2743 


2608 


2354 


34.14 


B433 


12:35 p.m. 


32 


46.46 




13.14 





28 .'8 


2855 


2745 


2261 


35.53 


B434 


12:50 p.m. 


32 


46.50 




13.56 





25.6 


2776 


2639 


2283 


34..55 


B435 


1:13 p.m. 


32 


46.56 




13.78 





20.4 


2719 


2585 


2380 


33.84 


B436 


3:10 p.m. 


32 


47.28 




15.00 





25.6 


2805 


2667 


2310 


34.91 


* Water samples 


B 426 to B 436 ta 


ten in False Ba 


y. 




















Julv 9, 


1910 












B437 


9:15 a.m. 


32 


42.46 




10.48 





20.6 


2774 


2637 


2426 


34.52 c 


B438 


9:2.T a.m. 


32 


42.35 




10.32 





20.6 


2765 


2629 


2417 


34.41 


B439 


9:30 a.m. 


32 


42.19 




10.10 





20.4 


2778 


2641 


2424 


34.57 


B440 


9:36 a.m. 


32 


42.09 




10.13 





20.0 


2760 


2624 


2428 


34.35 


B441 


9:42 a.m. 


32 


41.98 


11' 


10.19 





19.8 


2742 


2607 


2417 


34.12 c 


B442 


9:50 a.m. 


32 


41.92 




10.26 





20.2 


2776 


2639 


2439 


34..55 c 


B443 


10:02 a.m. 


32 


41.90 


11" 


10.04 





19.6 


2763 


2627 


2441 


34.,39 


B444 


10:12 a.m. 


32 


41.70 


117 


9.94 





20.6 


2794 


2656 


2445 


34.77 


B445 


10:16 a.m. 


32 


41.45 




9.90 





22.6 


2795 


2682 


2391 


.34.79 c 


B446 


10:23 a.m. 


32 


41.00 


117 


9.88 





22.5 


2822 


2683 


2419 


35.12 e 


B447 


10:50 a.m. 


32 


40.56 


117 


10.00 





23 . 3 


2846 


2706 


2418 


35.42 


B448 


2:45 p.m. 


32 


40.77 


117 


10.50 





25.2 


2868 


2728 


2381 


35.69 


B449 


3:00 p.m. 


32 


40.53 




10.00 





24.6 


2852 


2712 


2385 


35.50 c 


B450 


3:15 p.m. 


32 


41.08 


117 


9.84 





22.4 










B451 


3:. 35 p.m. 


32 


41.73 


117 


9.90 





21.1 


2794 


26.56 


2431 


34.77 


B4o2 


3:50 p.m. 


32 


41.97 


117 


9.94 





20.6 


2753 


2617 


2407 


34.26 c 


B453 


4:20 p.m. 


32 


42.46 


117 


10.48 
July 16 




1910 


20.9 


2776 


2639 


2421 


34..55 


B454 


7:17 p.m. 


32 


42.08 


117 


13.82 





18.3 


2737 


2602 


2451 


34.06 


B455 


7:25 p.m. 


32 


42.53 


117 


13.30 





15.4 


2716 


2582 


2498 


33.80 


B456 


7:30 p.m. 


32 


42.77 


117 


12.78 





15.5 


2720 


2586 


2500 


33.85 


B457 


7:35 p.m. 


32 


42.83 


117 


12.32 





15.8 










B458 


7:40 p.m. 


32 


42.78 


117 


11.70 
April 27 



1912 


19.6 


27.5.3 


2617 


2432 


.34.'26 


B459 


9:00 a.m. 


32 


39.30 


117 


13.95 




14.15 


2712 


2578 


2522 


33.75 


B460 


9:00 a.m. 


32 


39.30 


117 


13.95 





14.1 


2705 


2572 


2516 


33.66 


B461 


9:15 a.m. 


32 


40.30 


117 


13.80 


7 


14.4 


2709 


2575 


2513 


33.71 


B462 


9:15 a.m. 


32 


40.30 


117 


13.80 





14.5 


2710 


2576 


2512 


33.73 


B463 


9:30 a.m. 


32 


41.10 


117 


13.90 


7 


14.55 


2779 


2642 


2577 


34.58 


B464 


9:30 a.m. 


32 


41.10 


117 


13.90 





14.8 


2741 


2606 


2535 


34.11 


B465 


9:45 a.m. 


32 


42.00 


117 


14.10 


7 


15.35 


2722 


2588 


2504 


33.88 


B466 


9:45 a.m. 


32 


42.00 


117 


14.10 





15.3 


2713 


2579 


2498 


33.76 


B4fi7 


9:55 a.m. 


32 


42.60 


117 


13.55 


7 


15.25 


2716 


2582 


2502 


33.80 


B468 


9:55 a.m. 


32 


42.60 


117 


13..55 





15.7 


2716 


2582 


2493 


33.80 


B469 


10:05 a.m. 


32 


42.95 


117 


12.90 


7 


15.85 


2726 


2591 


2497 


33.93 


B470 


10:05 a.m. 


32 


42.95 


117 


12.90 





15.9 


2722 


2588 


2492 


33.88 



124 UniversUy of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Table 2. — Data Relative to San Diego Bat — (Concluded) 
Part C — Miscellaneous Bay Data 





Time 
of 
day 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Tem- 
perature 

centi- 
grade 


Specific gravity 




Water 
sample 
number 


0° 

S 

4?0 


17?5 

S ■ 

17°5 


t° 

S 

4?0 




North 
latitude 


West 
longitude 


Salinity 
SO/00 


B471 


10:20 a.m. 


32 = 


' 42r95 


117' 


April : 
' 11:75 


27, 1912 


16?95 


2721 


2587 


2467 


33.86 


B472 


10:20 a.m. 


32 


42.95 


117 


11.75 





16.9 


2721 


2587 


2468 


33.86 


B473 


10:30 a.m. 


32 


42.40 


117 


10.60 


7 


17.3 


2735 


2600 


2473 


34.04 


B474 


10:30 a.m. 


32 


42.40 


117 


10.60 





17.4 


2729 


2594 


2464 


33.96 


B475 


10:40 a.m. 


32 


42.00 


117 


10.00 


7 


17.05 


2752 


2616 


2494 


34.25 


B476 


10:40 a.m. 


32 


42.00 


117 


10.00 





17.5 


2733 


2598 


2466 


34.01 


B477 


10:55 a.m. 


32 


41.60 


117 


8.90 


7 


17.05 


2740 


2605 


2484 


34.10 


B478 


10:55 a.m. 


32 


41.60 


117 


8.90 





17.7 


2738 


2603 


2466 


.34.07 


B479 


11:00 a.m. 


32 


40.90 


117 


8.30 


7 


16.. 55 


2777 


2640 


2530 


34.56 


B480 


11:00 a.m. 


32 


40.90 


117 


8.30 





18.2 


2730 


2595 


2446 


33.97 


B4S1 


11:15 a.m. 


32 


40.25 


117 


7.50 


7 


17. .55 


2779 


2642 


2507 


34.58 


B482 


11:15 a.m. 


32 


40.25 


117 


7.50 





18.5 


2730 


2595 


2439 


33.97 


B 483 


11:35 a.m. 


32 


39.90 


117 


7.40 


3 


17.55 


2764 


2628 


2494 


34.40 


B484 


11:. 35 a.m. 


32 


39.90 


117 


7.40 





18.6 


2754 


2618 


2458 


34.27 


B485 


11:50 a.m. 


32 


39.20 


117 


7.30 


6 


18.55 


2744 


2609 


2451 


34.15 


B486 


11:50 a.m. 


32 


39.20 


117 


7.30 





18.7 


2735 


2600 


2439 


34.04 


B487 


7:00 p.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


August 
10.6 


4, 1912 




21.4 










B488 


8:00 p.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


10.6 





21.9 


2766 


2630 


2383 


34.42 


B489 


9:00 p.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


10.6 





21.6 










B400 


10:10 p.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


10.6 





20.7 










B491 


11:05 p.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


10.6 





20.8 










B492 


12:01 a.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


August 
10.6 


5, 1912 




20.9 


2733 


2598 


2379 


34.01 


B493 


1:00 a.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


10.6 





21.4 










B494 


3:05 a.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


10.6 





20.8 










B495 


5:05 a.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


10.6 





20.4 


2763 


2627 


2421 


34.39 


B496 


7:10 a.m. 


32 


42.4 


117 


10.6 





20.7 











lf'l'"'l Michael, ct al.: Ilijdrograiiliie Records of Hcrijips InfsiitKtioii 125 



EXPLANATION OF TABLE 3 
In the fall of 1908 a Pox apparatus (see Fox, 1905) for deter- 
miniHg the gaseous content of sea water was procured and, in 1911, 
Mr. H. C. Burbridge succeeded in measuring the carbon dioxide, 
nitrogen, and oxygen dissolved in a selected serias of samples. How- 
ever, considerable difficulty was experienced mainly because (if the 
absence of a supply of gas for fuel, and, as it is almost necessary both 
for operating and repairing the apparatus, the systematic analysis of 
gas content was not undertaken. "While the few results obtained are 
tabulated, as usual, to the nearest 0.01 e.c, the condition under which 
the analyses were made was so unsatisfactory that the error is probably 
greater than this would indicate. 

First column. — Water sample numbers entered in chronological order; for 
information relative to date, time, latitude, longitude, temperature i(i situ, 
specific gravity, and salinity refer to the same water sample numbers entered 
in Table 1. 

Second column. — Depth from which the sample was collected entered to the 
nearest meter. 

Third column. — Amount of carbon dioxide per kilogram of the sample 
measured in cubic centimeters at 0° C. under 760 millimeters pressure. 

Fourth column. — Amount of nitrogen per kilogram of the sample measured 
as stated above. 

Fifth column. — Amount of oxygen per kilogram of the sample measured as 
stated above. 

Table 3. — Gas Content 



^at«r-sample 


Depth in 


CO, 


N 





number 


meters 


c.c. per kg. 


c.c. per kg. 


c.c. per kg. 


1898 


18 


32.63 


6.91 


2.66 


1899 


6 


28.51 


6.86 


2.52 


1901 


82 


39.28 


10.29 


2.22 


1903 


11 


34.85 


8.38 


3.18 


1904 


37 


38.70 


12.99 


3.98 


1905 


16 


29.86 


6.03 


3.17 


1906 


9 


33.80 


8.65 


3.21 


1908 


137 


45.54 


12.05 


1..55 


1909 


92 


36.47 


9.11 


1.73 


1910 


13 


3.5.10 


8.42 


3.88 


1912 


110 


37.30 


8.43 


1.60 


1913 


73 


38.92 


10.02 


1.45 


1914 


27 


38.31 


9.63 


3.72 


1915 


S2 


41.81 


10.96 


2.41 


1916 


•5.0 


36.34 


10.16 


2.35 


1917 


7 


28.71 


8.78 


3.00 


2016 


137 


41.03 


10.36 


1.73 


2017 


!I2 


41.66 


12.59 


J. 60 


2018 


13 


41.32 


12.35 


4.43 


2019 


110 


35.98 


9.40 


1.4S 


2020 


73 


37.93 


9.29 


2.03 


2023 


.55 


34.02 


9.57 


1.61 


2024 


7 


35.93 


7.97 


3.23 


2027 


46 


38.50 


8.91 


3.17 


2029 


6 


36.07 


8.64 


3.71 


2031 


64 


38.23 


8.75 


2.30 


2032 


18 


38.13 


10.23 


4.17 


2033 


37 


38.43 


9.46 


3.60 


2034 


16 


33.12 


7.07 


2.57 


2035 


9 


33.67 


10.38 


3.06 



126 Universitij of Califoniia Publicalions in Zoology [Vol.15 



EXPLANATION OF TABLE 4 

All the soundings entered in this table were made with the Thomp- 
son sounding machine (see p. 9) unless otherwise stated in the table. 
Only those are given whose error is knoivn to be within two per cent 
of the depth. 

First cohinin. — Number of sounding entered in chronological order. 

Second columti. — Date. 

Third column. — Time when the lead struck bottom entered to the nearest 
minute; this enables comparison with collections made at nearly the same time 
(see Appendix III). 

Fourth column. — Section; for explanation see page 46. 

Fifth and sixth columns. — Latitude and longitude; for error see pages 18 and 4.5. 

Seventh column. — Depth of bottom entered to the nearest meter above 300 
and to the nearest five below that depth. 

Eighth column. — Character of bottom denoted by the abbreviations adopted 
by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey; thej' are explained in 
Appendix IV. 



1915] 



Michael, rt al.: Ilijdroijrapliic Records of Scripps I iifitUulidit 



127 











Table 4. — Souxdings 










Number 


Date 


Tinip 
of 
day 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Character 

o( 

bottom 




sounding 


N. latitude 


W. longitude 




1 


1905 
June 27 




40„ 


32° 


54:8 


117 = 


20:3 


385 






2 


June 


28 


5:30 a. m 


40„ 


32 


53.8 




19.2 


185 






3 


June 


28 


2:55 p.m 


40„ 


32 


53.6 




18.4 


146 






4 


June 


29 


5:50 a. m 


40u 


32 


54.2 




21.0 


185 






5 


June 


29 


7:07 a.m 


-tOn 


32 


53.3 




19.7 


92 






6 


June 


30 


4:55 a.m 


40„ • 


32 


53.4 




18.8 


185 






7 


July 


1 


6:00 a.m 


40,1 


32 


53.6 




18.0 


200 






8 


JulV 


1 


6:55 a.m 


(39„) 


32 


52.8 




17.3 


110 






9 


July 


5 


1 :0a p.m 


41„ 


32 


57.1 




25.9 


510 






10 


July 


8 


6:00 a.m 


40„ 


32 


52.7 




18.0 


185 






11 


July 


11 


11:40 a.m 


(40),,, 


32 


52.3 




17.7 


200 






12 


1906 
June 26 


10:15 a.m 


41n 


32 


55.7 




23.7 


565 






13 


July 


3 


9:30 a.m 


(40)„ 


32 


51.0 




20.0 


73 


rky. 




14 


July 


3 


3:00 p.m 


(39„) 


32 


51.5 




16.4 


145 


rky. 




15 


July 


11 


10:35 a.m 


40.5,, 


32 


56.8 




22.5 


680 






16 


July 


11 


12:50 p.m 


40.5„ 


32 


56.8 




22.5 


630 






17 


July 


18 


11:10 a.m 


41u 


32 


53.0 




25^6 


620 






IS 


JulV 


19 


11:25 a.m 


41,„ 


32 


49.6 




26.9 


600 






19 


July 


20 


9:30 a.m 


(40),„ 


32 


51.2 




18.8 


80 


M. E. 




20 


JulV 


21 


10:30 a.m 


41„ 


32 


54.6 




25.2 


600 






21 


JulV 


23 


9:25 a.m 


40„ 


32 


54.3 




21.4 


420 






22 


1908 
June 9 


2:15 p.m 


40„ 


32 


53.3 




18.0 


247 






23 


June 


10 


8:. 54 a.m 


(40„) 


32 


57.8 




20.0 


390 


gn. M. 




24 


June 


10 


9:26 a.m 


40„ 


32 


57.4 




21.8 


510 






25 


June 


10 


9:.52a.m 


41u 


32 


55.4 




24.5 


695 


f ne. gy. S 


.bk.Sp 


26 


June 


10 


10:25 a.m 


41ii 


32 


54.3 




27.4 


640 


gn. M. 




27 


June 


10 


10:56 a.m 


42„ 


32 


53.1 




29.5 


720 


gn. M. 




28 


June 


10 


11:29 a.m 


42„ 


32 


51.6 




32.0 


840 


gn. M. yl. 


Sp. 


29 


June 


10 


12:08 p.m 


43,„ 


32 


50.3 




34.5 


955 






30 


June 


10 


1:04 p.m 


44, 


32 


47.0 




40.0 


1080 


gn. br. M 




31 


June 


10 


1:51 p.m 


44, 


32 


43.6 




38.0 


1180 


gn. M. 




32 


June 


10 


3:06 p.m 


43, 


32 


44.7 




34.5 


1045 


gn. M. 




33 


June 


10 


4:13 p.m 


41., 


32 


47.5 




26.2 


510 


gn. M. vl 


Sp. 


34 


June 


11 


9:41 a.m 


(40,,) 


33 


2.S 




19.5 


40 


S. 




35 


June 


11 


10:03 a.m 


(40„) 


33 


1.7 




22.0 


385 


gn. M. S. 




36 


June 


11 


10:19 a.m 


(40..5,,) 


33 


2.3 




22.5 


415 


gn. M. 




37 


June 


11 


10:47 a.m 


(40.,) 


33 


1.4 




22.3 


400 


gn. M. 




38 


June 


11 


11:05 a.m 


41„ 


33 


3.2 




23.9 


380 






39 


June 


11 


11:57 a.m 


42,, 


32 


59.8 




28.0 


725 


gn. M. 




40 


June 


11 


12:26 p.m 


42,, 


32 


57.9 




30.6 


785 


gn. M. 




41 


June 


11 


1:33 p.m 


43„ 


32 


56.0 




33.5 


850 


gn. M. 




42 


June 


11 


3:00 p.m 


42„ 


32 


.55.3 




31.7 


815 


gn. M. 




43 


June 


11 


3:37 p.m 


42„ 


32 


54.5 




29.5 


685 


gn. M. 




44 


June 


12 


7:15 a.m 


41,„ 


32 


42.3 




24.9 


625 


gn. M. 




45 


June 


12 


7:44 a.m 


41,, 


32 


52.6 




26.6 


720 


gn. M. yl 


Sp. 


46 


June 


12 


8:16 a.m 


42„ 


32 


53.0 




29.6 


840 






47 


June 


12 


8:50 a.m 


42„ 


32 


54.1 




31.7 


905 


gn. M. 




48 


June 


12 


9:26 a.m 


43„ 


32 


.53.2 




33.1 


970 


gn.M. 




49 


June 


13 


6:42 a.m 


(40„) 


33 


0.2 




20.0 


205 


C. S. 




50 


June 


14 


6:57 a.m 


(40„) 


33 


1.0 




20.0 


180 


bk.M. 




51 


June 


14 


9:15 a.m 


(41„) 


33 


9.6 




26.7 


345 


gn. M. 




52 


June 


15 


7:56 a.m 


40, 


32 


38.3 




20.2 


100 


bk. S. 




53 


June 


15 


8:19 a.m 


41s 


32 


38.5 




23.0 


240 


gn. M. 




54 


June 


15 


8:45 a.m 


41, 


32 


.39.0 




26.0 


400 


bu. M. 




55 


June 


15 


9:08 a.m 


42» 


32 


39.3 




27.8 


275 


yl. S. 




56 


June 


15 


9:55 a.m 


42, 


32 


39.6 




30.0 


905 


gn. M. 




57 


June 


15 


12:12 p.m 


42, 


32 


37.3 




29.8 


12.55 


gn. M. 




58 


June 


15 


1:25 p.m 


42, 


32 


38.2 




31.3 


1210 


gn. M. 




59 


June 


15 


1:59 p.m 


43, 


32 


39.6 




33.0 


1215 


gn. M. 




60 


June 


15 


3:10 p.m 


42, 


32 


41.5 




28.0 


415 


rky. 




61 


June 


16 


8:20 a.m 


42,„ 


32 


48.8 




32.1 


950 


gn. M. 




62 


June 


16 


9:50 a.m 


43,„ 


32 


48.5 




34.4 


990 


gn. M. 




63 


June 


16 


10:45 a.m 


42, 


32 


47.0 




31.8 


960 


gy. M. S. 


yl. S,.. 



128 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Number 

of 
sounding 

64 



100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110' 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 

lis 

113 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 



Date 
1908 
June 16 
June 16 
June 16 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 19 
June 19 
June 19 
June 19 
June 19 
June 23 
June 23 
June 23 
June 23 
June 23 
June 24 
June 24 
June 24 
June 25 
June 25 
June 26 
June 26 
June 26 
June 26 
June 26 
June 26 
June 26 
June 26 
June 26 
June 26 
June 26 
June 27 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 
June 30 
June 30 
June 30 
July 1 
July 1 
Jul'v 1 



Table 4. — Souxdings — (Continued) 

Time Position 

of , * ^ 

day 



Section N. latitude W. longitude meters 



12:40 p.m 

1 : 50 p.m 

2:45 p.m, 

9:00 a. m 

9:55 a.m 

1 : 45 a.m 

12:05 p.m 

12:50 p.m 

1:40 p.m 

3:10 p.m 

7:05 a.m 

7:38 a.m, 

8:47 a.m, 

2:45 p.m 

4:05 p.m, 

1 :55 p.m 

2:11 p.m 

2:41 p.m 

3:11 p.m, 

3:37 p.m 

9:18 a.m, 

11:05 a.m 

12:10 p.m, 

9:03 a.m, 

2:00 p.m, 

7:04 a.m 

7:35 a.m 

7:58 a.m, 

8:25 a.m 

8:50 a.m 

9:13 a.m 

9:37 a.m 

10:03 a.m 

10:28 a.m 

10:57 a.m 

11:23 a.m 

5:35 a.m 

7:22 a.m 

7:36 a.m 

7:46 a.m 

S: 04 a.m 

8:20 a.m 

8:38 a.m 

8:58 a.m 

9:20 a.m 

9:42 a.m 

10:09 a.m 

10:40 a.m 

11:00 a.m 

12:31 p.m 

12:58 p.m 

1:20 p.m 

1:50 p.m 

2:10 p.m, 

2:48 p.m 

3:16 p.m 

3:45 p.m 

4:10 p.m 

4:37 p.m, 

8:45 a.m, 

2:27 p.m, 

2:55 p.m, 

9:37 a.m 

10:30 a.m 

12:01 p.m. 



42, 

•II9 

40, 

44,0 

45,0 

45j„ 

46,0 

46,0 

45,0 

44,0 

40„ 

41„ 
(40.5,,) 

40„ 

40„ 

4l8 

41, 

42s 

42s 

42s 

42,3 

42,3 

42,3 

40„ 
(40),. 

42, 

43, 

43s 

43s 

43, 

43, 

43, 

43s 

43, 

43, 

43, 

40„ 

42s 

42s 

42, 

42, 

42, 

42a 

42, 

42o 

42, 

42, 

42b 

42, 

43, 

43, 

43, 

43, 

43, 

43, 

43, 

43s 

43, 

43; 

40„ 

40„ 

40„ 

49,4 

50„ 

50„ 



32° 46:9 

32 44.0 

32 47.2 

32 51.7 

32 52.0 

32 51.4 

32 50.8 

32 50.5 

32 49.8 

32 48.9 

32 5.5.1 

32 57.3 

32 58.5 



117° 31:8 
117 27.0 



32 55.8 

32 .53.5 

32 40.4 

32 40.7 

32 40.9 

32 41.2 

32 41.4 

33 4.7 
33 5.5 
33 5.1 
32 .55.0 
32 48.8 
32 40.6 
32 40.6 
32 40.6 



40.6 
40.4 
39.8 
39.6 



32 39.3 

32 39.3 

32 39.3 

32 38.7 

32 54.4 

32 38.7 

32 39.4 

32 40.2 

32 41.2 

32 42.0 

32 42.8 

32 43.5 

32 44.0 

32 44.4 

32 45.2 

32 45.7 

32 46.2 

32 40.4 

32 40.2 

32 40.0 

32 39.3 

32 39.2 

32 38.7 

32 38.3 

32 37.7 

32 37.3 

32 36.8 

32 54.4 

32 54.3 

32 54.4 

33 10.0 
33 11.2 
33 11.0 



22.3 
40.2 
45.9 
46.0 
51.9 
49.3 
46.0 
40.2 
20.5 
23.2 
22.5 



117 18.5 
117 19.6 



26.3 
27.2 
29.5 
29.6 
30.3 
29.4 
31.6 
30.6 
21.5 
20.7 
31.5 
.33.0 
33.9 
34.7 
35.3 
34.9 
34.7 
35.3 
36.0 
37.0 
37.3 
117 21.5 
117 28.5 



28.9 
29.4 
29.7 
29.8 
30.0 
30.0 
30.0 
30.0 
30.0 
30.0 



117 30.0 
117 35.1 



35.1 
35.1 



117 35.6 
117 3.5.7 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
118 
118 
118 



36.2 

36.5 

36.6 

36.6 

36.6 

21.2 

21.7 

21.5 

3.0 

7.8 

9.8 



925 

530 

86 

1035 

1115 

1070 

1100 

1100 

1025 

925 

325 

550 

605 

46 

405 

330 

485 

1025 

1155 

1155 

610 

730 

755 

570 

88 

735 

1020 

1190 

1175 

1175 

1205 

1100 

1150 

1185 

1195 

1215 

585 

195 

195 

330 

525 

600 

765 

815 

895 

970 

1100 

1140 

1150 

1280 

1260 

1260 

1280 

1290 

1305 

1310 

1320 

1335 

1335 

585 

570 

505 

995 

900 

680 



of 
bottom 

gn.M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
dk. gn. M. 
gn. M. 

gn. M. yl. Sp. 
S. 
S. 

bk. S. 

gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 

gn. M. 

bk. S. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn.M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 

gn. M. 

gn. M. 
gn. M. 
bk. S. 
bk. S. 
bk. S. 
bk. S. 
rky. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn.M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 

gn. M. bk. S. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
bk. S. 
bk. S. 

gn. M. bk. S. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
bk. S. 



1915] 



M'hIkk I. it al.: Ilijdroyraphic Eccords of Scripps Institution 



129 



Number 

of 
sounding 


Date 




Time 
day 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Character 


N. latitude W. longitude 


of 
bottom 




1908 


















129 


Julv 


1 


12:35 p.m 


oO„ 


33 


11:3 118° 


8:1 


715 


bk. S. 


130 


Jufy 


1 


1:50 p.m 


50„ 


33 


12.4 118 


10.8 


1145 


gn. M. 


131 


July 


2 


7:25 a.m 


50,3 


33 


6.5 118 


9.7 


1135 


gn. br. M. 


132 


Julv 


2 


10:40 a.m 


51,, 


32 


58.0 118 


15.0 


1170 


gn. br. M. 


133 


July 




3:30 p.in 


45,3 


33 


5.0 117 


44.3 


740 


gn. M. 


134 


July 




3:40 p.m 


49,0 


32 


48.8 118 


5.9 


870 


gy-M. 


135 


July 




6:45 a.m 


52s 


32 


46.4 118 


20.6 


505 


bk. M. 


136 


Julv 




8:13 a.m 


52, 


32 


46.6 118 


21.5 


275 


bk. S. 


137 


July 




10:35 a.m 


52, 


32 


45.6 118 


20.5 


330 


bk. S. 


138 


July 




11:30 a.m 


52, 


32 


45.8 118 


19.6 


795 


gy- s. 


139 


July 


8 


6:30 a.m 


52, 


32 


47.0 118 


18.7 


1005 


br. M. 


140 


July 


8 


7:20 a.m 


52,0 


32 


47.9 118 


19.8 


970 


rky. 


141 


July 


8 


9:00 a.m 


52,0 


32 


48.4 118 


20.2 


1100 


bk. S. 


142 


July 


9 


9:15 a.m 


54,, 


33 


2.0 118 


32.3 


146 


R. Sh. 


143 


July 


9 


10:10 a.m 


54,, 


32 


58.3 118 


30.0 


550 


gy.M. 


144 


JulV 


9 


1:36 p.m 


54,, 


33 


0.2 118 


30.9 


1080 


gn. M. 


145 


JulV 


10 


6:43 a.m 


50„ 


32 


53.4 118 


10.2 


975 


gn. vl. M. 


146 


JulV 


11 


7:05 a.m 


61, 


32 


21.9 119 


6.8 


230 


bk.S. 


147 


Julv 


1 


8:08 a.m 


62, 


32 


22.0 119 


7.8 


110 


rkv. 


148 


JulV 


11 


8:18 a.m 


62, 


32 


22.1 119 


8.3 


110 


S." 


149 


JulV 


11 


8:33 a.m 


62, 


32 


22.3 119 


7.4 


106 


brk. R. 


150 


JulV 


1 


8:49 a.m 


'625 


32 


23.2 119 


8.1 


92 


bk. S. 


151 


Jul> 


1 


9:10 a.m 


62, 


32 


24.2 119 


8.9 


73 


bk. 8. 


152 


Julv 


6 


9:30 a.m 


51,0 


32 


48.2 118 


13.5 


880 


gn. M. bk. S. 


153 


JulV 


17 


8:10 a.m 


6I5 


Soundings 153 to 


88 


crs. S. 


154 


JulV 


17 


10:36 a.m 


6I5 




207 were ma 


le 


82 


crs. S. 


155 


JulV 


7 


10:48 a.m 


6I5 




on Cortez Banks 


97 


ers. S. 


156 


JulV 


7 


11:14 a.m 


6I5 




within 2;5 from 


146 


crs. S. 


157 


JulV 


7 


11:33 a.m 


6I3 




32° 2.5' N an 


1 


92 


crs. S. brk. Sh 


158 


JulV 


7 


2:38 p.m 


6I5 




119° .5' W. It 


92 


bk. M. 


159 


JulV 


7 


2:48 p.m 


61, 




was impossible 


95 


bk. M. 


160 


JulV 


7 


2:55 p.m 


61, 




to obtain more 


99 


ers. bk. S. 


161 


JulV 


7 


3:06 p.m 


61-, 




exact positio 


lis. 


101 


C. brk. S. 


162 


JulV 


7 


3:18 p.m 


61, 








161 


f ne. wh. S. 


163 


JulV 


7 


3:32 p.m 


6I5 








99 


rkv. 


164 


JulV ] 


7 


3:48 p.m 


6I3 








101 


rk>. 


165 


JulV 


7 


4:00 p.m 


61= 








82 


rky. 


166 


July ] 


7 


4:16 p.m 


6I5 








35 


rKv. 


167 


July ] 


7 


4:28 p.m 


61j 








42 


rkv. 


168 


Julv ] 


7 


5:35 p.m 


6I5 








40 


rkV. 


169 


JulV 


8 


7:22 a.m 


61; 








31 


rkv. 


170 


JulV 


8 


7:34 a.m 


61, 


Soundings 170 


to 


15 


rkV. 


171 


JulV 


18 


7:45 a.m 


61, 




207 were made 


13 


rkv. 


172 


JulV 


8 


7:50 a.m 


61, 




with a hand line 


13 


rky. 


173 


JulV 


8 


7:52 a.m 


61, 




'rom a row 


:ioat. 


13 


rky. 


174 


JulV 


8 


7:55 a.m 


61, 








11 


rkv. 


175 


JulV 


8 


7:57 a.m 


61, 








13 


rkV. 


176 


July 


8 


7:58 a.m 


61, 








15 


rky. 


177 


Julv 


8 


8:00 a.m 


61, 








15 


rky. 


178 


JulV 


8 


8:03 a.m 


61, 








15 


rkv. 


179 


July ] 


8 


8:10 a.m 


61, 








11 


rkV. 


180 


Julv ] 


8 


8:12 a.m 


61, 








13 


rkv. 


181 


July 


8 


8:14 a.m 


61, 








12 


rkv. 


182 


Julv 


8 


8:16 a.m 


61, 








11 


rkv. 


183 


JulV 


8 


8:22 a.m 


61, 








16 


rkV. 


184 


JulV ] 


8 


8:27 a.m 


61, 








16 


rkV. 


185 


Julv 


8 


8:30 a.m 


61, 








15 


rkV. 


186 


JulV 


8 


8:32 a.m 


61, 








13 


rkV. 


187 


JulV 


8 


8:33 a.m 


61, 








11 


rkV. 


188 


JulV ] 


8 


8:35 a.m 


61, 








11 


rkV. 


189 


JulV 


8 


8:36 a.m 


61, 








7 


rkV. 


190 


JulV ] 


8 


8:37 a.m 


61, 








7 


rkv. 


191 


JulV ] 


8 


8:38 a.m 


61, 








7 


rkv. 


192 


JulV ] 


8 


8:39 a.m 


61, 








7 


rkV. 


193 


Jul'y ] 


8 


8:40 a.m 


61, 








6 


rkV. 



130 



University of CalifoDiia Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 4. — Soundings — (Continued) 



Number 
of 


Date 


Time 
of 
day 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Character 

of 

bottom 


sounding 


N. latitude 


W. longitude 




1908 


















194 


July 


18 


8:41 a.m. 


61, 










4.5 


Bishop's Rock 


195 


July 


18 


8:42 a.m. 


61, 










6 


rky. 
rky. 


196 


JulV 


18 


8:44 a.m. 


61, 










11 


197 


July 


18 


8:45 a.m. 


61, 










10 


rky. 


198 


July 


18 


8:.50a.m. 


61, 










9 


rky. 


199 


July 


18 


8:52 a.m. 


61, 










7 


rky. 


200 


July 


18 


8:55 a.m. 


61, 










7 


rky. 


201 


JulV 


18 


8:58 a.m. 


61, 










11 


rky. 


202 


Jul'y 


18 


8:59 a.m. 


61, 










7 


rky. 


203 


JulV 


18 


9:00 a.m. 


61, 










7 


rky. 


204 


July 


18 


9:01a.m. 


61, 










8 


rky. 


205 


July 


18 


9:02 a.m. 


61, 










8 


rky. 


206 


July 


18 


9:35 a.m. 


61, 










22 


rky. 


207 


July 


18 


9:36 a.m. 


61, 










20 


rky. 


208 


July 


21 


9:55 a.m. 


■il.i 


32 


56:9 


117 


2.5:8 


570 


gn. M. 


209 


July 


21 


10:31a.m. 


■llu 


32 


53.0 


117 


26.8 


660 


gn. M. 


210 


July 


21 


10:58 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


49.6 


117 


28.8 


790 


gn. M. 


211 


JulV 


22 


7:35 a.m. 


43,0 


32 


49.2 


117 


34.3 


800 


gn. M. 


212 


Aug. 


29 


8:00 a.m. 


51''' 


29 


7.0 


118 


17.0 


730 


bk. S. 


213 


Aufr. 


29 


8:25 a.m. 


51'= 


29 


7.1 


118 


17.0 


1610 


bk. gy. S. 




1909 


















214 


Feb. 


19 


6:35 a.m. 


44, 


32 


41.5 


117 


39.7 


11.35 




215 


June 


15 


11:25 a.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52.4 


117 


32.9 


760 


gn. M. 


216 


June 


16 


2:50 p.m. 


41,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


32.1 


760 


gn. M. 


217 


.Tune 


22 


4:20 a.m. 


42„ 


32 


53.1 


117 


36.4 


1015 


gn. M. 


218 


June 


24 


3:55 a.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


640 


gn. M. 


219 


July 


1 


10:05 a.m. 


52,„, 


32 


52.5 


118 


21.5 


970 


bk. S. 


220 


JulV 


2 


1:00 p.m. 


42» 


32 


41.2 


117 


32.3 


1115 


gn. M. 


221 


July 


2 


4:25 p.m. 


41, 


32 


40.0 


117 


26.0 


265 


gn. M. vl. Sp. 


222 


Aug. 


31 


12:52 p.m. 


53,, 


33 


1.0 


118 


24.5 


630 


bk. S. R. 


223 


Sept. 


1 


7:09 a.m. 


54,0 


32 


50.5 


118 


32.0 


115 


crs. bk. S. 


224 


Sept. 


1 


7:55 a.m. 


55,„ 


32 


52.1 


118 


35.5 


475 


ers. S. gn. M. 


225 


Sept. 


1 


8:22 a.m. 


55,0 


32 


51.2 


118 


35.5 


475 




226 


Sept. 


1 


10:34 a.m. 


56,, 


33 


0.0 


lis 


41.3 


650 


gn. M. S. R. 


227 


Sept. 


2 


9:50 a.m. 


59.5, 


32 


23.3 


118 


57.5 


2.58 


gn. M. 


228 


Sept. 


2 


10:09 a.m. 


60, 


32 


22.6 


118 


58.5 


320 




229 


Sept. 


2 


11:15 a.m. 


61, 


32 


18.7 


119 


3.0 


790 


gn. M. 


230 


Sept. 


2 


11:34 a.m. 


61, 


32 


20.6 


110 


3.8 


485 




231 


Sept. 


2 


11:55 a.m. 


60, 


32 


21.7 


119 


2.3 


1.55 


gn. M. S. 


232 


Sept. 


2 


12:07 p.m. 


60, 


32 


22.0 


119 


0.9 


240 


gn. M. S. 


233 


Sept. 


2 


12:20 p.m. 


60, 


32 


24.0 


119 


1.7 


92 




234 


Sept. 


2 


12:32 p.m. 


60, 


32 


26.0 


119 


2.3 


77 




235 


Sept. 


2 


1:05 p.m. 


60, 


32 


27.3 


119 


2.3 


92 




236 


Sept. 


2 


1:20 p.m. 


6]„ 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 


420 




237 


Sept. 


3 


8:12 a.m. 


49,0 


32 


49.4 


118 


3.8 


845 


gn. M. 


238 


Sept. 


3 


9:00 a.m. 


48,0 


32 


49.8 


118 


1.9 


730 


gn. M. 


239 


Sept. 


3 


9:14 a.m. 


48,0 


32 


50.1 


118 


1.5 


730 




240 


Nov. 


2 


6:00 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


685 


gn. M. 


241 


Nov. 


2 


12:01p.m. 


41,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


26.0 


100 




242 


Nov. 


2 


12:35 p.m. 


41, „, 


32 


52.5 


117 


25.1 


73 




243 


Nov. 


2 


12:48 p.m. 


41„ 


32 


53.2 


117 


24.0 


128 




244 


Nov. 


2 


12:57 p.m. 


41„ 


32 


53.7 


117 


22.6 


442 




245 


Nov. 


2 


1:12 p.m. 


40.5,, 


32 


.53.8 


117 


22.5 


365 


gn. M. 


246 


Nov. 


4 


11:20 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.4 


117 


30.6 


1260 


gn. M. 


247 


Nov. 


4 


11:52 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.6 


117 


30.3 


1190 


gn. M. 


248 


Nov. 


5 


8:40 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.5 


117 


29.0 


825 


gn. M. 


249 


Nov. 


5 


9:02 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.6 


117 


30.3 


1190 


gn. M. 


250 


Mar. 


16 


1:20 p.m. 


42, 


32 


39.7 


117 


27.7 


.550 




251 


Apr. 


20 


4:33 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


19.0 


365 


gn. M. 


252 


Aug. 


13 


11:03 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


158 


gn. M. 


253 


Aug. 


13 


4:20 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 


820 


gn. M. 


254 


Aug. 


14 


3:00 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


1150 


gn. M. 


255 


Aug. 


15 


1:18 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


117 


10.0 


300 




256 


1910 

Aug. 16 


10:10 a.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


1134 


gn. M. 


257 


Aug. 


16 


1:47 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


1134 


gn. M. 



1915] 



Michael, ct (//.: Hijflroyraphic Records of Scripps InsHfufion 



131 









Table 4.— 


SOUKDIXGS — (Coni 


iiiued) 






\- umber 


Da 


e 


Time 
nf 
da.v 


Sectio 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Character 

of 

bottom 


mnding 


1 N. latitude 


W.I 


ongitude 




1910 


















258 


Aug. 


17 


10:44 a.m. 


•105 


32 


23:4 




-° 18:2 


110 


gu. M. 


259 


Aug. 


17 


11:10 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


23.4 




- 18.2 


260 


gn. M. 


260 


Aug. 


18 


7:40 a.m. 


39; 


32 


23.3 




■ 14.5 


27 




261 


Aug. 


18 


7:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


23.3 




■ 15.2 


55 




262 


Aug. 


18 


8:53 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 




- 17.8 


147 




263 


Aug. 


18 


9:25 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 




■ 20.0 


370 




264 


Aug. 


18 


9:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.5 




■ 20.0 


370 




265 


Aug. 


18 


10:05 a.m. 


4O5 


32 


24.4 




■ 17.6 


73 




266 


Aug. 


18 


10:27 a.m. 


39^ 


32 


24.3 




■ 15.3 


37 




267 


Aug. 


18 


10:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


25.0 




■ 16.3 


92 




268 


Aug. 


18 


12:40 p.m. 


39, 


32 


3.5.1 




■ 14.8 


46 






1911 


















269 


June 


12 


11:45 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.9 




• 15.8 


55 


S. 


270 


June 


12 


11:59 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.8 




■ 16.0 


70 


S. 


271 


June 


12 


12:25 p.m. 


39, 


32 


22.6 




- 16.2 


73 


S. 


272 


June 


12 


1:00 p.m. 


39, 


32 


22.7 




- 16.7 


77 


S. 


273 


June 


12 


1:06 p.m. 


39, 


32 


22.3 




• 17.0 


82 


S. 


274 


June 


12 


1:18 p.m. 


39. 


32 


22.2 




• 17.2 


101 


S. 


275 


June 


12 


1:30 p.m. 


39, 


32 


22^0 




• 17.4 


119 


S. 


276 


June 


12 


1:45 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.9 




■ 17.6 


128 


S. 


277 


June 


12 


1:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.8 




• 17.9 


174 


S. 


278 


June 


12 


2:10 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.7 




■ 18.1 


300 


S. G. 


279 


June 


12 


2:28 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.5 




■ 18.4 


395 


gn. M. 8. 


280 


June 


12 


2:45 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.4 




" 18.6 


630 


gn. M. S. 


281 


June 


12 


3:05 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.2 




• 18.8 


840 


gn. M. 


282 


June 


12 


3:27 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.2 




• 19.1 


1090 


gn. M. 


283 


June 


12 


4:00 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.0 




■ 19.3 


1135 


gn. M. 


284 


June 


20 


8:. 55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


23.6 




■ 17.1 


110 


gn. M. 


285 


June 


21 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




• 21.2 


1280 


gu. M. 


286 


June 


21 


7:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




• 21.2 


1290 


gn. M. S. 


287 


June 


21 


8:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




■ 21.2 


1290 


gn. M. 


288 


June 


21 


8:55 a.m. 


•IO3 


32 


22.7 




■ 20.7 


1240 


gn. M. 


289 


June 


27 


6:00 a.m. 


39= 


32 


23.2 




14.7 


49 




290 


June 


27 


6:30 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.9 




■ 15.2 


57 




291 


June 


27 


7:10 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.6 




■ 15.6 


71 




292 


June 


27 


7:35 a.m. 


39, 


32 


22.2 




16.1 


75 




293 


.Tune 


27 


8:45 a.m. 


39, 


32 


21.6 




17.0 


110 




294 


.June 


27 


9:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.9 




18.1 


275 




295 


June 


27 


10:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.2 




19.0 


945 


gn. M. 


296 


June 


27 


1:52 p.m. 


40, 


32 


18.3 




21.8 


1190 


gn. M. 


297 


June 


27 


2:45 p.m. 


-n. 


32 


19.7 




22.8 


1390 


gn. M. 


298 


June 


27 


3:50 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.0 




21.1 


1390 


gn. M. 


299 


June 


27 


4:40 p.m. 


40, 


32 


21.6 




20.2 


1320 


gn. M. 


300 


.Tune 


27 


5:00 p.m. 


■10,5 


32 


22.5 




19.2 


840 


gn. M. 


301 


June 


28 


5:55 a.m. 


39^ 


32 


24.7 




15.6 


37 




302 


June 


28 


6:25 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 




16.4 


99 




303 


June 


28 


6:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


23.8 




16.7 


110 




304 


.Tune 


28 


7:30 a.m. 


39..5- 


32 


23.6 




17.5 


154 




305 


June 


28 


8:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.0 




18.5 


520 


gn. M. 


306 


June 


28 


8:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


26.0 




18.5 


66 




307 


June 


28 


9:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


26.1 




19.0 


97 




308 


June 


28 


9:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


25.7 




19.5 


240 




309 


June 


28 


10:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


25.3 




20.0 


665 




310 


June 


28 


10:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.7 




20.8 


1115 


gn. M. 


311 


.June 


28 


11:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.2 




21.8 


1270 




312 


June 


29 


7:00a.m. 


41, 


32 


26.6 




25.6 


1440 


gn. M. 


313 


June 


29 


9:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


33.2 




19.4 


195 




314 


June 


29 


10:10 a.m. 


40; 


32 


34.1 




18.6 


205 




315 


.Tune 


29 


10:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


34.8 




17.8 


106 




316 


June 


29 


n :15 a.m. 


39, 


32 


36.7 




16.1 


59 




317 


June 


29 


ll:.50a.m. 


39, 


32 


37.4 




14.6 


35 




318 


Aug. 


10 


10:10 a.m. 


41, 


32 


18.2 




24.7 


1480 


gn. M. 


319 


Aug. 


n 


5:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


20.9 




21.1 


1410 


gn. M. 


320 


Aug. 


11 


10:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.7 




19.2 


540 


gn. M. 


321 


Aug. 


11 


12:46 p.m. 


39, 


32 


23^5 




17.4 


110 


gn. M. 



132 



V niversitij of California PuhlicatioHS in Zoology 



Tablk 4. — SouxDiNfiS — (Concluded) 



[Vol. 15 



Number 


Date 


Time 
of 
day 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Character 

of 

bottom 


sounding 


N. latitude 


W. longitude 




1911 


















322 


Aug. 


11 


1:58 p.m. 


39: 


32° 


23:9 


117° 


17:0 


93 




323 


Aug. 


11 


2:37 p.m. 


39^ 


32 


24.2 


117 


16.5 


77 




324 


Aug. 


12 


4:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.2 


117 


15.0 


33 




325 


Aug. 


12 


5:12 a.m. 


39; 


32 


24.6 


117 


15.8 


26 




326 


Aug. 


12 


6:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


31.4 


117 


21.5 


380 




327 


Aug. 


12 


8:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


32.6 


117 


20.2 


124 




328 


Aug. 


12 


9:20 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


31.9 


117 


20.5 


610 




329 


Aug. 


12 


10:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


33.6 


117 


18.0 


117 




330 


Aug. 


12 


11:26 a.m. 


39, 


32 


34.0 


117 


16.9 


97 




331 


Aug. 


12 


12:30 p.m. 


39, 


32 


37.3 


117 


16.0 


48 




332 


Aug. 


12 


12:56 p.m. 


39, 


32 


37.1 


117 


14.9 


33 




333 


191 
Feb. 


"lO 


8:25 a.m. 


(38). 


32 


28.0 


117 


11.2 


31 


rky. 


334 


Mar. 


23 


7:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


24.0 


117 


18.0 


108 


gn.M. 


335 


Apr. 


26 


6:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


iS.O 


137 


gn. M. 


336 


July 


16 


6:20 a.m. 


(39.) 


32 


43.4 


117 


16.8 


37 




337 


.TulV 


16 


6:25 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


43.5 


117 


17.1 


51 




338 


JulV 


16 


6:30 a.m. 


(39.) 


32 


43.5 


117 


17.4 


55 




33!) 


July 


16 


6:36 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43.6 


117 


17.7 


57 




340 


Jul'y 


16 


6:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43.7 


117 


18.0 


57 




341 


JulV 


16 


6:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43.7 


117 


18.3 


68 




342 


July 


16 


6:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43.8 


117 


18.6 


71 




343 


July 


16 


7:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43.9 


117 


18.9 


73 




344 


July 


16 


7:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43.9 


117 


19.2 


79 




345 


July 


16 


7:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.0 


117 


19.5 


81 




346 


JulV 


16 


7:22 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


19.8 


85 




347 


JulV 


16 


7:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


85 




348 


JulV 


16 


7:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.2 


117 


20.2 


86 




349 


JulV 


16 


7:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.3 


117 


20.7 


95 




350 


JulV 


16 


7:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.3 


117 


20.9 


97 




351 


July 


16 


7:55 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.4 


117 


21.2 


99 




352 


July 


16 


8:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.5 


117 


21.6 


99 




353 


July 


16 


8:20 a.m. 


41, 


32 


44.8 


117 


23.3 


245 




354 


July 


16 


8:36 a.m. 


41, 


32 


45.1 


117 


24.4 


400 




355 


JulV 


16 


8:47 a.m. 


41, 


32 


45.5 


117 


25.5 


485 




356 


July 


16 


9:13 a.m. 


41, 


32 


45.7 


117 


26.8 


570 




357 


July 


16 


9:38 a.m. 


42, 


32 


46.0 


117 


28.5 


770 




358 


July 


16 


10:03 a.m. 


42, 


32 


46.2 


117 


29.7 


785 




359 


JulV 


16 


10:54 a.m. 


42, 


32 


46.5 


117 


30.9 


780 




360 


JulV 


16 


11:26 a.m. 


43, 


32 


47.0 


117 


33.0 


860 




361 


JulV 


16 


12:05 p.m. 


43,, 


32 


47.5 


117 


35.2 


955 




362 


July 


17 


7:45 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


43.5 


117 


17.1 


46 




363 


JulV 


17 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43.7 


117 


18.3 


68 




364 


July 


17 


9:14 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


85 




365 


JulV 


17 


10:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.5 


117 


21.6 


99 




366 


July 


17 


10:40 a.m. 


41, 


32 


45.0 


117 


24.0 


340 




367 


July 


17 


11:59 a.m. 


41, 


32 


46.2 


117 


22.4 


123 




368 


JulV 


22 


6:10 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


43.2 


117 


16^7 


22 




369 


JulV 


22 


6:30 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


43.0 


117 


16.0 


11 




370 


July 


22 


7:30 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 


43.5 


117 


17.1 


46 




371 


July 


22 


8:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


43.7 


117 


1S.3 


68 




372 


July 


22 


9:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.1 


117 


20.0 


79 




373 


July 


22 


9:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


44.5 


117 


21.6 


106 




374 


July 


22 


10:20 a.m. 


41, 


32 


45.0 


117 


24.1 


375 




375 


July 


22 


11:15 a.m. 


41, 


32 


4.5.5 


117 


26.4 


530 




376 


Aug. 


"3 


10:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.0 


117 


19.2 


550 


gn. M. 



I 



1915] Michael, et al.: Hydroyrapliic liecords of Scripps Iiistihidou 133 



C. Biological Field Data 

EXPLANATION OF TABLE 5. PART A 
This part includes all the field data relative to the plankton col- 
lected prior to July 12, 1908, the collections being mainly of a pre- 
liminary nature. 

First column. — Numbers under which the collections were accessioned; they 
are arranged, as a rule, according to date from May 16, 1904, to May 20, 1905, 
then from May 22, 1901, to January 5, 1904, then from June 19, 1905, to July 29, 
1907, then from June 11 to June 12, 1908, and finally from November 2 to 
November 3, 1907. 

Second column. — Ajii)aratus used in making the hauls: 000, 8, 12, and 20 refer 
to tow-nets (see p. 9) of the mesh indicated having the dimensions given in 
Appendix I. K.B. refers to the Kofoid water bottle (see p. 11). P.P., P. 12, 
P.20, and P.D. refer to the sub-surface pump (see p. 11), the F indicating that 
the water was filtered through filter paper, the 12 through No. 12 netting, and 
the 20 through No. 20 netting, while the D indicates that after settling the 
water was decanted. 

Third column. — Date. 

Fourth column. — Time and duration of haul entered to the nearest five minutes, 
which is as close as it was ever originally recorded. 

Fifth column. — Section; for explanation see page 46. 

Sixth and seventh columns. — Latitude and longitude entered usually to the 
nearest 0;i ; the position is probably not accurate to more than 0.5 miles. 

Eighth column. — Depth at beginning and end of haul entered to the nearest 
meter above and to the nearest five below 100 meters; the error is probably 
greater than this would indicate. 

Ninth column. — Miscellaneous remarks relative to hauls. 



134 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Appa- 
Haul ratus 
number used 



000 

20 

20 

20 

20 

000 

20 

20 

20 

20 

000 

000 

000 

20 

20 

20 

20 

000 

000 

000 

20 

20 

20 

20 

20 

20 

000 

20 

20 

000 

20 

20 

20 

20 

000 

000 

20 

20 

000 

20 

20 

20 

20 

000 

000 

000 

20 

000 

20 

20 

000 

20 

20 

000 

12 

12 

000 

20 

20 

20 

000 

000 

12 

12 



Date 
1904 
May 16 
May 16 
May 16 
May 16 
May 16 
May 18 
May 18 
May 18 
May 18 
May 18 
May 18 
May 20 
May 20 
May 20 
May 20 
May 20 
May 20 
May 24 
May 24 
May 24 
May 24 
May 24 
May 24 
May 24 
May 24 
May 24 
May 26 
May 26 
May 26 
May 26 
May 26 
May 26 
May 28 
May 28 
May 28 
May 28 
Mav 28 
May 28 
May 28 
May 31 
May 31 
May 31 
May 31 
May 31 
May 31 
May 31 
May 31 
.Tune 2 
June 2 
.June 2 
June 2 
.Tune 2 
June 2 
.Tune 2 
.June 8 
June 8 
June 8 
June 
June 
.Tune 
June 
.Tune 
June 
June 



Table 5 — Data Relative to Piankton Hauls 

Part A — PreJimiitary Plaiilton Collections 

Time of day Position Depth 

and 
duration of haul 



6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 



6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 



6:00 a.m. 



6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 



6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 



6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 



6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 



6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 



6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 



Section 


N lat. 


Wl 


rag. 


meters 


Remarks 


41, 


32° 


35:8 


117° 


23:8 


210-0 




■ill 


32 


35.8 


117 


23.8 


120-0 




■il. 


32 


35.8 


117 


23.8 


165-0 




41, 


32 


35.8 


117 


23.8 


120-0 


Hauls 4-5 made 


•11, 


32 


35.8 


117 


23.8 


165-0 


between 6:00 


41, 


32 


39.6 


117 


26.0 


165-0 


and 9:00 a.m. 


■lis 


32 


39.6 


117 


26.0 


92-0 




■lis 


32 


39.6 


117 


26.0 


120-0 




■lis 


32 


39.6 


117 


26.0 


130-0 


Hauls 9-11 made 


41, 


32 


.39.6 


117 


26.0 


16.5-0 


between 6:00 


41, 


32 


39.6 


117 


26.0 


210-0 


and 9 :00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


33.2 


117 


22.1 


200-0 




40, 


32 


33.2 


117 


22.1 


230-0 


Hauls 13, 16, and 


40, 


32 


33.2 


117 


22.1 


110-0 


17 made between 


40, 


32 


33.2 


117 


22!l 


13.5-0 


6:00 and 9:00 


40, 


32 


33.2 


117 


22.1 


155-0 


a.m. 


40, 


32 


33.2 


117 


22.1 


18.5-0 




41, 


32 


3.5.7 


117 


25.0 


18.5-0 




41, 


32 


35.7 


117 


25.0 


200-0 


Hauls 19, 20, and 


41, 


32 


35.7 


117 


25.0 


220-0 


23-26 made be- 


41, 


32 


35.7 


117 


25.0 


110-0 


tween 6:00 and 


41, 


32 


35.7 


117 


25.0 


130-0 


9:00 a.m. 


41, 


32 


35.7 


117 


25.0 


13.5-0 




41, 


32 


35.7 


117 


25.0 


165-0 




41, 


32 


35.7 


117 


25.0 


14.5-0 




41, 


32 


35.7 


117 


25.0 


185-0 




40, 


32 


37.7 


117 


21.3 


210-0 




40, 


32 


37.7 


117 


21.3 


17.5-0 




40, 


32 


37.7 


117 


21.3 


13.5-0 




40, 


32 


37.7 


117 


21.3 


210-0 


Hauls 30-32 made 


40, 


32 


37.7 


117 


21.2 


17.5-0 


between 6:00 


40, 


32 


37.7 


117 


21.3 


135-0 


and 9:00 a.m. 


41, 


32 


42.3 


117 


26.1 


100-0 




41, 


32 


42.3 


117 


26.1 


135-0 




41, 


32 


42.3 


117 


26.1 


17.5-0 




41, 


32 


42.3 


117 


26.1 


210-0 


Hauls 36-38 made 


41, 


32 


42.3 


117 


26.1 


13.5-0 


between 6:00 


41, 


32 


42.3 


117 


26.1 


175-0 


and 9:00 a.m. 


41, 


32 


42.3 


117 


26.1 





25 min. tow, prob- 


41, 


32 


42.0 


117 


24.9 


25.5-0 


ably bet. 9:00 


41, 


32 


42.0 


117 


24.9 


220-0 


and 10:00 a.m. 


41, 


32 


42.0 


117 


24.9 


290-0 


Hauls 43-44, 46- 


41, 


32 


42.0 


117 


24.9 


340-0 


48 made between 


41, 


32 


42.0 


117 


24.9 


38.5-0 


6:00 and 9:00 


41, 


32 


42.0 


117 


24.9 


290-0 


a.m. 


41, 


32 


42.0 


117 


24.9 


18 




41, 


32 


42.0 


117 


24.9 







41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


23.9 


300-0 




41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


23.9 


250-0 




41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


23.9 


190-0 




41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


23.9 


38.5-0 


Hauls 53-56 made 


41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


23.9 


330-0 


between 6:00 


41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


23.9 


27.5-0 


and 9:00 a.m. 


41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


23.9 


46 


20 minute tow 


40, 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 


15.5-0 


Hauls 57-63 made 


40, 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 


245-0 


between 6:00 


40, 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 


290-0 


and 10:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 


28.5-0 




40, 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 


210-0 




(39,) 


32 


39.1 


117 


14.0 







(39,) 


32 


39.1 


117 


14.0 







41, 


32 


40.2 


117 


24.7 


18.5-0 


Hauls 64-71 made 


41, 


32 


40.2 


117 


24.7 


13.5-0 


between 6:00 


41, 


32 


40.2 


117 


24.7 





and 9:00 a.m. 



i 



1915] 



Michael, et ah: Hydrographic Records of Scripps Listitiiiion 



135 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 

Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 

Appa- Timeofdav Position Depth 

Haul ratus and , * , in 

number used Date duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters Remarks 
1904 

67 12 June 9 41, 32° 40:2 117° 24:7 64-0 

68 20 June 9 41, 32 40.2 117 24.7 175-0 

69 20 June 9 41, 32 40.2 117 24.7 100-0 

70 000 June 9 41, 32 40.2 117 24.7 

71 20 June 9 41, 32 40.2 117 24.7 

72 12 June 10 10:00 a.m. 41, 32 46.8 117 26.0 110-0 

73 20 June 10 10:00 a.m. 41, 32 46.8 117 26.0 110-0 

74 20 June 10 10:00 a.m. 41, 32 46.8 117 26.0 175-0 

75 12 June 10 41„ 32 46.8 117 26.0 145-0 Hauls 75-79 made 

75a 20 June 10 .41, 32 46.8 117 26.0 14.5-0 between 10:00 

76 000 June 10 41, 32 46.8 117 26.0 185-0 a.m. and noon 

77 000 June 10 41, 32 46.8 117 26.0 20 minute tow 

78 20 June 10 41, 32 46.8 117 26.0 15 minute tow 

79 12 June 10 41, 32 46.8 117 26.0 15 minute tow 

80 20 June 14 41, 32 43.3 117 26.3 165-0 Hauls 80-87 made 

81 20 June 14 41, 32 43.3 117 26.3 100-0 between 6:00 

82 12 June 14 41, 32 43.3 117 26.3 64-0 a.m. and noon 

83 12 June 14 41, 32 43.3 117 26.3 135-0 

84 000 June 14 41, 32 43.3 117 26.3 175-0 

85 000 June 14 41, 32 43.3 117 26.3 20 minute tow 

86 20 June 14 41, 32 43.3 117 26.3 15 minute tow 

87 12 June 14 41, 32 43.3 117 26.3 15 minute tow 

88 000 June 16 40, 32 31.6 117 18.6 82-0 Hauls 88-97a made 

89 20 June 16 40„ 32 31.6 117 18.6 100-0 between 6:00 

90 12 June 16 40, 32 31.6 117 18.6 46-0 and 9:00 a.m. 

91 20 June 16 40, 32 31.6 117 18.6 64-0 

92 12 June 16 40, 32 31.6 117 18.6 82-0 

93 20 June 16 (39,) 32 42.0 117 17.0 

94 12 June 16 (39,) 32 42.0 117 17.0 

95 000 June 16 (39,) 32 42.0 117 17.0 

96 20 June 16 (39,) 32 42.0 117 16.0 

97 000 June 16 40, 32 32.4 117 18.2 110-0 

'97a 12 June 16 10:00-? a.m. B 32 40.7 117 10.2 

98 000 June 18 40,, 32 32.5 117 18.6 190-0 Hauls 98-106 made 

99 20 June 18 40,, 32 32.5 117 18.6 185-0 between 6:00 

100 12 June 18 40, ^ 32 32.5 117 18.6 145-0 and 9:00 a.m. 

101 20 June 18 40„ , 32 32.5 117 18.6 110-0 

102 20 June 18 40, s 32 32.5 117 18.6 73-0 

103 000 June 18 40,', 32 32.5 117 18.6 

104 12 June 18 40,5 32 32.5 117 18.6 

105 20 June 18 40,^ 32 32.5 117 18.6 

106 20 June 18 (39,) 32 42.0 117 16.0 

107 000 June 21 40, 32 29.3 117 19.0 310-0 Hauls 107-114 

108 20 June 21 40, 32 29.3 117 19.0 300-0 made between 

109 12 June 21 40, 32 29.3 117 19,0 25.5-0 6:00 and 9:00 

110 20 June 21 40, 32 29.3 117 19.0 210-0 a.m. 

111 12 June 21 40, 32 29.3 117 19.0 165-0 

112 000 June 21 40, 32 29.3 117 19.0 18 

113 12 June 21 40, 32 29.3 117 19.0 4 

114 20 June 21 40, 32 29.3 117 19.0 

115 000 June 23 8:15-? a.m. 42, 32 42.8 117 29.5 18 Hauls 118-122 

116 12 June 23 8:15-? a.m. 42, 32 42.8 117 29.5 4 made between 

117 20 June23 8:15-?a.m. 42, 32 42.8 117 29.5 8:00 a.m. and 

118 000 June 23 42, 32 42.8 117 29.5 36.5-0 noon 

119 20 June 23 42, 32 42.8 117 29.5 3.5.5-0 

120 12 June 23 42, 32 42.8 117 29.5 310-0 

121 20 June 23 42, 32 42.8 117 29.5 265-0 

122 12 June 23 42, 32 42.8 117 29.5 210-0 

124 000 June 24 10:30-11:45 p.m. 40, 32 36.2 117 21.5 

125 12 June 24 10:30-11:45 p.m. 40, 32 36.2 117 21.5 

126 20 June 24 10:30-11:45 p.m. 40, 32 36.2 117 21.5 

127 000 June 24 40, 32 36.2 117 21.5 

* This haul was originally accessioned under the number, 100a. 



136 



University of California PublicaUons in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



128 


20 


129 


20 


130 


12 


131 


000 


132 


000 


133 


12 


134 


12 


135 


000 


136 


20 


137 


12 


138 


20 


139 


12 


140 


000 


141 


20 


142 


12 


143 


000 


144 


20 


145 


12 


146 


12 


147 


20 


148 


12 


149 


20 


150 


000 


151 


000 


152 


20 


153 


12 


154 


20 


155 


12 


156 


000 


157 


12 


158 


000 


159 


12 


160 


20 


161 


12 


162 


12 


163 


12 


164 


20 


165 


20 


166 


20 


167 


12 


168 


20 


169 


12 


170 


20 


171 


12 


172 


20 


173 


12 


174 


20 


175 


000 


176 


20 


177 


12 


178 


000 


179 


000 


180 


12 


181 


20 


182 


000 


183 


20 


184 


12 


185 


000 


186 


12 


187 


20 


188 


000 


189 


12 


106 


000 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 

Part A — PreUminary Plankton Collections 

Time of day 
and 

Date duration of haul Section 
1904 

June 28 7:00 a.m. 41, 

June 28 7:00 a.m. 4:, 

June 28 7:00 a.m. 41, 

June 28 7:00 a.m. 41, 

June 28 41; 

June 28 41, 

June 28 7:30-? a.m. 41, 

June 30 8:30 a.m. 41.5,, 

June 30 8:30 a.m. 41.5, 

June 30 8:30 a.m. 41.-5, 

.Tune 30 41..5, 

.Tune 30 41..5, 

June 30 41..5, 

June 30 41.5, 

June 30 41..5„ 

July 5 10:00 a.m. 41, 

July 5 10:00 a.m. 41, 

July 5 10:00 a.m. 41, 

July 5 41, 

July 5 41, 

July 5 41, 

July 5 41, 

July 5 41, 

July 7 6:45 a.m. 41, 

July 7 6:45 a.m. 41, 

July 7 6:45 a.m. 41, 

July 7 41, 

July 7 41, 

July 7 8:30-9:00 a.m. 41, 

July 7 8:30-9:00 a.m. 41, 

July 7 9:10-9:30 a.m. 41, 

July 7 9:10-9:30 a.m. 41, 

July 7 9:10-9:30 a.m. 41, 

July 9 6:00 a.m. 40, 

July 9 40, 

July 9 40, 

July 9 6:00 a.m. 40, 

July 9 40, 

July 9 40, 

July 9 40, 

July 9 40, 

July 9 40, 

July 9 40, 

July 12 8:30 a.m. 41, 

July 12 8:30 a.m. 41„ 

July 12 8:40 a.m. 41„ 

.July 12 8:40 a.m. 41„ 

July 12 8:40 a.m. 41„ 

July 12 8:50-? a.m. 41„ 

July 12 8:50-? a.m. 4]„ 

July 12 8:50-? a.m. 41, 

July 12 10:00-! a.m. (.39.) 

July 12 10:00-? a.m. (.39.) 

July 12 10:00-10:05 a.m. (.39.) 

July 14 7:00 a.m. ."iO, 

July 14 7:00 a.m. 39, 

July 14 7:00 a.m. 39, 

July 14 7:30-? a.m. 39, 

July 14 7:30-? a.m. 39, 

JulV 14 7:30-? a.m. 39, 

July 14 8:00-? a.m. .39, 

July 14 8:00-? a.m. 39, 

July 16 7:30-? a.m. 40.5, 



Pos 


jtion 




Deptll 
meters 




Nlat. 


W long. 


Remarks 


32° 36ri 


117° 


22:7 


120-0 




32 36.1 


117 


22.7 


18.5-0 




32 36.1 


117 


22.7 


82-0 




32 36.1 


117 


22.7 


190-0 




32 36.1 


117 


22.7 





Hauls 132-134 


32 36.1 


117 


22.7 


155-0 


made between 


32 36.1 


117 


22.7 





7:00 a.m. and 


32 44.7 


117 


27.5 


310-0 


noon 


32 44.7 


117 


27.5 


300-0 




32 44.7 


117 


27.5 


25.5-0 




32 44.7 


117 


27.5 


210-0 


Hauls 138-142 


32 44.7 


117 


27.5 


165-0 


made between 


32 44.7 


117 


27.5 





8:30 a.m. and 


32 44.7 


117 


27.5 





noon 


32 44.7 


117 


27.5 







32 40.0 


117 


26.4 


36.5-0 




32 40.0 


117 


26.4 


35.5-0 




32 40.0 


117 


26.4 


290-0 




32 40.0 


117 


26.4 


18.5-0 


Hauls 146-1.50 


32 40.0 


117 


26.4 


240-0 


made between 


32 40.0 


117 


26.4 





10:00 a.m. and 


32 40.0 


117 


26.4 





2:00 p.m. 


.32 40.0 


117 


26.4 







32 36 


117 


27 


16.5-0 




32 36 


117 


27 


150-0 




32 36 


117 


27 


120-0 




32 36 


117 


27 


82-0 


Hauls 1.54 and 155 


32 36 


117 


27 


46-0 


made between 


32 36 


117 


27 


18 


7:00 and 8:00 


32 36 


117 


27 





a.m. 


32 36 


117 


27 


9 




32 36 


117 


27 







32 36 


117 


27 







32 34 2 


117 


19.5 


1.55-0 




32 34.2 


117 


19.5 


18.5-0 


Hauls 162-170 


32 342 


117 


19.5 


130-0 


made between 


32 34 2 


117 


19.5 


92-0 


6:00 a.m. and 


32 34.2 


117 


19.5 


82-0 


noon 


32 34.2 


117 


19.5 


16.5-0 




32 34.2 


117 


19.5 







32 34.2 


117 


19.5 







32 34.2 


117 


19.5 







32 34.2 


117 


19.5 







32 30 


117 


23 


46-0 




32 30 


117 


23 


100-0 




32 30 


117 


23 


13.5-0 




32 30 


117 


23 


175-0 




32 30 


117 


23 


190-0 




32 30 


117 


23 





Hauls 176-178 


32 30 


117 


23 





ended before 


32 30 


117 


23 





10:00 a.m. 


32 43.0 


117 


17.0 







32 43.0 


117 


17.0 







32 43.0 


117 


16.0 





Towed from row- 


32 32 8 


117 


15.0 


82-0 


boat in "brown 


32 32.8 


117 


15.0 


73-0 


water ' ' 


32 32.8 


117 


1.5.0 


46-0 




32 32 8 


117 


15.0 





ended before 


32 32.8 


117 


15.0 





8:00 a.m. 


32 32 8 


117 


1.5.0 





Hauls 18.5-187 


32 32 8 


117 


1.5.0 







32 32.8 


117 


15.0 







32 36.5 


117 


17.5 





Towed in ' ' red 
water' ' 



1915] Micliael, et al.: Iliiclrof/rapJiic Bccords of Scripps Iiislitiitiou 1:37 

Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 

Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 

Appa- Timeofdav Position Deptli 

Haul ratus and , * > in 

umber used Date duration of Iiaul Section N lat. W long. meters Remarks 
1904 

107 000 July 19 8:30-'? p.m. 

198 000 July 19 

]ii9 000 July 19 

201 000 July 19 11:45 p.m.-? 

202 12 July 19 11:45 p.m.-f 
20.3 000 July 21 6:00 a.m. 

206 20 July 21 6:00 a.m. 

207 12 July 21 6:00 a.m. 

208 20 July 21 6:00 a.m. 

209 12 July 21 6:00 a.m. 

210 000 July 21 7:00-? a.iu. 

211 000 July 21 7:30-? a.m. 

212 20 July 21 7:30-? a.m. 

213 12 July 21 7:30-? a.m. 

214 12 July 21 7:30-? a.m. 
21.'5 000 July 21 7:50-? a.m. 

216 000 July 23 9:30-? p.m. 

217 000 July 23 

218 000 July 23 

219 000 July 23 

220 12 July 23 0:30-? p.m. 

221 12 July 23 9:30-? p.m. 

222 000 JulV 26 7:30 a.m. 

223 20 July 26 7:30 a.m. 

224 20 July 26 7:30 a.m. 

225 12 July 26 7:30 a.m. 

226 000 July 26 

227 12 July 26 

228 000 July 26 

229 12 July 26 

230 000 July 28 6:00-? a.m. 

231 000 July 28 

232 000 July 28 

233 000 July 28 

234 000 Aug. 8 9:30-? a.m. 

235 000 Aug. S 

236 000 Aug. 8 

237 20 Aug. 19 7:00-? a.m. 

238 000 Aug. 19 7:00-? a.m. 

239 000 Aug. 19 

240 000 Aug. 19 

241 000 Aug. 19 

242 000 Aug. 19 

243 000 Aug. 19 

244 12 Aug. 19 

245 000 Aug. 27 7:00-? a.m. 

246 12 Aug. 27 7:00-? a.m. 

247 20 Aug. 27 7:00-? a.m. 

248 000 Aug. 27 

249 000 Aug. 27 

250 000 Aug. 27 

251 000 Aug. 27 

252i 000 Sept. 2 5:30-6:00 a.m. 

253 12 Sept. 2 5:30-6:00 a.m. 

2.54 20 Sept. 2 5:30-6:00 a.m. 

255 000 Sept. 2 6:10-6:30 a.m. 

2.56 12 Sept. 2 6:10-6:30 a.m. 

257 20 Sept. 2 6:10-6:30 a.m. 

258 12 Sept. 2 6:50-7:20 a.m. 

259 20 Sept. 2 6:50-7:20 a.m. B 32 42.0 117 14.3 



40.5; 


32° 


36:5 


117° 


17:5 


9 


Haul ended before 
11:45 p.m. 


40.5, 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.5 


9 


Hauls 198-199 


40.5, 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.5 


18 


made between 


40.5, 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.5 


6 


8:30 and 11:45 


40.5, 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.5 





p.m. 


41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 


185-0 




41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 


16.5-0 




41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 


130-0 




41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 


92-0 




41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 


55-0 




41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 


IS 


Haul ended before 
7:30 a.m. 


41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 


9 


Hauls 211-214 


41; 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 





ended before 


41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 





7:50 a.m. 


41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 







41, 


32 


37.1 


117 


23.6 


4 




40, 


32 


35.0 


117 


18.8 





Hauls 216-221 


40, 


32 


35.0 


117 


18.8 


9 


made between 


40, 


32 


35.0 


117 


18.8 


9 


9:30 p.m. and 


40, 


32 


35.0 


117 


18.8 


18 


12:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


35.0 


117 


18.8 







40, 


32 


3.5.0 


117 


18.8 







41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


25.0 


185-0 




41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


25.0 


165-0 




41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


25.0 


92-0 




41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


25.0 


55-0 




41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


25.0 


18 


Hauls 226-229 


41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


25.0 





made between 


41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


25.0 





7:30 and 10:30 


41, 


32 


38.5 


117 


25.0 





a.m. 


40, 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.7 





Hauls 230-233 


40, 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.7 





made between 


40, 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.7 





6:00 and 10:00 


40, 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.7 





a.m. 


40, 


32 


34.2 


117 


19.5 


9 


Hauls 234-236 


40, 


32 


34.2 


117 


19.5 


18 


made between 


40, 


32 


34.2 


117 


19.5 


4 


9:30 and 11:30 
a.m. 


40, 


32 


38.7 


117 


22.2 





Hauls 237-244 


40, 


32 


38.7 


117 


22.2 


9 


made between 


40, 


32 


38.7 


117 


22.2 


9 


7:00 and 10:00 


40, 


32 


38.7 


117 


22.2 


4 


a.m. 


40, 


32 


38.7 


117 


22.2 


18 




40, 


32 


38.7 


117 


22.2 







40, 


32 


38.7 


117 


22.2 


4 




40, 


32 


38.7 


117 


22.2 







40, 


32 


36.7 


117 


20.7 





Hauls 24:3-251 


40, 


32 


36.7 


117 


20.7 





made between 


40, 


32 


36.7 


117 


20.7 





7:00 and 10:00 


40; 


32 


36.7 


117 


20.7 





a.m. 


40; 


32 


36.7 


117 


20.7 


9 




40, 


32 


36.7 


117 


20.7 


9 




40, 


32 


36.7 


117 


20.7 


IS 




B 


32 


41.1 


117 


14.0 







B 


32 


41.1 


117 


14.0 







B 


32 


41.1 


117 


14.0 







B 


32 


41.6 


117 


14.2 


10 




B 


32 


41.6 


117 


14.2 







B 


32 


41.6 


117 


14.2 







B 


32 


42.0 


117 


14.3 








138 



University of CaJiforma Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Haul 


ratus 


umber 


used 


260 


000 


261 


000 


262 


000 


263 


000 


264 


000 


265 


12 


266 


12 


267 


20 


268 


20 


269 


12 


270 


12 


271 


20 


272 


20 


273 


000 


274 


000 


275 


000 


276 


20 


277 


12 


278 


12 


279 


20 


280 


000 


281 


000 


282 


000 


283 


20 


284 


12 


285 


12 


286 


000 


287 


000 


288 


000 


289 


000 


290 


000 


291 


000 


292 


20 


293 


20 


294 


12 


295 


12 


296 


12 


297 


000 


298 


000 


299 


000 


300 


12 


301 


12 


302 


12 


303 


20 


304 


20 


305 


000 


306 


000 


307 


000 


308 


20 


309 


20 


310 


12 


311 


12 


312 


12 


313 


000 


314 


000 


315 


000 


316 


20 


317 


20 


318 


12 


319 


12 


320 


12 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 

Part A — PreJiminary Plankton Collections 

Time of day Position 

and , « , 

Date duration of haul Section N lat. W long. 
1904 

Sept. 2 B 32°4i:6 117° 14:2 

Sept. 10 6:00 a.m. ' 40, 32 37.4 117 22.3 

Sept. 10 40, 32 37.4 117 22.3 

Sept. 10 40, 32 37.4 117 22.3 

Sept. 10 40, 32 37.4 117 22.3 

Sept. 10 6:00 a.m. 40, 32 37.4 117 22.3 

Sept. 10 40, 32 37.4 117 22.3 

Sept. 10 6:00 a.m. 40, 32 37.4 117 22.3 

Sept. 10 40, 32 37.4 117 22.3 

Sept. 17 6:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Sept. 17 9:40-10:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Sept. 17 6:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Sept. 17 9:40-10:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Sept. 17 6:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Sept. 17 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Sept. 17 9:40-10:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Sept. 24 6:00 a.m. 41, 32 45.4 117 23.5 

Sept. 24 6:00 a.m. 41„ 32 45.4 117 23.5 

Sept. 24 41„ 32 45.4 117 23.5 

Sept. 24 41, 32 4.5.5 117 23.5 

Sept. 24 6:00 a.m. 41, 32 45.4 117 23.5 

Sept. 24 41, 32 4.5.4 117 23.5 

Sept. 24 41, 32 45.4 117 23.5 

Oct. • 1 8:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Oct. 1 8:00a.m. 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Oct. 1 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Oct. 1 8:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Oct. 1 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Oct. 1 41, 32 38.6 117 24.0 

Oct. 20 9:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.5 117 25.0 

Oct. 20 : 41, 32 38.5 117 2.5.0 

Oct. 20 41, 32 38.5 117 25.0 

Oct. 20 9:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.5 117 25.0 

Oct. 20 41, 32 38.5 117 25.0 

Oct. 20 9:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.5 117 25.0 

Oct. 20 41, 32 38.5 117 2.5.0 

Oct. 20 41, 32 38.5 117 25.0 

Oct. 28 9:45 a.m. 41, 32 34.6 117 24.8 

Oct. 28 41, 32 34.6 117 24.8 

Oct. 28 12:10-12:30 p.m. 41, 32 34.6 117 24.8 

Oct. 28 9:45 a.m. 41, 32 34.6 117 24.8 

Oct. 28 4], 32 34.6 117 24.8 

Oct. 28 12:10-12:30 p.m. 41, 32 34.6 117 24.8 

Oct. 28 9:45 a.m. 41, 32 .34.6 117 24.8 

Oct. 28 12:10-12:30 p.m. 41, 32 34.6 117 24.8 

Nov. 4 10:30 a.m. 41, 32 42.3 117 26.0 

Nov. 4 41, 32 42.3 117 26.0 

Nov. 4 12:40-1:00 p.m. 41, 32 42.3 117 26.0 

Nov. 4 10:30 a.m. 41, 32 42.3 117 26.0 

Nov. 4 12:40-1 :00 p.m. 41, 32 42.3 117 26.0 

Nov. 4 10:30 a.m. 41, 32 42.3 117 26.0 

Nov. 4 41, 32 42.3 117 26.0 

Nov. 4 12:40-1:00 p.m. 41, 32 42.3 117 26.0 

Nov. 12 7:00 a.m. 40, 32 44.0 117 21.3 

Nov. 12 40, 32 44.0 117 21.3 

Nov. 12 10:40-11:00 a.m. 40„ 32 44.0 117 21.3 

Nov. 12 7:00 a.m. 40, 32 44.0 117 21.3 

Nov. 12 10:40-11:00 a.m. 40, 32 44.0 117 21.3 

Nov. 12 7:00a.m. 40„ 32 44.0 117 21.3 

Nov. 12 40, 32 44.0 117 21.3 

Nov. 12 10:40-11:00 a.m. 40, 32 44.0 117 21.3 



Deptll 




meters 


Remarks 


10 


Made between 7:20 




and 8:30 a.m. 


165-0 


Hauls 261-268 


18 


made between 


92-0 


6:00 and 9:00 





a.m. 


92-0 




92-0 




130-0 









110-0 




4 




14.5-0 









18.5-0 




18 


Made between 6:00 





and 9:40 a.m. 


13.5-0 


Hauls 276-282 


100-0 


made between 


9 


6:00 and 10:00 





a.m. 


17.5-0 




IS 




9 




130-0 


Hauls 283-288 


92-0 


made between 





S:00 a.m. and 


165-0 


noon 


18 









14.5-0 


Hauls 289-296 


18 


made between 


9 


9:00 a.m. and 


110-0 


noon 


4 




73-0 




9 




4 




16.5-0 




IS 


Hauls 298 and 301 





made between 


92-0 


9:45 a.m. and 





12:10 p.m. 







130-0 









16.5-0 




18 


Made between 





10:30 a.m. and 


130-0 


12:40 p.m. 







92-0 




9 


Made between 





10:30 a.m. and 


110-0 


12:40 p.m. 


18 


Made between 





7:00 and 10:40 


82-0 


a.m. 







46-0 




9 


Made between 7:00 





and 10:40 a.m. 



1915] Michael, et al.: Tlydrngmphk Records of Scripps Inslitution 139 

Table 5. — Data Relative to Plaxkton Hauls — {Continued) 
Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 
Time of day Position Depth 



Haul ratu 



.■121 


000 


322 


000 


323 


000 


324 


20 


325 


20 


326 


12 


327 


12 


328 


12 


329 


000 


330 


000 


331 


000 


332 


20 


333 


20 


334 


12 


335 


12 


336 


12 


337 


000 


338 


000 


339 


000 


340 


20 


341 


20 


342 


20 


343 


12 


344 


12 


345 


12 


346 


000 


347 


000 


348 


000 


340 


20 


350 


20 


351 


12 


352 


12 


353 


12 


354 


000 


355 


000 


356 


000 


357 


20 


358 


20 


359 


12 


360 


12 


361 


12 


362 


000 


363 


000 


364 


000 


365 


20 


366 


20 


367 


12 


36S 


12 


369 


12 


370 


000 


371 


000 


372 


000 


373 


20 


374 


20 


375 


12 


376 


12 


377 


12 


378 


20 


379 


000 


380 


000 


381 


000 


382 


20 



Date duration of haul Section N lat. W long. .meters Remarks 
1904 

Nov. 18 8:00 a.m. 41, 32° 3613 117° 25:8 1S5-0 Hauls 321-328 

Nov. 18 41, 32 36.3 117 25.8 made between 

Nov. 18 41, 32 36.3 117 25.8 8:00 a.m. and 

Nov. 18 8:00 a.m. 41, 32 36.3 117 25.8 14.5-0 noon 

Nov. 18 41, .32 36.3 117 25.8 

Nov. 18 8:00a.m. 41, 32 36.3 117 25.8 110-0 

Nov. 18 41, 32 36.3 117 25.8 

Nov. 18 41, 32 36.3 117 25.8 

Nov. 26 8:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.3 117 2.5.1 18.5-0 Hauls 329-336 

Nov. 26 41, 32 38.3 117 25.1 made between 

Nov. 26 41s 32 38.3 117 2.5.1 8:00 a.m. and 

Nov. 26 8:00 a.m. 41, 32 38.3 117 25.1 14.5-0 noon 

Nov. 26 41, 32 38.3 117 2.5.1 

Nov. 26 8:00a.m. 41, 32 38.3 117 25.1 110-0 

Nov. 26 41, 32 38.3 117 25.1 

Nov. 26 41, 32 38.3 117 2.5.1 

Dec. 2 8:00-? a.m. 40, 32 35.5 117 17.6 27 Hauls 337-345 

Dee. 2 40, 32 35.5 117 17.6 made between 

Dec. 2 40, 32 3.5.5 117 17.6 8:00 a.m. and 

Dec. 2 8:00-? a.m. 40, 32 35.5 117 17.6 noon 

Dec. 2 40, 32 35.5 117 17.6 

Dec. 2 40, 32 35.5 117 17.6 

Dec. 2 8:00-? a.m. 40, 32 35.5 117 17.6 IS 

Dec. 2 40, 32 35.5 117 17.6 

Dec. 2 40, 32 3.5.5 117 17.6 

Dee. 12 8:00 a.m. 42, 32 43.0 117 29.6 18.5-0 Hauls 346-3.53 

Dec. 12 42, 32 43.0 117 29.6 made between 

Dec. 12 42, 32 43.0 117 29.6 8:00 a.m. and 

Dee. 12 8:00 a.m. 42, 32 43.0 117 29.6 14.5-0 noon 

Dec. 12 42, 32 43.0 117 29.6 

Dec. 12 8:00 a.m. 42, 32 43.0 117 29.6 110-0 

Dee. 12 42, 32 43.0 117 29.6 

Dee. 12 42, 32 43.0 117 29.6 

Dec. 17 8:00 a.m. (38,) 32 34.7 117 11.0 7.3-0 Hauls 3.54-361 

Dec. 17 (38,) 32 34.7 117 11.0 made between 

Dec. 17 (38,) 32 34.7 117 11.0 8:00 a.m. and 

Dec. 17 8:00 a.m. (38,) 32 34.7 117 11.0 5.5-0 noon 

Dee. 17 (38,) 32 34.7 117 11.0 

Dec. 17 8:00 a.m. (38,) 32 34.7 117 11.0 37-0 

Dec. 17 (38,) 32 34.7 117 11.0 

Dec. 17 (38,) 32 34.7 117 11.0 

Dec. 28 8:00 a.m. 42, 32 40.2 117 28.8 18.5-0 Hauls 362-369 

Dee. 28 42, 32 40.2 117 28.8 made between 

Dec. 28 42, 32 40.2 117 28.8 8:00 a.m. and 

Dec. 28 8:00 a.m. 42, .32 40.2 117 28.8 14.5-0 noon 

Dec. 28 42, 32 40.2 117 28.8 

Dee. 28 8:00 a.m. 42, 32 40.2 117 28.8 110-0 

Dec. 28 42, 32 40.2 117 28.8 

Dec. 28 42, 32 40.2 117 28.8 

1905 

Jan. 12 8:00a.m. 41..5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 18-5-0 Hauls 370-377 

Jan. 12 41.5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 made between 

Jan. 12 41..5s 32 38.0 117 27.5 8:00 a.m. and 

Jan. 12 8:00 a.m. 41..5,, 32 38.0 117 27.5 14.5-0 noon 

Jan. 12 41..5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 

Jan. 12 8:00 a.m. 41.5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 110-0 

Jan. 12 41.5s 32 38.0 117 27.5 

Jan. 12 41.5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 

Jan. 14 B 32 41.5 117 14.2 Towed 20 minutes; 

tide fallinw 

Jan. 20 8:00 a.m. 39, 32 37.1 117 14.6 46-0 Hauls 379-386 

Jan. 20 39, 32 37.1 117 14.6 made between 

Jan. 20 39, 32 37.1 117 14.6 8:00 a.m. and 

Jan. 20 8:00 a.m. 39, 32 37.1 117 14.6 37-0 noon 



140 University of California Publications in Zoologi/ [Vol. 15 

Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 

Time of day Position Depth 

and , ^ ^ in 

Date duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters Remarks 
]9U4 

Jan. 20 39, 32° 37:i 117° 14:6 

Jan. 20 8:00 a.m. 39, 32 37.1 117 14.6 27-0 

Jan. 20 39, 32 37.1 117 14.6 

Jan. 20 39, 32 37.1 117 14.6 

Jan. 22 10:00-10:30 a.m. B 32 42.9 117 13.2 Tide fallinn; 

Jan. 27 8:00 a.m. 41, 32 45.0 117 23.3 110-0 Hauls 388-393 

Jan. 27 41„ 32 45.0 117 23.3 made between 

Jan. 27 8:00 a.m. 41, 32 4.5.0 117 23.3 82-0 8:00 a.m. and 

Jan. 27 41„ 32 45.0 117 23.3 noon 

Jan. 27 8:00 a.m. 41„ 32 45.0 117 23.3 5.5-0 

Jan. 27 41„ 32 45.0 117 23.3 

Jan. 30 10:00-10:25 a.m. B 32 42.9 117 13.2 Tide falling 

Feb. 8 10:00-10:20 a.m. B 32 42.9 117 13.2 

Feb. 10 6:00 a.m. 39, 32 31.4 117 13.1 64-0 Hauls 396-402 

Feb. 10 39„ 32 31.4 117 13.1 made between 

Feb. 10 39^ 32 31.4 117 13.1 6:00 and 10:00 

Feb. 10 6:00 a.m. 39„ 32 31.4 117 13.1 5.5-0 a.m. 

Feb. 10 6:00 a.m. 39, 32 31.4 117 13.1 37-0 

Feb. 10 39s 32 31.4 117 13.1 

Feb. 10 39, 32 31.4 117 13.1 

Feb. 18 6:00-fa.m. 41, 32 40.2 117 24.1 Hauls 403-410 

Feb. IS 41s 32 40.2 117 24.1 130-0 made between 

Feb. 18 41, 32 40.2 117 24.1 6:00 and 10:00 

Feb. 18 6:00-? a.m. 41, 32 40.2 117 24.1 a.m. 

Feb. 18 41, 32 40.2 117 24.1 5.5-0 

Feb. 18 41, 32 40.2 117 24.1 

Feb. 18 6:00-? a.m. 41, 32 40.2 117 24.1 92-0 

Feb. 18 41, 32 40.2 117 24.1 

Feb. 25 6:00-? a.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.0 Hauls 411^17 

Feb. 25 42, 32 40.6 117 30.0 made between 

Feb. 25 42, 32 40.6 117 30.0 18.5-0 6:00 and 10:00 

Feb. 25 6:00-? a.m. 42, 32 40,6 117 30.0 a.m. 

Feb. 25 42, 32 40.6 117 30.0 110-0 

Feb. 25 6:00-? a.m. 42, 32 40.6 117 30.0 

Feb. 25 42, 32 40.6 117 30.0 14.5-0 

Mar. 6 6:00-? a.m. 42, 32 37.9 117 28.7 Hauls 418-423 

Mar. 6 ... 42, 32 37.9 117 28.7 17.5-0 made between 

Mar. 6 6:66-? a.m. 42, 32 37.9 117 28.7 6:00 and 10:00 

Mar. 6 42, 32 37.9 117 28.7 100-0 a.m. 

Mar. 6 6:00-! a.m. 42, 32 37.9 117 28.7 

Mar. 6 42, 32 37.9 117 28,7 13.5-0 

Mar. 11 6:00-? a.m. 41, 32 44.5 117 26.4 Hauls 424-4.^1 

Mar 11 41, 32 44.5 117 26.4 made between 

Mar! 11 41, 32 44.5 117 26.4 16.5-0 6:00 and 10:00 

Mar. 11 6:66-? a.m. 41, 32 44.5 117 26.4 am- 

Mar. 11 41, 32 44.5 117 26 4 

Mar. 11 41, .32 44,5 117 26.4 92-0 

Mar. 11 6:00-? a.m. 41, 32 44.5 117 26.4 

Mar. 11 41, 32 44.5 117 26.4 130-0 

Mar. 18 6:00-? a.m. 41.5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 Hauls 4.i_-4d/ 

Mar. 18 41..5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 made between 

Mar. 18 .". 41.5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 18.5-0 6:00 and 10:00 

Mar. 18 6:00-? a.m. 41..5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 a.m. 

Mar. 18 41..5,, 32 38.0 117 27.5 110-0 

Mar. 18 41.5, 32 38.0 117 27.5 14.5-0 

Mar. 25 42, 32 42.6 117 28.4 Hauls 438-443 

Mar. 25 42, 32 42 6 117 28.4 16.5-0 °'^^® '^^/Trnn 

Mar. 25 42, 32 42.6 117 28.4 «:00 and 10:00 

Mar. 25 42, 32 42.6 117 28.4 100-0 a-™- 

Mar. 25 42, 32 42.6 117 28.4 

Mar. 25 42, 32 42.6 117 28.4 13.5-0 

Apr. 1 6:00-? a.m. 41, 32 34 117 25.8 Hauls 444-4.50 

Apr 1 41, 32 34 117 25.8 made between 

Apr! 1 41, 32 34,0 117 25,8 18.5-0 6:00 and 10:00 

Apr. 1 6:66-? a.m. 41, 32 34.0 117 25.8 a.m. 





Appa- 


Haul 


ratus 


number 


used 


383 


20 


384 


12 


385 


12 


386 


12 


387 


20 


388 


000 


389 


000 


390 


20 


391 


20 


392 


12 


393 


12 


394 


20 


395 


20 


396 


000 


397 


000 


398 


000 


399 


20 


400 


20 


401 


20 


402 


20 


403 


000 


404 


000 


405 


000 


406 


12 


407 


12 


408 


12 


409 


20 


410 


20 


411 


000 


412 


000 


413 


000 


414 


12 


415 


12 


416 


20 


417 


20 


418^ 


000 


419 


000 


420 


12 


421 


12 


422 


20 


423 


20 


424 


000 


425 


000 


426 


000 


427 


12 


428 


12 


429 


12 


430 


20 


431 


20 


432 


000 


433 


000 


434 


000 


435 


12 


436 


12 


437 


20 


438 


000 


439 


000 


440 


12 


441 


12 


442 


20 


443 


20 


444 


000 


445 


000 


446 


000 


447 


12 



1915] 



Michael, ct al.: Hijclroyraphic Eecords of Scripps Institutiuii 



141 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 

Part A — Preliminary PlanMon Collections 

Appa- Time of day 

Haul ratus and 

umber used Date duration of haul Section 
1904 

448 12 Apr. 1 41, 

449 20 Apr. 1 6:00-? a.m. 41, 
4.50 20 Apr. 1 41, 

451 000 Apr. 8 6:00-? a.m. 39, 

452 000 Apr. 8 39, 

453 000 Apr. 8 39, 

454 000 Apr. 8 39, 

455 12 Apr. 8 6:00-? a.m. 39, 

456 12 Apr. 8 39, 

457 12 Apr. 8 39, 

458 12 Apr. 8 39, 

459 20 Apr. 8 6:00-fa.m. 39, 

460 20 Apr. 8 39, 

461 000 Apr. 15 41..5, 

4G2 000 Apr. 15 41.5, 

463 12 Apr. 15 41..5, 

464 12 Apr. 15 41..5, 

465 20 Apr. 15 41..5, 

466 20 Apr. 15 41.5, 

467 000 Apr. 22 39, 

468 000 Apr. 22 39, 

469 12 Apr. 22 39, 

470 12 Apr. 22 39, 

471 20 Apr. 22 39, 

472 20 Apr. 22 39, 

473 000 Apr. 29 41„ 

474 000 Apr. 29 41, 

475 12 Apr. 29 41, 

476 12 Apr. 29 41s, 

477 20 Apr. 29 41, 

478 20 Apr. 29 41, 

479 000 May 6 (40)„.., 

480 000 May 6 (40)„., 

481 12 Mav 6 (40),.^ 

482 12 Mav 6 (40)„„, 

483 20 May 6 (40)<,.5 

484 20 Mav 6 (40)„,, 

485 000 Mav 13 40, 

486 000 Mav 13 40, 

487 000 May 13 40, 

488 12 Mav 13 40, 

4S9 12 May 13 40, 

490 20 May 13 40, 

491 20 May 13 40, 

492 000 May 20 39, 

493 000 Mav 20 39, 

494 000 Mav 20 39, 

495 12 Mav 20 39, 

496 20 Mav 20 39, 

497 20 Mav 20 39, 

1901 

500 June 21 52,„ 

501 June 21 8:00-? p.m. .54,, 

502 000 Mav 22 11:00-11 :15 a.m. 52,„ 
.503 20 Mav 29 5:00-? a.m. (51,,) 

504 20 May 30 5:00-? a.m. (51:^) 

505 20 Mav 31 5:00-? a.m. (51.,) 

506 000 .Tune 1 5: 00-5:. 55 a.m. (51.,) 

507 000 June 2 6:30-? a.m. (51,,) 

508 000 June 3 4:50-? a.m. (51-,) 

509 000 June 5 6:30-? a.m. (51,,) 

510 000 June 6 8:30-? a.m. (51,,) 

511 000 .Tune 7 5:10-? a.m. (51,,) 
.512 nOO June 8 7:00-8:00 a.m. 52,„ 





Pos 


;ition 




Depth 
meters 




N lat. 


W long. 


Remarks 


32° 


34:0 


117° 


2.5:8 


110-0 




32 


34.0 


117 


25.8 







32 


34.0 


117 


25.8 


14.5-0 




32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 





Hauls 451-460 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 





made between 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 





6:00 and 10:00 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 


73-0 


a.m. 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 







32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 







32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 







32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 


37-0 




32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 







32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 


55-0 




32 


44.8 


117 


27.5 





Hauls 461-466 


32 


44.8 


117 


27.5 


200-0 


made between 


32 


44.8 


117 


27.5 





6:00 and 10:00 


32 


44.8 


117 


27.5 


130-0 


a.m. 


32 


44.8 


117 


27.5 







32 


44.8 


117 


27.5 


165-0 


Hauls 467-472 


32 


35.0 


117 


16.0 





made between 


32 


35.0 


117 


16.0 


82-0 


6:00 and 10:00 


32 


35.0 


117 


16.0 





a.m. 


32 


35.0 


117 


16.0 


5.5-0 




32 


35.0 


117 


16.0 







32 


35.0 


117 


16.0 


73-0 




32 


45.2 


117 


23.2 





Hauls 473-478 


32 


45.2 


117 


23.2 


18.5-0 


made between 


32 


45.2 


117 


23.2 





6:00 and 10:00 


32 


45.2 


117 


23.2 


110-0 


a.m. 


32 


45.2 


117 


23.2 







32 


45.2 


117 


23.2 


14.5-0 




32 


47.5 


117 


20.2 





Hauls 479-484 


32 


47.5 


117 


20.2 


130-0 


made between 


32 


47.5 


117 


20.2 





6:00 and 10:00 


32 


47.5 


117 


20.2 


73-0 


a.m. 


32 


47.5 


117 


20.2 


n 




32 


47.5 


117 


20.2 


100-0 




32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 





Hauls 48-5-491 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 





made between 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 


110-0 


6:00 and 10:00 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 





a.m. 


32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 


73-0 




32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 







32 


38.8 


117 


21.6 


92-0 




32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 





Hauls 492-497 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 





made between 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 


82-0 


6:00 and 10:00 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 


46-0 


a.m. 


32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 







32 


36.5 


117 


17.4 


64-0 




33 


21 


118 


IS 







33 


24 


118 


31 







33 


42.0 


118 


18.0 







33 


43.3 


lis 


16.3 







33 


43.3 


118 


16.3 





Driz:^ling 


33 


43.3 


118 


16.3 





Drizzling 


33 


43.3 


lis 


16.3 





Lisht fog 


33 


43.3 


lis 


16.3 





Heavv fog 


33 


43.3 


lis 


16.3 





Cloudy 


33 


43.3 


lis 


16.3 







33 


43.3 


lis 


16.3 







33 


43 3 


lis 


16 3 







33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 








142 



JJniversitij of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Eelative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 
Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 





Appa- 




Time of dav 






Position 




Depth 




























number 


used 


Date 


duration of haul 


Section 


N lat. 


W long. 


meters 


Remarks 






1901 




















513 




June 8 




(51,,) 


33 


43:3 


118 


16:3 




n 




514 


000 


June 9 


6:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


ns 


17.8 









515 


000 


June 10 


5:15-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









516 


000 


June 11 


5:35-? a.m. 


(51a) 


33 


43.3 


118 


16.3 









517 




June 12 




(•5I21) 


33 


43.3 


ns 


16.3 









518 


000 


June 12 


5:00-5:20 a.m. 


52^0 


33 


39.3 


lis 


17.8 









519 




June 14 




(53,0 


33 


34.4 


117 


56.2 









520 


20 


June 14 


5:66-5:20 a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


lis 


17.8 









521 


20 


June 15 


5:10-? a.m. 


52.,„ 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









522 


"'20 


June 15 
June 16 
June 17 





















Off San Pedro 


523 














Off San Pedro 


524 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 




525 


20 


July 1 
June 18 



















Two gallons ' ' red 
water" filtered 


526 


20 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 







527 


20 


June 19 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,„ 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









528 




June 19 


6:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


20.5 


118 


19.0 









529 




June 20 




52,7 


33 


25 


118 


22 




n 


Dip-net haul 
Tow 


530 




June 20 




52,7 


33 


25.0 


lis 


22.0 







531 


20 


June 20 


5:1.5-? a.m. 


52,„ 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









532 


20 


June 21 


5:10-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









533 


000 


June 21 
June 22 
June 22 


1:00-? p.m. 
2:00-? p.m. 












550 






-0 




534 












High tide 


535 


go 


33 


25.6 


118 


20.0 




536 


000 
20 


June 22 
June 24 




52,7 

52,» 


33 
33 


25.6 
39.3 


118 
118 


20.0 
17.8 








Haul ended at 


537 


5:00-? a.m. 


33° 25:3 N and 


538 


20 


June 24 
June 25 




















118° 20:5 W 


539 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 




540 


20 


June 25 


6:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


.39.3 


lis 


17.8 









541 


"2(3 


June 25 
June 26 
June 29 
June 30 






















Off Santa C'atalina 


542 














Oft' Santa Catalina 


543 














Off Santa Catalina 


544 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 




545 


20 


Julv 1 


5:00-? a.m. 


52j, 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









546 


000 


July 2 




(51n) 


33 


43.4 


118 


16.2 









547 


20 


July 2 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









548 


20 


Julv 3 


5:00 a.m. 


52,„ 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









549 


20 


Julv 4 


5:30-? a.m. 


52,„ 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









550 


20 


Julv 5 


6:00-? a.m. 


52,„ 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









551 


20 


Julv 6 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









552 


20 


July 11 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,„ 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









553 


20 


July 12 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









554 


20 


July 13 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









555 


20 


Julv 14 


5:00-? a.m. 


52,0 


33 


39.3 


118 


17.8 









556 


000 


Julv 16 


8:20-8:40 a.m. 


(38,) 


32 


39.0 


117 


11.0 









557 




July 16 
Julv 16 
JiilV i7 
July 18 



















Off San Diego 


558 























Off San Diego 


559 














Off San Diego 


560 














Off San Diego 


561 




Julv 19 


1:05-1:35 p.m. 


39, 


32 


22.8 


117 


1.5.2 









562 




July 20 



















Off San Diego in 


563 




Julv 20 


9:20-10:00 a.m. 


39, 


32 


37.0 


117 


15.0 







"red water" 


564 


000 


Julv 22 


8:40-9:40 a.m. 


39; 


32 


37.0 


117 


15.0 









565 


cioo 


Julv 22 
JulV 24 




39, 
39, 


32 
32 


37.0 
37.0 


117 
117 


1.5.0 
15.0 


85 



-0 


In ' ' red water ' ' 


566 


9:20 a.m. 




567 


000 


July 24 


11:2.5-11:59 a.m. 


39; 


32 


37.0 


117 


1.5.0 









568 


000 


Julv 25 


9:40 a.m. 


.39, 


32 


37.0 


117 


15.0 


240 


-0 




569 


000 


July 26 
Julv 27 




B 

(39..5„ 


32 
) 32 


41.0 
53.0 


117 
117 


14.0 
17.5 


225 



-0 




570 


8:15 a.m. 




571 


000 


Julv 27 
July 27 




B 

(39,„) 


32 
32 


41.0 
51.8 


117 
117 


14.0 
16.5 


120 



-0 




572 


9:05 a.m. 




573 


000 


Julv 31 

1902 


8:30 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.6 


117 


17.2 


230 


-0 




574 




Julv 27 


11:00-? a.m. 


(51=,) 


33 


43.6 


lis 


16.8 









575 




July 2 


7:00-? a.m. 


(51„) 


33 


43.6 


118 


16.8 










1915] Michael, ct a].: Ili/rlrofirapliic Records of Scripps Instiintion 143 

Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 

Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 

Appa- Time of day 

mil rntiis and 

ation of haul 



imber 


used 


Date 
1902 


n76 




Julv 3 


577 




Julv 4 


578 




July 5 


579 




Julv 10 


580 




Julv 12 


581 




Julv 12 


582 




July 12 


583 




July 19 


584 




July 19 


585 




July 21 


586* 




July 29 


590 




Aug. 1 


591 




Sept. 5 


592 




Sept. 18 


593 




Nov. 1 

1903 


594 




June 26 


595 


12 


June 27 


596 


P.F. 


June 27 


597 


P.12 


June 27 


598 


P.F. 


June 27 


599 


P.12 


June 29 


600 


12 


June 29 


601 


000 


June 29 


602 


P.F. 


June 29 


608 


P.F. 


June 29 


604 


P.F. 


June 29 


606 


P.O. 


June 30 


607 


P.F. 


June 30 


60S 


P.F. 


June 30 


60!) 


12 


June 30 


610 


P.F. 


June 30 


611 


P.D. 


June 30 


612 




June 30 


61 :^ 


000 


Julv 1 


614 


P.F. 


July 1 


615 


P.F. 


July 1 


616 


P.12 


July 1 


617 


P.F. 


Julv 1 


618 


000 


July 1 


619 


000 


July 1 


620 


P.D. 


Julv 2 


621 


P.12 


July 2 


622 


P.D. 


Julv 2 


623 


P.F. 


Julv 2 


624 


P.12 


Julv 2 


625 


000 


July 2 


626 


12 


July 2 


627 


P.12 


July 3 


628 


000 


Julv 3 


629 


12 


Julv 3 


630 


P.12 


Julv 3 


631 


P.D. 


July 3 


632 




July 3 


633 


000 


Julv 3 


634 


P.D. 


Julv 6 


635 


12 


July 6 


636 


000 


July 6 


637 


P.12 


July 6 


638 


P.12 


Julv 6 


639 


P.D. 


Julv 6 


640 


12 


Julv 6 


641 


000 


Julv 6 



9:00-? p.m. 







Po; 






Depth 
meters 


R. 




Section 


Nlat. 


W long. 


•marks 


(51,.,) 


33' 


'43r6 


118" 


' 16f8 









(51.) 


33 


43.6 


118 


16.8 








Off 
Off 
Off 




























(51-,) 


33 


43.7 


118 


16.8 





Tide rising 


(51,,) 


33 


43.2 


118 


17.0 





TiJ 


e rising 


(51„) 


33 


43.2 


lis 


17.0 









(51,,) 


33 


43.6 


lis 


16.7 









52,„ 


33 


40.0 


118 


20.0 









Off 
Off 
Off 


























San Pedro 


(51„) 


33 


43.6 


118 


16.8 




(51„) 


33 


43.6 


118 


16.8 










Off 
Off 
















39, 


32 


.35.0 


117 


17.0 




39, 


32 


35.0 


117 


17.0 


77 






39, 


32 


35.0 


117 


17.0 


92 






40, 


32 


33.0 


117 


20.0 


130 






40, 


32 


33.0 


117 


20.0 


130-0 






40, 


32 


33.0 


117 


20.0 


130-0 






40, 


32 


33.0 


117 


20.0 


62 






40, 


32 


33.0 


117 


20.0 




130 




Off 


San Diego 


39, 


32 


32.0 


117 


17.0 




39, 


32 


32.0 


117 


17.0 


62 






39, 


32 


32.0 


117 


17.0 


130 






39, 


32 


32.0 


117 


17.0 


130-0 






39, 


32 


32.0 


117 


17.0 


130 






39, 


32 


32.0 


117 


17.0 


130 






B 


32 


40.6 


117 


10.5 









40, 


32 


36.0 


117 


21.6 









40, 


32 


36.0 


117 


21.6 









40, 


32 


36.0 


117 


21.6 


55 






40, 


32 


36.0 


117 


21.6 


130 






40, 


32 


36.0 


117 


21.6 


130 






40, 


32 


36 


•117 


21.6 


130-0 






40. 


32 


36.0 


117 


21.6 









41, 


32 


38.0 


117 


23.0 









41, 


32 


38.0 


117 


23.0 


73 






41, 


32 


38.0 


117 


23.0 


73 






41, 


32 


38.0 


117 


23.0 


130 






41, 


32 


38.0 


117 


23.0 


130 






41, 


32 


38.0 


117 


23.0 


130-0 






41, 


32 


38.0 


117 


23.0 


130-0 

73 



130-0 

130 

130 




Ou 

Off 
Off 
Off 
Off 


























San Diego 


























B 


32 


40.6 


117 


10.5 














185-0 







73 

130 

73 


Off 
Off 
Off 
Off 
Off 
Off 
Off 


























San Diet'o 




































San Diego 












San Dieiio 



130-0 Off San Diego 
15.5-0 Off San Diego 



No data relative to hauls 587-589. 



144 Vniversiti) of California PuhUcafions in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part A — Preliviinary Planlcton Collections 

Time of day Position Depth 

Date duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters Remarks 

1903 

July 6 130 On San B: 

July 7 Off San D 

July 7 B 32 40.6 117 10.5 

July 7 Otf San D 

July 7 Oflf San D 

July 7 73 Oflf San D 

July 7 73 Off San D 

July 7 130 Off San D 





Appa- 


Haul 


ratus 


number 


used 


642 


P.D. 


643 


000 


644 


12 


645 


12 


646 


P.D. 


647 


P.D. 


648 


P.12 


649 


P.D. 


650 


P.12 


651 


12 


652 


000 


653 


P.F. 


654 


P.P. 


655 


000 


656 


P.F. 


657 


P.12 


658 


P.D. 


659 


12 


660 


P.D. 


661 


P.D. 


662 


P.F. 


663 


P.F. 


664 


P.12 


665 


12 


666 


000 


667 




668 


12 


669 


12 


670 


P.12 


671 


12 


672 


P.F. 


673 


P.12 


674 


P.F. 


675 


000 


676 


12 


677 


P.F. 


678 


000 


679 


12 


6S0 


P.12 


681 


P.F. 


682 


P.12 


683 


P.F. 


686 


12 


688 


000 


689 


P.F. 


690 


P.F. 


691 


P.12 


692 


P.12 


693 


P.F. 


694 


000 


695 


12 


696 


12 


697 


P.F. 


698 


P.12 


699 


P.F. 


700 


P.12 


701 


P.F. 


702 


000 


703 


12 


704 


000 


705 


12 


706 


P.P. 


707 


P.P. 



July 7 130 Off San D 

July 7 130-0 Off San D 

July 7 130-0 Off San D 

July 8 Night Off San D 

July 8 Night — Oflf San D 

July 8 Night Off San D 

July 8 Night 73 Off San D 

July 8 Night 73 Orf San D 

July 8 Night Oif San D 

July 8 Night Off San D: 

July 8 Night 73 Oflf San D 

July 8 Night 130 Oflf San D 

July 8 Night 130 Oflf San D 

July 8 Night 130 Off San D 

July 8 Night 130 Off San D: 

Julv 8 Night 165-0 Off San D: 

July 8 Night 16.5-0 Oflf San D 

JulV 8 Night 165-0 Oflf San D 

July 8 Night 16.5-0 Oflf San D 

July 8 B 32° 40.'6 117° 1015 

July 9 • 73 Off San D 

July 9 Off San D 

July 9 73 Off San D 

July 9 130 Oflf San D 

July 9 130 Oflf San D 

Julv 9 1.5.5-0 Oflf San D 

Julv 9 15.5-0 On San D 

July 10 Off San D: 

July 10 Oflf San D: 

July 10 Off San D 

July 10 73 Off San D 

July 10 73 Off San D 

Julv 10 130 Oflf San D 

July 10 130 Oflf San D 

July 10 16.5-0 Oflf San D 

.July 10 16.5-0 Oflf SanD 

July 13 Off San D 

Jtilv 13 73 Off San D 

July 13 73 Oflf San D 

July 13 130 Oflf San D 

July 13 130 Off San D: 

July 13 140-0 Oflf San D: 

Julv 13 140-0 Off San D 

Julv 14 Off San D 

Julv 14 Oflf San D 

July 14 73 Oflf San D 

July 14 73 Otf San D 

July 14 130 Oflf San D 

July 14 130 Oflf San D 

July 14 17.5-0 Off San D 

July 14 17.5-0 Off San D 

Julv 16 Oflf San D 

July 16 Off San D 

Julv 16 Off San D 

July 16 73 Off San D 



ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 



ego 
ego 



ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 



ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 



ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 
ego 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hiidrographic Records of Scrip ps Inslitution 



145 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Fart A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 



Tin 



and 



708 
709 
710 
711 
7]2 
713 
714 
715 
716 
717 
718 
719 
720 
721 
723 



728 
729 
730 
731 
732 
733 
735 
736 
737 
738 
739 
740 
741 
742 
743 
744 
745 
746 
747 
748 
740 
750 
751 
752 
753 
754 



758 
759 
760 
761 
762 
763 
764 
765 
766 
767 
768 
769 
770 
771 



P.12 
P.F. 

P.12 

000 

12 

000 

12 

12 

12 

000 

12 

000 

000 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

000 

000 

12 

20 

12 

P.F. 

12 

P.F. 

12 

000 

000 

P.F. 

20 

000 

12 

12 

12 

20 

20 

20 

12 

12 



12 
000 
000 



Date duration of haul 
1903 

July 16 

July 16 

July 16 

July 16 

July 16 

July 17 

July 17 

July 18 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 21 

July 22 

July 22 Night 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 22 

July 23 

JulV 23 

July 23 

July 23 

Julv 23 

JulV 23 

Julv 23 

July 23 

JulV 23 

JtilV 23 

July 23 

July 25 

Julv 27 

July 27 

JulV 27 

July 27 

July 27 

JulV 27 

July 27 

JulV 27 

JulV 27 

July 27 

JulV 28 

Julv 28 

Julv 28 

Julv 29 

Julv 29 

July 29 

Julv 29 

Julv 29 

JulV 29 

Julv 29 

July 29 



NIat. 



W long. 



Depth 

meter.s Remarks 



39, 
39, 
39, 
39, 



(39,) 
39, 



73 

130 

130 

185-0 

185-0 

120-0 

120-0 

92-0 

32° 37:0 117° 15:0 

32 37.0 117 15.0 

32 37.0 117 15.0 

32 37.0 117 15.0 

32 41.4 117 10.0 

32 41.4 117 10.0 

46-0 

82-0 

92-0 

120-0 

155-0 

155-0 

100-0 

32 38.0 117 15.0 
32 37.0 117 15.0 




64-0 

73 

135-0 

175-0 

175-0 

130 

250-0 

310-0 

92-0 

32 41.4 117 10.0 

130-0 

165-0 

210-0 

240-0 

200-0 

175-0 

275-0 



225-0 

300-0 

290-0 

28.5-0 

260-0 

255-0 

225-0 

170-0 

215-0 



155-0 

110-0 

73-0 

155-0 

185-0 

120-0 

110-0 

82-0 

55-0 



195-0 



Off San Die^o 

Off 8an Diejio 

Off' San Diego 

Off San Diego 

Off San Diego 

Off San Diego 

Off San Diego 

Off San Diego 



Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 



Off San 
Off San 
Ott San 
Off San 
Off San 
Off San 
Off San 
Off San 
On San 
Off San 



Diego 
Diego 
Diego 
Diego 
Diego 
Diego 
Diego 
Diego 
Diego 
Diego 



Off San Diego 
Ou San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
In San Diego Bay 
Off' San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Oil San Diego 
Off Coronaflo 
Off San Diego 
Off' San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Dieso 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diesro 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 
Off San Diego 



146 



Universify of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 





Appa- 


Haul 


ratus 


lumber 


used 


773 


20 


774 


P.20 


775 


000 


776 


12 


777 


20 


778 


P.20 


779 


P.20 


780 


P.20 


781 


P.20 


782 


12 


783 


000 


784 


20 


785 


000 


786 


20 


787 


000 


788 


20 


789 


20 


790 


12 


•791 


000 


792 


20 


793 


12 


794 


20 


795 


12 


796 




797 




798 


000 


799 


20 


800 


000 


801 


12 


802 


12 


803 


000 


804 


20 


805 


20 


806 


12 


807 




808 




809 




810 




811 


000 


812 


12 


813 


20 


814 


20 


815 


000 


816 


20 


817 


20 


818 


20 


819 


000 


820 


20 


821 


000 


822 


12 


823 


20 


824 


12 


825 


000 


826 


000 


827 


20 


828 




829 


12 


830 


20 


831 


000 


832 


000 


833 


12 


834 


20 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 

Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 

Time of day 
and 
Date duration of haul Section 

1903 

July 29 

July 31 

July 31 

July 31 

July 31 

July 31 

July 31 

July 31 

July 31 

Nov. 1 

Nov. 1 

Nov. 1 

Nov. 1 

Nov. 1 

Dec. 17 41, 

Dee. 17 41, 

Dec. 17 41, 

Dec. 17 41, 

Dec. 17 41, 

Dec. 17 B 

Dec. 17 41, 

Dec. 18 41, 

Dec. 18 

Dec. 18 B 

Dee. 18 B 

Dec. 18 41, 

Dec. 18 41, 

Dec. 18 41, 

Dec. 18 41, 

Dec. 21 41, 

Dec. 21 41, 

Dec. 21 41, 

Dec. 21 41, 

Dec. 21 41, 

Dec. 22 5:00-? a.m. B 
Dec. 22 5:30-? a.m. B 
Dec. 22 4:00-? a.m. B 
Dec. 22 6:00-? a.m. B 

Dee. 23 41, 

Dec. 23 41, 

Dee. 23 41, 

Dee. 23 41, 

Dec. 23 : 41, 

Dec. 23 41, 

Dee. 24 41, 

Dec. 24 41, 

Dec. 24 41, 

Dee. 24 41, 

Dec. 24 41, 

Dec. 24 41, 

Dec. 28 41, 

Dec. 28 41, 

Dec. 28 2:00-? a.m. 41, 

Dec. 28 41, 

Dec. 28 41, 

Dee. 28 8:30-? p.m. B 

Dec. 28 41, 

Dec. 28 2:00-? a.m. 41, 

Dee. 29 41, 

Dee. 29 41, 

Dee. 29 41, 

Dec. 29 2:00-? a.m. 41, 





Po 


sition 




Depth 
meters 




N lat. 


W long. 


Remarks 










145-0 


Off San Diego 










130 


Off San Die^o 










185-0 


Off San Die^o 










110-0 


Off San Dico 










145 














Oft' San Dico 










51 


Off San Dieo'O 










105 












22 












14.5-0 












200-0 












17.5-0 












210-0 












120-0 




32° 


33' 


117' 


23' 


145-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


16.5-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


110-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


72-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


200-0 




32 


40.6 


117 


10.5 







32 


33 


117 


23 


130-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


130-0 

92-0 




Off San Diego 


32 


40.5 


117 


10.0 


Outer channel of 












Glorietta Bight 


32 


40.5 


117 


10.0 





Inner channel of 


32 


33 


117 


23 


145-0 


Glorietta Bight 


32 


33 


117 


23 


92-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


16.5-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


36-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


73-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


14.5-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


130-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


110-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


92-0 




32 


42.0 


117 


14.0 







32 


41.6 


117 


14.1 







32 


42.2 


117 


14.0 







32 


41.0 


117 


14.0 







32 


33 


117 


23 


330-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


18.5-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


220-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


275-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


255-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


220-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


200-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


23.5-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


29.5-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


200-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


320-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


185-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


210-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


130-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 







32 


33 


117 


23 


300-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


18.5-0 




32 


40.6 


117 


10.5 







32 


33 


117 


23 


140-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 







32 


33 


117 


23 


73-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


310-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 


230-0 




32 


33 


117 


23 








Michael, cf al.: Hudroyniphic Eccords of Scripps I)isiilutii)ii 



147 



Table 5.- 



Haul 


Appa- 
ratus 


number 


used 


835 




836 


20 


837 


12 


838 


000 


839 


20 


840 


20 


841 


000 


842 


12 


843 


20 


844 


20 


845 


000 


846 


000 


847 


000 


848 


20 


849 


12 


850 


12 


851 


000 


852 


20 


853 


12 


854 


20 


855 


000 


856 


000 


857 


000 


858 


12 


859 


000 


860 


20 


861 


000 


862 


20 


863 


12 


864 


20 


865 


000 


866 


20 


867 


000 


868 


20 


880 


000 


881 


12 


882 


20 


883 


000 


884 


12 


885 


20 


886 


000 


887 


12 


888 


20 


892 


000 


893 


12 


894 


20 


896 


000 


897 


12 


898 


20 


900 


K.B. 


902 


000 


903 


12 


904 


20 


906a 


K.B. 


906b 


K.B. 


906e 


K.B. 


906d 


K.B. 


906e 


K.B. 


906f 


K.B. 


906g 


K.B. 



Tin 



? of da 
and 



Date duration of haul Section 

1903 

Dec. 29 1:00-? p.m. B 

Dee. 29 41, 

Dec. 29 41, 

Dec. 29 2:00-? a.m. 41, 

Dec. 29 41, 

Dec. 30 41, 

Dec. 30 41, 

Dec. 30 41, 

Dec. 30 41, 

Dee. 30 41, 

Dec. 30 41, 

Dec. 30 41, 

Dec. 30 41, 

Dec. 30 41, 

Dec. 30 41, 

Dec. 31 41, 

Dec. 31 41, 

Dec. 31 41, 

Dec. 31 41, 

Dec. 31 41, 

Dec. 31 41, 

Dec. 31 41, 

1904 

Jan. 4 41, 

Jan. 4 41, 

Jan. 4 41, 

Jan. 4 41, 

Jan. 4 41, 

Jan. 4 41, 

Jan. 4 41, 

Jan. 4 41, 

Jan. 5 

Jan. 5 

Jan. 5 

.Tan. 5 

1905 

June 19 40, 

June 19 40, 

June 19 40, 

June 19 40, 

June 19 40, 

June 19 40, 

June 21 (39„) 

June 21 (39,„) 

June 21 (;39,„) 

June 22 (39,,) 

June 22 (39„) 

June 22 (39„) 

June 22 40„ 

June 22 40„ 

June 22 40„ 

June 22 40„ 

June 23 (39,„) 

June 23 (39,„) 

June 23 (39,„) 

June 23 40„ 

June 23 40„ 

June 23 40„ 

June 23 40„ 

June 23 40„ 

June 23 40i, 

June 23 40„ 



ANKTON 


Hauls — (Continued) 




^lanl-ton Collections 






Po 


ition 




Depth 
meters 




N lat. 


W long. 


Remarks 


32° 40:6 


117 


= 10:5 







32 33 


117 


23 


300-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


19.5-0 




32 33 


117 


23 







32 33 


117 


23 


245-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


210-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


27.5-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


15.5-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


145-0 




32 33 


117 


23 







32 33 


117 


23 







32 33 


117 


23 


220-0 




32 33 


117 


23 







32 33 


117 


23 


265-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


185-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


92-0 




32 33 


117 


23 







32 33 


117 


23 







32 33 


117 


23 


100-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


145-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


15.5-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


14.5-0 




32 33 


117 


23 







32 33 


117 


23 


100-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


145-0 




32 33 


117 


23 







32 33 


117 


23 


16.5-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


15.5-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


92-0 




32 33 


117 


23 


140-0 
185-0 

82-0 
18.5-0 

11-0 




•Near Point Loma 








Near Point Loma 








Near Point Loma 








Near Point Loma 


32 45.5 


117 


20.7 


Hauls 880-885 


32 45.5 


117 


20.7 





made between 


32 45.5 


117 


20.7 





6:00 and 9:00 


32 46.3 


117 


21.3 





a.m. 


32 46.3 


117 


21.3 







32 46.3 


117 


21.3 







32 52.2 


117 


17.3 





Hauls 886-888 


32 52.2 


117 


17.3 





made between 


32 52.2 


117 


17.3 





6:00 and 9:00 
a.m. 


32 51.6 


ir 


17.2 





Hauls 892-900 


32 51.6 


ir 


17.2 





made between 


32 51.6 


ir 


17.2 





6:00 and 9:00 


32 55.6 


117 


19.5 


18.5-0 


a.m. 


32 .5.5.6 


117 


19.5 


175-0 




32 55.6 


ir 


19.5 


145-0 




32 5.5.6 


ir 


19.5 


50 




32 51.6 


ir 


16.5 





Hauls 902-907 


32 51.6 


11" 


16.5 





made between 


32 51.6 


ir 


16.5 





6:00 and 9:00 


32 52.8 


ir 


18.0 





a.m. 


32 52.8 


11' 


18.0 


9 


Hauls 906a-906h 


32 52.8 


11" 


18.0 


18 


preserved in 


32 .52.8 


11" 


18.0 


27 


formalin and 


32 52.8 


11' 


18.0 


46 


HgCU and 


32 52.8 


ir 


■ 18.0 


92 


decanted 


32 52.8 


11' 


18.0 


135 





148 



University of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 







T.\BLE 5. — Data Relative to Plankton 


Hauls — (Continued) 








Part A—Prel 


iminary 


Plankton 


Collections 








Appa- 




Time of day 




Position 


Depth 




Haul 


ratus 




and 
duration of haul 












number 


used 


Date 


Section 


NIat. 


W long. 


meters 


Remarks 






1903 














906h 


K.B. 
K.B. 


June 23 
June 23 




40„ 
40„ 


32° 5218 
32 52.8 


117° i8:o 

117 18.0 


185 





907a 




Hauls 907a-9071i 


907b 


K.B. 
K.B. 


June 23 
June 23 




40., 
40,1 


32 52.8 
32 52.8 


117 18.0 
117 18.0 


9 
18 


were filtered 


907c 




directly through 
No. 20 netting 


907d 


K.B. 


June 23 




40„ 


32 52.8 


117 18.0 


27 


907e 


K.B. 


June 23 




40„ 


32 52.8 


117 18.0 


46 


907f 


K.B. 
K.B. 


June 23 
June 23 




40„ 
40„ 


32 52.8 
32 52.8 


117 18.0 
117 18.0 


92 
135 




907g 
907h 






K.B. 

000 


June 23 
June 26 




40„ 
(40),, 


32 52.8 
32 48.7 


117 18.0 
117 21.5 


185 





908 


10:00-10:20 a.m. 




909 


12 


June 26 


10:00-10:20 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 48.7 


117 21.5 







910 


20 


June 26 


10:00-10:20 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 48.7 


117 21.5 







911 


000 


June 26 




(40),, 


32 48.7 


117 21.5 





Hauls 911-916 


912 


12 


June 26 




(40),, 


32 48.7 


117 21.5 


92-0 


made between 


913 


20 


June 26 




(40),, 


32 48.7 


117 21.5 


120-0 


10:20 a.m. and 


914 


000 


June 26 




(40),, 


32 48.7 


117 21.5 





noon 


915 


12 


June 26 




(40),„ 


32 48.7 


117 21.5 







916 


20 


June 26 




(40),, 


32 48.7 


117 21.5 







917 


000 


June 27 


6:00-6:20 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 52.4 


117 18.3 





Hauls 917-921g 


918 


12 


June 27 


6:00-6:20 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 52.4 


117 18.3 





made between 


919 


20 


June 27 


6:00-6:20 a.m. 


(40),., 


32 52.4 


117 18.3 





6:00 and 10:00 


920a 


K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
IC.B. 
K.B. 


June 27 
June 27 
June 27 
June 27 
June 27 
June 27 
June 27 




40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 


32 54.8 
32 54.8 
32 54.8 
32 .54.8 
32 54.8 
32 54.8 
32 54.8 


117 20.3 
117 20.3 
117 20.3 
117 20.3 
117 20.3 
117 20.3 
117 20,3 




IS 

46 

92 

185 

275 

365 


a.m. 


920b 




Hauls 920a-920g 


920c 




were filtered 


920a 




directlv through 


920e 




No. 2(l' netting 


920f 






920g 






921a 


K.B. 
K.B. 


June 27 
June 27 




40,1 
40„ 


32 54.8 
32 54.8 


117 20.3 
117 20.3 



IS 


Hauls 921a-921g 


921b 




preserved in 


921c 


K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 


June 27 
June 27 
June 27 
June 27 




40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 


32 54.8 
32 .54.8 
32 54.8 
32 54.8 


117 20.3 
117 20.3 
117 20.3 
117 20.3 


46 
92 
1S5 


formalin and 


921d 




HgCL and 


921e 




decanted 


921 f 






921g 
922 


K.B. 

000 


June 27 
June 28 




40„ 
40„ 


32 54.8 
32 53.8 


117 20.3 
117 19.2 


365 





5:30-5:50 a.m. 




923 


12 


June 28 


5:30-5:50 a.m. 


40„ 


32 53.8 


117 19.2 







924 


20 


June 28 


5:30-5:50 a.m. 


40„ 


32 53.8 


117 19.2 







925 


000 


June 28 


6:00 a.m. 


40„ 


32 53.8 


117 19.2 


185-0 • 




926 


12 


June 28 


6:00 a.m. 


40„ 


32 53.8 


117 19.2 


14.5-0 




927 


20 


June 28 


6:00 a.m. 


40„ 


32 53.8 


117 19.2 


1 75-0 




92S 


000 


June 28 


4:00 p.m. 


40„ 


32 53.8 


117 18.3 


185-0 




929 


12 


June 28 


4:00 p.m. 


40„ 


32 53.8 


117 18.3 


14.5-0 




930 


20 


June 28 


4:00 p.m. 


40„ 


32 53.8 


117 18.3 


175-0 




932 


000 


June 29 


6:50-! a.m. 


40„ 


32 54.2 


117 21.0 





Hauls 932-934 


933 


12 


June 29 


6:50-? a.m. 


40„ 


From 5:5 


to 7:07 





ended before 


9.34 


20 


June 29 


6:50-? a.m. 


40„ 


a.m. boat drifted 





7:07 a.m. 


935 


000 


June 29 


5:50 a.m. 


40„ 


from above posi- 


185-0 




936 


12 


June 29 


5:50 a.m. 


40„ 


tion to 


follow- 


14.5-0 




937 


20 


June 29 


5:50 a.m. 


40„ 


ing position 


175-0 




938 


12 


June 29 


7:07 a.m. 


40„ 


32 53.3 


117 19.7 


92-0 




939 


000 


June 30 


4:55 a.m. 


40„ 


32 53.4 


117 18.8 


1.8.5-0 




940 


12 


June 30 


4:55 a.m. 


40„ 


From 4:55 to 5:55 


14.5-0 




941 


20 


June 30 


4:55 a.m. 


40„ 


a.m. boat drifted 


175-0 




942 


000 


June 30 


5:25-5:45 a.m. 


40„ 


from above posi- 







943 


12 


.lune 30 


5:25-5:45 a.m. 


40„ 


tion to 


follow- 







944 


20 


June 30 


5:25-5:45 a.m. 


40„ 


ing position 







945 


12 


June 30 


5:55 a.m. 


40„ 


32 52.9 


in 17.6 


92-0 




946a 


K.B. 


June 30 


11:25 a.m. 


40„ 


32 54.8 


117 20.3 


,365 




946b 


K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 


June 30 
June 30 
June 30 




40„ 
40„ 
40„ 


32 54.8 
32 54.8 
32 .54.8 


117 20.3 
117 20.3 
117 20.3 


405 
310 




946c 




Hauls 946b-946e 


946d 


2:45 p.m. 


made between 


947* 


000 


July 1 


6:30-6:50 a.m. 


(39..5„) 


32 .53.6 


117 18.0 





11:25 a.m. and 


948* 


12 


JulV 1 


6:30-6:50 a.m. 


(39.5,,) 


32 53.6 


117 18.0 





2:45 p.m. 



From 6:00 to 6:55 a.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to32°52:SN 117° 17:3 W. 



1915] Michael, el al.: Ilijdrograpliic Records of »S'c/-ipps Institution 149 

Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 

Part A — PreUminary Plankton Collections 

Appa- Time of day Position Depth 

Haul ratus and , « > in 

number used Date duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters Remarks 
1903 

940* 20 July 1 6:80-6:50 a.m. (39.5„) 32'' 53:6 117° 18:0 

950* 000 JulV 1 6:00 a.m. 40^ 32 53.6 117 18.0 185-0 

951* 12 JiilV 1 6:00 a.m. 40,i 32 53.6 117 18.0 145-0 

952* 20 .liilV 1 6:00 a.m. 40„ 32 53.6 117 18.0 175-0 

953 000 .lul'v 1 6:55a.m. (39„) 32 52.8 117 17.3 100-0 

954 12 JnlV 1 6:55 a.m. (39„) 32 52.8 117 17.3 64-0 

955 20 .July 1 6:55 a.m. (39j,) 32 52.8 117 17.3 02-0 
957 20 .Tiil'v 3 8:30-? a.m. (39,„) 32 51.4 117 16.5 

959 000 .TulV 5 1:20-1:40 p.m. 41„ 32 57.1 117 25.9 

960 12 July 5 1:20-1:40 p.m. 41„ 32 57.1 117 25.9 

961 20 July .1 1:20-1:40 p.m. 41,i 32 57.1 117 25.9 

962 000 July 5 1:05 p.m. 41ii 32 57.1 117 25.9 215-0 

963 12 July 5 1:05 p.m. 41,i 32 57.1 117 25.9 180-0 

964 20 JulV 5 1:05 p.m. 41„ 32 57.1 117 25.9 20.5-0 
965a K.B. Julv 5 9:04 a.m. 41„ 32 56.0 117 26.1 365 
965b K.B. July 5 9:25 a.m. 41„ 32 56.0 117 26.1 275 

966 000 July 6 (39„) 32 52.2 117 17.0 Hauls 966-968 

967 12 July 6 (39,„) 32 52.2 117 17.0 probably lasted 

968 20 Julv 6 (39,„) 32 52.2 117 17.0 40 minutes 

960 000 .TulV 7 5:45-6:25 a.m. (40)„ 32 52.4 117 18.3 

970 12 July 7 5:45-6:25 a.m. (40),„ 32 52.4 117 18.3 

971 20 July 7 5:4.5-6:25 a.m. (40)„ 32 52.4 117 18.3 

976 000 ,Tuly 8 6:00-6:20 a.m. 40„ 32 52.7 117 18.0 

977 12 July 8 6:00-6:20 a.m. 40„ 32 52.7 117 18.0 

978 20 July 8 6:00-6:20 a.m. 40„ 32 52.7 117 18.0 

979 000 .Tulv 8 40„ 32 52.7 117 18.0 18.5-0 Hauls 979-981 

980 12 July 8 40„ 32 52.7 117 18.0 145-0 probably between 

981 20 July 8 40„ 32 .52.7 117 18.0 175-0 7:00and8:00a.m, 

982a K.B. July 8 40„ 32 55.0 117 18.0 9 Hauls 982a-9S2g 

982b K.B. Julv 8 40„ 32 55.0 117 18.0 18 probawy between 

982c K.B. July 8 40„ 32 55.0 117 18.0 46 9:00 and 10:00 

982d K.B. Julv 8 40„ 32 55.0 117 18.0 92 a.m. 

982e K.B. July 8 40„ 32 55.0 117 18.0 185 

9S2f K.B. July 8 40„ 32 .55 117 18.0 275 

982g K.B. July 8 40„ 32 55.0 117 18.0 365 

983 000 July 10 7:15-7:35 a.m. 40„ 32 53.0 117 19.3 

984 12 July 10 7:15-7:35 a.m. 40„ 32 53.0 117 19.3 

985 20 JulylO 7:15-7:35 a.m. 40„ 32 .53.0 117 19.3 

986 000 .Tuly 10 6:20 a.m. 40„ 32 53.0 117 19.3 18.5-0 Hauls 986-988 

987 12 Julv 10 6:20 a.m. 40„ 32 .53.0 117 19.3 145-0 duplicated at 
20 JulylO 6:20 a.m. 40„ 32 53.0 117 19.3 17.5-0 7:00 a.m. and 

000 .Tnlv 11 7:00-7:20 a.m. (39„) 32 52.8 117 17.2 catches eom- 

12 Julv 11 7:00-7:20 a.m. (39„) 32 52.8 117 17.2 bined 

20 July 11 7:00-7:20 a.m. (.39,,) 32 52.8 117 17.2 

000 .Tulv 11 6:05 a.m. (39„) 32 52.8 117 17.2 185-0 

12 .Tulv n 6:05 a.m. (39,,) 32 52.8 117 17.2 14-5-0 

20 .Tulv n 6:05 a.m. f39.,) 32 52.8 117 17.2 175-0 

000 .Tulv 11 6:10-6:30 p.m. (40),„ 32 52.4 117 18.3 

12 Julv 11 6:10-6:30 p.m. (40),„ 32 52.4 117 18.3 

20 .Tuly 11 6:10-6:30p.m. (40), „ 32 52 4 117 18.3 

000 .Tulv 12 7:30-7:50 a.m. 40„ 32 54.8 117 20.3 

12 .Tuly 12 7:30-7:50 a.m. 40,, .S2 .54 8 117 20.3 

20 .Tuly 12 7:30-7:50 a.m. 40„ 32 54 8 117 20 3 

000 .Tulv 12 7:00 a.m. 40„ 32 54.8 117 20.3 36.5-0 

12 July 12 7:00 a.m. 40„ 32 .54.8 117 20.3 365-0 

20 Jidy 12 7:00 a.m. 40„ 32 54.8 117 20.3 36.5-0 

July 12 (39,„) Dip-net haul, two 

000 .Tulv 13 9:00-9:20 a.m. 40„ 32 .53.3 117 19.6 miles off 

12 .Tuly 13 9:00-9:20a.m. 40„ 32 53.3 117 19.6 La Jolla 

20 .Tulv 13 9:00-9:20 a.m. 40„ 32 53.3 117 19.6 

000 July 13 8:00 a.m. 40„ 32 53.3 117 19.6 27.5-0 

12 .Tuly 13 8:00 a.m. 40„ 32 53 3 117 19.6 27.5-0 

20 July 13 8:00 a.m. 40„ 32 53.3 117 19.6 275-0 

' From 6:00 to 6:55 a.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 5218 N 117° 17:3 W. 



150 



University of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 





Appa 




Time of day 






Position 




Depth 




Haul 






and 
















number 


used 


Date 


duration of haul 


Section 


^lat. 


W long. 


meters 


Remarks 






1903 


















1016a 


K.B. 


July 17 


1:02 p.m. 


43„ 


32° 


53:3 


117° 


35:3 


825 


Hauls 1016a-1017c 


1016b 


K.B. 


July 17 


1:52 p.m. 


43u 


32 


53.3 


117 


35.3 


460 


were filtered 


1017a 


K.B. 


July 17 


6:44 p.m. 


44u 


32 


.53.8 


117 


39.6 


730 


directlv through 


1017b 


K.B 


July 17 


7:17 p.m. 


44,1 


32 


53.8 


117 


39.6 


5.50 


No. 20 netting 


1017c 


K.B 


July 17 


7:51 p.m. 


44„ 


32 


53.8 


117 


39.6 


365 




1018 


000 


July 17 


8:30-8:45 p.m. 


44„ 


32 


54.0 


117 


41.3 







1019 


12 


July 17 


8:30-8:45 p.m. 


44„ 


32 


54.0 


117 


41.3 







1020a 


K.B 


July 18 


11:12 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


50.0 


118 


19.0 


730 


Hauls 1020a-1020e 


1020b 


K.B 


July 18 


12:28 p.m. 


52i„ 


32 


50.0 


118 


19.0 


185 


were filtered 


1020c 


K.B 


July 18 


12:52 p.m. 


52,0 


32 


50.0 


118 


19.0 


550 


directly through 


1020a 


K.B 


July 18 


1:38 p.m. 


52,„ 


32 


50.0 


118 


19.0 


365 


No. 20 netting 


1020e 


K.B 


July 18 


2:09 p.m. 


52,„ 


32 


50.0 


118 


19.0 


460 




1021 




Jul'y 17 

















Dip-net haul, near 
San Clemente Is. 




















1 024 




July 19 

















Dip-net haul, near 
San Clemente Is. 






















102f)a 


K.B 


July 20 


11:38 a.m. 


51„5 


32 


57.5 


118 


16.9 


915 


Hauls 1029a-1029e 


1029b 


K.B 


Jul'y 20 


12:21p.m. 


51i,. 


32 


57.5 


118 


16.9 


.550 


were filtered 


1029c 


K.B 


July 20 


12:50 p.m. 


51„ = 


32 


57.5 


118 


16.9 


365 


directly through 


1029d 


K.B 


July 20 


1:21p.m. 


51l.5 


32 


57.5 


118 


16.9 


730 


No. 20 netting 


1029e 


K.B 


July 20 


1:49 p.m. 


51„s 


32 


57.5 


118 


16.9 


185 




1030 


000 


Jul'y 20 


2:30 p.m. 


■51„ 5 


32 


57.5 


118 


16.9 


730-0 




1031 


12 


July 20 


2:30 p.m. 


51i,5 


32 


57.5 


118 


16.9 


730-0 




1032 


20 


July 20 


2:30 p.m. 


51n5 


32 


57.5 


118 


16.9 


730-0 




1034a 


K.B 


July 21 


6:05 a.m. 


44„ 


32 


55.6 


117 


38.1 


640 


Hauls 1034a-1034c 


1034b 


K.B 


July 21 


6:. 55 a.m. 


44„ 


32 


55.6 


117 


38.1 


365 


were filtered 


1034c 


K.B 


Jul'y 21 


7:18 a.m. 


44„ 


32 


55.6 


117 


38.1 


185 


directly through 
No. 20" netting 


1036a 


K.B 


July 21 


10:54 a.m. 


42„ 


32 


.55.0 


117 


31.6 


640 


Hauls 1036a-1036c 


1036b 


K.B 


Juiy 21 


12:36 p.m. 


42„ 


32 


55.0 


117 


31.6 


365 


were filtered 


1036c 


K.B 


July 21 


12:49 p.m. 


42„ 


32 


55.0 


117 


31.6 


185 


directly through 


1039 


000 


July 21 


6:30 p.m. 


41u 


32 


53.5 


117 


24.2 


18.5-0 


No. 20 netting 


1040 


12 


July 21 


6:30 p.m. 


41u 


32 


53.5 


117 


24.2 


14.5-0 




1041 


20 


July 21 


6:30 p.m. 


41„ 


32 


53.5 


117 


24.2 


175-0 




1042 


20 


July 26 


11:00-11:20 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.9 







1043 


12 


July 26 


11:00-11 :20 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.9 


18 




1045 


000 


July 27 


4:00 p.m. 


41,, 


32 


58.5 


117 


24.5 


550-0 




1046 


20 


July 27 


4:00 p.m. 


41,, 


32 


58.5 


117 


24.5 


550-0 




1048 


000 


July 28 


7:15 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


18.0 


18.5-0 




1049 


12 


July 28 


7:15 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


18.0 


145-0 




1050 


20 


July 28 


7:15 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


18.0 


175-0 




1051 


000 


July 28 


7:30-7:50 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


18.0 







1052 


12 


Jul'y 28 


7:30-7:50 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


.52.7 


117 


18.0 







1053 


20 


JulV 28 


7:30-7:50 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


18.0 







1054 


000 


Jul|y 29 


10:00 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


55 


117 


18 


36.5-0 




1055 


12 


July 29 


10:00 a.m. 


40., 


32 


55 


117 


18 


36.5-0 




1056 


20 


Jul> 29 


10:00 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


55 


117 


18 


36.5-0 




1057 


20 


Nov. 9 




(39,.) 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.5 





Hauls 1057-1059 


1058 


20 

20 


Nov. 10 
Nov. 15 




(39,„) 
(39„) 


32 
32 


51.3 
51.3 


117 
117 


16.5 
16.5 






beean between 


1059 




7:00 and 9:00 






















a.m. and lasted 






















20 minutes 


1060 


K.B 


Dec. 16 


11:20 a.m. 












870 


Hauls 1060-1075 


1062 


K.B 
K.B 


Dec. 16 
Dec. 16 


12:50 p.m. 
1:35 p.m. 
4:00 a.m. 












500 
320 


made about 20 


1063 












miles NW of 


1064 


K.B 


Dec. 17 












730 


San Diego 


1065 


K.B 


Dec. 17 


4:40 a.m. 












560 


1066 


K.B 


Dec. 17 


5:20 a.m. 












365 




1067 


K.B 


Dec. 17 


7:2.5 a.m. 












990 




1068 


K.B 


Dec. 17 


8:30 a.m. 












900 




1069 


KB 


Dee. 17 


9:25 a.m. 












715 




1070 


K.B 


Dec. 17 


10:50 a.m. 












.530 




1071 


K.B 


Dec. 17 


11 :40 a.m. 












530 




1073 


12 


Dee. 17 




















1915] 



Michael, et al.: nijdrofjnipliic liccord.'i of Scriixps Institution 



151 



T.\BLE 5. — D.\T.\ Eelative TO PLANKTON HAULS — (Continued) 
Fart A — Preliminary Planktcm Collections 





App.i- 




Time of day 
and 






Pos 


ition 




Depth 






Hani 


ratus 




















umber 


used 


Date 
1903 


duration of haul 


Section 


"^S 


lat. 


Wl 


ng. 


meters 


Remarks 




1074 


20 


Dec. 17 





















1075 


000 


Dec. 17 





















1077 




Dee. 27 


8:00-9:00 a.m. 




32° 


'47:0 


117° 


"14:7 





Hisli tide. 


False 


1078 




Dee. 28 


3:00-4:00 p.m. 


(39;') 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.5 





Bay. 




1079 




Dec. 30 




(39„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.5 













1906 


















1080 




Jan. 2 
Jan. 3 




(39,„) 
(39,„) 


32 
32 


51.3 
51.3 


117 
117 


16.5 
16.5 






Haul made 
10:00 p.m 


about 


1081 


5:00-? p.m. 




10S2 




Jan. 4 


12:01-? p.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.5 









1083 




Jan. 4 




(39,„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.5 





Haul made 


about 


1084 




Mav 18 


8 : 00- f p.m. 


(39„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.5 





10:00 p.m 




1085 




May 24 


8:00-? p.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.5 









1086 




June 1 


8:00-? p.m. 


(39„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


16.5 









1087 


000 


June 19 


5:30 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


17.6 


92-0 






1088 


000 


June 19 


6:00-? a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


17.6 









10S9 


20 


June 19 


6:00-? a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


17.6 









1000 


20 


June 19 


5:30 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.0 


117 


17.6 


64-0 






1091 


20 


June 19 


5:30 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


17.6 


82-0 






1 094 


000 


June 19 


3:30 ji.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


17.6 


185-0 






10115 


20 


June 19 


3:30 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


17.6 


18.5-0 






1 096 


000 


June 20 


4:50-5:10 a.m. 


(39,,,) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.5 









1097 


12 


June 20 


4:50-5:10 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.5 









1098 


20 


June 20 


4:50-5:10 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.5 









1099 


000 


June 20 


5:40 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.5 


64-0 






1100 


12 


June 20 


5:40 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.5 


46-0 






1101 


20 


June 20 


5:40 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.5 


55-0 






1103 


000 


June 20 


2:30 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


20.0 


18.5-0 






1104 


12 


June 20 


2:30 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


20.0 


14.5-0 






1105 


20 


June 20 


2:30 p.m. 


40,, 


32 


52.7 


117 


20.0 


16.5-0 






1106 


000 


June 21 


4:5.5-5:20 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.0 


117 


19.0 









1107 


12 


.Tune 21 


4:55-5:20 a.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


51.0 


117 


19.0 









1108 


20 


June 21 


4:55-5:20 a.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


51.0 


117 


19,0 









1109 


000 


June 21 


6:00-6:10 a.m. 


(40) „ 


32 


51.0 


117 


19.0 


27 






1110 


12 


June 21 


6:00-6:10 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.0 


117 


19.0 


16 






1111 


20 


June 21 


6:00-6:10 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.0 


117 


19.0 


18 






1115 


000 


June 25 


6:05 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


16.4 


110-0 






1116 


20 


June 25 


5:15-5:40 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


16.4 









1117 


12 


June 25 


5:1.5-5:40 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


16.4 









1118 


12 


.Tune 25 


6:05 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


16.4 


82-0 






1119 


000 


June 25 


5:1.5-5:40 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


16.4 









1120 


20 


June 25 


6:05 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


16.4 


100-0 






1125 


000 


June 26 


4:25-4:55 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


5l!8 


117 


16,7 









1126 


12 


June 26 


4:25-4:55 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.7 


n 






1127 


20 


.Tune 26 


4:2.5-4:55 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16 7 









1128 


000 


.Tune 26 


5:15 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.7 


73-0 






1129 


12 


June 26 


5:15 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16,7 


73-0 






1130 


20 


June 26 


5:15 a.m. 


(39,.) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.7 


73-0 






1131 


000 


June 26 


10:40 a.m. 


41 „ 


32 


55.7 


117 


23.7 


500-0 






1132 


12 


June 26 


10:40 a.m. 


41,1 


32 


55.7 


117 


23,7 


500-0 






1 1 33 


20 


.Tune 26 


10:40 a.m. 


41 „ 


32 


55.7 


117 


23.7 


500-0 






1134 


000 


.June 26 


12:35 p.m. 


41„ 


32 


55.7 


117 


23,7 


520-0 






11.35 


12 


.Tune 26 


12:35 p.m. 


41„ 


32 


55.7 


117 


23.7 


520-0 






1136 


20 


June 26 


12:35 p.m. 


41 „ 


32 


55.7 


117 


23.7 


520-0 






1137 


000 


.Tune 27 


4:50-5:10 a.m. 


(39,.) 


32 


52.2 


117 


17,0 









1 1 38 


12 


.Tune 27 


5:35 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


17,0 


110-0 






11.39 


20 


June 27 


5:35 a.m. 


(39,.) 


32 


52.2 


117 


17.0 


110-0 






1140 


000 


June 27 


5:35 a.m. 


(39,.) 


32 


52^2 


117 


17.0 


1 1 0-0 






1141 


20 


June 27 


5:55-6:15 a.m. 


(39..) 


32 


52.2 


117 


17.0 









1142 


20 


.Tune 27 


4:.50-5 :10 a.m. 


(39,.) 


32 


52.2 


117 


17,0 


n 






1143 


12 


.Tune 27 


4:50-5:10 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52^2 


117 


170 









1144 


12 


.Tune 27 


5:5.5-6:15 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


17 









1149 


000 


.Tune 28 


4:55-5:20 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


.52.6 


117 


16,5 









1150 


12 


June 28 


4:55-5:20 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.6 


117 


16.5 









1151 


20 


June 28 


4:55-5:20 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.6 


117 


16,5 










152 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — D.\T.\ Relative to Plankton Kavls^ (Contunted) 
Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 





Appa- 






Time of day 






Po 


sition 




Depth 




Haul 
lumber 


used 






and 
duration of haul 
















Date 




Section 


Nlat. 


W long. 


meters 


Remarks 






1906 


















1152 


000 


June 


28 


5:45 a.m. 


(39„) 


32° 


52:6 


117' 


16:5 


130-0 




1153 


12 


June 


28 


5:45 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.6 


117 


16.5 


130-0 




1154 


20 


June 


28 


5:45 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.6 


117 


16.5 


130-0 




1158 


000 


June 29 


5:05-5:20 a.m. 


(39..) 


32 


52.3 


117 


16.4 





Hauls 1158-1160 


1159 


12 


June 29 


5:0.5-5:20 a.m. 


C%) 


32 


52.3 


117 


16.4 





also include 


1160 


20 


June 29 


5:05-5:20 a.m. 


(".».o) 


32 


52.3 


117 


16.4 





similar hauls 


1161 


000 


June 


29 


5: 35 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.3 


117 


16.4 


55-0 


made from 5:55 


1162 


12 


June 29 


5:35 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.3 


117 


16.4 


5.5-0 


6:15 a.m. 


1163 


20 


June 


29 


5:35 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.3 


117 


16.4 


5.5-0 




1168 


000 


June 


30 


6:00-6:25 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


16.5 







1169 


12 


June 30 


6:00-6:25 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


16.5 







1170 


20 


June 


30 


6:00-6:25 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


16.5 







1171 


000 


June 30 


6:40 a.m. 


(39,o) 


32 


52.4 


117 


16.5 


37-0 




1172 


12 


June 


30 


6:40 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


16.5 


37-0 




1173 


20 


June 


30 


6:40 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


16.5 


37-0 




1174 


000 


June 30 


10:15 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54 


117 


18 


340-0 




1175 


12 


June 


30 


10:15 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54 


117 


18 


340-0 




1176 


20 


June 


30 


10:15 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54 


117 


18 


340-0 




1177 


000 


June 


30 


11 :10 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54 


117 


18 


290-0 




1178 


12 


June 


30 


11:10 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54 


117 


18 


290-0 




1179 


20 


June 


30 


11:10 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54 


117 


18 


290-0 




1180 


000 


July 


2 


6:00-6:20 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.8 


117 


16.8 







1181 


12 


July 


2 


6:00-6:20 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.8 


117 


16.8 







1182 


20 


July 


2 


6:00-6:20 am.. 


(39„) 


32 


.52.8 


117 


16.8 







1183 


000 


July 


2 


6:40 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


.52.8 


117 


168 


1 20-0 




1184 


12 


July 


2 


6:40 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


.52.8 


117 


16.8 


1 20-0 




1185 


20 


July 


2 


6:40 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


.52.8 


117 


1 6.8 


120-0 




1190 


000 


July 


3 


5:1.5-6:05 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.6 


117 


18.0 







1191 


12 


Jul'y 


3 


5:1.5-6:05 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.6 


117 


18.0 







1192 


20 


July 


3 


5:1.5-6:05 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.6 


117 


18.0 







1193 


000 


July 


3 


6:35 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.6 


117 


18.0 


1.5.5-0 




1194 


12 


Jul'y 


3 


6:35 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.6 


117 


18.0 


15.5-0 




1195 


20 


July 


3 


6:35 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.6 


117 


18.0 


155-0 




1204 


000 


July 


5 


6:30-6:55 a.m. 


(39,0 5 


) 32 


52.5 


117 


17.4 







120.) 


12 


July 


5 


6:30-6:55 a.m. 


(39,„5 


) 32 


52.5 


117 


17.4 







1206 


20 


July 


5 


6:30-6:.55a.m. 


(39,,, 


) 32 


52.5 


117 


17.4 







1207 


000 


July 


5 


7:10 a.m. 


(39,„ 5 


) 32 


52.5 


117 


17.4 


82-0 




1208 


12 


July 


5 


7:10 a.m. 


(39,„, 


) 32 


52.5 


117 


17.4 


82-0 




1209 


20 


Jul'y 


5 


7:10 a.m. 


(39,„, 


) 32 


52.5 


117 


17.4 


82-0 




1210 


000 


JulV 


6 


6:1-5-6:45 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.5 







1211 


12 


July 


6 


6:1.5-6:45 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.5 







1212 


20 


July 


6 


6:1.5-6:45 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.5 







1213 


000 


July 


6 


7:15 a.m. 


(39,») 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.5 


no-0 




1214 


12 


July 


6 


7:15 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.5 


1 1 0-0 




1215 


20 


July 


6 


7:15 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


51.8 


117 


16.5 


110-0 




1216 


12 
20 
12 


Jul'y 
July 
July 


6 
6 
6 


9:3.5-11 :35 a.m. 
9:3.5-11 :35 a.m. 
11:40 a.m.- 
1:. 35 p.m. 

















Hauls 1216-1237 


1217 












made within 


1218 












two miles of 














La Jolla. 


1219 


20 


July 


6 


11:40 a.m.- 
1:35 p.m. 































1220 


12 
20 


July 
July 


6 
6 


1 :40-3 :35 p.m. 

1:40-3:35 p.m. 

3:40-5:00 p.m. 

3:40-5:00 p.m. 

7:00-8:00 p.m. 

7:00-8:00 p.m. 

7:00-8:00 p.m. 

8:05-10:00 p.m. 

8:0.5-10:00 p.m. 
10: 05-11:. 59 p.m. 
10:05-ll:59p.m. 
12:05-2:00 a.m. 


















1221 














1222 


12 


July 
July 


6 

















1223 


20 


6 

















1224 


000 


Jul'y 
July 


6 

















1225 


12 


6 

















1226 


20 


July 


6 

















1227 
1228 
1229 
1230 
1231 
1232 


12 


July 


6 

















20 


July 
July 
July 

July 
July 


6 

















12 


6 

















20 


6 

















12 


7 

















20 


7 


12:05-2:00 a.m. 


















1915] 



Michael, et al.: Ilijdroyrapliic Records of Scripps Inslihifion 



153 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part A — Pniiminary Planl'ton Collections 



lumber 


used 


Date 
19t)6 


1233 


12 


July 7 


1234 


20 


Julv 7 


1235 


12 


July 7 


1236 


20 


July 7 


1237 


000 


Julv 7 


1240 


000 


July 10 


1241 


12 


July 10 


1242 


20 


July 10 


1243 


000 


Julv 11 


1244 


8 


July 11 


1245 


20 


July 11 


1246 


000 


Julv 11 


1247 


8 


Julv 11 


1248 


20 


Julv 11 


1249 


000 


Julv 11 



duration of haul 



Secti. 



N lat. 



1250 8 July 11 

1251 20 July 11 



Julv 11 
Julv n 
July 11 
July 12 
July 12 
July 12 
July 12 
July 12 
Julv 12 
July 13 
July 13 
July 13 
July 13 
July 13 
July 13 
Julv 13 
Julv 13 
Julv i3 
Julv 13 
July 13 
Julv 13 
July 14 
Julv 14 
Julv 14 
Julv 14 
July 14 
July 14 
Julv 16 
Julv 16 
July 16 
Julv 16 
Julv 16 
July 16 
Julv 17 
Julv 17 
Julv 17 
July 17 
Julv 17 
July 17 
Julv IS 
Julv 18 
July 18 
July 18 



1252 
1253 

1254 
1255 
1256 
1257 
1258 
1259 
1260 
1261 
1262 
1263 
1264 
] 265 
1266 
1267 
1268 
1269 
1270 
1271 
1272 
1273 
1274 
1275 
1276 
1277 
1278 
12S1 
1282 
1 283 
1284 
1 28o 
1286 
1292 
1293 
1294 
1295 
1296 
1297 
1300 
1301 
1302 
1303 



000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 



20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 

8 

20 

000 



2:05^:00 ;i.m 

2:05-4:00,i.m 

4:05-6:00 a.m 

4:05-6:00 a.m 

6:05-6:30 a.m. 

2:30-2:50 p.m. (40),„ 3i- 01:6 11 

2:30-2:50 p.m. (40),„ 32 51.6 11 

2:30-2:50 p.m. {40),„ 32 51.6 11 

5:3.5-6:00 a.m. 40„ 32 .53.0 11 

5:35-6:00 a.m. 40„ 32 .53.0 11 

5:3.5-6:00 a.m. 40„ 32 .53.0 11 

6:20 a.m. 40,, 32 ,53.0 11 

6:20 a.m. 40„ 32 53.0 11 

6:20 a.m. 40„ 32 .53.0 11 

11:10a.iu.- 40..5,, 32 56.8 11 

12:10 ji.m. 

11:10 a.m.- 40.5,, 32 56.8 11 

12:10 p.iH. 

11:10 a.m.- 40.5,, .32 56.8 11 
12:10 p.m. 

1:30-2:20 p.m. ^O-'^.. 32 56.8 11 

1:30-2:20 p.m. 40..5,, 32 56.8 11 

1:30-2:20 p.m. 40.5,, 32 56.8 11 

5:10-5:35 a.m. (40),„ 32 .52.1 11 

5:10-5:35 a.m. (40),„ 32 52.1 11 

5:10-5:35 a.m. (40),„ 32 .52.1 11 

6:00 a.m. (40),„ 32 ,52.1 11 

6:00a.m. (40),„ 32 .52.1 11 

6:00 a.m. (40),„ 32 .52.1 11 

5:5,5-6:25 a.m. (39io) 32 .52.0 11 

5 :.5.5-6 :25 a.m. (39,o) 32 52.0 11 

5:5.5-6:25 a.m. (39,o) 32 52.0 11 

6:45 a.m. (39,„) 32 .52.0 11 

6:45 a.m. (39>n) 32 .52.0 11 

6:45 a.m. (3f>,«) 32 .52.0 11 

10:20-11 :00 a.m. (40),„ 32 49.6 11 

10:20-11:00 a.m. (40),,, 32 49.6 11 

10:20-11 :00 a.m. (40),,, 32 49.6 11 

12:10-1:00 p.m. (40), „ 32 49.6 11 

12:10-1:00 p.m. (40),„ 32 49.6 11 

12:10-1 :00 p.m. (40),„ 32 49.6 11 

5:30-5:55 a.m. (40),„ 32 51.6 11 

5:30-5:.55a.m. (40),„ 32 51.6 11 

5:30-5:.55a.m. (40),„ 32 51.6 11 

6:20 a.m. (40),„ 32 51.6 11 

6:20 a.m. (40),„ 32 51.6 IT 

6:20 a.m. (40),„ 32 51.6 11' 

5:30-5:.55a.m. (39..5,„) 32 51.6 11 

5: 30-5:. 55 a.m. (39..5,„) 32 

5:30-5:55 a.m. (39..5,„) 32 

6:15 a.m. (39..5,„) 32 

6:15 a.m. (.39..5,„) 32 

6:15 a.m. (39..5,„) 32 

5:40-6:10 a.m. (40),„ 32 

5:40-6:10 a.m. (40),,, 32 

5:40-6:10 a.m. (40),„ 32 

6:30 a.m. ('40),„ 32 

6:30 a.m. f40),„ 32 

6:30 a.m. (■4O),,, 32 

5:40-6:30 a.m. (39,„) 32 

5:40-6:30 a.m. (39,„) .32 

5:40-6:30 a.m. (;39,„) 32 

ll:40-ll:.59a.m. 41„ 32 



51.6 11 

51.6 11 

51.6 11 

51.6 11 

51.6 11 

51.4 11 

51.4 11 

.51.4 11 

51.4 11 

51.4 n 

51 4 11 

52.0 11 

52.0 11 

52.0 11 

53.0 11 



' 18:6 
18.6 
18.6 
17.6 
17.6 
17.6 
17.6 
17.6 
17.6 
22.5 

22.5 



22.5 



22.5 

22.5 
17.9 
17.9 
17.9 
17.9 
17.9 
17.9 
16.8 
16.8 
16.8 
16.8 
16.8 
16.8 
21.4 
21.4 
21.4 
21.4 
21.4 
21.4 
18.6 
18.6 
1S.6 
18.6 
IS, 6 
18.6 
17.5 
17.5 
17.5 
17.5 
17.5 
17.5 
18.2 
18.2 
18.2 
18.2 
18.2 
18.2 
16.1 
16.1 
16.1 
25.6 



Dentil 
meters 























155-0 

155-0 

155-0 

595 

595 

595 

570 

570 

570 







5.5-0 

55-0 

5.5-0 







92-0 

92-0 

92-0 

185 

185 

185 

285 

285 

285 







64-0 

64-0 

64-0 







73-0 

73-0 

73-0 







64-0 

64-0 

64-0 



154 



Universitij of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part A — Preliminary Plankton Collections 





Appa- 




Time of dav 






Po 


ition 




Depth 


Haul 


ratus 




and 
























uraber 


used 


Date 


duration of haul 


Section 


^ 


lat. 


W long. 


meters Remarks 






1906 
















1304 


8 


July 18 


11:40-11:59 a.m. 41 „ 


32° 


53:0 


117' 


25:6 - 


575 


130.5 


20 


July 18 


11:40-11:59 a.n 


41„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


25.6 


575 


1306 


000 


July 18 


12:55-1:15 p.m. 


■41„ 


32 


.53.0 


117 


25.6 


275 


1307 


8 


July 18 


12:5.5-1:15 p.m. 


•ill, 


32 


53.0 


117 


25.6 


275 


1308 


20 


July 18 


12:55-1:15 p.m. 


41„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


25.6 


275 


1309 


000 


July 18 


1:45-2:10 p.m. 


-llu 


32 


53.0 


117 


25.6 





1310 


8 


July 18 


1:4.5-2:10 p.m. 


•il,i 


32 


53.0 


117 


25.6 





1311 


20 


July 18 


1:45-2 :10 p.m. 


41,, 


32 


.53.0 


117 


25.6 





1312 


000 


July 19 


5:40-6:30 a.m. 


(39,,,) 


32 


52.5 


117 


16.1 





1313 


8 


July 19 


5:40-6:30 a.m. 


(39„.,) 


32 


52.5 


117 


16.1 





1314 


20 


July 19 


5:40-6:30 a.m. 


(39,0.5) 


32 


52.5 


117 


16.1 





131.5 


000 


July 19 


12:01-12:20 p.n 


. 41,0 


32 


49.6 


117 


26.9 


585 


1316 


8 


July 19 


12:01-12:20 p.m. 41,„ 


32 


49.6 


117 


26.9 


585 


1317 


20 


July 19 


12:01-12:20 p.m. 41,, 


32 


49.6 


117 


26.9 


585 


1318 


000 


July 19 


1:2.5-1:55 p.m. 


41io 


32 


49.6 


117 


26.9 


310 


1319 


8 


July 19 


1:25-1:55 p.m 


41io 


32 


49.6 


117 


26.9 


310 


1320 


20 


July 19 


1:2.5-1:55 p.m. 


41,0 


32 


49.6 


117 


26.9 


310 


1321 


000 


July 19 


2:20-2:45 p.m. 


41,„ 


32 


49.6 


117 


26.9 





1322 


8 


July 19 


2:20-2:45 p.m 


41,0 


32 


49.6 


117 


26.9 





1323 


20 


July 19 


2:20-2:45 p.m 


41,0 


32 


49.6 


117 


26.9 





1324 


000 


July 20 


5:50-6:15 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


17.0 





132.5 


8 


July 20 


5:50-6:15 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


17.0 





1326 


20 


Jul> 20 


5:50-6:15 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


17.0 





1327 


000 


July 20 


6:30 a.m. 


(39,.) 


32 


52.4 


117 


17.0 


120-0 


1328 


8 


July 20 


6:30 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


17.0 


120-0 


1329 


20 


July 20 


6:30 a.m. 


(39,„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


17.0 


120-0 


1336 


000 


July 21 


5:20-6:20 a.m 


(39,„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.2 





1337 


8 


JulV 21 


5:20-6:20 a.m 


(39„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.2 





1338 


20 


JulV 21 


5:20-6:20 a.m. 


(39,,,) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.2 





1339 


000 


July 21 


11:00 a.m. 


41 „ 


32 


54.6 


117 


25.2 


56.5-0 


1340 


8 


.inly 21 


11:00 a.m. 


41 „ 


32 


.54.6 


117 


25^2 


56.5-0 


1341 


20 


JulV 21 


11:00 a.m. 


41,1 


32 


54.6 


117 


25.2 


56.5-0 


1342 


000 


July 21 


12:45 p.m. 


41 u 


32 


54.6 


117 


25.2 


27.5-0 


1343 


8 


JulV 21 


12:45 p.m. 


41„ 


32 


54.6 


117 


25.2 


27.5-0 


1344 


20 


JulV 21 


12:45 p.m. 


41„ 


32 


.54.6 


117 


25.2 


27.5-0 


134.5 


000 


.JulV 21 


1:1.5-1:40 p.m 


41„ 


32 


54.6 


117 


25.2 





1346 


8 


JulV 21 


1:1.5-1:40 p.m 


41„ 


32 


54.6 


117 


25^2 





1347 


20 


JulV 21 


1:1.5-1:40 p.m 


41„ 


32 


.54.6 


117 


25.2 





1348 


000 


July 23 


5:50-6:30 a.m 


(39,„) 


32 


51.9 


117 


16.9 





1349 


8 


July 23 


5:50-6:30 a.m 


(39,.) 


32 


.51.9 


117 


16.9 





13.50 


20 


July 23 


5:50-6:30 a.m 


(39,„) 


32 


51.9 


117 


16.9 





1351 


000 


JulV 23 


10:40 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


,543 


117 


21.4 


390-0 


13.52 


8 


Julv 23 


10:40 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.54.3 


117 


21.4 


390-0 


1353 


20 


JulV 23 


10:40 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.54.3 


117 


21.4 


390-0 


1354 


000 


JulV 23 


11:20 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54.3 


117 


21.4 


210-0 


13.55 


8 


JulV 23 


11:20 a.m. 


40,1 


32 


54.3 


117 


21.4 


210-0 


1356 


20 


July 23 


11:20 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54.3 


117 


21.4 


210-0 


1.357 


000 


JulV 23 


ll:3.5-ll:.59a.n 


1. 40„ 


32 


54.3 


117 


21.4 





1358 


8 


JulV 23 


11:3.5-11:59 a.n 


1. 40„ 


32 


54.3 


117 


21.4 





1359 


20 


JulV 23 


11:3.5-11:. 59 a.n 


1. 40„ 


32 


54.3 


117 


21.4 





1362 


000 


Julv 24 


5:30-6:25 a.m 


(39,„) 


32 


.52.2 


117 


16.6 





1363 


8 


JulV 24 


5:30-6:25 a.m 


(39„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


16.6 





1364 


20 


July 24 


5:30-6:25 a.m 


(39,„) 


32 


52.2 


117 


16.6 





1371 


000 


JulV 25 


5:3.5-6:30 a.m 


(39,„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


17.0 





1372 


8 


JulV 25 


5:3.5-6:30 a.m 


(39,„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


17.0 





1373 


20 


Julv 25 


5:3.5-6:30 a.m 


(39„) 


32 


52.4 


117 


17.0 





1375 


20 


AuL'. 4 


5:40 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


18.8 


14.5-0 


1376 


20 


Ausr. 4 


6:20 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


18.8 


18.5-0 


1377 


20 


Aut,'. 4 


6:40-7:05 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.52.7 


117 


18.8 





1378 


000 


Aug. 4 

1907 


6:40-7:05 a.m 


40„ 


32 


52.7 


117 


18.8 





1379 


000 


June 3 


2:30 p.m. 


(39„) 


32 


53.4 


117 


17.4 


135-0 


1380 


8 


June 3 


2:30 p.m. 


(39„) 


32 


53.4 


117 


17.4 


130-0 


1381 


20 


June 3 


2:30 ],.m. 


(39„) 


32 


53.4 


117 


17.4 


120-0 



Micltael, ct al.: Hijdrogmphk Records of iScripps Institution 



155 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Port A — PreUminary Plankton Collections 



Haul 
number 


Appa- 
ratus 
used 


Date 


Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Remarks 




N lat. 


W long. 




1382 


000 


1907 
June 11 


7:00 a.m. 


(39„) 


32° 


53:4 


117° 


17:4 


110-0 






1383 


8 


June 11 


7:00 a.m. 


(39,,) 


32 


53.4 


117 


17.4 


92-0 






1384 


20 


June 11 


7:00 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


53.4 


117 


17.4 


100-0 






1386 


20 


June 15 


10:00-10:20 a.n 


. (39,o) 


32 


51.0 


117 


16.5 









1387 


000 


June 17 


7:00 a.m. 


40,1 


32 


54.0 


117 


17.7 


145-0 






1388 


20 


June 17 


7:00 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


54.0 


117 


17.7 


135-0 






1389 


8 


June 17 


7:00 a.m. 


40n 


32 


54.0 


117 


17.7 


130-0 






1390 


20 


June IS 


6:00-6:20 a.m. 


(39.„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


17.2 









1391 


000 


June 21 


7:00 a.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


51.5 


117 


21.1 


92-0 






1392 


20 


June 21 


7:00 a.m. 


(40),. 


32 


51.5 


117 


21.1 


82-0 






1393 


000 


June 24 


7:00 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


53.1 


117 


17.3 


110-0 






1394 


8 


June 24 


7:00 a.m. 


(39,0 


32 


53.1 


117 


17.3 


92-0 






1395 


20 


June 24 


7:00 a.m. 


(39„) 


32 


53.1 


117 


17.3 


100-0 






1396 


20 


June 28 


4:00-4:20 p.m. 


(39.„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


17.2 









1397 


20 


July 1 


8:00-8:20 a.m 


(39,„) 


32 


51.3 


117 


17.2 









1398 


000 


July 3 


10:00 a.m. 


(39..5„) 


32 


53.6 


117 


17.5 


13.5-0 






1399 


20 


JulV 3 


10:00 a.m. 


(39..5„) 


32 


53.6 


117 


17.5 


130-0 






1400 


8 


JulV 3 


10:00 a.m. 


(39.5,,) 


32 


53.6 


117 


17.5 


120-0 






1401 


20 


JulV 9 


9:00 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.4 


117 


18.0 


130-0 






1 402 


000 


JulV 9 


9:00 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.4 


117 


18.0 


13.5-0 






1 403 


12 


July 9 


9:00 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.4 


117 


18.0 


120-0 






1404 


20 


JulV 12 


9:00 a.m. 


(40),o 


32 


50.6 


117 


22.1 


100-0 


Surface covei 


ed 


1 405 


000 


JulV 12 


9:00 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


50.6 


117 


22.1 


110-0 


with ' ' red 




1 406 


8 


July 12 


9:00 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 


50.6 


117 


22.1 


92-0 


water" 




1407 


20 


JulV 12 


9:00 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


50.6 


117 


22.1 


100-0 






1409 


20 


JulV 24 


8:00 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.5 


117 


21.9 


14.5-0 






1410 


000 


July 24 


8:00 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.5 


117 


21.9 


155-0 






1411 




Julv 24 


8:00-? a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.5 


117 


21.9 









1412 


000 


JulV 29 


9:30 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.7 


117 


18.0 


18.5-0 






1413 


20 


JulV 29 


9:30 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.7 


117 


18.0 


17.5-0 






1414 


8 


JulV 29 


9:30 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.7 


117 


18.0 


16.5-0 






1415 


20 


190S 

June 11 


2:25-2:45 p.m 


43„ 


32 


56.3 


117 


34.2 









1416 


000 


June 11 


2:2.5-2:45 p.m 


43„ 


32 


56.3 


117 


34.2 









1417 


000 


June 12 


12:01-12:25 p.m. 43,„ 


32 


51.6 


117 


35.3 









1418 


000 


June 12 


10:00-10:25 a.m. 43,„ 


32 


51.6 


117 


35.3 









1419 


K.B. 


June 12 


3:15 p.m. 


42, 


32 


44.7 


117 


32.3 


1020 






1420 


000 


1907 

Nov. 2 


5:00-5:30 p.m 


39, 


32 


32.0 


117 


16.8 









1421 


20 


Nov. 2 


5:00-5:30 p.m 


39, 


32 


32.0 


117 


16.8 









1422 


12 


Nov. 2 


5:00-5:30 p.m 


39e 


32 


32.0 


117 


16.8 









1423 


000 


Nov. 3 


8:42-9:00 a.m 


(39.) 


32 


39.5 


117 


14.2 


■ 






1424 


20 


Nov. 3 


8:40-9:00 a.m 


(390 


32 


39.5 


117 


14.2 









1425 


12 


Nov. 3 


8:3.5-9:00 a.m 


(390 


32 


39,5 


117 


14.2 









1426 


000 


Nov. 3 


9:20-9:40 a.m 


(390 


32 


38.0 


117 


14.0 









1427 


20 


Nov. 3 


9:20-9:40 a.m 


(390 


32 


38.0 


117 


14.0 









1428 


12 


Nov. 3 


9:20-9:40 a.m 


(390 


32 


38.0 


117 


14.0 










156 University of California Publicaiions in Zoologij [Vol. 15 



EXPLANATION OF TABLE 5, PART B 

This part includes all the field data relative to the plankton col- 
lected since June 12, 1908, which marks the time when water samples 
were first collected in connection with net hauls and when the first 
serious attempt at collecting primarily for quantitative purposes was 
commenced. 

First column. — Numbers under which the collections were accessioned; they 
are arranged in chronological order irrespective of the nature of the haul. 

Second column. — Apparatus used in making the hauls: K.B. refers to the 
Kofoid water bottle (see p. 11), and the remaining symbols to nets as explained 
in Appendix I. 

Third column. — Time and duration of haul entered to the nearest minute. 

Fourth column. — Section; for explanation see page 46. 

Fifth and sixth columns. — Latitude and longitude; for error see pages 18 and 45. 

Seventh column. — Depth at beginning and end of haul entered to the nearest 
meter above and the nearest five below 200 meters; for error see page 20. 

Eighth column. — Numbers indicating water samples taken in connection with 
haul; see Table 1. 

Ninth column. — Miscellaneous remarks relative to hauls. 



1915] 



Michael, et aJ.: HydrograpJiic Records of Scripps IiustitHtion 



157 



Table 5. — Data Eelative to Plankton Hauls — (^Continued) 
Fart B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



142!) K.B. 
1430 K.B. 



1432 
1433 
1434 
1435 

1436 
1437 
1438 
1439 
1440 
1441 
1442 

1444 
1445 
1446 
1447 
144S 
1449 
1450 
1451 
1452 
1453 
1454 

1455 
1456 
1457 
1458 
1459 
1460 
1461 
1462 
1463 
1464 

1465 
1466 
1467 
1468 
1469 
1470 
1471 
1472 
1473 



000 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 

000 
12 
000 
12 
20 

K.B. 

K.B. 

000 
12 
20 

K.B. 

000 

12 

20 

K.B. 

000 
12 
20 

000 
12 
20 

K.B. 

K.B. 

000 

12 

20 

K.B. 

K.B. 

000 
10 
20 

000 
10 
20 

000 
10 
20 



Time of day 

and 

duration of hau! 

10:30 a.m. 
11:14 a.m. 

9:35 a.m. 

10:30-10:50 a.m. 
10:35 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
12:20 p.m. 

9:30-9:50 a.m. 

9:30-9:50 a.m. 
11:10-11:50 a.m. 
11:10-11 :50 a.m. 
11:10-11:50 a.m. 
11:25 a.m. 
12:01 p.m. 

12:30-1:00 p.m. 
12:30-1:00 p.m. 
12:30-1:00 p.m. 
12:45 p.m. 

2:40-3:20 p.m. 

2:40-3:20 p.m. 

2:40-3:20 p.m. 

2:40 p.m. 

3:26-3:39 p.m. 

3:26-3:39 p.m. 

3:26-3:39 p.m. 

10:45-11:20 a.m. 
10:4.5-11:20 a.m. 
10:45-11 :20 a.m. 
11:10 a.m. 
11:10 a.m. 

1:40-2:20 p.m. 

1:40-2:20 p.m. 

1:40-2:20 p.m. 

2:20 p.m. 

2:20 p.m. 

7:4.5-8:25 a.m. 

7:45-8:25 a.m. 

7:45-8:25 a.m. 

9:35 a.m. 

9:35 a.m. 

9:35 a.m. 
10:20-10:40 a.m. 
10:20-10:40 a.m. 
10:20-10:40 a.m. 



N lat. W long. 

June 12, 1908 

32° 53:7 117° 34:5 

32 53.7 117 34.5 

June 13, 1908 

(41.5,0 33 9.1 117 27.5 

15. 1908 
117 30.1 
117 30.1 
117 29.9 
117 29.7 

16, 1908 
117 34.4 



43„ 
43„ 



42, 
42, 
42, 



46,, 
46,, 
46,, 
46,, 
45,, 
45,, 
45,, 
45,, 
44,, 
44,, 
44,, 

45,, 
45,, 
45,, 
45,, 
45,, 
45„ 
45j„ 
45,„ 
45„ 
45,0 

41,, 
41,, 
41,, 
41,, 
41,, 
41,, 
(40.,) 
(40„) 
(40,,) 



1476* K.OOO 42„ 



1477 
1478 
1479 
1480 

1481 
1482 
1483 
1484 
1485 



K.B. 

000 
12 
20 

K.B. 
K.B. 
10 
K.B. 
K.B. 



4:25 p.m. 
4:4.5-5:00 p.m. 
4:45-5:00 p.m. 
4:4.5-5:00 p.m. 

8:45 a.m. 

9:40 a.m. 
10:05 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
12:50 p.m. 



42, 

42, 
42, 
42, 

41,3 



42,3 
42„ 



Jun 

32 39.3 

32 39.0 

32 37.7 

32 37.0 

June 

32 48.5 

32 48.5 

32 46.9 

32 46.9 

32 46.9 

32 46.9 

32 46.9 



117 34.4 
117 31.8 



31.8 
31.8 
31.8 
31.8 



0.1 
0.1 
0.1 
0.1 



117 50.0 
117 50.0 



32 59.5 

32 59.5 

32 59.5 

33 0.0 



0.1 
0.1 
0.1 



June '. 

32 57.8 

32 57.8 

32 57.8 

32 57.8 

32 57.8 

32 49.8 

32 49.8 

32 49.8 

32 49.8 

32 49.8 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



50.0 
50.0 
43.6 
43.6 
43.6 
42.0 
38.9 
38.9 
38.9 



46.0 
46.0 
46.0 
46.0 
46.0 
46.0 
46.0 
46.0 
46.0 



01. ( 



32 

32 57.7 

32 57.7 

32 57.7 

32 57.7 

32 57.7 

32 58.8 

32 58.8 

32 58.8 



32 41.4 

32 41.4 

32 41.4 

32 41.4 



Jun 



117 22.7 
117 22.7 
117 22.7 
117 22.7 
117 22.7 
117 20.0 
117 20.0 
117 20.0 
21. 1908 
117 30 

23, 1908 

117 30.3 
117 30.3 
117 30.3 
117 30.3 

24. 1908 
117 27.0 



117 
117 
117 
117 



29.4 
29.8 
31.8 
29.4 



1100 




460 
520 
520 
660 
695 



49,51 
50 



Deptll 
meters 

915 

550 

300 


890 
705 
455 










890 
640 






705 






915 












1070 
1070 






1025 
1025 



80 

80 

80 

440-0 

440-0 

440-0 

81 

81 

81 

92 



Imperfectly closed 
Imperfectly closed 



Imperfectly closed 

61 

Imperfectly closed 

67 

Imperfectly closed 

Same haul as 1458 

77 

77 



Same haul as 1463 



* Trial of Kofoid closing net made between 9:00 and 11:00 a.m. 



158 Vniversity of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Table 5. — Data Relative to Plaxktox Hauls — {Continued) 
Part B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Appa- Time of day Position Depth Water 

Haul ratus and / ^ ^ in sample 

number used duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters number Remarks 

June 25. 1908 

1488 000 8:25-9:15 a.m. 40„ 32° ,55:0 117° 2114 106 

1489 000 8:25-9:15 a.m. 40„ 32 55.0 117 21.4 106 Same haul as 1488 

1490 8:25-9:15 a.m. 40ii 32 55.0 117 21.4 106 

1491 20 8:25-9:15 a.m. 40„ 32 55.0 117 21.4 106 

1492 000 10:10 a.m. 40„ 32 55.1 117 21.3 38.5-0 

1493 20 10:10 a.m. 40„ 32 55.1 117 21.3 38.3-0 

1494 000 11:00 a.m. 40„ 32 55.1 117 21.3 3S.5-0 

1495 11:15 a.m. 40„ 32 5.5.1 117 21.3 18.5-0 

1496 20 11:15 a.m. 40„ 32 55.1 117 21.3 18.5-0 

1499 000 3:4.5-4:10 p.m. (40),„ 32 51.4 117 21.5 

1500 000 3:4.5-4:10 p.m. (40),„ 32 51.4 117 21.5 Same haul as 1499 

1501 3:4.5-4:10 p.m. (40),„ 32 51.4 117 21.5 

1502 20 3:4.5^:10 p.m. (40),„ 32 51.4 117 21.5 

June 26, 1908 

1503 42, Dip-net haul 

1504 000 12:25-12:50 p.m. 42, 32 38.8 117 29.9 

1505 000 12:25-12:50 p.m. 42, 32 38.8 117 29.9 Same haul as 1.504 

1506 10 12:25-12:50 p.m. 42, 32 38.8 117 29.9 

1507 20 12:25-12:50 p.m. 42, 32 38.8 117 29.9 

June 27. 1908 

1508 000 5:.50a.m. 40„ 32 .54.1 117 21.0 27.5-0 

1509 000 5:58-6:15 a.m. 40„ 32 54.1 117 21.0 Same haul as 1508 

1510 10 5:58-6:15 a.m. 40n 32 54.1 117 21.0 

1511 20 5:58-6:15 a.m. 40„ 32 .54.1 117 21.0 

1512 000 6:20-6:45 a.m. 40„ 32 54.1 117 21.0 

1513 10 6:20-6:45 a.m. 40„ 32 54.1 117 21.0 

1.514 20 6:20-6:45 a.m. 40„ 32 54.1 117 21.0 

June 30. 1908 

1516 000 9:00 a.m. 40„ 32 .54.4 117 21.5 4.55-0 

1517 10 9:20-9:45 a.m. 40,, 32 .54.4 117 21.5 

1518 000 9:50-10:05 a.m. 40„ 32 54.4 117 21.5 

1519 10 9:50-10:05 a.m. 40„ 32 54.4 117 21.5 

1520 20 9:.50-10:05a.m. 40„ 32 54.4 117 21.5 

1521 K.B. 2:55 p.m. 40„ 32 .54.4 117 21.5 505 144 

Julv 1. 1908 

1523 K.B. 11:16 a.m. 50,. 33 11.3 118 8.1 365 162 

1524 000 12:15 p.m. 50,. 33 11.3 118 8.1 27.5-0 

Julv 2, 1908 

1527 000 11:20 a.m. 50,, 32 58.4 118 13.6 920-0 

1.528 10 11:20 a.m. 50„ 32 58.4 118 13.6 920-0 

1529 20 11:20 a.m. 50„ 32 58.4 118 13.6 920-0 

1530 000 ll:40-ll:.59a.m. 50„ 32 58.4 118 13.6 182 

Julv 7. 1908 

1532 000 9:30-10:30 a.m. 52., 32 45.6 118 20.5 227 

1533 20 9:30-10:30 a.m. 52„ 32 4.5.6 118 20.5 227 

Julv 8. 1908 

1535 000 7:.3.5-7:54p.m. 52„ 33 21.9 118 19.1 237a 

1537 10 7:. 3.5-7:. 54 p.m. .52,,, 33 21.9 118 19.1 237a 

1538 20 7:. 3.5-7 :54 p.m. 52,„ 33 21.9 118 19.1 237a 

Julv 9. 1908 

1542 K.OOO 6:4.5-7:00 p.m. ,54,, 33 0.2 118 31.3 92 

Julv 10, 1908 

1.543 K,B. 7:17 a.m. 50„ 32 .53.4 118 10.2 825 245 

1.544 K.B. 8:25 a.m. 50„ 32 .53.4 118 10.2 640 Imperfectly closed 

1.545 K.B. 8:56 a.m. .50,, 32 .53.4 118 10.2 460 Imperfectly closed 

1.546 K,B. 10:10 a.m. .50,, 32 .53.4 118 10.2 275 Imperfectly closed 

1.547 K.B. 10:.34a.m. 50„ 32 .53.4 118 9.1 135 246 

1.548 K.B. 10:59 a.m. 49„ 32 53.5 118 7.4 640 248 

Julv 16, 1908 

1.549 K.B. 10:05 a.m. 51,„ 32 48.7 118 14.5 640 324 
1550* K.OOO 51, „ 32 49.2 118 14.9 640 

Julv 17, 1908 

1.5.53 61, 32 24.2 119 6.2 Dip-net haul 

1.557 K.OOO 1:4.5-2:30 p.m. 61, 32 24.2 119 6.2 460 

1558 000 8:00-9:00 p.m. 61-, 32 24.2 119 6.2 Haul formerly 

labelled 1562 
* Haul 1550 began at 11:45 a.m. and ended at 12:40 p.m. 



1915] 



Michael, ct al.: Hudrograpliic Records of Scripps luxfUutioii 



150 







Table 5. — Dat^ 


Relativ 


E TO 


Plankton 


Hauls— (C 


ontiimcd) 






Part B— 


Plankton Collections of Qua7ititative Sign 


ficance 




Appn- 


Time of day 

.ind 

dur.itiou uf haul 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Water 
sample 
number 




er used 


N lat. 


Wl 


ons. 


Remark 


9 000 


6:20-6:30 a.m. 


61, 


32° 


July 18, 1908 
24:2 119° 6:2 





347 




000 


7:20-8:00 a.m. 


61., 


32 


24.2 


119 


6.2 









3 K.B. 


11:29 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


July 2 
49.6 


1, 1908 
117 28.8 


640 


386 




■i K.B. 


11:47 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


49.6 


117 


28.8 


460 


388 




5 K.B. 


12:40 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


49.6 


117 


28.8 


135 


391 




6 K.B. 


12:58 p.m. 


42„, 


32 


49.6 


117 


28.8 


275 


392 




7 K.OOO 


1:06-1 :29 p.m. 
2:45-3:13 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


49.6 


117 


28.8 


640 






8 000 


42,„ 


32 


49.6 


117 


28.8 





395 




t) 10 


2:45-3:13 p.m. 


42„, 


32 


49.6 


117 


28.8 





395 




K.OOO 


7:57-8:13 a.m. 


43,,, 


32 


July 2 
50.1 


2. 1908 
117 34.0 


37 




Net faile 


1 000 


8 


09-8:50 a.m. 


43,„ 


32 


50.6 


117 


33.7 





"402 




2 K.OOO 


9 


16-9:29 a.m. 


43,0 


32 


51.4 


117 


33.3 


5o 






3 K.OOO 


9 


54-10:08 a.m. 


42„ ■ 


32 


53.3 


117 


32.3 


92 






4 000 


10 


13-10:31 a.m. 


42„ 


32 


53.3 


117 


32.3 





"406 




5 K.OOO 


10 


44-10:55 a.m. 


42„ 


32 


53.8 


117 


31.8 


137 






6 K.OOO 


12 


33-12:46 p.m. 
55-1:15 p.m. 


42„ 


32 


55.6 


117 


30.4 


365 






7 000 


12 


42„ 


32 


56.3 


117 


29.8 





411 




S K.OOO 


1 


52-2:07 p.m. 
30-7:50 p.m. 


42,, 


32 


57.6 


117 


28.8 


550 






Q 000 




(40),„ 


32 


51.5 


117 


21.4 





"4I6 




10 


7 


30-7:50 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.5 


117 


21.4 





416 




1 20 


7 


30-7:50 p.m. 


(:40),o 


32 


51.5 


117 


21.4 





416 




2 000 


8 


10-8:35 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.9 


117 


21.6 





418 




3 10 


8 


10-8:35 p.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.9 


117 


21.6 





418 




4 20 


8 


10-8:35 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.9 


117 


21.6 





418 




5 000 


4:27-4:50 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


July 2 
51.5 


3, 1908 
117 22.0 





421 




6 10 


4 


27-4:50 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.5 


117 


22.0 





421 




7 20 


4 


27-4:50 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.5 


117 


22.0 





421 




S 000 


5 


05-5:30 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 


52.1 


117 


20.2 





422 




9 10 


5 


05-5:30 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 


52.1 


117 


20.2 





422 




20 


5 


05-5:30 a.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


52.1 


117 


20.2 





422 




1 000 


7 


48-8:10 p.m. 


(40),. 


32 


51.7 


117 


20.7 





425 




2 10 


7 


48-8:10 p.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.7 


117 


20.7 





425 




3 20 


7 


48-8:10 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.7 


117 


20.7 





425 




4 000 


8 


20-8:42 p.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.8 


117 


22.0 





426 




5 30 


8 


20-8:42 p.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.8 


117 


22.0 





426 




6 20 


8 


20-8:42 p.m. 


(40),„ 


32 


51.8 


117 


22.0 





426 




7 000 


4:26-4:46 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 


July 2 
51.4 


4, 1908 
117 22.2 





430 




S 10 


4:26-4:46 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.4 


117 


22.2 





430 




9 20 


4:26-4:46 a.m. 


(40),, 


32 


51.4 


117 


22.2 





430 




0* 000 


4:58-5:18 a.m. 


(40.5) 


,32 


51.5 


117 


22.6 





431,432 




1» 10 


4:58-5:18 a.m. 


(40.5) 


,32 


51.5 


117 


22.6 





431, 432 




2* 20 


4:58-5:18 a.m. 


(40.5) 


,32 


51.5 


117 


22.6 





431, 432 




3 K.OOO 


12:33-12:41 p.m. 
12:50-1 :00 p.m. 

7:00-7:20 p.m. 


41,n 


32 


51.4 


117 


18.2 


92 






4 10 


41, n 


32 


1^1 4. 


117 


IS 9 









5 000 


41' 


August 
31 18.8 


26. 1908 
117 27.1 





467, 468 




6 10 


7:00-7:20 p.m. 


41' 


31 


18.8 


117 


27.1 





467, 468 




7 20 


7:00-7:20 p.m. 


41' 


31 


18.8 


117 


27.1 





467, 468 




S K.B. 


10:40 a.m. 


51'^- 


August 
29 7.4 


29. 1908 

118 17.0 


1.540 


549 




9 K.B. 


11 :45 a.m. 




51" 


29 


7.6 


118 


16.9 


1100 


553 




K.B. 


12:30 p.m. 




51" 


29 


7.8 


118 


16.9 


730 


556 




] K.B. 


12:50 p.m. 




5 p. 


29 


7.8 


118 


16.9 


550 


.558 




2 K.B. 


1 :45 p.m. 




51" 


29 


8.0 


ns 


16.9 


365 


561 




3 K.B. 


1:58 p.m. 




51" 


29 


8.1 


118 


16.9 


275 


563 




4 K.B. 


2:22 p.m. 




51" 


29 


8.2 


118 


16.9 


185 


566 




5 K.B. 


2:40 p.m. 




5]" 


29 


8.3 


118 


16.9 


137 


568 




6 K.B. 


2:54 p.m. 




51" 


29 


8.4 


118 


16.9 


92 


569 




7 K.B. 


3:05 p.m. 




51" 


29 


8.5 


lis 


16.8 


46 


571 




8 K.B. 


3:21 p.m. 




51" 


29 


8.5 


118 


16.8 


1280 


573 




From 4:55 to 


5:15 a.m. the bo 


at ilriftei 


from the 


position entered to 32° 5i:2 


N 117° 22 



IGO 



Vnii'ersitij of Califontia Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Eelative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part B- — Planlcton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



Appa- Time of day 

Haul ratus and 

number used duration of haul 



Position 



1619 
1620 
1621 

1622 
1623 
1624 

1625 
1626 
1627 
1628 
1629 

1634 
1635 
1636 

1637 
1638 
1639 
1640 



K.OOO 9:20-9:32 a.m. 
K.OOO 10:03-10:14 a.m. 
K.OOO 10:52-11:01 a.m. 



K.B 
K.B, 
K.B, 
K.B 
K.B 
K.B 
K.B 
K.B 

000 
12 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 



8:50 a.m. 

9:48 a.m. 
10:30 a.m. 
10:58 a.m. 
11:18 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
11:43 a.m. 
11:54 a.m. 

5:50-6:20 a.m. 
5:50-6:20 a.m. 
7:55 a.m. 
8:35 a.m. 
9:05 a.m. 
9:10 a.m. 
9:27 a.m. 



51'* 
51^' 
51. .5" 



26" 
26" 
26" 
26" 
26" 



44, 



■i4s 



44, 



N lat. W long. 

August 30, 1908 
29° 7:8 118° 16:9 
29 8.6 118 16.8 
29 8.6 118 17.5 

August 31, 1908 



28 20., 

28 20.8 

28 20.8 

28 20.8 

28 20.8 

28 20.8 

28 20.8 

28 20.8 
February 19, 1909 



116 10.8 

116 10.8 

116 10.8 

116 10.8 

116 10.8 

116 10.8 

116 10.8 

116 10.8 



32 41.5 

32 41.5 

32 41.5 

32 41.5 

32 41.5 

32 41.5 

32 41.5 



39.7 
39.7 
39.7 



117 39.7 
117 39.7 



39.7 
39.7 



117 31.8 
June 17. 1909 
32 51.3 117 16.7 



1641* 20 42i„ 

1642* 12 42,„ 32 52.3 117 31.8 

1643* 000 42,0 32 52.3 117 31.8 

1644 K.B. 12:40 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.5 117 30.6 

1645 K.B. 12:55 p.m. 42i„ 32 51.3 117 30.0 

1646 K.B. 1:10 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.0 117 29.2 

1647 K.B. 1:15 p.m. 42i, 32 51.2 117 28.8 

June 16, 1909 

1648 K.B. 3:36 p.m. 42,„ 32 52.1 117 32.1 

1649 K.B. 4:05 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.9 117 31.5 

1650 000 5:05-5:50 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.7 117 32.4 

1651 12 5:0.5-5:50 p.m. 42„ 32 51.7 117 32.4 

1652 12 6:10-6:45 p.m. 42„ 32 51.7 117 32.4 

1653 000 6:10-6:45 p.m. 42,„ 32 .51.7 117 32.4 
16.54 12 6:55-7:20 p.m. 42,„ 32 50.9 117 31.8 
1655 000 6:5.5-7:20 p.m. 42,„ 32 50.9 117 31.8 
16.56 12 7:2.5-8:00 p.m. 42,„ 32 50.9 117 31.8 

1657 000 7:25-8:00 p.m. 42,„ 32 50.9 

1658 12 5:00-6:00 p.m. (39,„) 

1659 000 5:00-6:00 p.m. (39,„) 

1660 000 6:00-6:45 p.m. (39,„) 

1661 000 6:4.5-7:30 p.m. (39,„) 

1662 000 7:30-8:00 p.m. (39,,,) 

1666 12 8:4.5-9:15 a.m. 39, 

1667 000 8:4.5-9:15 a.m. 39, 

1668 S.N.I 9:05-9:30 a.m. 39, 

1671 K.B. 5:36 p.m. 42„ 

1672 12 5:.55-6:20p.m. 42,„ 32 51.8 117 30.4 

1673 000 5:. 5.5-6 :20 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.8 117 30.4 

1674 K.B. 6:00 p.m. 42,„ 32 .52.0 117 31.3 

1675 K.B. 6:15 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.8 117 30.5 

1676 K.B. 6:36 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.8 117 29.9 

1677 S.N.I 6:40 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.8 117 29.8 

1678 K.B. 6:45 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.7 117 29;7 

1679 12 7:00-7:35 p.m. 43,„ 32 52.0 117 32.9 
16.80 000 7:00-7:35 p.m. 4.3„ 32 52.0 117 32.9 

1681 12 7:40-8:15 p.m. 43,„ 32 52.1 117 33.1 

1682 000 7:40-8:15 p.m. 43,„ 32 52.1 117 33.1 

1683 K.OOO 8:10-8:40 p.m. 43„ 32 .52.8 117 33.2 

1684 K.OOO 9:20-9:45 p.m. 43„ 32 53.0 117 32.7 

'Hauls began at 11:45 a.m. and ended at 12:45 p.m. 



32 51.3 
32 51.3 

32 
32 



16.7 

16.7 

1.3 117 16.7 

51.3 117 16.7 

June 19, 1909 

32 37.1 117 14.5 

32 37.1 117 14.5 

32 37.1 117 14.5 

June 21, 1909 
32 52.8 117 32.2 



Depth 
meters 



185 

1430 

1100 

730 

365 

185 

137 

92 

46 





920 

460 

185 



Water 
sample 
number Remarks 

Failed to close 

648 
652 
655 
657 
659 
661 
663 
664 

882, 883 



Imperfectly closed 
Imperfectly closed 



891 
892 
894 



978 
979 



Imperfectly closed 







365 

275 
185 
92 

730 981 

550 983 





984 

984 Sun-down 6:. 54 

p.m. 



985 

985 

Surface tempera- 

ture correspond- 

ing to hauls 

1658-1662 was 

18?4. Boat at 

mooring 



37 

460 988 





365 989 

275 990 

185 991 Sun-down 6:55 

92-0 p.m. 

92 993 





994 

994 

460 

275 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Ilydrographic Records of Scripijs Institiilioii 



161 



Table 5. — D.\ta Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 





Arpa- 


Time of dav 






Po 


sition 




Depth 


Water 




Hnul 


ratus 


and 












in 


sample 














umber 


used 


duraliou of hau 


Sectio 


n N lat. 


W 


ong. 


meters 


number 


Remarks 












June 


22. 1909 








1685 


12 


4:00-5:00 a.m 


43„ 


32° 


53:2 


117' 


36:5 





995 




1686 


000 


4:00-5:00 a.m 


43„ 


32 


53.2 


117 


36.5 





995 




1687 


000 


4:00-5:00 a.m 


43„ 


32 


53.2 


117 


36.5 





995 


Same haul as 1686 


1688 


L.N.I 
000 


4:40-5:20 a.m 
5:15-6:10 a.m 


43„ 
43„ 


32 
32 


52.6 

52.8 


117 
117 


36.6 
35.7 


185 







1689 


"996 




1690 


K.OOO 


6:3.5-6:50 a.m 


43,. 


32 


52.9 
Tune 


117 35.6 
23. 1909 


365 












1691 


L.N.I 
K.B. 


4:5.5-5:20 a.m 
5:50 a.m. 


42,„ 
42,0 


32 
32 


52 
52 


117 
117 


30 
30 


185 
460 






1692 




Imperfectly closed 


1693 


K.B. 


6:00 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


185 


998 




1694 


12 


4:5.5-6:00 a.m 


42„ 


32 


52 


117 


30 





997, 999 




1695 


000 


4:. 5.5-6: 00 a.m 


42„ 


32 


52 


117 


30 





997, 999 




1697 


12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 


6:10-6:50 a.m 
6:10-6:50 a.m 
6:3.5-7:00 a.m 
7:2.5-7:45 a.m 
8:1.5-8:25 a.m 
7: 00-8:. 55 a.m 


42,0 
42,„ 
42,0 
42,0 
42,0 
42,0 


32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 


52 
52 
52 
52 

52 
52 


117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 


30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 






460 

365 

" 






1698 






1699 






1700 






1701 






1702 


1000 




1703 


000 


7:00-8:55 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1000 




1704 


K.OOO 


8:.5.5-9:17a.m 


42,„ 


32 


52 
June 


117 30 
24, 1909 


92 












1 705 


K.B. 


3:55 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


640 


1002 


Struck bottom 


1706 


K.B. 


4:27 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


.550 




Imperfectly closed 


1707 


K.B. 


4:50 p.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52 


117 


30 


460 


1003 


1708 


S.N.I 
K.B. 


4:58-5:15 p.m 
5:50 p.m. 


42,0 
42,. 


32 
32 


52 
52 


117 
117 


30 
30 


92 
365 






1709 


1005 




1710 


K.B. 


6:05 p.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52 


117 


30 


275 


1006 




1711 


12 


5:0.5-6:15 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1004 




1712 


000 


5:0.5-6:15 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1004 




1714 


K.OOO 
12 


6:2.5-6:45 p.m 
6:20-7:05 p.m 


42,0 
42,0 


32 
32 


52 

52 


117 
117 


30 
30 


185 







1715 


1007 




1716 


000 


6:20-7:05 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1007 




1717 


K.OOO 
12 


7:15-7:35 p.m 
7:15-8:23 p.m 


42,0 
42,0 


32 
32 


52 
52 


117 
117 


30 
30 


550 







1718 


1008,1009 




1719 


000 


7:1.5-8:23 p.m 


42,,, 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1008,1009 














June 


25, 1909 








1721 


K.B. 


3:47 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


460 


1010 




1722 


K.B. 


4:07 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


365 


1012 




1723 


K.B. 


4:25 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


275 


1013 




1724 


K.B. 


4:44 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


460 


1014 




1725 


S.N.I 

K.OOO 

12 


4:44-5:15 p.m 
5: 00-5:. 55 p.m 
5:10-6:10 p.m 


42,0 
42,0 
42,0 


32 
32 
32 


52 
52 
52 


117 
117 
117 


30 
30 
30 


1H5 

550 








1726 






1727 


1015 




1728 


000 


5:10-6:10 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1015 




1729 


K.OOO 
12 


6:13-6:35 p.m 
6:1.5-7:00 p.m 


42,0 
42,0 


32 
32 


52 
52 


117 
117 


30 
30 


460 







1730 


1015,1016 


Water was bril- 


1731 


000 


6:15-7:00 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1015,1016 


liantly phos- 


1732 


K.OOO 


6:53-7:14 p.m 
7:0.3-7:40 p.m 


42,„ 


32 


52 


117 


30 


400 




phorescent 
throughout 


1 733 


12 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1016,1017 


1734 


000 


7:03-7:40 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1016,1017 


the evening 


1735 


K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 


7:34-7:54 p.m 
8:12-8:32 p.m 
7:4.5-8:41 p.m 


42,0 
42,0 
42,0 


32 
32 
32 


52 
52 

52 


117 
117 
117 


30 
30 
30 


295 

200 








1736 






1737 


1017,1018 




1738 


000 


7:4.5-8:41 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1017,1018 




1739 


K.OOO 


8:41-9:01 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 
June 


117 30 
28, 1909 


92 












1740 


K.B. 


4:43 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


730 


1020 




1741 


K.B. 


5:10 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


715 




Imperfectly closed 


1742 


K.B. 


6:00 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


365 


1021 


1743 


12 


5:00-6:20 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1022 




1744 


000 


5:00-6:20 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1022 




1745 


K.OOO 
12 


6:28-6:48 p.m 
6:3.5-7:11 pm. 


42,0 
42,0 


32 
32 


52 
52 


117 
117 


30 
30 


365 







1746 


1023 




1747 


000 


6:3.5-7:11 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 





1023 




1748 


K.OOO 


7:10-7:35 p.m 


42,0 


32 


52 


117 


30 


46 







162 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



1750 
1751 
1752 
1753 
1754 
1755 
1756 

1757 
1758 
1759 
1760 
1761 
1762 
1763 
1764 



12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

000 

12 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 



1766 12 

1767 000 
176S 12 
1769 000 



1770 

1771 

1772 

1773 

1774 

1775 

1776 

1777 

1778' 

1779* 

17S3 
1784 
17S5 
1786 
1787 
1788 
1789 
1790 
1791 
1792 
]793t S.N.I 



S.N.I 
12 
000 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
12 
000 

12 

000 

S.N.I 

12 

000 

S.N.I 

S.N.I 

12 

000 

R.N.I 



1794t 

1 795t 

1796t 

1797 

1798 

1799 

1800 

ISOl 

1802 

1803 

1804 

1 805 

1 806 
1807 
1808 
1 809 
1810 



S.N.I 

12 

000 

S.N.I 

S.N.I 

12 

noo 

S.N.I 

S.N.I 

12 

000 
S.N.I 
S.N.I 
L.N.I 
L.N.I 
12 

000 



Table 5. — 
Part B- 

Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 



Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
-PlanMon CoUections of Quantitative Significance 



15-8:00 p.m. 
15-8:00 p.m. 
42-8:05 p.m. 
15-8:38 p.m. 
10-8:50 p.m. 
10-8:50 p.m. 
50-9:16 p.m. 

4:30-4:40 a.m. 
4:30-5:30 a.m. 
4:30-5:30 a.m. 
5:25-5:50 a.m. 
5:55-6:20 a.m. 
5:40-6:35 a.m. 
5:40-6:35 a.m. 
6:30-7:10 a.m. 

00-4:25 p.m. 
00-4:25 p.m. 
1.5-9 :00 p.m. 
1.5-9:00 p.m. 

7:25-7:45 a.m. 

7:55-8:23 a.m. 

7:5.5-8:23 a.m. 
10:56 a.m. 
11:27 a.m. 
11:53 a.m. 
12:12 p.m. 
12:30 p.m. 



4:50-5:11 a.m. 

4:50-5:11 a.m. 

5:00-5:23 a.m. 

5:56-6:30 a.m. 

5:56-6:30 a.m. 

6:00-6:35 a.m. 

6:36-6:48 a.m. 

6:37-7:00 a.m. 

6:37-7:00 a.m. 

6:50-7:10 a.m. 

9:38-9:48 a.m. 

9:52-10:09 a.m. 

9:38-10:11 a.m. 

9:38-10:11 a.m. 
12:4.5-1:05 p.m. 

1:10-1:35 p.m. 
12:4.5-1 :36 p.m. 
12:45-1:36 p.m. 

1:38-2:00 p.m. 

4:2.3-4:150 p.m. 

4:23-4:50 p.m. 

4:23-4:50 p.m. 

4:5.5-5:25 p.m. 

5:3.5-6:00 p.m. 

6:10-6:35 p.m. 

6:43-7:05 p.m. 

6:1.5-7:05 p.m. 

6:1.5-7:05 p.m. 



47s 

46..59 

46..5, 

46..5a 

42, 

42, 

42, 

42, 

42, 

41, 

41, 

41, 

41, 

41, 

41, 

41, 

41, 

41, 



N lat. 
July 
32° 52' 
32 52 
32 52 
32 52 
32 52 
32 52 
32 52 

June 
32 .52 
32 52 
32 52 
32 52 
32 52 
32 52 
32 52 
32 52 

June 30, 1909 
32 50.1 118 3.1 
32 50.1 118 3.1 
32 49.1 118 23.0 
32 49.1 118 23.0 

July 1, 1909 
32 47.7 118 26.3 
32 48.1 



117° 30' 
117 30 
117 30 
117 30 
117 30 
117 30 
117 30 
29, 1909 
117 30 
117 30 
117 30 



117 
117 



117 30 
117 30 



118 25.7 
118 25.7 
118 21.5 
118 21.5 
118 21.5 
118 21.5 
118 21.5 
lis 21.5 
32 .52.0 118 21.5 

July 2. 1909 
32 48.6 118 20.4 
From 4:50 to 7:15 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 48.1 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 .52.0 



32 48.0 

32 44.5 

32 44.5 

32 44.5 

32 44.5 

32 41.2 

32 41.2 

32 41.2 

32 41.2 

32 41.2 

32 40.0 

32 40.0 

32 40.0 

32 40.0 

32 40.0 

32 40.0 

32 40.0 

32 40.0 



118 17.5 

117 53.5 

117 53.5 

117 53.5 

117 53.5 

117 32.3 

117 32.3 

117 32.3 

117 32.3 

117 32.3 

117 26.0 

117 26.0 

117 26.0 

117 26.0 



26.0 
26.0 
26.0 
26.0 



Depth 
meters 





92 

185 

• 



275 

185 





92 

46 





275 









825 
640 
460 



Water 
sample 
number 



1023 
1023 



1024 

1024 



1025 
1025 



Net badly torn 



1026 
1026 



1045 
1045 
1054 
10.54 



1060 
1060 
1063 
1064 



1065 
1066 



Imperfectly closed 



1068.1069 
1068,1069 



1071,1072 
1071,1072 



1073 
1073 



1081,1082 
1081,1082 



1088,1089 
1088,1089 



1092 
1092 



32 40.0 117 26.0 



1095 
1095 



* Haul began 10:52 a.m. and ended at 12:40 p.m. 

fFrom 9:38 to 10:11 a.m. the boat drifted from tlie position entered to 43° 4415 N 117° 50:0 W. 



1915] 



Michael, et aJ.: HijdroyrapJiic Records of Scripps Institution 



1C3 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plan.cton Hauls — {Continued) 
Part B — Planl'ton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



1811 
1812 
1813 
1814 
1815 
1816 
1817 
1818 
1819 
1820 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1821 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 



used 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.O0O 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

S.N.I 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

S.N.I 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

000 
000 
K.OOO 
K.OOO 
S.N.I 
K.OOO 
K.OOO 
K.OOO 
K.OOO 
K.OOO 
000 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

12 

000 

K.OOO 



duration of haul 



4:10-4 
4:10-4 
4:2.5-5 
4:50-5 
4:50-5 
5:30-5 
6:0.5-6 
5:40-6 
5:40-6 
6:32-6 
7:07-7 
6:40-7 
6:40-7 
6:30-6 
6:00-7 
6:00-7 
6:40-7 
6:5.5-7 

7:04-7 
7:04-7 
7:05-7 
7:51-8 



: ot)-8 
: 5.5-8 



:45 a.m. 
:45 a.m. 
00 a.m. 
:35 a.m. 
:35 a.m. 
:55 a.m. 
:25 a.m. 
:35 a.m. 
:35 a.m. 
:55 a.m. 
:35 a.m. 
:36 a.m. 
:36 p.m. 
:50 p.m. 
:00 p.m. 
:00 p.m. 
:03 p.m. 
:20 p.m. 
:45 p.m. 
:50 p.m. 
:50 p.m. 
:52 p.m. 
:20 p.m. 
:25 p.m. 
:25 p.m. 



10:20-11:05 a.m. 
11:20 a.m. 
11:4.5-11:55 a.m. 
12:3.5-12:45 p.m. 
12:40-1:00 p.m. 
12:5.5-1:05 p.m. 

1:17-1:28 p.m. 

1:3.5-1:45 p.m. 

1:50-2:00 p.m. 

2:10-2:20 p.m. 

2:45 p.m. 



3:50-4 

3:30-4 

3:30-4 

4:3.3-4 

4:. 53-5 

4:20-5 

4:20-5 

5:12-5 

5:27-5 

5:. 50-6 

6:10-6 

5:18-6 

5:18-6 

6:18-6 

6:38-6 

6:15 

6:1.5 

6:. 5.3 

7:1.5-7 

7:03-7 

7:03-7 

7:3.5-7 

7:55-8 

7:40-8 

7:40-8 

8:16-8 



:00 a.m. 
15 a.m. 
:15 a.m. 
;43 a.m. 
:05 a.m. 
;15 a.m. 
:15 a.m. 

22 a.m. 
40 a.m. 
03 a.m. 

23 a.m. 
:25 a.m. 
25 a.m. 

:30 p.m. 
:48 p.m. 
00 p.m. 
:00 p.m. 
: OS p.m. 

25 p.m. 
36 p.m. 
36 p.m. 
45 p.m. 
05 p.m. 
15 p.m. 
15 p.m. 

26 p.m. 



42,0 
42,„ 
42,„ 
42,0 
42,0 
42,,, 
42,0 
42,0 
42,„ 
42,0 
42,0 
42,0 
42,„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40,1 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 
40„ 

(40),„ 
(40),„ 
(40),„ 
(40),, 
(40),,, 
(40),.. 
(40),„. 
(40),„. 
(40),, 
(40),„ 
(39,,) 

(40),, 
(40),, 
(40),, 
(40),, 
(40j„ 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),, 
(40),, 
(40),, 
(40),, 
(40),, 
(401,. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),. 
(40),,, 



1 N lat. 
July 
32° 52:0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 .52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 52.0 

32 53.2 

32 53.2 

•32 53.2 

32 53.2 

32 53.2 

32 53.2 

32 53.2 

32 53.2 

32 5.3.2 

32 53.2 

32 53.2 

32 53.2 

July f 

32 51.3 

32 51.3 

32 52.0 

32 52.2 

32 52.5 

32 52.5 

32 52.5 

32 52.5 

32 52.3 

32 52.1 

32 52.0 

July S 

32 .52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 .52.3 

32 52.3 

32 .52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 

32 52.3 



W long. 
7, 1909 
117° 30:0 



Depth 



mete 



Water 
sample 
number 



Re: 



arks 



30.0 
30.0 
30.0 
30.0 



117 30.0 

117 30.0 

117 30.0 

117 30.0 



117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 

117 20.0 

117 20.0 



30.0 
30.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 



20.0 
20.0 



117 18.8 

117 19.2 

117 19.3 

117 19.5 

117 19.5 

117 19.5 

117 19.0 

117 18.6 

117 18.4 

117 17.4 



20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 



1103 

1103 

185 

1104 

1104 

92 

46 

1105 

1105 

18 

9 

1105 

1105 

185 

1106,1107 

1106,1107 

8 

92 

46 

1107,1108 

1107,1108 

16 

1108,1109 

1108,1109 



37-0 

27 

18 

14 

9 

9 

55 

92 

275-0 

140 Failed to close 

1112,1113 

1112,1113 

46 

1113,1114 

1113,1114 

15 

9 

92 

64 

1115 

1115 

55 

27 

1116 

1116 

14 

92 

1116 

1116 

185 

46 

1117,1118 

1117,1118 



164 



University of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (^Continued) 
Fart B — FlanMon Collections of Quantitative Significance 





Appa- 


Time of dar 






Position 




Depth 


Water 


Haul 


ratus 


and 












in 


sample 










lumber 


used 


duration of haul 


Section 


Nlat. 


Wlong. 


meters 


number Remarks 












Julv 9, 1909 






1874 


12 


8:45-11:35 p.m. 


(40)„ 


32° 


52:3 


117° 


20:0 





1119 


187.5 


000 


8:4.5-11:35 p.m. 


(40).„ 


32 


52.3 


117 


20.0 





1119 


1876 


K.OOO 


11:30-11:45 p.m. 
11:49-11:59 p.m. 


(40),, 
(40)„ 


32 


52.3 


117 


20.0 


46 




1877 


K.OOO 


32 


52.3 117 20.0 
July 10, 1909 


27 








1878 


K.OOO 


12:12-12:23 a.m. 


(40)„ 


32 


52.3 


117 


20.0 


18 




1879 


K.OOO 


12:27-12:37 a.m. 


(40)„ 
(40)„ 
(40),o 


32 


52.3 


117 


20.0 


9 




1880* 


12 




32 


52.3 


117 


20.0 





1119^1120 


1881* 


000 




32 


52.3 


117 


20.0 





1119,1120 


1882 


12 


12:55-4:28 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


.53.0 


117 


18.0 





1121 


1883 


000 


12:55-4:28 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


,53.0 


117 


18.0 





1121 


1884 


K.OOO 


4:2.5-4:40 a.m. 


40n 


32 


53.0 


117 


18.0 


46 




1885 


K.OOO 


4:4.5-4:55 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 




18.0 






1886 


K.OOO 
12 


5:03-5:15 a.m. 
4:3.5-5:20 a.m. 


40.1 
40„ 


32 
32 


53.0 
53.0 


117 


18.0 
18.0 


18 





18S7 


1122 


1888 


000 


4:35-5:20 a.m. 


40,1 


32 


53.0 


117 


18.0 





1122 


1889 


K.OOO 
K.OOO 


5:19-5:30 a.m. 
5:36-5:50 a.m. 


40„ 
40„ 


32 
32 


53.0 
53.0 


117 


18.0 
18.0 


9 
92 




1890 


Failed to close 


1891 


12 


5:2.5-5:55 a.m. 


40„ 


32 


53.0 




18.0 





1122,1123 


1892 


000 


5:25-5:55 a.m. 


40n 


32 


53.0 


117 


18.0 





1122, 1123 










August 


31, 1909 






1894 


K.B. 


1:50 p.m. 
2:10 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


.53.1 


118 


24.5 


365 




1895 


K.B. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 


460 


118.5 


1896 


K.B. 


2:21 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


118 


24.5 


275 


1187 


1897 


K.B. 
K.B. 


2:45 p.m. 
3:00 p.m. 


53„ 
53„ 


32 
32 


53.1 
53.1 


117 
117 


24.5 
24.5 


365 
137 




1898 


Imperfectly closed 


1899 


K.B. 


3:02 p.m. 


53,, 


32 


53.1 


117 


24.5 


92 


1190 


1900 


K.B. 


3:10 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


.53.1 


117 


24.5 


135 


1191 


1901 


K.B. 


3:25 p.m. 


53„ 


32 


53.1 


117 


24.5 


46 


1193 










September 1, 


909 






1902 


000 


5:46-6:06 a.m. 


53, 


32 


47.3 


118 


27.3 





1203 


1903 


12 


5:46-6:06 a.m. 


53, 


32 


47.3 


118 


27.3 





1203 


1905 


K.B. 


8:22 a.m. 


55,„ 


32 


51.2 


118 


35.5 


475 


1213 Struck bottom 


1906 


000 


12: 40-12:. 50 p.m. 


56„ 


33 


0.0 


118 


41.2 





1237 


1907 


12 


12:40-12:50 p.m. 


56,, 


33 


0.0 


118 


41.2 





1237 


1908 


20 


12:40-12:50 p.m. 


56,, 


33 


0.0 


118 


41.2 





1237 


1909 


L.N.I 


12:.5.5-1 :25 p.m. 


56,, 


33 


0.0 


118 


41.2 


92 










September 2. 


909 






1910 


000 


5:52-6:13 a.m. 


5.5, 


32 


37.2 


118 


37.2 





1262 


1911 


12 


5 :.52-6 :13 a.m. 


.55, 


32 


37.2 


lis 


37.2 





1262 


1912 


20 


5:52-6:13 a.m. 


55- 


32 


37.2 


118 


37.2 





1262 


1914 


K.B. 


10:09 a.m. 


60^ 


32 


22.6 


118 


58.5 


320 


Mud haul 


1915 


000 


2:0.5-2:27 p.m. 


61, 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 





1298 


1916 


12 


2:0.5-2:27 p.m. 


61c 


32 


2S.0 


119 


3.0 





129S 


1917 


20 


2:0.5-2:27 p.m. 


61c, 


32 


28.0 


119 


3.0 





1298 


1918 


12 


6:20-6:40 p.m. 


56, 


32 


40.0 


lis 


39.2 





1314, 1315 


1919 


20 


6:20-6:40 p.m. 


56, 


32 


40.0 


118 


39.2 





1314, 1315 










September 3. 


909 






1920 


000 


6:00-6:37 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.5 


lis 


20.3 





1323, 1324 


1921 


12 


6:00-6:37 a.m. 


52,0 


32 


48.5 


118 


20.3 





1323,1324 


1922 


20 


6:00-6:37 a.m. 


52,„ 


32 


48.5 


lis 


20.3 





1323, 1324 


1923 


K.OOO 


8:32-8:40 a.m. 


49„ 


32 


49.4 


118 


3.8 


46 




1924 


K.OOO 


9:14-9:44 a.m. 


48,0 


32 


50.1 


118 


1.5 


730 


Net struck bottom 


1925 


K.OOO 


10:41-11:11 a.m. 


48,0 


32 


51.2 




59.1 


.550 


Net slijjhtly torn 


1926 


k!ooo 


12:21-12:52 p.m. 
1:22-1 :49 p.m. 
2:17-2:40 p.m. 
2:53-3:12 p.m. 
3:22-3:37 p.m. 
6:14-6:43 p.m. 


47,0 


32 


52.1 


117 


57.0 


365 




1927 


K.OOO 


47„ 


32 


52.6 




55.9 


230 




1928 


K.oon 


47„ 


32 


53.2 


117 


54.S 


137 




1929 


K.OOO 


47„ 


32 


53.6 


117 


53.7 


92 




1930 


K.OOO 


47„ 


32 


53.9 


117 


53.2 


46 




1931 


000 


42,0 


32 


52.0 




30.0 





i3,56,"l3.57 


1932 


12 


6:14-6:43 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 




30.0 





1356, 1357 


1933 


20 


6:14-6:43 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 




30.0 





1356, 1357 



Haul began 11:35 p.m. July 9 and ended 12:45 a.m. July 10. 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Ilydrographic Eecords of Scripps Instifudon 



16:5 



Table 5. — Data Eelative to Plankton Haui.."' — (Continued) 
Part B — PlanMon Collections of Quantitative Significance 





Appa- 


Time of day 






Pos 


ition 




Depth 


Wa 


ter 


Haul 
number 




and 
duration of hau 
















pie 

ber Remarks 


used 


Section 


Nlat. 


W long. 


meters 


niia 










September 17. 


1909 








1934 


12 


8:00-9:00 a.m f39.5,„ 


) 32 


5ir2 


117 


' 17:5 

















September 27, 


1909 








1935 


12 


8:43-9:00 a.m 


(39.5,„ 


) 32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





1363 














3ctober 


4, 1909 








1936 


12 


9:10-9:30 a.m 


(39..5,„ 


) 32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





1364. 


1365 










October 


11. 1909 








1038 


12 


9:00-9:20 a.m 


(39.5,0 


) 32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





1366, 


1367 










October 


18, 1909 








1940 


12 


8:5.5-9:15 a.m 


(39.5,0 


) 32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





1368, 


1369 










November 2, 


1909 








1941 


000 


6:00-6:20 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





1376, 


1377 


1942 


12 


6:00-6:20 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





1376, 


1377 


1943 


20 


6:00-6:20 a.m 


42,0 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 





1376, 


1377 


1944 


K.OOO 
K.OOO 
K.OOO 
K.OOO 

K.B. 

K.B. 


6:21-6:41 a.m 
6:50-7:05 a.m 
7:16-7:30 a.m 
7:43-8:03 a.m 
9:59 a.m. 
10:20 a.m. 


42,„ 
42,0 
42„ 
42,0 
42,0 
42,0 


32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 


52.0 
52.0 
52.0 
52.0 
52.0 
52.0 


117 
117 
117 
117 

117 
117 


30.0 
30.0 
30.0 
30.0 
30.0 
30.0 


46 
92 
185 
365 
.550 
365 




Sunrise 6:12 a 


1946 






1947 






1948 






1949 






1950 


138.5" 




1951 


K.B. 


10:34 a.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


30.0 


185 


1386 




1952 


K.B. 
K.B. 

000 


10:45 a.m. 42,„ 
10:53 a.m. 42,„ 
12:04-12:26 p.m. 41 „ 


32 
32 
32 


52.0 
.52.0 
52.0 


117 
117 
117 


30.0 
30.0 
26.0 


92 

46 







1953 






1954 


1389" 




1955 


12 


12:04-12:26 p.m. 41,„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


26.0 





1389 




1956 


20 


12:04-12:26 p.m. 41,„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


26.0 





1389 




1957 


K.B, 


1:12 p.m. 


40.,5„ 


32 


53.8 


117 


22.5 


365 


1392 


Struck bottom 


1958 


K.B. 
K.B. 


1:12 p.m. 
1:32 p.m. 


40.5,, 
40.5,, 


32 
32 


53.8 
.53.8 


117 
117 


22.5 
22.5 


365 

185 




Mud haul 


1959 


1393" 




1960 


K.B. 
K.B. 


1:40 p.m. 
1:46 p.m. 


40.5,, 
40.5,, 


32 .53.8 117 

32 53.8 117 

November 3, 


22.5 
22.5 

909 


92 
46 






1961 












1963 


K.OOO 
K.OOO 
K.OOO 
K.OOO 
000 


2:53-3:15 p.m 
4:20-4:35 p.m 
4:40-4:50 p.m 
5:06-5:14 p.m 
5:0.5-5:45 p.m 


42,,, 
42„ 
42„ 
42„ 
42„ 


32 52.0 117 
32 53.2 117 
32 .53.4 117 
32 53.6 117 
From 5:00 to e 


30.0 
30.0 
30.0 
.30.0 
:00 


.550 

365 

185 

92 








1964 






1965 






1966 






1967 


1404" 




1968 


12 


5:0-5-5:45 p.m 


42„ 


r 


.m. boat flrif tofl 





1404 




1969 


20 


5:0.5-5:45 p.m 


42„ 


from above posi- 





1404 




1970 


K.OOO 
K.OOO 


5:20-5:30 p.m 
5:33-5:43 p.m 
5:47-5:57 p.m 


42,1 
42„ 


tion to follow- 
ing position 
32 54.1 117 30.0 
November 4. 1909 


55 
37 






1971 






1972 


K.OOO 


42„ 


18 












1973 


K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 


11 :52 a.m. 

12:42 p.m. 

1:18 p.m. 


42, 
42. 
42, 


32 40.6 117 30.3 

32 40.6 117 30.3 

32 40.6 117 30.3 

November .■;. 1909 


1200 

1100 

820 




Struck bottom 


1974 






1975 












1976 


K.OOO 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

K.OOO 

000 

12 

20 

K.OOO 


9:4.5-10:00 a.n 
10:4.5-11:00 a.n 
11:2.5-11:35 a.n 
ll:4.5-ll:.59a.n 
12:11-12:35 p.n 


1. 42, 
1. 42, 
1. 42, 
1. 42, 
1. 42, 
42, 
.. 42, 
.. 42, 
1. 42, 


32 40.6 117 30.3 
32 40.6 117 30.3 
32 40.6 117 30.3 
32 40.6 117 30.3 
32 40.6 117 30.3 
32 40.6 117 30.3 
32 40.6 117 30.3 
32 40.6 117 30.3 
32 40.6 117 30.3 
December 8. 1909 


1000 

730 

365 

185 

92 







46 






1977 






1978 






1979 






1980 






1981* 


1437' 
1437 
1437 




1982* 






1983* 






1984 


12:42-i2":'52"p.'ii 










1985 


12 


8:4.5-9:00 a.m 


(39.5,.^ 


32 
De 


51.2 
cember 


117 
24. 


17.5 

1909 





1439 




1986 


12 


8: 40-8:. 55 a.m 


(39.5,„) 32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





1440, 


1441 










.1 


»nuar.v 


16. 1910 








1987 


12 


10:00-10:15 a.n 


1. (39.5,0 


32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





1442, 


1443 










Februarv 3. 1910 








1988 


12 


9:00-9:20 a.m 


(39.5,0 


32 


51.2 


117 


17.5 





1444, 


1445 



Haul began at 11:50 a.m. anrl ended at 12:42 p.m. 



166 Viii versify of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 

Part B — Planlcton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Appa- Time of day Position Depth Water 

sample 



number used duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters number Remarks 

February 17, 1910 

1989 S.N.I 6:4.3 a.m. 42, 32° 38:6 117° 28:5 46-29 

1990 S.N.I 7:03 a.m. 42, From 6:13 to 8:07 92-46 

1991 000 6:20-7:15 a.m. 42, a.m. boat drifted 1452 Sunrise 6:35 a.m., 

1992 12 6:20-7:15 a.m. 42, from above posi- 1452 bright and clear 

1993 20 6:20-7:15 a.m. 42, tion to follow- 1452 throughout the 

1994 S.N.I 7:17 a.m. 42, ing position 137-92 entire day 

1995 S.N.I 8:07 a.m. 42, 32 40.0 117 32.0 185-137 ...., 

1996 S.N.I 8:27 a.m. 42, From 8:07 to 11:47 275-185 

1997 L.N.I 9:35 a.m. 42, a.m. boat drifted 36.5-275 

1998 000 7:30-9:25 a.m. 42, from above posi- 1453 

1999 12 7:30-9:25 a.m. 42, tion to follow- 1453 

2000 20 7:30-9:25 a.m. 42, ing position 1453 

2001 L.N.I 10:06 a.m. 42, 460-365 

2002 L.N.I 10:38 a.m. 42, 32 38.5 117 31.5 550-18 

February 18, 1910 

2003 K.B. 3:10 p.m. 42,„ 32 52.0 117 32.0 365 1465 Weather bright 

2004 K.B. 3:21p.m. 42i„ From 2:.52 to 5:35 275 1466 and clear until 

2005 K.B. 8:35 p.m. 42.5,„ p.m. boat drifted 185 1467 sunset at 5:40 

2006 K.B. 3:48 p.m. 43,„ from the above 92 1469 p.m. Twilight. 

2007 K.B. 3:55 p.m. 43i„ position 46 1470 lasted until 7:00 

2008 K.B. 4:00 p.m. 43,o 18 1471 after which it 

2009 K.B. 4:21 p.m. 43,„ 550 was clear but 

2010 000 2:52-4:25 p.m. 42..5,„ 1464,1468 very dark 

2011 12 2:52-4:25 p.m. 42..5,„ 1464,1468 

2012 20 2:52-4:25 p.m. 42.5,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 1464,1468 

2013 S.N.I 5:52 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 .5.50-365 

2014 000 4:50-6:15 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 1472 

2015 12 4:50-6:15 p.m. 42„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 1472 

2016 20 4:50-6:15 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 1472 

2017 S.N.I 6:30 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 36.5-275 

2018 S.N.I 6:57 p.m. 42„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 27.5-185 

2019 S.N.I 7:19 p.m. 42,, 32 51.2 117 31.5 18.5-92 

2020 S.N.I 7:35 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 92-46 

2021 S.N.I 7:47 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 46-0 

2022 S.N.I 8:00 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 46-18 

2023 S.N.I 8:08 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 18-0 

2024 000 6:2.5-8:22 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 1473 

2025 12 6:2.5-8:22 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 1473 

2026 20 6:25-8:22 p.m. 42,„ 32 51.2 117 31.5 1473 

March 15, 1910 

2027 L.N.I 1:32 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 550-460 

2028 000 1:12-1 :50 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 1483 

2029 12 1:12-1:. 50 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 1483 

2030 20 1:12-1:50 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 1483 

2031 L.N.I 2:01p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 460-365 Fog gathering 

2032 L.N.I 2:28 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 36.5-275 and dispersing 

2033 000 2:00-2:43 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 14S4 throughout the 
20.34 12 2:00-2:43 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 1484 afternoon 

2035 20 2:00-2:43 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 1484 

2036 L.N.I 3:00 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 27.5-185 

2037 L.N.I 3:35p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 18.5-137 

2038 L.N.I 3:52p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 137-92 

2039 000 2:47-4:03 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 1485 

2040 12 2:47-4:03 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 1485 

2041 20 2:47-4:03 p.m. 42, 32 404 117 31.0 1485 

2042 L.N.I 4:05 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 92-46 

2043 L.N.I 4:18 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 46-18 

2044 000 4:25-5:20 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 1486 

2045 12 4:2.5-5:20 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 I486 

2046 20 4:2.5-5:20 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 1486 

2047 L.N.I 5:26 p.m. 42, 32 40.4 117 31.0 46-18 

March 16. 1910 

2048 L.N.I 1:20 p.m. 42, 32 39.2 117 27.0 5.50-460 Struck bottom 

2049 000 1:10-1 :50 p.m. 41..5, 1 :00 to 1 :50 drifted 1494 

2050 12 1:10-1 :50 p.m. 51.5, from above to fol- 1494 

lowing position 



I 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



167 









Table 5. — 


Data K 


ELATI\ 


lY. TO 


Plankton 






Part B- 


-PlanTcton Collections of Quan 




Appa- 


Time of day 






Po 


sition 




Haul 




and 




















number 


used 


duration of haul 


Sect 


on ^ 


hit. 


W 


ong. 












March 


16. 1910 


2051 


20 


1:10-1:50 p.m. 


41. 


h 32 


40:5 




= 28:8 


2052 


L.N.I 


2:41 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2053 


L.N.I 


3:08 p.m. 


42, 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2054 


000 


2:30-3:22 p.m. 


42, 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2055 


12 


2:30-3:22 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2056 


20 


2:30-3:22 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2057 


L.N.I 


3:37 p.m. 


42; 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2058 


L.N.I 


3:55 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2059 


L.N.I 


4:08 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2060 


L.N.I 


4:20 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2061 


L.N.I 


4:30 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2062 


000 


4:40-5:50 p.m. 


42, 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2063 


20 


4:40-5:50 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2064 


000 


6:00-6:55 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2065 


12 


6:00-6:55 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 


2066 


20 


6:00-6:55 p.m. 


42s 


32 


40.4 




31.2 










JUarch 


17, 1910 


2067 


L.N.I 


1:10 p.m. 


42,„ 


32 


50.0 




30.0 


2068 


L.N.I 


1:37 p.m. 


42„ 


From 12 


52 to 


3:40 


2069 


L.N.I 


2:02 p.m. 


42, 




p.m. the bos 


t 


2070 


000 


1:30-2:18 p.m. 


42„ 


drifted from the 


2071 


12 


1:30-2:18 p.m. 


42,0 


above 


posit 


ion 


2072 


20 


1:30-2:18 p.m. 


42,0 


to the 


followincr 


2073 


L.N.I 


2:23 p.m. 


42,„ 


position 




2074 


L.N.I 


2:43 p.m. 


42,„ 










2075 


L.N.I 


2:59 p.m. 


42,„ 










2076 


L.N.I 


3:14 p.m. 


42,0 










2077 


L.N.I 


3:24 p.m. 


42,0 










2078 


000 


2:20-3:34 p.m. 


42,0 










2079 


12 


2:20-3:34 p.m. 


42,„ 










2080 


20 


2:20-3:34 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2081 


L.N.I 


4:20 p.m. 


42,0 


82 


50.6 


117 


29,2 


2082 


000 


3:40-4:30 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2083 


12 


3:40-4:30 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2084 


20 


3:40-4:30 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29^2 


2085 


000 


4:4.5-5:10 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2086 


12 


4:45-5:10 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2087 


20 


4:4.5-5:10 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2088 


L.N.I 


5:11 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2089 


L.N.I 


5:37 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2090 


L.N.I 


5:58 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2091 


000 


5:30-6:10 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2092 


12 


5:30-6:10 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


.50.6 


117 


29.2 


2093 


20 


5:30-6:10 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2094 


L.N.I 


6:17 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2095 


L.N.I 


6:37 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29^2 


2096 


000 


6:15-6:50 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2007 


12 


6:1.5-6:50 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29^2 


2098 


20 


6:1.5-6:50 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2099 


L.N.I 


6:53 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2100 


S.N.I 


7:24 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2101 


000 


6:5.5-7:30 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


.50.6 


117 


29.2 


2102 


12 


6:5.5-7:30 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29.2 


2103 


20 


6:. 5.5-7 :30 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


.50.6 


117 


29.2 


2104 


S.N.I 


7:34 p.m. 


42,0 


32 


50.6 


117 


29^2 












April 19, 1910 


2105 


N.OOO 


8 


37 a.m. 


40-, 


32 


23.5 


117 


20.0 


2106 


N.OOO 


8 


54 a.m. 


40^ 


Frc 


m 8:30 to 11:30 


2107 


N.OOO 


9 


09 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. th 


e boa 


t 


2108 


S.N.I 


9 


32 a.m. 


4O3 


d 


rifted from the 


2109 


000 


8 


30-9:45 a.m. 


40, 


above position 


2110 


12 


8 


30-9:45 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


2111 


20 


8 


30-9:45 a.m. 


40, 


position 




2112 


S.N.I 


9 


55 a.m. 


40, 











-{Continued) 



meters number Remarks 

1494 

460-365 Clear and bright, 

36.5-275 but windy and 

1495 rough, making 

1495 it difficult to 

1495 handle the 

275-185 apparatus. 

185-137 Amount of 

137-92 drift unknown 

92-46 

46-9 











550-460 The afternoon 

460-365 was cloudy 

36.5-275 with a continu- 

1509 ous drizzle from 

1509 2:40 to 4:40 

1509 

275-185 

18.5-137 

137-92 

92-46 

46-18 

1510 

1510 

1510 

,5,50-460 Drift unknown 

1511 after 3:40 p,m. 

1511 

1511 

1512 

1512 

1512 

460-0 

460-365 Twilight 5:40 to 

36.5-275 6:15 p.m., but 

1513 dark on account 

1513 of heavy clouds 

1513 

27.5-185 

18.5-137 

1.514 

1514 

1514 

137-92 

92-46 

1.515 

1515 

1515 

46-18 

92-46 Rough and foggy 

137-92 at intervals 

185-137 Net bridle broken 

27.5-185 

1522 

1522 

1522 
36.5-275 



168 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part B — PlanTctoH Collections of Quantitative Significance 



Haul 


Appa- 
ratus 
used 


Time of da.v 

and 

duration of haul 


Section 




Position 




Depth 
meters 


Water 
sample 




number 


Nlat. 


W long. 


Remarks 


2113 


S.N.1 


10:28 a.m. 


40. 




April 19, 1910 


460-365 








2114 


000 


9:55-10:45 a.m. 40, 













1523" 






2115 


12 


9:55-10:45 a.m. 40. 













1523 






2116 


20 


9:55-10:45 a.m. 40. 


32° 


21:6 


117° 


17:4 





1523 






2117 


N.OOO 
N.OOO 
N.OOO 
N.OOO 
N.OOO 


2:47 a.m. 
3:00 a.m. 
3:15 a.m. 
3:36 a.m. 
3:59 a.m. 


40, 
40, 
40, 
4O5 
40.5 


32 
32 
32 
32 
32 


April 20, 1910 
23.3 117 20.0 
23.0 117 19.9 
28.8 117 19.5 
22.6 117 19.5 
22.5 117 19.4 


46-0 

92-46 

137-92 

18.5-137 

275-185 






Bright moonlight 
till 3:00 a.m. 


2118 






2119 






Dark but clear 


2120 






3:00-4:20 a.m. 


2121 






Twilight 4:20- 


2122 


N.OOO 


4:33 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 


117 


19.0 


365-275 






5:15 a.m. 


2123 


000 
12 
20 

000 


4:4.5-5:30 a.m 
4:4.5-5:30 a.m 
4:45-5:30 a.m 
5:38-6:10 a.m 


40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 


32 
32 
32 
32 


22.3 
22.3 
22.3 
21.4 


117 
117 
117 
117 


19.0 
19.0 
19.0 
18.0 












Sunrise 5:15 


2124 






a.m. 


2125 








2126 


1535' 






2127 


12 


5:38-6:10 a.m 


40. 


32 


21.4 


117 


18.0 





1535 






2128 


20 


5:38-6:10 a.m 


40. 


32 


21.4 


117 


18.0 





1535 






2129 


N.OOO 


2:57 a.m. 


41, 


32 


April I 
23.0 


1. 1910 
117 23.2 


46-0 






Bright moonlight 


2130 


N.OOO 
N.OOO 
N.OOO 
N.OOO 
N.OOO 


3:07 a.m. 
3:21a.m. 
3:36 a.m. 
3:54 a.m. 
4:20 a.m. 


41, 

41= 

41= 

40.5, 

40, 


32 
32 
32 
32 
32 


23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 


117 
117 
117 
117 
117 


22.8 
22.7 
22.6 
22.5 
22.4 


92-46 
137-92 
185-137 

275-185 
36.5-275 






until 3:20 a.m. 


2131 






Dark until 4:30 


2132 






a.m. Twilight 


2133 






till sunrise at 


2134 






5:15 a.m. Day 


2135 


N.OOO 


4:47 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


22.3 


460-365 






bright; ocean 


2136 


000 


4:40-5:05 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


22.3 





1536' 




smooth 


2137 


12 


4:40-5:05 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


22.3 





1536 






2138 


20 


4:40-5:05 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


22.3 





1536 






2139 


N.OOO 


5:19 a.m. 


40,, 


32 


23.5 


117 


21.6 


550-460 








2140 


N.OOO 
N.OOO 
N.OOO 


5:39 a.m. 
6:12 a.m. 
6:23 a.m. 


40, 
4O5 
40, 


From 5:15 to 7:07 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 


46-0 

92-46 

137-92 








2141 








2142 








2143 


N.OOO 


6:35 a.m. 


40, 


above 


position 


18.5-137 








2144 


N.OOO 


6:50 a.m. 


40, 


t 


the followinsf 


275-185 








2145 


000 


5:1.5-7:07 a.m 


40, 


position 







1537 






2146 


12 


5:15-7:07 a.m 


4O3 













1537 






2147 


20 


5:15-7:07 a.m 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


20.0 





1537 






2148 


N.OOO 


7:13 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


20.0 


36.5-275 








2149 


N.OOO 


7:36 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


20.0 


460-365 








2150 


N.OOO 


8:07 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


117 


20.0 


550-460 








2151 


20 


11:35-11:49 a.r 


n. 40, 


August 
32 23.4 


13, 1910 
117 18.2 





1567, 


1568 




2152 


12 


11:3.5-11:49 a.r 


Q. 40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





1567, 


1.568 




2153 


000 


11:35-11:49 a.r 


Q. 40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





1567, 


1568 




2154 


S.N.1 


11:59 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


125-100 








2155 


S.N.1 
S.N.1 


12:55 p.m. 
1:06 p.m. 
1:12 p.m. 
1:17 p.m. 
l:00-l:30p.m 


40, 
40, 


32 
32 


23.4 
23.4 


117 
117 


18.2 
18.2 


100-75 
75-50 








2156 








2157 


S.N.1 
S.N.1 


40, 
40, 


32 
32 


23.4 
23.4 


117 
117 


18.2 
18.2 


50-25 
25-0 








2158 








2159 


20 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





1569^ 


1.570 




2160 


20 


l:00-l:30p.m 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





1569, 


1570 


Same haul as 2159 


2161 


12 


l:00-l:30p.m 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





1569, 


1570 




2162 


000 


l:00-l:30p.m 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 





1569, 


1570 




2163 


20 


6:30-6:55 p.m 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





1573 






2164 


12 


6:30-6:55 p.m 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





1573 






2165 


000 


6:30-6:55 p.m 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


21.9 





1573 






2166 


S.N.1 


8:25 a.m. 


40, 


Aupust 
32 23.4 


14. 1910 
117 18.2 


150-100 








2167 


S.N.1 


8 


35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


100-75 






Drift unknown 


2168 


S.N.1 


8 


42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


75-0 








2169 


S.N.1 


8 


47 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


50-0 








2170 


S.N.1 


8 


53 a.m. 


40- 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


50-25 








2171 


S.N.1 


8 


59 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


25-0 









Michael, et al.: Hi/drograpltic Eecnrds of tScripps InglUution 



1C9 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 







Part B—Planl-ton 


Collections of Quant 


Ii;.nl 
u 111 her 


Appa- 
used 


Time of dav 

and 

duration of haul 


Section 




Pos 


tion 




"^ 


at. 


W long. 


2172 


S.N.I 


9:02 a.m. 


40-, 


August 
32° 23:4 


14, 
117 


1910 
° 18:2 


2174 


20 


8:42-9:22 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2175 


12 


8:42-9:22 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2176 


000 


8:42-9:22 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2177 


20 


10:22-10:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2178 


12 


10:22-10:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2179 


000 


10:22-10:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


21 SO 


20 


11:10-11:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2181 


12 


11:10-11:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2182 


000 


11:10-11:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2183 


S.N.I 


12:15 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2184 


S.N.I 


12:.50p.ra. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2185 


N.OOO 


1:30 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2186 


N.OOO 


1 :45 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2187 


N.OOO 


1:55 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


21 88 


N.OOO 


2:05 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2189 


N.OOO 


2:10 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2190 


N.OOO 


2:14 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


117 


18.2 


2191 


000 


1:. 50-2 :15 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


T17 


18.2 


2192 


N.OOO 


4:50 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


2153 


N.OOO 


5:20 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11' 


24.2 


2194 


N.OOO 


5:40 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


117 


24.2 


2195 


20 


5:00-5:40 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11' 


24.2 


2196 


12 


5:00-5:40 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


ll' 


24!2 


2199 


N.OOO 


1:30 p.m. 


40„ 


August 
32 52.8 


15. 

11' 


1910 
19.0 


2200 


N.OOO 


1 :45 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


11' 


19.0 


2201 


N.OOO 


1:52 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


11' 


19.0 


2202 


N.OOO 


2:00 p.m. 


40,1 


32 


52.8 


11' 


19.0 


2203 


N.OOO 


2:15 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


11' 


19.0 


2204 


000 


3:00-3:30 p.m. 


■ 40„ 


32 


52.8 


11- 


19.0 


2205 


12 


3:00-3:30 p.m. 


40n 


32 


52.8 


11' 


19.0 


2206 


20 


3:00-3:30 p.m. 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


11' 


19.0 


2207 


000c 


10:1.5-10:50 a.m. 


41, 


August 
32 23.4 


16, 
11 


1910 
24.2 


2208 


12 


10:1.5-10:50 a.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11' 


24^2 


2209 


20 


10:1.5-10:50 a.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11' 


■ 24.2 


2210 


N.OOO 


5:30 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


I 24.2 


2212 


N.OOO 


5:55 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11' 


r 24.2 


2213 


OOOe 


5:29-6:10 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11' 


r 24.2 


2214 


12 


5:29-6:10 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


• 24.2 


2215 


20 


5:29-6:10 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


• 24.2 


2216 


N.OOO 


6:30 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


' 24.2 


2217 


N.OOO 


6:40 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


• 24.2 


2218 


N.OOO 


6:.53p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


- 24.2 


2219 


OOOc 


6:20-6:54 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


■ 24.2 


2220 


12 


6:20-6:54 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


■ 24.2 


2221 


20 


6: 20-6:. 54 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


- 24.2 


2222 


N.OOO 


7:02 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


■ 24.2 


2223 


N.OOO 


7:10 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


■ 24.2 


2224 


OOOc 


6:58-7:07 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


7 24.2 


2225 


12 


6:58-7:07 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


- 24.2 


2226 


20 


6:58-7:07 p.m. 


41, 


32 


23.4 


11 


" 24.2 


2227 


N.OOO 


8:22 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


■ 21S> 


222.8 


OOOc 


8:05-8:30 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


- 21.9 


2229 


12 


8: 0.5-8:. 30 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


• 21.9 


2230 


20 


8:0.5-8:30 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


' 21.9 


2231 


N.OOO 


8:. 53 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


■ 21.9 


2232 


N.OOO 


9:18 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


• 21.9 


2233 


N.OOO 


9:. 33 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


' 21.9 


2234 


N.OOO 


9:45 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


■ 21.9 


2235 


N.OOO 


9:54 p.m. 


40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


■ 21.9 


2236 


N.OOO 


9:59 p.m. 


. 40, 


32 


23.4 


11 


■ 21.9 



meters 



Water 
saraiile 
number 



Remarks 



25-0 

1576, 1577 

1576, 1577 

1576, 1577 

1579 

1579 Partly clouilv 

1579 

1582 

1.582 

1.582 

.550-0 

550-0 Net torn 

300-200 

200-100 

100-75 

7.5-50 

.50-25 

2.5-0 

1586 

800-350 

350-125 

12.5-50 

1596 

1.596 

250-1.50 

1.50-75 

7.5-50 Bright and clear, 

50-25 sea smooth 

25-0 

1605 

1605 

1605 

1606 Clear and calm 

1606 

1606 

700-.500 

500-350 Sunset 6:50 p.m. 

1618,1619 Twilight ended 

1618, 1619 7:07 p.m. 

1618, 1619 Bright moon- 

350-200 light 8:0.5-9:35 

200-125 p.m. 

12.5-50 

1619,1620 

1619,1620 

1619,1620 

50-25 

2.5-0 

1620 

1620 

1620 

700-500 

1621,1622 

1621,1622 

1621,1622 

500-3.50 

350-200 

200-125 

125-50 

50-25 

2.5-0 



170 



Vniversiiij of California F'uhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 

Part B — Flanlcton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Depth Water 

in sample 

meters number 



Haul 


Appa 
ratus 
used 


Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 


Sectic 


Position 


number 


n X lat. 


W long. 


2237 


N.OOO 


11:37 a.m. 


40= 


August 
32° 23.4 


17, 1910 

117° 18:2 


2238 


N.OOO 


11:48 a.m. 


40j 


32 23.4 


117 18.2 


2239 


N.OOO 


11:56 a.m. 


40; 


32 23.4 


117 18.2 


2240 


N.OOO 


12:05 p.m. 


40; 


32 23.4 


117 18.2 


2241 


N.OOO 


12:08 p.m. 


40; 


32 23.4 


117 18.2 


2242 


OOOe 


12:01-12:15 p.m. 


40j 


32 23.4 


117 18.2 


2243 


12 


12:01-12:15 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 18.2 


2244 


20 


12:01-12:15 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 18.2 


2245 


N.OOO 


3:20 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2246 


N.OOO 


4:08 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2247 


N.OOO 


4:21 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2248 


N.OOO 


4:35 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2249 


N.OOO 


4:42 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2250 


N.OOO 


4:46 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2251 


OOOc 


4:27-4:48 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2252 


12 


4:27-4:48 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2253 


20 


4:27-4:48 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2254 


N.OOO 


6:24 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2255 


OOOc 


6:30-6:54 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2256 


12 


6:30-6:54 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2257 


20 


6:30-6:.54p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2258 


N.OOO 


6:55 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2259 


OOOc 


6:. 56-7 :28 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2260 


12 


6:56-7:28 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2261 


20 


6:56-7:28 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2262 


N.OOO 


7:16 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2263 


N.OOO 


7:33 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2264 


OOOc 


7:30-7:56 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2265 


12 


7:30-7:56 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2266 


20 


7:30-7:56 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2267 


N.OOO 


7:50 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2268 


N.OOO 


7:57 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2269 


N.OOO 


8:35 p.m. 


41, 


32 23.4 


117 24.2 


2270 


N.OOO 


9:02 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2271 


OOOc 


8:52-9:21 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2272 


12 


8:52-9:21 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2273 


20 


8:52-9:21 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2274 


N.OOO 


9:30 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2275 


N.OOO 


9:45 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2276 


N.OOO 


9:58 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2277 


N.OOO 


10:04 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2278 


N.OOO 


10:09 p.m. 


40, 


32 23.4 


117 21.9 


2279 


20 


6:30-7:30 p.m. 


B 


.\pril 29. 1911 
32 431 117 11.4 


2280 


20 


6:30-7:30 p.m. 


B 


April 30. 1911 
32 43.1 117 11.4 


2281 


20 


6:30-7:30 p.m. 


B 


May ] 
32 43.1 


. 1911 
117 11.4 


2282 


20 


6:30-8:00 p.m. 


B 


Mav 2 
32 43.1 


, 1911 
117 11.4 


2283 


20 


6:30-8:00 p.m. 


B 


Mav 3 
32 43.1 


. 1911 

117 11.4 


2284 


20 


6:30-8:00 p.m. 


B 


Mav 4 
32 43.1 


. 1911 
117 11.4 


2285 


20 


6:30-8:00 p.m. 


B 


Mav 5 
32 43.1 


, 1911 
117 11.4 


2286 


20 


6:30-8:00 p.m. 


B 


Mav 6 
32 43.1 


1911 
117 11.4 


2287 


20 


6:30-8:00 p.m. 


B 


May 7 
32 43.1 


, 1911 
117 11.4 


2288 


20 


6:30-8:00 p.m. 


B 


May 8 
32 43.1 


, 1911 

117 11.4 


2289 


OOOc 


3:00-4:00 a.m. 


40, 


June 14, 1911 
32 22.4 117 21.2 



Remarks 



160-100 

100-75 Bright and clear 

75-50 

50-25 

2.5-0 

163'2 
1632 
1632 

550-350 

350-200 

200-125 

125-50 

50-25 

25-0 

1650 
1650 
1650 

700-500 

16.55, 1656 Sunset 6:41 p.m. 

1655, 1656 Twilight ended 

1655,1656 7:06 p.m. Clear 

500-350 moonlight 7:30- 

16.5^1657 10:09 p.m. 

1656, 1657 

1656, 1657 

350-200 

200-125 

1657, 1658 

1657, 1658 

1657, 1658 

125-50 

50-25 

25-0 

5.50-350 

1659 
16.50 
16.59 

.350-225 

22.5-125 

125-50 

50-25 

25-0 

Hauls 2279-2288 

made from 

* * Agassiz ' ' 

„ while tied to 

mooring 





















1728 



1915] 



Michael, et al. : Hydrogivph ic Records of Scr.ipps Inst it iilioi 



171 



2290 
22111 
22S12 



12 

20 
N.O 



N.O 

N.O 

000c 

12 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
000c 
12 
20 
000c 
12 
20 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

OOOc 
12 
20 

OOOc 

12 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 

12 

20 
OOOc 



Table 5.— 

Part B— 

Time of dav 

and 

duration of haul 

3:00-4:00 a.m. 
3:00-4:00 a.m. 
.5:07 a.m. 



5:20 a.m. 

5:35 a.m. 

5:00-5:40 a.m. 

5:00-5:40 a.m. 

5:00-5:40 a.m. 

5:50 a.m. 

6:12 a.m. 

6:20 a.m. 

6:27 a.m. 

6:30 a.m. 

6:35 a.m. 

6:50 a.m. 

7:00 a.m. 

7:07 a.m. 

7:15 a.m. 

7:25 a.m. 

7:32 a.m. 

7:40 a.m. 

7:46 a.m. 

7:50 a.m. 

6:0.5-7:55 a.m. 

6:05-7:55 a.m. 

6:0.5-7:55 a.m. 

9: 55-10:. 55 a.m. 

9:. 55-10:. 55 a.m. 
9:5.5-10:55 a.m. 
11:05 a.m. 
11:20 a.m. 
11:27 a.m. 
11:34 a.m. 
11:40 a.m. 
11:44 a.m. 
11:48 a.m. 
11:54 a.m. 
11:58 a.m. 
10:.59-11 :59 a.m. 
10:.59-11 :59 a.m. 
10:.59-ll:59a.m. 

1:30-2:20 a.m. 
1:30-2:20 a.m. 
1:30-2:20 a.m. 
2:23 a.m. 
2:35 a.m. 
2:43 a.m. 
2:54 a.m. 
2:58 a.m. 
3:02 a.m. 
3:07 a.m. 
3:10 a.m. 
3:12 a.m. 
2:2.5-3:25 a.m. 
2:2.5-3:25 a.m. 
2:2.5-3:25 a.m. 
4:23-5:07 a.m. 



Data Belative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Planlcton Collections of Qiiantitative Significance 



Positi. 



40^ 
40, 
40, 



40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40; 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
iO, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 



N Int. W long. 

June 14, 1911 
From 2:14 to 5:15 
a.m. boat drifted 
from above posi- 
tion to follow- 
ing jiosition 



22:2 117° 21:6 



21.6 
21.6 
21.6 
21.6 
21.2 



32 22.4 

From 5:50 to 7:55 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from tlie 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 22.1 117 21.5 
32 22.4 117 21.2 
From 10:00 to 11:59 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



22.0 
June : 



117 20.4 
;, 1911 
32 22.7 117 19.2 
From 1:30 to 4:10 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above jiosition 
to the following 
position 



meters 



Water 
sample 
number 



Remarks 



117 
117 



18.5 
19.2 



1728 

1728 

137-0 See hydrographie 

data for water 
samples corre- 
137-92 spending to N.O 

92-73 hauls, one 

1733 sample usually 

1733 being taken 

1 733 from each depth 

73-55 before and after 

5.5-46 each Nansen 

46-37 series 

37-27 

27-18 

9-0 Dav bright and 

137-92 clear 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

1734 

1 734 

1734 

1751,1761 

1751,1761 

1751,1761 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

1761,1762 

1761,1762 

1761,1762 

1763,1772 Dark and foggy 

1763,1772 

1763,1772 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

1772,1776 

1772,1776 

1772,1776 

1785,1794 Partlv cloudy 



172 



UniversUij of California Fuhlications in Zoologn 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Eelative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 
Part B — Planl'ton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



2347 
2348 
2349 
2350 
2351 
2352 
2353 
2354 
2355 
2356 
2357 
2358 
2359 
2360 
2361 
2362 
2363 
2364 
2365 
2366 
2367 
2368 
2369 
2370 
2371 
2372 
2373 
2374 
2375 

2376 
2377 

2378 
2379 
2380 
2381 
2382 
2383 
2384 
2385 
2386 
2387 
2388 
2389 
2390 
2391 
2392 
2393 
2394 
2395 
2396 
2397 
2399 
2400 
2401 
2402 
2403 
2404 
2405 
2406 
2407 
2408 
2409 
2410 



12 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 

12 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 

12 

20 
N.O 
OOOc 

12 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 

OOOc 

12 

20 

N.O 

OOOc 

12 

20 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

OOOc 

12 

20 

N.O 

OOOc 

12 

20 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

OOOc 

12 

20 

OOOc 



Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 

4:23-5:07 a.in. 
4:23-5:07 a.m. 
5:03 a.m. 
5:10 a.m. 
5:10-6:25 a.m. 
5:10-6:25 a.m. 
5:10-6:25 a.m. 
5:20 a.m. 
5:26 a.m. 
5:30 a.m. 
5:35 a.m. 
5:39 a.m. 
5:42 a.m. 
5:45 a.m. 
7:0.5-8:05 a.m. 
7:0.5-8:05 a.m. 
7:0.5-8:05 a.m. 
8:10 a.m. 
8:20-9:25 a.m. 
8:20-9:25 a.m. 
8:20-9:25 a.m. 
8:20 a.m. 
8:27 a.m. 
8:40 a.m. 
8:45 a.m. 
8:47 a.m. 
8:. 54 a.m. 
8:58 a.m. 
9:01a.m. 

1:50-2:30 a.m. 
1:50-2:30 a.m. 
1:50-2:30 a.m. 
2:35 a.m. 
2:4.5-3:45 a.m. 
2:4.5-3:45 a.m. 
2:4.5-3:45 a.m. 
2:45 a.m. 
2:52 a.m. 
2:59 a.m. 
3:04 a.m. 
3:08 a.m. 
3:11 a.m. 
3:16 a.m. 
3:20 a.m. 
4:1.5-4:45 a.m. 
4:15-4:45 a.m. 
4:1.5-4:45 a.m. 
4:45 a.m. 
4:50-5:45 a.m. 
4:50-5:45 a.m. 
4:50-5:45 a.m. 
5:00 a.m. 
5:05 a.m. 
5:10 a.m. 
5:15 a.m. 
5:20 a.m. 
5:30 a.m. 
5:33 a.m. 
5:35 a.m. 
5:5.5-6:20 a.m. 
5:55-6:20 a.m. 
5:5.5-6:20 a.m. 
6:45-7:30 a.m. 



Position 



Section N lat. 



40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40; 
40; 
40, 
4O5 
40, 
4O3 
40, 
4O3 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40s 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

39..5, 

39..5, 

39.5, 

40, 

39.55 

39, 

39, 

39, 

39, 

39, 

39, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 



W long, 
June 15, 1911 
From 4:20 to 6:25 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
pcsition 



32° 23:5 117° 18:9 
32 22.7 117 19.2 
From 7:05 to 9:25 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 23.3 117 18.6 

June 16. 1911 
32 23.5 117 18.0 
From 1:48 to 3:45 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 22.7 117 17.1 
32 23.5 117 18.0 
From 4:12 to 6:20 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



Depth 
meters 



Water 
sample 
number 



Remarks 



1785,1794 

1785, 1794 

137-92 

02-73 

1794,1807 

1794,1807 

1794, 1807 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

1808,1817 For water samples 

1808,1817 corresponding 

1808, 1817 to N,0 hauls 

137-92 see p. 171 

1818, 1827 

1818, 1827 

1818,1827 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 



32 23.2 117 17.5 
32 23.5 117 18.0 



1863,1873 

1863,1873 

1863, 1873 
92 

1874,1885 

1874.1885 

1874,1885 

73 Dark and cloudy 

55 

46 

37 

27 

18 

9 



1889, 1896 

1889,1896 

1889, 1896 
92 

1896,1900 

1896,1900 

1896, 1900 

73 

55 

46 

37 

27 

18 

9 



1900,1907 

1900, 1907 

1900, 1907 



Michael, el ah: Hydrograpliic Records of Scripps Iiisiitiitioii 



173 



Table 5. — Data Eelative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part B — FlanTcton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



number 

2411 
2412 
2413 
2414 
2415 
2416 
2417 
2418 
2419 
2420 
2421 
2422 
2423 
2424 
2425 
2426 

2427 
2428 
2429 
2430 
2431 
2432 
2433 
2434 
2435 
2436 
2437 
2438 
2439 
2440 
2441 
2442 
2443 
2444 
2445 
2446 
2447 
2448 
2449 
2450 
2451 
2452 
2453 
2454 
2455 
2456 
2457 
2458 
2459 
2460 
2461 
2462 
2463 
2464 
2465 
2466 
2467 
2468 
2470 
2471 
2472 
2473 
2474 
2475 



12 

20 

12 

20 
OOOe 

12 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 

OOOc 
12 

20 

N.O 

OOOe 

12 

20 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

OOOc 

12 

20 

N.O 

OOOc 

12 

20 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

OOOc 

12 

20 

N.O 

OOOe 

12 

20 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

OOOc 

12 

20 



Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 

6:4,5-7:30 a.m 
6:45-7:30 a.m 
7:48-8:20 a.m, 
7:48-8:20 a.m 
8:2.5-9:43 a.m 
8:2.5-9:43 a.m 
8:25-9:43 a.m 
8:40 a.m. 
8:45 a.m. 
8:52 a.m. 
8:55 a.m. 
9:05 a.m. 
9:07 a.m. 
9:15 a.m. 
9:17 a.m. 
9:18 a.m. 



1:4.5-2:25 a.m. 
1:4.5-2:25 a.m. 
1:4.5-2:25 a.m. 
2:30 a.m. 
2:30-4:00 a.m. 
2:30-4:00 a.m. 
2:30-4:00 a.m. 
2:40 a.m. 
2:47 a.m. 
2:55 a.m. 
3:00 a.m. 
3:07 a.m. 
3:11 a.m. 
3:15 a.m. 
3:20 a.m. 
4:35-5:00 a.m. 
4:3.5-5:00 a.m. 
4:3.5-5:00 a.m. 
5:04 a.m. 
5:0.5-6:10 a.m. 
5:05-6:10 a.m. 
5:0.5-6:10 a.m. 
5:12 a.m. 
5:30 a.m. 
5:35 a.m. 
5:38 a.m. 
5:42 a.m. 
5:46 a.m. 
5:49 a.m. 
5:52 a.m. 
6:.5.5-7:38a.m. 
6:55-7:38 a.m. 
6:5.5-7:38 a.m. 
7:42 a.m. 
7:45-8:30 a.m. 
7:4.5-8:30 a.m. 
7:4.5-8:30 a.m. 
7:50 a.m. 
8:00 a.m. 
8:04 a.m. 
8:10 a.m. 
8:18 a.m. 
8:20 a.m. 
8:22 a.m. 
8:25 a.m. 
8:5.5-10:00 a.m. 
8:. 5.5-1 0:00 a.m. 
8:5.5-10:00 a.m. 



Positi( 



Section 

40= 

40, 

40, 

40, 

39..55 

39.5j 

39.5; 

■iO, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

39..55 

39, 

39j 

40j 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 



N lat. W long. 
June 16. 1911 
From 6:45 to 9:43 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32° 23;0 117° 17:4 

June 17, 1911 
32 21.6 117 21.5 
From 1:30 to 3:55 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



20.' 



117 
117 



20.0 
21.2 



From 4:30 to 6:10 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



21.0 
22.4 



20.2 
21.2 



From 6:.55 to 8:45 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



Waler 
sample 
number 



1911 
1911 

1918,1328 
1918,1928 
1918, 1< 28 



1.37-92 

92-73 For water samples 



22.4 
22.4 



20.2 
19.9 
19.9 
19.9 



73-55 
55-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 
9-0 






137-92 






92-73 
73-55 
55-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 






137-92 






92-73 
7.3-55 
55-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 






137-92 






92-73 
73-55 
55-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 









1974,1981 
1974,1981 
1974,1981 

1981,1994 
1981,1994 
1981,1994 



1997, 2004 
1997, 2004 
1997, 2004 

2004, 2014 
2004, 2014 
2004, 2014 



corresponding 
to N.O hauls 
see p. 171 



201.5, 2025 
2015, 2025 
2015, 2025 

2026 "" 

2026 

2026 



2036 
2036 
2036 



174 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table o. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part B — Playtlton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



Appa- 


Time of day 




Position 


Depth 


Water 




us"d 


and 
duration oJ 










sample 
number 




hau 


Sectio 


1 N lat. W long. 


meters 


Remarks 










June 18. 1911 








OOOe 


2:00-2:35 


a.m 


40, 


32° 22:7 117° 19:2 





2049, 2056 


For water samples 


12 


2:00-2:35 


a.m 


■lOj 


From 2:00 to 3:55 





2049, 2056 


corresponding 


20 


2:00-2:35 a.m 


40, 


a.m. the boat 





2049, 2056 


to N.O hauls 


OOOc 


2:40-3:35 a.m 


40,, 


drifted from the 





2056, 2063 


see p. 171 


12 


2:40-3:35 a.m 


40,, 


above position 





2056, 2063 




20 


2:40-3:35 


a.m 


40,, 


to the following 





2056, 2063 




N.O 


2:55 a.m. 




40, 


position 


137-92 




Dark and cloudy 
until beginning 
of twilight at 


N.O 


3:02 a.m. 




40, 


92-73 




N.O 


3:10 a.m. 
3:15 a.m. 
3:20 a.m. 
3:22 a.m. 
3:25 a.m. 
3:30 a.m. 
3:32 a.m. 
3:40-3:55 a.m 


40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 




73-35 
55-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 






N.O 




3:42 a.m. 


N.O 






N.O 






N.O 






N.O 






X.O 






OOOc 


2063 




12 


3: 40-3:. 55 


a.m 


40, 







2063 




20 


3: 40-3:. 55 


a.m 


40, 


32 22.2 117 18.8 





2063 




OOOe 


4:03-4:35 


a.m 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 





2070, 2077 




12 


4:05-4:35 a.m 


40, 


From 4:05 to 5:45 





2070, 2077 




20 


4:0.5-4:35 a.m 


40, 


a.m. the boat 





2070, 2077 




OOOc 


4:38-5:45 


a.m 


■10,, 


drifted from the 





2077, 2084 




12 


4:38-5:45 


a.m 


40,, 


above position 





2077. 2084 




20 


4:38-5:45 a.m 


40,, 


to the following 





2077,2084 




N.O 


4:40 a.m. 
4:50 a.m. 
5:00 a.m. 
5:05 a.m. 




40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 


position 


137-92 
92-73 
73-55 
55-46 






N.O 






N.O 






N.O 






N.O 


5:10 a.m. 
5:13 a.m. 




40, 
40, 




46-37 
37-0 






N.O 






N.O 


5:17 a.m. 




40, 




37-27 






N.O 


5:20 a.m. 




40, 




27-18 






N.O 


5:23 a.m. 




40, 




18-9 












40, 









Dip-net haul 


N.O 


5:2.5 a.m. 




40, 


32 22.2 117 1S.8 


9-0 




OOOe 


6:2.5-7:30 


a.m 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 





2097, 2104 




12 


6:2.5-7:30 


a.m 


40, 


From 6:00 to 7:30 





2097,2104 


At 6:30 a.m. a 


20 


6:25-7:30 


a.m 


40, 


a.m. the boat 





2097, 2104 


heavy mist. 


N.O 


6:30 a.m. 




40, 


drifted from the 


137-92 




almost a drizzle. 


N.O 


6:38 a.m. 




40- 


above position 
to the following 


92-73 




commenced 


N.O 


6:45 a.m. 




40, 


73-55 






N.O 


6:50 a.m. 




40- 


position 


55-46 






N.O 


5:55 a.m. 




40, 


46-37 






N.O 


7:00 a.m. 




40, 
40, 




37-27 






n!o 


7:04 a.m. 






27-18 






N.O 


7:08 a.m. 




40', 




18-9 






N.O 


7:10 a.m. 




40, 


32 22.8 117 18.8 


9-0 














June 20, 1911 








OOOc 


4:35-5:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 117 18.0 





2105,2114 


Twilight well 


12 


4:3.5-5:15 


a.m 


40, 


From 4:35 to 6:40 





2103,2114 


advanced at 


20 


4:35-5:15 


a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 





2105,2114 


4:35 a.m. 


OOOc 


5:20-6:05 a.m. 


,39..5, 


drifted from the 





2114,2119 




12 


5:20-6:05 a.m. 


39.5, 


above position 





2114,2119 




20 


5:20-6:05 a.m. 


39..5, 


to the following 





2114,2119 




NO 


5:20 a.m. 




40- 


tiosition 


137-92 






N.O 


5:30 a.m. 




40, 




92-73 






N.O 


5:37 a.m. 




40, 




73-55 






N.O 


5:42 a.m. 




40, 




55-46 






N.O 


5:48 a.m. 




40, 




46-37 






n!o 


5 :.52 a.m. 




40-. 




37-27 






N.O 


5 :.5.5 a.m. 




30, 




27-18 






N.O 


5:58 a.m. 




39, 




18-9 






N.O 


i:00 a.m. 




^9. 




9-0 






n!o 


6:05 a.m. 




39" 




92-0 







! 



Mirhnd, ct al.: Hydrogrophic Records of «S'cr//;p.s Instifution 



175 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 
Part B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 





Appa- 


Time of day 






Position 




Depth 


Wa 


ter 


Haul 


ratus 


and 








A 




in 


sail 


pie 










number 


used 


duration of haul 


Sectioi 


1 N lat. 


w 


ong. 


meters 


nun 


ber 












June 


18, 1911 








2539 


OOOe 


6:10-6:40 a.m. 


39-, 













2119 




2540 


12 


6:10-6:40 a.m. 


39, 













2119 




2541 


20 


6:10-6:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 


23:o 


117 


17:2 





2119 




2542 


OOOe 


7:05-7:30 a.m. 


40,-, 


32 


23.5 


117 


18.0 





2128 




2543 


12 


7:0.5-7:30 a.m. 


40, 


From 7:05 to 9:35 





2128 




2544 


20 


7:0.5-7:30 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. tl 


e boa 


t 





2128 




2545 


000c 


7:45-9:40 a.m. 


39.5, 


drifted from the 





2133 


2146 


2546 


12 


7:45-9:40 a.m. 


39.5,, 


above 


position 





2133 


2146 


2547 


20 


7:4.5-9:40 a.m. 


39.5, 


1 


the 


followino; 





2133 


2146 


2548 


N.O 


8:05 a.m. 


40, 




losition 




137-92 






2549 


N.O 


8:15 a.m. 


40, 










92-73 






2550 


N.O 


8:25 a.m. 


39. 










73-55 






2551 


N.O 


8:35 a.m. 


393 










55-46 






2552 


N.O 


8:42 a.m. 


39,, 










46-37 






2553 


N.O 


8:45 a.m. 


39b 










37-27 






2554 


N.O 


8:. 50 a.m. 


39^ 










27-18 






2555 


N.O 


8:52 a.m. 


39, 










18-9 






2556 


N.O 


8:55 a.m. 


39, 


32 


23.6 


] ] 7 


17.0 


9-0 






2557 


OOOe 


10:15-10:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 


20.0 


117 


17.4 





2147, 


"214,8 


2558 


12 


10:1.5-10:40 a.m. 


39. 


32 


20.0 


117 


17.4 





2147, 


2148 


2559 


20 


10:15-10:40 a.m. 


39, 


32 


20.0 


117 


17.4 





2147, 


2148 


2560 


N.O 


10:20 a.m. 


39. 


32 


20.0 


117 


17.4 


92-73 






2561 


N.O 


10:30 a.m. 


39. 


32 


20.0 




17.4 


73-55 






2562 


N.O 
N.O 


10:35 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 


39, 
39. 


32 
32 


20.0 
20.0 


117 


17.4 
17.4 


5.5-46 
46-0 






2563 
















June 


21, 1911 








2564 


OOOe 


5:00-7:00 a.m. 


40.., 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





2149 


2150 


2565 


12 


5:00-7:00 a.m. 


40., 


4:35 to 7 


:20 a 


m. 





2149 


21.50 


2566 


20 


5:00-7:00 a.m. 


40.3 


boat drifted from 





2149 


21.50 


2567 


N.O 


5:05 a.m. 


40. 


above 1 


f ollow- 


1190-820 






2568 


N.O 


6:25 a.m. 


40; 


ing position 




820-460 






2569 


N.O 


7:19 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.6 


117 


20.9 


460-137 






2570 




8:20 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


1290 


2151 














June 


>2, 1_911 








2571 


OOOe 


5:3.5-5:50 a.m. 


42,, 


32 


40.0 




32.0 





2189 


2194 


2." 72 


20 


5:3.5-5:50 a.m. 


42s 


32 


40.0 




32.0 





2189. 


2194 


2573 


OOOe 


6:00-7:18 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 




32.0 





2194. 


2205 


2574 


12 


6:00-7:18 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 




32.0 





2194, 


2205 


2575 


20 


6:00-7:18 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 




32.0 





2194, 


2205 


2576 


N.O 
N.O 

N.O 


6:00 a.m. ' 
6:11 a.m. 


42, 
42, 
42, 
42, 


32 
32 
32 
32 


40.0 
40.0 
40.0 
40.0 




32.0 
32.0 
32.0 
32.0 


137-92 
9-''-0 


92-73 






2577 






2578 






2579 


6:20 a.m. 






2580 


N.O 


6:30 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 




32.0 


73-55 






2581 


N.O 




42, 

42, 


32 
32 


40.0 
40.0 




32.0 
32.0 



5.5-46 






2582 


6:40 a.m. 






2583 


N.O 
N.O 


6:44 a.m. 
6:47 a.m. 


42, 
42, 


32 
32 


40.0 
40.0 




32.0 
32.0 


46-37 
37-27 






2384 






2585 


N.O 
N.O 


6:. 52 a.m. 
6:57 a.m. 


42, 

42, 


32 
32 


40.0 
40.0 




32.0 
32.0 


27-18 
18-9 






2586 






2587 


N.O 


6:59 a.m. 


42, 


32 


40.0 




32.0 


9-0 






2588 


OOOe 


9:20-10:00 a.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52.0 




30.0 





2213" 




2589 


12 


9:20-10:00 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 




30.0 





2213 




2590 


20 


9:20-10:00 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


.52.0 




30.0 





2213 




2591 


N.O 


9:45 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 




30.0 


137-92 






2592 


N.O 


9:52 a.m. 


42,0 


32 


52.0 




30.0 


92-0 






2593 


N.O 


10:00 a.m. 


42,„ 


32 


52.0 


117 


sno • 


92-73 
















June 24, 1911 








2594 


OOOe 


3:4.5-4:30 p.m. 


52,„ 


32 


.50.0 


118 


20.3 





23.59, 


2360 


2595 


12 


3:4.5-4:30 p.m. 


■52,0 


32 


50.0 


118 


20.3 





23.59, 


2360 


2596 


20 


3:4.5-4:30 p.m. 


52i„ 


32 


50.0 


118 


20.3 





23.59. 


2360 


2597 


N.O 
N.O 
N.O 


3:47 p.m. 
3:56 p.m. 
4:04 p.m. 


■'52,„ 
52,0 
52,„ 


32 
32 
32 


50.0 
50.0 
50.0 


118 
118 
118 


20.3 
20.3 
20.3 


137-92 
92-73 
73-55 






2598 






2599 







For %vater samples 
corresponding 
to N.O hauls 
see p. 171 



Mud haul made 
with the Ekman 
water bottle 

Dip-net haul 
Dip-net haul 

Bright and clear 



176 



University of California Puhlicafions in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 







Table 


5.— 


Data Relative to 


Plankton 






Part B- 


-Plankton Collections of Quant 




Appa- 


Time of day 




Pos 


ition 


Haul 




and 
duration ol 








A 


uiuber 


used 


haul 


Section 


N lat. 


W long. 












June 


24. 1911 


2600 


N.b 






- 52,0 
•52,0 


32° 50:0 
32 50.0 


118° 20:3 


2601 


"4:"l'2'p.'m." 




118 20.3 


2602 


N.O 


4:15 p.m. 




52„ 


32 50.0 


118 20.3 


2603 


N.O 


4:20 p.m. 




52,0 


32 50.0 


118 20.3 


2604 


N.O 


4:25 p.m. 




52„ 


32 50.0 


118 20.3 


2605 


N.O 


4:27 p.m. 




52,0 


32 50.0 


118 20.3 


2606 


N.O 


4:30 p.m. 




52,0 


32 50.0 
June 


118 20.3 

26, 1911 


2607 


OOOc 


4:00-5:10 


a.m. 


40,5 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


2608 


12 


4:00-5:10 


a.m. 


40^5 


From3:c 


2 to 5:10 


2609 


20 


4:00-5:10 


a.m. 


40,3 


a.m. the boat 


2610 


N.O 


4:01a.m. 




4O5 


drifted from the 


2611 


N.O 


4:16 a.m. 




4O3 


above 


position 


2612 


N.O 


4:25 a.m. 




40j 


to the 


following 


2613 


N.O 


4:34 a.m. 




40„ 


position 


2614 


N.O 


4:40 a.m. 




40, 






2615 


N.O 


4:47 a.m. 




40, 






2616 


N.O 


4:53 a.m. 




40. 






2617 


N.O 


4:58 a.m. 




40, 






2618 


N.O 


5:02 a.m. 




40, 






2619 


N.O 


5:07 a.m. 




40, 


32 22.1 


117 18.5 


2620 


OOOc 


5:45-6:45 


a.m. 


4O5 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


2621 


12 


5:4.5-6:45 


a.m. 


4O5 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


2622 


20 


5:4.5-6:45 


a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


2623 


OOOc 


7:3.5-8:50 


a.m. 


40, 


32 22.4 


117 21.2 


2624 


12 


7:. 3.5-8: 50 


a.m. 


40, 


From 7:30 to 8:50 


2625 


20 


7:3.5-8:.50 


a.m. 


40, 


a.m. tl 


e boat 


2626 


N.O 


7:40 a.m. 




40, 


drifted from the 


2627 


N.O 


7:55 a.m. 




40, 


above 


[losition 


2628 


N.O 


8:03 a.m. 




40, 


to the 


following 


2629 


N.O 


8:09 a.m. 




40, 


position 


2630 


N.O 


8:15 a.m. 




40, 






2631 


N.O 


8:20 a.m. 




40, 






2632 


N.O 


8:30 a.m. 




40, 






2633 


N.O 


8:32 a.m. 




40, 






2634 


N.O 


8:35 a.m. 




40, 


32 21.8 


117 20.5 


2635 








40, 












Auffust 


8, 1911 


2637 


N.O 


3:50 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2638 


N.O 


4:03 a.m. 




40, 


From 3:35 to 4:22 


2639 


OOOc 


4:0.5-5:05 


a.m. 


40,3 


a.m. boat drifted 


2640 


12 


4:0.5-5:05 a.m. 


40,, 


from above posi- 


2641 


20 


4:0.5-5:05 a.m. 


40, s 


tion to follow- 


2642 


N.O 


4:15 a.m. 




40,3 


ing position 


2643 


N.O 


4:22 a.m. 




40, 


32 22.3 


117 17.9 


2644 


N.O 


4:55 a.m. 




40, 


32 22.3 


117 17.9 


2645 


OOOc 


5:10-5:25 


a.m. 


40, 


32 22.3 


117 17.9 


2646 


12 


5:10-5:25 


a.m. 


40, 


32 22.3 


117 17.9 


2647 


20 


5:10-5:25 


a.m. 


•10, 


32 22.3 


117 17.9 


2648 


N.O 


5:18 a.m. 




40, 


32 22.3 


117 17.9 


2649 


N.O 


5:23 a.m. 




40, 


32 22.3 


117 17.9 


2650 


N.O 


5:30 a.m. 




40, 


32 22.3 


117 17.9 


2651 


OOOc 


6:0.5-6:55 


a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2652 


12 


6: 0.5-6:. 55 


a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2653 


20 


6:0.5-6:55 


a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2654 


N.O 


6:10 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2655 


N.O 


6:22 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2656 


N.O 


6:28 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2657 


N.O 


6:35 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2658 


N.O 


6:40 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2659 


N.O 


6:44 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2660 


N.O 


6:48 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2661 


N.O 


6:. 52 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 


2662 


OOOc 


7:1.5-8:30 


a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 


117 18.0 



AULS — ( Continued) 
itive Significance 
Depth Water 



uOer 



Re 



Dip-net haul 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

2361 Beginning of 

2361 twilight 

2361 3:52 a.m. 

137-92 For water samples 

92-73 corresponding 

73-55 to N.O hauls 

55-0 see p. 171 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

2364, 2365 

2364, 2365 

2364, 2365 

2366, 2367 

2366, 2367 

2366, 2367 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

lS-9 

9-0 

Dip-net haul 

92-73 Very dark until 

73-55 beginning of 

2621 twilight at 4:20 

2621 a.m. Sun hidden 

2621 from 5:20 to 

55-46 7:55 a.m., after 

46-37 which it was 

37-27 bright and clear 

2622 

2622 

2622 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

2623,2624 

2623, 2624 

2623, 2624 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

2625, 2626 



1915] 



Michael, ct al.: Hijdrographic liecords of Scripps Institution 



177 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Part B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



Appa- 

Haul ratus 

nwmber used 



2663 

2664 

2665 

2666 

2667 

2668 

2669 

2670 

2671 

2672 

2673 

2674* 

2675* 

2676* 

2677t 

2678t 

2679t 

2680 
2681 
2682 
2683 

2684 
2685 
2686 
2687 
2688 
2689 
2690 
2691 
2692 
2693 
2694 
2695 
2696 
2697 
2698 
2699 
2700 
2701 
2702 
2703 
2704 
2705 
2706 
2707 
2708 
2709 
2710 
2711 
2712 
2713 
2714 
2715 
2716 
2717 
2718 
2719 
2720 
2721 



12 
20 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 
OOOc 
12 
20 

OOOc 
12 
20 

OOOe 
12 
20 

N.O 

N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOe 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 



durati 



? of day 

md 

n of haul 



Depth 



7:15-8:30 a.m. 

7:15-8:30 a.m. 

7:27 a.m. 

7:35 a.m. 

7:43 a.m. 

7:48 a.m. 

7:55 a.m. 

8:10 a.m. 

8:15 a.m. 

8:21 a.m. 

8:24 a.m. 

8:45-9:55 a.m. 

8:45-9:55 a.m. 

8: 4.5-9:. 55 a.m. 
10:17-10:38 a.m. 
10:17-10:38 a.m. 
10:17-10:38 a.m. 

3:20-4:23 a.m. 
3:20-4:23 a.m. 
3:20-4:23 a.m. 
3:27 a.m. 

3:38 a.m. 
3:49 a.m. 
3:55 a.m. 
4:00 a.m. 
4:06 a.m. 
4:12 a.m. 
4:16 a.m. 
4:20 a.m. 
4:48-5:45 a.m. 
4:48-5:45 a.m. 
4:50 a.m. 
5:04 a.m. 
5:10 a.m. 
5:14 a.m. 
5:20 a.m. 
5:25 a.m. 
5:30 a.m. 
5:33 a.m. 
5:36 a.m. 
6:06-6:33 a.m. 
6:06-6:33 a.m. 
7:20 a.m. 
7:30 a.m. 
7:40 a.m. 
7:45 a.m. 
7:. 53 a.m. 
7:57 a.m. 
8:02 a.m. 
8:05 a.m. 
8:08 a.m. 
7:1.5-8:10 a.m. 
7:1.5-8:10 a.m. 
8:37 a.m. 
8:45 a.m. 
8:52 a.m. 
8:57 a.m. 
9:03 a.m. 
9:08 a.m. 
9:12 a.m. 



Sectioi 
40, 

■iOj 

■iO, 

40-, 

40, 

40; 

40; 

39.5s 

39^ 

39, 

39, 

39.5^ 

39.5j 

39.5„ 

4O5 

40, 

4O3 

40,5 
40,5 
40,5 
40; 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
4O3 
4O5 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40,5 



N lat. W long. 

August 8. 1911 
From 7:15 to 8:30 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



22:8 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 



' 17:3 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 



August 9, 1911 
32 22.7 117 19.2 
From 3:20 to 4:25 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



21.5 
22 7 



117 
117 



18.8 
19.2 



From 4:45 to 7:08 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 22.4 117 18.5 
32 22.7 117 19.2 
From 7:15 to 8:10 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



umber 



Remarks 



2625, 2626 

2625, 2626 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 For water samples 



32 22.4 117 18.5 

40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 

40, From 8:. 35 to 9:20 
40, a.m. the boat 

40, drifted from the 

40, above iiosition 

40, to the following 

40, position 

From 8:45 to 10:02 a.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 22:8 N 117' 
From 10:17 to 10:42 a.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 2312 N 117 



37-27 
27-0 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 



















137-92 

92-73 
73-55 
55-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 




137-92 
92-73 
73-55 
5.5-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 




137-92 
92-73 
73-55 
55-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 




137-92 
92-73 
73-55 
55-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 



2643 
2643 
2643 
2652 
2652 
2652 

2653, 2654 
2653, 2654 
2653, 2654 



corresponding 
to N.O hauls 
see p. 171 



Dark throughout 
entire N.O series 



2655, 2658 
2655, 2658 



2675 
2675 



2676, 2677 
2676, 2677 



17:0 W. 

° 17;5 W. 



178 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Appa- 

Haul ratus 

number used 

2723 N.O 

2724 N.O 

2725 000c 

2726 20 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 
Part B — PlanTcton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Depth 



2727 

2728 

2729 

2730 

2731 

2732 

2733 

2734 

2735 

2736 

2737 

2738 

2739 

2740 

2741 

2742 

2743 

2744 

2745 

2746 

2747 

2748 

2749 

2750 

2751 

2752 

2753* 

2754* 

2755* 



2763 

2764 
2765 
2766 
2767 
2768 
2769 
2770 
2771 
2772 
2773 
2774 
2775 

2776 

2777 
2778 
2779 
2780 



N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 

20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 

20 
OOOc 

20 
OOOc 

20 
OOOc 

20 
OOOc 



2756 OOOc 

2757 20 

2758 OOOc 

2759 20 

2760 OOOc 

2761 OOOc 

2762 OOOc 



OOOc 

9 

12 

OOOc 

9 

12 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

OOOc 

9 

12 



Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 

9:15 a.m. 
9:17 a.m. 
8:35-9:20 a.m. 
8:3.5-9:20 a.m. 

3:50 a.m. 
4:00 a.m. 
4:08 a.m. 
4:15 a.m. 
4:27 a.m. 
4:33 a.m. 
4:37 a.m. 
4:43 a.m. 
4:47 a.m. 
3:4.5-4:53 a.m. 
3:45-4:53 a.m. 
5:10 a.m. 
5:15 a.m. 
5:25 a.m. 
5:32 a.m. 
5:38 a.m. 
5:45 a.m. 
5:48 a.m. 
5:53 a.m. 
5:58 a.m. 
5:06-6:00 a.m. 
5:06-6:00 a.m. 
6:12-7:55 a.m. 
6:1 2-7:. 55 a.m. 
8:4.5-9:45 a.m. 
8:45-9:45 a.m. 



12:. 53-1 :45 p.m. 

40-6:40 a.m. 
40-6:40 a.m. 
20-7:48 a.m. 
20-7:48 a.m. 
05-9:12 a.m. 
4.5-11 :57 a.m. 
46-1 :35 p.m. 



4:27-5:37 a.m. 

4:27-5:37 a.m. 

4:27-5:37 a.m. 

6:2.5-6:38 a.m. 

6:2.5-6:38 a.m. 

6:2.5-6:38 a.m. 

9:45 a.m. 
10:30 a.m. 
11:05 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
11:37-11:56 a.m. 
11:37-11:56 a.m. 
11: 37-11:. 56 a.m. 



Section 

40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 
40, 
40. 
40, 
40, 
40. 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40, 
4O5 
41, 
41, 
41. 
41, 
41, 
41, 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
39., 

74,, 
74.,3 
74., 



75., 
75,, 
75,, 
75„ 
75„ 
75., 
75,. 



Position 

N lat, \V long. 

August 9, 1911 



32° 22:3 117° 20:2 

August 10, 1911 
32 22.4 117 21.2 
From 3:40 to 4:.55 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 21.3 117 21.5 
32 22.4 117 21.2 
From 5:05 to 6:02 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



meters 



Water 
sample 
numfier 



Remarks 



22.5 
23.3 

18.2 
18.7 
1S.7 
18.2 
18.2 
18.2 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



20.5 
20.0 
24.7 
24.5 
24.5 
24.7 



32 20.6 

32 20.5 

32 20.5 

32 20.0 

32 22.0 

32 23.0 
A 

33 

33 53.0 
33 53.0 
33 51.3 
33 51.3 



117 24.7 
117 24.7 



117 21.3 
117 21.2 



117 
117 

117 
117 



21.2 
20^5 
19.0 
17.0 



120 10.7 

120 10.7 

120 12.8 

120 12.8 



51.3 
49.6 
49.6 
49.6 
49.6 
49.6 
49.6 
49.6 



120 
120 
120 
120 
120 
120 
120 
120 



12.8 
16.2 
16.2 
16.2 
16.2 
16.2 
16.2 
16.2 



18-9 For water samples 

9-0 corresponding 

2678 to N.O hauls 

2678 see p. 171 

137-92 Cloudy and dark 



92-73 
73-55 
55-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 




137-92 
92-73 
73-55 
5.5-46 
46-37 
37-27 
27-18 
18-9 

9-0 






































730-550 
550-365 
365-1 85 
18.5-0 









2679, 2680 
2679, 2680 



throughout 
entire Nansen 
series 



2681 
2681 
2701 
2701 
2702 
2702 
2707 
2707 
2722 

2723 
2723 
2726 
2726 
2735 
2755 
2772 

2930 
2930 
2930 
2933 
2933 
2933 



2960 
2960 
2960 



OOOc 3:20-3:40 p.m. 51,, 33 22.0 118 16.0 

9 3:20-3:40 p.m. 5],„ 33 22.0 118 16.0 

12 3:20-3:40 p.m. 51„ 33 22.0 118 16.0 

OOOc 3:4.5-4:00 p.m. 51,„ .33 22.0 118 16.0 2968 

9 3:4.5^:00 p.m. 51,„ 33 22.0 118 16.0 2968 

* From 10:15 a.m. to 1:55 p.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 

24;3 W. Hauls 2753 and 2754 began at 11:35 a.m. and ended at 12:45 p.m. 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Ilijdrographic Records of Scripps Inslitufion 



179 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 
Fart B — Planlcton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



Appa- Time of day 

Haul ratus and 

number used duration of haul 



Section 



2781 12 3:45-4:00 p.m. 51,, 

2782 000c 4:0.5-4:25 p.m. 51,s 

2783 9 4:0.5-4:25 p.m. 51„ 

2784 12 4:0.5-4:25 p.m. 51,„ 

2785 OOOo 8:00-8:45 a.m. 40, 

2786 9 8:00-8:45 a.m. 40, 

2787 12 8:00-8:45 a.m. 40, 

2788 000c 8:5.5-10:00 a.m. 40, 

2789 9 8:5.5-10:00 a.m. 40, 

2790 12 8:.55-10:00a.m. 40, 

2791 N.O 9:.50a.m. 40, 

2792 N.O 10:07 a.m. 40, 

2793 N.O 10:27 a.m. 40, 

2794 N.O 10:34 a.m. 40, 

2795 N.O 10:37 a.m. 40, 

2796 N.O 10:42 a.m. 40, 

2797 N.O 10:45 a.m. 40, 

2798 N.O 10:49 a.m. 40, 

2799 N.O 10:52 a.m. 40, 

2800 000c 10:20-10:.55a.m. 40, 

2801 9 10:20-10:55 a.m. 40, 

2802 12 10:20-10:55 a.m. 40, 

2803* 000c 40, 

2804* 9 40, 

2805* 12 40, 

2806 N.O 11:20 a.m. 40, 

2807 N.O 11:32 a.m. 40, 

2808 N.O 11:43 a.m. 40, 

2809 N.O 11:50 a.m. 40, 

2810 N.O ll:.5Sa.m. 40, 

2811 N.O 12:. 55 p.m. 40, 

2812 N.O 1:00 p.m. 40, 

2813 N.O 1:03 p.m. 40, 

2814 N.O 1:06 p.m. 40, 

2815 N.O 1:10 p.m. 40, 

2816 N.O 1:22 p.m. 40, 

2817 N.O 1:45 p.m. 40, 

2818 OOOc 12:4.5-l:.55p.m. 40, 

2819 9 12:4.5-1:55 p.m. 40, 

2820 12 12:4.5-1 :55 p.m. 40, 

2821 OOOc 2:10-3:07 p.m. 40, 

2822 9 2:10-3:07 p.m. 40. 

2823 12 2:10-3:07 p.m. 40, 

2824 N.O 2:30 p.m. 40, 

2825 N.O 3:00 p.m. 40, 

2826 OOOc 7:10-8:10 a.m. 40, 

2827 9 7:10-8:10 a.m. 40-, 

2828 12 7:10-8:10 a.m. 40, 

2829 OOOc 8:32-9:40 a.m. 40, 

2830 9 8:32-9:40 a.m. 40-, 

2831 12 8:32-9:40 a.m. 40, 

2832 N.O 8:43 a.m. 40, 

2833 N.O 8:55 a.m. 40, 

2834 N.O 9:05 a.m. 40, 

2835 N.O 9:13 a.m. 40, 

2836 N.O 9:20 a.m. 40, 

2837 N.O 9:25 a.m. 40, 

2838 N.O 9:28 a.m. 40, 

2839 N.O 9:32 a.m. 40, 

2840 N.O 9:35 a.m. 40, 

2841 N.O 9:38 a.m. 40, 
* Haul began at 11:10 a.m. and endei 



Position 




Depth 


Water 
samT)le 














Nlat. 


W long. 


meters 


number 


August 


23, 1911 








33° 22:0 


118° 


16:0 







2968 


33 22.0 


118 


16.0 







2969 


33 22.0 


118 


16.0 







2969 


33 22.0 


118 


16.0 







2969 


October 


24, 1911 








32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2978 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2978 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2978 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2979 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2979 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2979 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


137- 


92 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


92- 


73 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


73- 


55 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


55-46 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


46- 


37 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


37- 


27 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


27- 


18 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


18- 


9 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


9- 







32 22^4 


117 


21.2 







2984 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2984 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2984 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2985 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2985 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2985 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


185- 


-137 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


137- 


-92 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


9S- 
■ 73- 


-73 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


55 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


5.5- 


-46 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


46- 


-37 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


37- 


-27 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


27- 


-18 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


18- 


-9 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


9- 


-0 




32 22^4 


117 


2L2 


27.5- 


-185 




32 22.4 


117 


2T.2 


36.5- 


-275 




32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2986 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2986 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2986 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2987 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2987 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 







2987 


32 22.4 


117 


21.2 


460- 


-365 




32 22^4 


117 


21.2 


550- 


-460 




October 


25, 1911 








32 22.7 


117 


19.2 







2988 


32 22.7 


117 


19.2 







2988 


32 22.7 


117 


19.2 







2988 


32 22.7 


117 


19.2 







2999 


32 22.7 


117 


19.2 







2999 


32 22.7 


117 


19.2 







2999 


32 22.7 


117 


19.2 


18.5- 


-137 






117 


19.2 


137- 


-92 




32 22.7 


117 


19.2 


92- 


-73 




32 22^7 
32 22.7 


117 


19.2 


73- 


-55 




117 


19.2 


55- 


-46 




32 22.7 


117 


19.2 


46- 


-37 




32 22.7 


117 


19.2 


37- 


-27 




32 22.7 


117 


19.2 


27- 


-18 




32 22'7 
32 22.7 


117 


19^2 
19.2 


18- 


-9 




117 


9 


-0 




a at 12:3 


1 p.m 











Amount of drift 
unknown 
throughout 
entire day 

For water samples 
corresponding 
to N.O hauls 
see p. 171 



Drift unltnown 
throughout 
entire day 

Sky partly over- 
cast until 9:35 
a.m., after 
which it was 
bright and clear 



ISO 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Appa- 

Haul ratus 

number used 



Table 5. — Data Rel. 

Part B—Plaiiltoii 

Time of day 
and 
duration of haul Section 



.ATivE TO Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 
Collections of Quantitative Significance 



2842 
2843 
2844 
2845 
2846 
2847 
2848 
2849 
2850 
2851 
2852 
2853 
2854 
2855 
2856 
2857 
2858 
2859 
2860 
2861 
2862 
2863 
2864 
2865 
2866 
2867 
2868 



000c 

9 
12 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
000c 

9 
12 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOe 

9 

12 

OOOc 

9 

12 

N.O 

N.O 

K.B. 
K.B. 

OOOe 
9 
12 
K.B. 
K.B. 
K.B. 
OOOe 



2870 
2871 
2872 
2873 
2874 
2875 
2876 
2877 

2878 9 

2879 12 
2SS0 K.OOO 

2881 K.OOO 

2882 K.OOO 

2883 OOOc 

2884 9 

2885 12 

2886 K.OOO 

2887 K.OOO 

2888 K.OnO 

2889 K.OOO 
2S90 K.OOO 

2891 K.OOO 

2892 K.OOO 

2893 K.OOO 

2894 OnOc 

2895 9 
2896 



12 

2897 K.OOO 

2898 K.OOO 

2899 K.OOO 

2900 K.OOO 

2901 K.OOO 

2902 K.OOO 

2903 K.OOn 



9:50-10:50 a.m. 

9:50-10:50 a.m. 

9:50-10:50 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. 
10:18 a.m. 
10:25 a.m. 
10:30 a.m. 
10:35 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
10:44 a.m. 
10:47 a.m. 
10:50 a.m. 
10:.59-11 :59 a.m. 
10: 59-11:. 59 a.m. 
10:59-11:59 a.m. 
11:10 a.m. 
11:30 a.m. 
11:55 a.m. 
12:10-12:45 p.m. 
12:10-12:45 p.m. 
12:10-12:45 p.m. 

1:00-1 :4op.m. 

1:00-1 :45 p.m. 

1:00-1:45 p.m. 

1:15 p.m. 

1:45 p.m. 



7:45 

8:15 

7:.50- 

7:50- 

7:.50- 

8:55 

9:05 

9:20 

9:00 

9:00 

9:00 

10:50 

11:1.5 

11:40 

12:01- 

12:01 

12:01 

12:50 

1:10 

1:,3.5 

2:00 

2:3.5 

3:07 

3:40 

4:17- 



a.m. 
a.m. 

50 a.m. 

50 a.m. 

50 a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 

-10:20 a.m. 
-10:20 a.m. 
-10:20 a.m. 
-11:05 a.m. 
-11:30 a.m. 
-11:55 a.m. 
-12:31p.m. 
-12:31p.m. 
-12:31 p.m. 
-1 :05 p.m. 
-1 :25 p.m. 
-1 :50 p.m. 
-2:15 p.m. 
-2:50 p.m. 
-3:22 p.m. 
-3 : 55 p.m. 
-4:32 p.m. 



40 a.m. 

40 a.m. 

40 a.m. 

15 a.m. 

35 a.m. 

57 a.m. 

35 a.m. 
4.5-10:00 a.m. 
10-10:25 a.m. 
50-11 :05 a.m. 



00-8 
20-8 
42-8 
20-9 



40j 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40-, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40= 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 



Nlat. 
October 



32° 


22:7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




October 


26, 


32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




32 


22.7 




October 


27 


32 


22.4 




32 


22.4 




32 


22.4 




32 


22.4 




32 


22.4 




32 


22.4 




32 


22.4 




32 


22.4 




32 


22.4 




32 


22.4 





W long. 

;5, 1911 

° 19:2 

19.2 
19.2 
19.2 
19.2 
19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 
19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 
19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 
1911 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 
' 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

• 19.2 

■ 19.2 

• 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 
' 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 

• 19.2 

■ 19.2 

■ 19.2 
19.2 

1911 

■ 21.2 
7 21.2 
7 21.2 
7 21.2 

21.2 
21.2 
21.2 
21.2 
21.2 
21.2 



meters 



Water 
sample 
number 



Remarks 



3000 

3000 

3000 For water samples 

185-137 corresponding 

137-92 to N.O hauls . 

92-73 see p. 171 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3001 

3001 

3001 

275-185 

36.5-275 

460-365 







3002 

3002 

3002 

550-460 

550-0 



550 

460 







365 

275 

185 







18 

.37 







46 

64 

92 

137 

185 

275 

365 

460 



3003 Drift unknown 
3005 throughout 

3004 entire day 
3004 

3004 
3006 
3007 
3009 
3008 
3008 
3008 Sky overcast 

throughout day, 

becoming 

cloudy and 

3010 wind.v in after- 
3010 noon, threaten- 
3010 ing rain from 
3:30 to 5:00 

3011 
3011 
3011 
Threatening rain 

Drift unknown 

throughout 

entire day 



1915] 



Michael, cf ah: Hi/clrographic Eecords of Scripps Instilulirni 



181 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — (Continuea) 

Part B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Appa- Time of day Position Deptll Water 

Haul ratus and r ''• % in sample 

number used duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters number Remarks 

October 27. 1911 

2904 K.OOO 11:15-11:30 a.m. 40^ 32° 2214 117° 2i:2 110 

2905 K.OOO 12:01-12:16 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 137 Raining from 

2906 OOOi' 12:01-12:30 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 3012 12:30 to 1:30 

2907 9 12:01-12:30 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 3012 p.m., after 

2908 12 12:01-12:30 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 3012 which sky 

2909 000c 1:0.5-1 :55 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 began to "clear 

2910 9 1:05-1 :55 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 

2911 12 1:0.5-1 :55 p.m. 40. 32 22.4 117 21.2 

2912 K.OOO 1:30-1:45 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 185 

2913 K.OOO 2:20-2:35 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 275 

2914 K.OOO 2:55-3:10 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 365 

2915 K.000 3:50-4:05 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 460 

October 28, 1911 

2916 000c 8:.55a.m. 40^ 32 22.7 117 19.2 550-0 f'lear and bright 

2917 000c 9:2.5-9:45 a.m. 40^ 32 22.7 117 19.2 3013 throughout day 

2918 9 9:2.5-9:45 a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 3013 

2919 12 9:25-9:45 a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 3013 

2920 40., 32 22.7 117 19.2 Dip-net haul 

2921 000c 9:50-10:10 a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 

2922 9 9:50-10:10 a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 

2923 12 9:50-10:10 a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 

2924 OOOe 10:20-10:45 a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 

2925 9 10:20-10:45 a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 

2926 12 10:20-10:45 a.m. 40^. 32 22.7 117 19.2 

November 29, 1911 

2927 000c 4:46-5:10 p.m. 39„ 32 29.5 117 13.5 3014 

2928 9 4:46-5:10 p.m. 39, 32 29.5 117 13.5 3014 

2929 12 4:46-5:10 p.m. 39, 32 29.5 117 13.5 3014 

November 30, 1911 

2930 000c 4:3.5-5:20 a.m. 40,., 32 23.5 117 18.0 3017 Bright starlight 

2931 9 4:3.5-5:20 a.m. 40,.., From 4:10 to 6:07 3017 but no moon 

a.m. the boat until 5:25. 

drifted from the when twilight 

above position began. Sunrise 

to the following 6:35; bright and 

2932 12 4:3.5-5:20 a.m. 40,, position 3017 clear thereafter 

2933 N.O 5:26 a.m. 40. 137-92 For water samples 

2934 OOOc 5:30-6:45 a.m. 40, 3018 corresponding 

2935 9 5:30-6:45 a.m. 40, 3018 to N.O hauls 

2936 12 5:30-6:45 a.m. 40, 3018 see p. 171 

2937 N.O 5:44 a.m. 40, 92-73 

2938 N.O 5:55 a.m. 40, 73-.55 

2939 N.O 6:06 a.m. 40. 32 21.8 117 21.1 5.5-37 

2940 N.O 6:16 a.m. 40, 32 21.8 117 21.1 5.5-46 

2941 N.O 6:24a.m. 40, 32 21.8 117 21.1 46-37 

2942 N.O 6:31a.m. 40. 32 21.8 117 21.1 37-27 

2943 N.O 6:35 a.m. 40. 32 21.8 117 21.1 27-18 

2944 N.O 6:39 a.m. 40. 32 21.8 117 21.1 18-9 

2945* OOOc 8:10-9:05 a.m. 40, 32 23.5 117 18.0 3019 

2946* 9 8:10-9:05 a.m. 40^ 32 23.5 117 18.0 3019 

2947* 12 8:10-9:05 a.m. 40, 32 23.5 117 18.0 3019 

2948* N.O 9:08 a.m. 40, 32 23.5 117 18.0 137-92 

2949 OOOc 9:30-10:30 a.m. 40, 32 23.5 117 18.0 3020 

2950 9 9:30-10:30 a.m. 40, From 9:30 to 10:30 3020 

2951 12 9:30-10:30 a.m. 40, a.m. the boat 3020 

2952 N.O 9:35 a.m. 40, drifted from the 92-73 

2953 N.O 9:45 a.m. 40, above position 73-55 

29.54 N.O 9:.50a.m. 40, to the following 5-5-46 

29.55 N.O 9:57 a.m. 40, position 46-37 

29.56 N.O 10:02 a.m. 40, 37-27 

2957 N.O 10:05 a.m. 40, 27-18 

29.58 N.O 10:25 a.m. 40, 18-9 

29.59 N.O 10:30a.m. 40, 32 22.7 117 19.2 9-0 

*From 8:10 to 9:05 a.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 22:7 N 117° 19:2 W. 



182 



Universitij of California Fublications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 
Fart B — Planl'ton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



Appa- 

Haul ratus 

number used 



2960 
2961 
2962 
2963 
2964 
2965 
2966 
2967 
2968 
2969 
2970 
2971 
2972 
2973 
2974 
2975 
2976 
2977 
2978 
2979 
2980 
2981 
2982 
2983 
2984 
2985 
2986 
2987 
2988 
2989 
2990 
2991 
2992 
2993 
2994 
2995 
2996 
2997 
2998 
2999 
3000 
3001 
3002 
3003 
3004 
3005 
3006 
3007 
3008 
3009 
3010 

3011 
3012 
3013 
3014 
3015 
3016 
3017 
3018 
3019 
3020 
3021 
3022 



000c 
9 
12 

N.O 

000c 

9 

12 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 
9 

12 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 

9 

12 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 
9 

12 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 

OOOc 

9 

12 

N.O 

OOOc 

9 

12 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 

N.O 



5 a.m. 



Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 

3:50-4:15 a.m. 
3:50-4:15 a.m. 
3:50-4:15 a.m. 
4:20 a.m. 
4:25-5:30 a.m. 
4:25-5:30 a.m. 
4:25-5:30 a.m. 
4:33 a.m. 
4:40 a.m. 
4:47 a.m. 
4:52 a.m. 
4:57 a.m. 
5:00 a.m. 
5:05 a.m. 
5:07 a.m. 
6:05-7:10 a.m. 
6:0.5-7:10 a.m. 
6:05-7:10 a.m. 
6:30 a.m. 
6:40 a.m. 
6:47 a.m. 
6:54 a.m. 
6:58 a.m. 
7:02 a.m. 
7:06 a.m. 
7:08 a.m. 
7:10 a.m. 
7:. 50-8: 25 
7:50-8:25 a.m. 
7:50-8:25 a.m. 
7:50 a.m. 
7:57 a.m. 
8:03 a.m. 
8:07 a.m. 
8:13 a.m. 
8:16 a.m. 
8:19 a.m. 
8:22 a.m. 
8:25 a.m. 
8:4.5-9:27 a.m. 
8:4.5-9:27 a.m. 
8:4.5-9:27 a.m. 
8:46 a.m. 
8:55 a.m. 
9:03 a.m. 
9:08 a.m. 
9:13 a.m. 
9:16 a.m. 
9:20 a.m. 
9:24 a.m. 
9:26 a.m. 

4:05-4:50 a.m. 
4:05-4:50 a.m. 
4:0.5^:50 a.m. 
4:50 a.m. 
5:00-7:55 a.m. 
5:00-7:55 a.m. 
5:00-7:55 a.m. 
5:00 a.m. 
5:05 a.m. 
5:10 p.m. 
5:15 a.m. 
5:20 a.m. 



Position 



Section N lat. 



40, J 

40,5 

40,; 

40, 

40, 

4U, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40. 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40,5 

40,5 

40,5 

40, 

40., 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

4(1, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40. 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 
40, 
40. 
40, 



W long. 
December 1. 1911 
32° 22:7 117° 19;2 
From 3:45 to 5:45 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 21.3 117 20.4 
32 22.7 117 19.2 
From 6:00 to 8:30 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



Depth 
meters 



Water 
sample 
number 



Remarks 



32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 

32 22. 
Deccu 

32 22, 

32 22, 

32 22, 

32 22, 

32 22, 

32 22 

32 22 

.32 22, 

32 22, 

.32 22, 

32 22, 

32 22, 



117 19.3 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 -21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

il7 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 
iber 2, 1911 

4 117 21.2 

4 117 21.2 

4 117 21.2 

4 117 21.2 

4 117 21.2 

4 117 21.2 

4 117 21.2 

4 117 21.2 

4 117 21.2 

4 117 21.2 

,4 117 21.2 

4 117 212 



3022 

3022 

3022 

137-92 

3024 

3024 

3024 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 For water samples 

37-27 corresponding 

27-18 to N.O hauls 

18-9 see p. 171 

9-0 

3025 

3025 

3025 

137-92 Sunrise 6:34 a.m. 

92-73 

73-.55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3026 

3026 

3026 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3027 

3027 

3027 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 : 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3028 Clear but no moon. 

3028 Twilight began 

3028 at 5:52 a.m. 

137-92 Ocean excep- 

3029 tionallv smooth 

3029 No drift "detected 

3029 bv noon 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 



1915] 



Michael, ct al.: Hiidroyrapliic Records of Scripps ImttiUUion 



183 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Contimied) 
Fart B — Plankton Collections of Qtiantitative Significance 



Appa- 

Haul ratus 

number used 



3023 
3024 
3025 



N.O 
N.O 
N.O 



3026 K.OOO 

3027 K.OOO 

3028 K.OOO 

3029 K.OOO 

3030 K.OOO 

3031 K.OOO 

3032 K.OOO 

3033 K.OOO 

3034 K.OOO 

3035 K.OOO 

3036 K.OOO 

3037 K.OOO 

3038 K.OOO 

3039 K.OOO 

3040 K.OOO 

3041 K.OOO 



3042 

3043 -K.OOO 

3044 K.000 
3045 

3046 K.OOO 

3047 K.OOO 

3048 K.OOO 

3049 K.OOO 

3050 K.OOO 



3051 
3052 
3053 
3054 
3055 
3056 
3057 
3058 
3059 
3060 
3061 
3062 
3063 
3064 
3065 
3066 
3067 
3068 
3069 
3070 
3071 
3072 
3073 
3074 
3075 
3076 
3077 
3078 
3079 
3080 
3081 
3082 



000c 

9 
OOOe 

9 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOe 

9 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
000c 

9 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
000c 

9 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 



Time of dav 

and 

duration of haul 

5:24 a.m. 

5:27 a.m. 

5:30 a.m. 

8:23-8:38 a.m. 

8:58-9:13 a.m. 

9:24-9:39 a.m. 

9:46-10:01 a.m 
10:08-10:23 a.m 
10:30-10:45 a.m 
10:55-11:09 a.m 
11:20-11:35 a.m 
11:44-11:59 a.m 
12:22-12:37 p.m 
12:. 54-1: 09 p.m. 

1:32-1:47 p.m, 

5:10-5:23 a.m 

5:27-5:40 a.m, 
5:4.5-5:58 a.m 
6:08-6:21 a.m 



6:36-6:49 a.m. 
6:. 53-7 :06 a.m. 

7:12-7:25 a.m. 
7:36-7:49 a.m. 
7:56-8:09 a.m. 
8:17-8:30 a.m. 
8:42-8:55 a.m. 



4:15- 
4:1.5- 
6:1.5- 
6:1.5- 
6:20 
6:30 
6:40 
6:. 50 
6:55 
7:00 
7:07 
7:10 
7:13 
8:40- 
8:40- 
8:50 
9:00 
9:07 
9:10- 
9:10- 
9:12 
9:17 
9:22 
9:30 
9:32 
9:36 
10:00- 
10:00- 
10:07 
10:16 
10:23 
10:30 



-6:10 a.m. 

-6:10 a.m. 

-7:30 a.m. 

-7:30 a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

-9:05 a.m. 

-9:05 a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

-9:38 a.m. 

-9:38 a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

-10:48 a.m. 

-10:48 a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 



40. 
40. 
40, 
40. 
40., 
40., 
40„ 
40. 
40. 
40,, 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 

40-, 
40, 
40, 
40, 



40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 

40. 
40. 
40. 
40, 
40, 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40, 
40. 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 



N lat. W long. 

L>ecember 2, 1911 

32° 22:4 117° 21:2 



32 22.4 

32 22.4 

32 22.4 

32 22.4 



22.4 
22.4 
22.4 



117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 

117 21.2 



21.2 
21.2 



32 22.4 

32 22.4 

32 22.4 

32 22.4 

32 22.4 

December 3. 1911 

32 22.7 117 19.2 

32 22.7 117 19.2 

32 22.7 117 19.2 

32 22.7 117 19.2 



117 21.2 
117 21.2 
117 21.2 



32 22.7 117 

32 22.7 117 

32 22.7 117 

32 22.7 117 

32 22.7 117 

32 22.7 117 

32 22.7 117 

32 22.7 117 

32 22.7 117 
December 27. 

32 23.5 117 

From 4:05 to 7:30 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



19.2 
19.2 
19.2 
19.2 
19.2 
19.2 
19.2 
19.2 
19.2 
1911 
18.0 



32 20.2 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

32 22.7 

32 22'.7 

32 22.7 

32 22^7 

32 22.7 

32 22.7 



18.5 
18.0 



117 18.0 

117 18.0 

117 18.0 

117 18.0 



117 
117 



18.0 
18.0 
117 18.0 
117 18.0 
117 18.0 
117 18.0 
117 18.0 
117 18.0 
117 19.2 



19.2 
19.2 
19.2 



Depth 
meters 



Remarks 



117 19.2 
117 19.2 



27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

18 

.27 

37 

46 Bright, clear, and 

55 calm 

73 

92 

137 

185 

275 

365 

460 

IS Extremely dark 

27 till dawn at 

37 5:25 a.m. Sun- 

365 rise 6:32 a.m. 

Calm, smooth, 
and cloudy 

Dip-net haul 

46 

55 

Dip-net haul 

73 

92 

137 

185 

275 

3033 For water samples 

3033 corresponding 

3034 to N.O hauls 

3034 see p. 171 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3035 

3035 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 No drift detected 

3036 by 9:40 a.m. 

3036 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

• 9-0 

3037 

3037 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 



184 



University of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Appa- 

Haul ratus 

number used 



3083 
3084 
3085 
3086 
3087 

3088 
3089 
3090 

3091 
3092 
3093 
3094 
3095 
3096 
3097 
3098 
3099 
3100 
3101 
3102 
3103 
3104 
3105 
3106 
3107 
3108 
3109 
3110 
3111 

3112 
3113 
3114 
3115 
3116 
3117 
3118 
3119 
3120 
3121 
3122 
3123 
3124 
3125 



3126 
3127 
3128 
3129 
3130 
3131 
3132 
3133 
3134 
3135 
3136 
3137 
3138 
3139 
3140 
3141 
3142 



N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 

OOOc 

9 

OOOc 



N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 
9 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 

OOOc 
9 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 



N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
NO 
OOOc 
9 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 



Table 5. — : 

Part B— 

Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 

10:35 a.m. 
10:40 a.m. 
10:42 a.m. 
10:44 a.m. 
10:46 a.m. 

4:10-4:52 a.m. 
4:10-4:52 a.m. 
4 :.55-6 :25 a.m. 

4:55-6:25 a.m. 
4:55 a.m. 
5:08 a.m. 
5:19 a.m. 
5:28 a.m. 
5:35 a.m. 
5:43 a.m. 
5:48 a.m. 
5:53 a.m. 
5:57 a.m. 
7:40-9:15 a.m. 
7:40-9:15 a.m. 
8:12 a.m. 
8:20 a.m. 
8:28 a.m. 
8:35 a.m. 
8:40 a.m. 
8:44 a.m. 
8:48 a.m. 
8:51 a.m. 
8:. 53 a.m. 

3:50-5:50 a.m. 
3:50-5:50 a.m. 
4:18 a.m. 
4:33 a.m. 
4:45 a.m. 
4:55 a.m. 
5:02 a.m. 
5:07 a.m. 
5:14 a.m. 
5:17 a.m. 
5:22 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:00-7:05 a.m. 
6:00-7:05 a.m. 



Data EEr. 
Plankton 



a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
-9:15 
-9:15 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 



a.m. 
a.m. 



ATivE TO PijANKton Hauls — (Continued) 

Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Position Depth Water 

f ^ ^ in sample 

ters number 



40, 
40j 
40, 
40, 
40, 

40, 
40, 
40,,, 

40,, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40. 

40. 

40. 

40, 

40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 
40, 
40. 



40, 
40. 
40, 
40. 
40, 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40. 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40- 
40, 



N !at. W long. 

December 27. 1911 



Remarks 



32° 22 
32 22 
32 22 
32 22 
32 22 

December 28, 
32 22.7 11' 



117° 19:2 
117 19.2 
117 19.2 
117 19.2 
117 19.2 

1911 

19.2 



From 4:10 to 6:22 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above ])osition 
to the following 
jiosition 



18.3 
21.2 



32 22.25 

32 22.4 

From 7:40 to 9:15 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



32 20.3 117 22.0 

February 9. 1912 
32 23.5 117 18.0 
From 3:25 to 6:50 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



11? 



18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 



32 21.7 

32 21.7 

32 23.5 

32 23.5 

From 7:40 to 9:15 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 No drift detected 

9-0 by 10:50 a.m. 

3042 For water samples 

3042 corresponding 

3044 to N.O hauls 

see p. 171 

3044 Darli until dawn 

137-92 at 5:50 a.m. 

92-73 Partly cloudy 

73-55 until 9:05 a.m., 

55—46 when it became 

46-37 very cloudy and 

37—27 threatened rain 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3046 

3046 

137-92 

92-73 

73-.55 

5.5^6 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3057 No moon but clear. 

3057 Dawn at 5:50 

137-92 a.m. High fog 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

137-92 

30.58 Cloudy and dis- 

3058 mal from 6:50 

a.m. until 12:20 
p.m. 

92-73 

73-55 

55^6 

46-37 

37-27 

27-0 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3060 

3060 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

.5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 



191.5] 



Micliael, et al.: Eydrographic Records of Scripps Institull 



185 



Table 5. — Data Rei. 
Part B — Plankton 



ATivE TO Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 
Collections of Quantitative Significance 





Appa- 


Time of dav 




Position 














number 


used 


duration of haul 


Sectic 


n N lat. 
Feln-ua 


W long. 
r,v 9, 1912 


3143 


N.O 


8:27 a.m. 


4O3 






3144 


N.O 


8:32 a.m. 


4O5 






3145 


N.O 


8:35 a.m. 


4O5 






3146 


N.O 


8:37 a.m. 


4O5 


32° 23:0 


117° 17:7 


3147 


OOOe 


9:42-10:56 a.m. 


4O3 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3148 


9 


9:42-10:56 a.m. 


40, 


From 9: 


10 to 10:56 


3149 


N.O 


10:10 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


3150 


N.O 


10:20 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


3151 


N.O 


10:27 a.m. 


40, 


above 


position 


3152 


N.O 


10:35 a.m. 


4O3 


to the 


following 


3153 


N.O 


10:40 a.m. 


40, 


position 


31.54 


N.O 


10:48 a.m. 


40, 






3155 


N.O 


10:52 a.m. 


40, 






3156 


N.O 


10:54 a.m. 


40, 






3157 


N.O 


10:56 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.6 


117 19.0 


3158* 


OOOc 
9 

N.O 




40, 
40, 
40, 


32 22.4 
32 22.4 
From 11 


117 21 2 


3159* 




117 212 


3160 


11:26 a.m. 


20 a.m. to 


3161 


N.O 


11:35 a.m. 


40, 


1:00 p 


m. the boat 


3162 


N.O 


11:43 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


3163 


N.O 


11:.51 a.m. 


40, 


above 


losition 


3164 


N.O 


11:59 a.m. 


40, 


to the 


following 


3165 


N.O 


12:04 p.m. 


40, 


position 


3166 


N.O 


12:08 p.m. 


40, 






3167 


N.O 


12:12 p.m. 


40, 






3168 


N.O 


12:16 p.m. 


40, 






3169 


N.O 


12:20 p.m. 


40, 


32 21.75 
February 


117 20.4 

10. 1912 


3170 


OOOc 


3:50-5:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3171 


9 


3:50-5:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3172 


N.O 


4:28 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3173 


N.O 


4:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3174 


N.O 


5:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3175 


N.O 


5:11 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3176 


N.O 


5:18 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3177 


N.O 


5:23 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3178 


N.O 


5:27 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3179 


N.O 


5:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 


117 19.2 


3180 


N.O 


5:37 a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 
March 


117 19.2 
22, 1912 


3183 


OOOc 


9:2.5-10:00 a.m. 


B 


32 39.8 


117 14.1 


3184 


12 


9:2.5-10:00 a.m. 


B 


82 39.8 


117 14.1 


3185 


20 


9:2.5-10:00 a.m. 


B 


32 39. S 


117 14.1 



OOOc 10:10-10:45 a.m. B 



32 39.8 117 14.1 



3187 


12 


10:10-10:45 a.m. 


B 


32 39.8 117 14.1 


3188 


20 


10:10-10:45 a.m. 


B 


32 39.8 117 14.1 


3189 


OOOc 


11:0.5-11:25 a.m. 


B 


32 39.8 117 14.1 


3190 


12 


11:0.5-11:25 a.m. 


B 


32 39.8 117 14.1 


3191 


20 


11:0.5-11:25 a.m. 


B 


32 39.8 117 14.1 
Marrh 23, 1912 


3192 


OOOc 


3:02-4:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 117 18.0 


3193 


12 


3:02-4:35 a.m. 


40, 


From 3:00 to 6:00 


3194 


20 


3:02-4:35 a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


3195 


N.O 


3:10 a.m. 


40, 


drifted from the 


3196 


N.O 


3:14 a.m. 


40- 


above position 


3197 


N.O 


3:25 a.m. 


40, 


to the following 


3198 


N.O 


3:45 a.m. 


40, 


position 


3199 


N.O 


3:55 a.m. 


40, 




3200 


N.O 


4:01 a.m. 


40, 




3201 


N.O 


4:10 a.m. 


40, 





meters 



Water 
sample 
number 



Re 



arks 



27-18 

18-0 

18-9 

9-0 

3072 For water samples 

3072 corresponding 

137-92 to IV .0 hauls 

92-73 see p. 171 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3081 

3081 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-0 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 





137-92 Dark throughout 

92-73 entire Nansen 

73-55 series 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

Hauls made while 

the Agassiz was 

anchored in the 

mouth of San 
Diego Bay 

° ^ 











3092 Dark and clear; 

no moon 

3092 Twilight from 

3092 4:4.5 until sun- 

137-92 riseat 5:.50a.m. 

92-73 Clear all day 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 



* Haul began at 11:25 a.m. and ended at 1:00 p.m. 



186 



University of California Publications in Zool 



ogu 



[Vol. 15 



Table 5. — Data Eelative to Plankton Hxvls— {Continued) 
Fart B— Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Depth 





Appa- 


Time of day 




Position 


Haul 




and 








number 


used 


duration of haul 


Section 


' X lat. W long. ' 












March 23, 1912 


3202 


N.O 


4:15 a.m. 




40; 




3203 


N.O 


4:20 a.m. 




40; 




3204 


000c 


4:45-6:00 


a.m. 


40= 




3205 


12 


4:45-6:00 


a.m. 


4O3 




3206 


20 


4:4.5-6:00 


a.m. 


40, 




3207 


N.O 


4:50 a.m. 




4O5 




3208 


N.O 


5:02 a.m. 




4O5 




3209 


N.O 


5:12 a.m. 




40, 




3210 


N.O 


5:20 a.m. 




4O3 




3211 


N.O 


5:26 a.m. 




40o 




3212 


N.O 


5:35 a.m. 




4O5 




3213 


N.O 


5:40 a.m. 




4O3 




3214 


N.O 


5:45 a.m. 




40, 




3215 


N.O 


5:55 a.m. 




4O3 


32° 22:75 117° 18:5 


3216 


OOOc 


6:40-7:45 


a.m. 


40, 


32 23.5 117 18.0 


3217 


12 


6:40-7:45 a.m. 


40, 


From 6:40 to 7:45 


3218 


20 


6:40-7:45 


a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


3219 


N.O 


6:40 a.m. 




40, 


drifted from the 


3220 


N.O 


6:56 a.m. 




40, 


above position 


3221 


N.O 


7:06 a.m. 




40, 


to the following 


3222 


N.O 


7:11 a.m. 




40, 


position 


3223 


N.O 


7:20 a.m. 




40, 




3224 


N.O 


7:25 a.m. 




40, 




3225 


N.O 


7:30 a.m. 




40, 




3226 


N.O 


7:34 a.m. 




40, 




3227 


N.O 


7:38 a.m. 




40, 


32 24.0 117 18 0. 


3228 


OOOe 


8:12-9:20 


a.m. 


40, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


3220 


12 


8:12-9:20 


a.m. 


40, 


From 8:12 to 9:20 


3230 


20 


8:12-9:20 


a.m. 


40, 


a.m. the boat 


3231 


N.O 


8:18 a.m. 




40, 


drifted from the 


3232 


N.O 


8:30 a.m. 




40, 


above position 


3233 


N.O 


8:40 a.m. 




4(1, 


to the following 


3234 


N.O 


8:46 a.m. 




Id, 


position 


3235 


N.O 


8:52 a.m. 




40, 




3236 


N.O 


9:00 a.m. 




40, 




3237 


N.O 


9:04 a.m. 




40, 




3238 


N.O 


9:10 a.m. 




40, 




3239 


N.O 


9:12 a.m. 




40, 




3240 


N.O 


9:15 a.m. 




40, 


32 23.2 117 18.5 


3241 


OOOc 


9:52-10:55 a.m. 


40,, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 


3242 


12 


0:52-10:55 a.m. 


40, , 




3243 


20 


9:52-10:55 a.m. 


40,, 


From 9:52 to 10:. 55 


3244 


N.O 


10:00 a.m. 




40, 


a.m. the boat 


3245 


N.O 


10:10 a.m. 




40. 


drifted from the 


3246 


N.O 


10:16 a.m. 




40, 


above position 


3247 


N.O 


10:24 a.m. 




40, 


to the following 


3248 


N.O 


10:30 a.m. 




40, 


position 


3249 


N.O 


10:36 a.m. 




40, 




3250 


N.O 


10:41 a.m. 




40, 




32il 


N.O 


10:47 a.m. 




40, 




3252 


N.O 


10:50 a.m. 




40, 


32 22.75 117 20.5 
March 24. 1912 


3253 


OOOc 


3:1.5-4:30 


a.m. 


40,, 


32 22.7 117 19.2 


3254 


12 


3:1.5-4:30 


a.m. 


40, , 


From 3:15 to 6:30 


3255 


20 


3:1.5-4:30 


a.m. 


40,, 


a.m. the boat 


S2-6 


N.O 


3:20 a.m. 




40, 


drifted from the 


3257 


N.O 


3:30 a.m. 




40, 


above jiosition 


3258 


N.O 


3:38 a.m. 




40, 


to the following 


3259 


N.O 


3:46 a.m. 




40. , 


]iosition 


3260 


N.O 


3:58 a.m. 




40. 




3261 


N.O 


4:05 a.m. 




40, 




3262 


N.O 


4:09 a.m. 




40^ 




3263 


N.O 


4:15 a.m. 




40. 




3264 


N.O 


4:18 a.m. 




40, 





meters 



Water 
sample 
number 



Remarks 



18-9 

9-0 

3105 For water samples 

3105 corresponding 

3105 to N.O hauls 

137-92 see p. 171 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3119 

3119 

3119 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3121 

3121 

3121 

137-0 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 .. .. 

9-0 

3132 

3132 

3132 

137-92 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3142 Dark until begin- 

3142 ning of twilight 

3142 at 4:50 a.m. 

137-92 Partlv cloudv 

92-73 until "8 a.m. " 

73-.55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 



Michael, ct ah: Hiidrognrphic Fccords of Scripps Insiitution 



187 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 
Fart B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



Appa- 
Haul ratus 
number used 



3265 
3266 
3267 
3268 
3269 
3270 
3271 
3272 
3273 
3274 
3275 
3276 
3277 
3278 
327S) 
3280 
3281 
3282 
3283 
3284 
3285 
3286 
3287 
3288 
3289 
3290 
3291 
3292 



N.O 
000c 
12 
20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 

K.OOO 
OOOc 

K.OOO 
OOOc 

K.OOO 
OOOc 

K.OOO 
OOOc 

K.OOO 
OOOc 

K.OOO 
OOOc 

K.OOO 
OOOc 

K.000 
OOOc 



3293 N.O 

3294 OOOc 

3295 12 



3296 
3297 
3298 
3299 
3300 
3301 
3302 
3303 
3304 
3305 
3306 
3307 
3308 
3309 
3310 
3311 
3312 
3313 
.3314 
3315 
3316 
3317 
3318 
3319 
3320 
.3321 
3322 
3323 
3324 
3325 
3326 



20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 
12 
20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
OOOc 
12 
20 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 
N.O 



Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 

4:45 a.m. 

5:00-7:30 a.m. 

5:00-7:30 a.m. 

5:00-7:30 a.m. 

5:40 a.m. 

5:48 a.m. 

5:54 a.m. 

5:59 a.m. 

6:05 a.m. 

6:08 a.m. 

6:13 a.m. 

6:16 a.m. 

8:03-8:18 a.m. 

8:03-8:18 a.m. 

8:26-8:41 a.m. 

8:26-8:41 a.m. 

8:50-9:05 a.m. 

8:50-9:05 a.m. 

9:12-9:27 a.m. 

9:12-9:27 a.m. 

9:35-9:50 a.m. 

9:3.5-9:50 a.m. 
10:00-10:15 a.m. 
10:00-10:15 a.m. 
10:26-10:41 a.m. 
10:26-10:41 a.m. 
10:52-11:07 a.m. 
10:52-11:07 a.m. 

3:20 a.m. 
3:30-5:10 a.m. 
3:30-5:10 a.m. 

3:30-5:10 a.m. 
3:55 a.m. 
4:05 a.m. 
4:30 a.m. 
4:40 a.m. 
4:48 a.m. 
4:57 a.m. 
5:05 a.m. 
5:10 a.m. 
5:5.5-7:15 a.m. 
5:5.5-7:15 a.m. 
5:55-7:15 a.m. 
6:00 a.m. 
6:15 a.m. 
6:30 a.m. 
6:40 a.m. 
6:45 a.m. 
6:55 a.m. 
7:05 a.m. 
7:10 a.m. 
7:15 a.m.* 
8:4.5-10:10 a.m. 
8:4.5-10:10 a.m. 
8:4.5-10:10 a.m. 
9:00 a.m. 
9:10 a.m. 
9:20 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 
9:35 a.m. 
9:45 a.m. 
9:55 a.m. 



40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40. 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 

40, 

40,, 

40,., 

40,, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40. 

40, 

40, 

40; 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40, 

4O5 

40, 

40, 



NIat. 
March 



W long. 
I, 1912 



Water 
sample 
number 



Remarks 



32° 21:2 
32 21.3 



21.3 

21.5 

21.5 

22.3 

22.3 

22.3 

22.3 

22.6 

22.6 

22.75 

22.75 117 

22.6 117 

22.6 117 

22.6 117 

22.6 117 



19:5 

19.0 

19.0 

18.7 

18.7 

18.5 

18.5 

18.75 

18.75 

18.6 

18.6 

19.0 

19.0 

19.3 

19.3 

19.5 

19.5 



April 26. 1912 
32 23.5 117 18.0 
From 3:00 to 5:10 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



18.2 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
18.0 
19.2 

From 8:45 to 10:10 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



21.9 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 
23.5 



117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 
117 



137-92 

3159 

3159 

31.59 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

9 Hauls 3277 to 

3161 3292 were made 

18 while the boat 

3162 was steaming 

27 slowlv ahead, 

3163 and the posi- 

37 tions entered 

3164 correspond to 

46 the beginning 

3165 of each haul 

92 

3166 

137 

3167 

185 

3168 

14.5-92 For water samples 

3174 corresponding 

3174 to N.O hauls 

see p. 171 

3174 Dark until dawu 

92-73 at 4:20 a.m. 

73-55 Cloudy through- 

5.5-46 out day 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3186 

3186 

3186 

137-0 Struck bottom 

92-73 

73-55 

55-46 

46-37 

37-27 

27-18 

18-9 

9-0 

3199 

3199 

3199 

137-92 

92-0 

92-73 

73-55 

5.5-46 

46-37 

37-27 



188 



University of California Puhlications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 









Table 5.— 


Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 








Part B- 


-Planliton Collections of Qtiantitative Significance 






Appa- 


Time of day 




Position 


Depth 


Water 




Haul 




and 






in 


sample 








lumber 


used 


duration of haul 


Section 


N lat. W long. 
April 26. 1912 


meters 




Remarks 


3327 


N.O 


10:00 a.m. 


40j 




27-18 






3328 
3329 


N.O 


10:05 a.m. 


40i 




18-9 






N.O 


10:10 a.m. 


4O3 


32° 23:4 117' 19:0 


9-0 














July 17. 1912 








3330 


S.20 


6:10 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 43.2 117 16.7 


22-0 




Taken in middle 












of kelp 


3331 


S.20 


6:30 a.m. 


(39.) 


32 43.0 117 16.0 


11-0 


3217 


Between kelp and 
shore 


3332 


S.20 


7:45 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 43.5 117 17.1 


37-0 


3223, 3224 


On outer edge of 


3333 


S.20 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 43.7 117 18.3 


61-0 


3225, 3226 


kelp 


3334 


S.20 


9:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 44.1 117 20.0 


76-0 


3227,3228 




3335 


S.20 


10:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 44.5 117 21.6 
■Tub- 22. 1912 


92-0 


3235,3236 




3336 


S.20 


6:10 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 43.2 117 16.7 


22-0 


3247 


Taken in middle 
of kelp 


3337 


S.20 


6:30 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 43.0 117 16.0 


11-0 


3248 


Between kelp and 
shore 


3338 


S.20 


7:30 a.m. 


(39,) 


32 43.5 117 17.1 


37-0 


3252 


Outer edge of 


3339 


S.20 


8:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 43.7 117 18.3 


61-0 


3253, 3254 


kelp 


3340 


20 


9:00-9:12 a.m. 


40, 


32 44.1 117 20.0 





3255 




3341 


S.20 


9:01 a.m. 


40, 


32 44.1 117 20.0 


70-0 


3255, 3256 




3342 


20 


9:30-9:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 44.5 117 21.6 





3257 




3343 


S.20 


9:32 a.m. 


40, 


32 44.5 117 21.6 


92-0 


3257, 3258 




3344 


20 


10:20-10:45 a.m. 41, 


32 45.0 117 24.1 





3259 




3345 


S.20 


10:22 a.m. 


41, 


32 45.0 117 24.1 


355-0 


32.59, 3260 




3346* 


20 




41, 


32 45.5 117 26.4 





3262 




3348 


K.20 


5:. 56-6: 06 p.m 


B 


32 42.6 117 13..50 


7 


3264, 3265 




3340 


20 


5:56-6:06 p.m 


B 


32 42.6 117 13.55 





3263 




3350 


20 


8:1.5-8:23 p.m 


B 


32 42.4 117 10.6 





3266 




3351 


20 


8:25 p.m. 


B 


32 42.4 117 10.6 


13-0 










JuIt 24. 1912 








3352 


K.20 


5:20-5:25 a.m 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 


5 


3277,3278 


See Appendix TI 


3353 
3354 


20 


5:21—5:26 a.m 


40s 


4:40 to 6:50 drifted 







for information 


xr2o 


5:4.5-5:50 a.m 


40' 


from above to fol- 


9 


3279, 3280 


relative to the 


3356 


K.20 


6:0.5-6:10 a.m 


40, 


lowing position 


18 


3282, 3283 


distance covered 


3357 


K.20 


6:21-6:26 a.m 


40, 


32 22.8 117 19.7 


27 


3284, 3285 


by K.20 hauls 


3358 


20 


7:35-9:00 a.m 


40. 


32 22.4 117 21.2 





3291,3296 




3359 


K.20 


7:37-7:42 a.m 


40^ 


7:35 to 9:50 drifted 


46 


3287,3288 




3360 


K.20 


7:5.5-8:00 a.m 


40, 


from above to fol- 


55 


3289, 3290 




3361 


K.20 


8:20-8:25 a.m 


40, 


lowing position 


92 


3292. 3293 




3362 


K.20 


8:45-8:50 a.m 


40. 




46 


3294. 3295 




3363 


20 


9:0.5-9:45 a.m 


40, 


32 22.2 117 19.3 





3296 




3364 


K.20 


10:10-10:15 a.n 


1. 40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 


137 


3300, 3301 




3365 


20 


10:12-11 :35a.n 


1. 40. 


10:05 to 11:43 drifted 





3304 




3366 


K.20 


10:3.5-10:40 a.n 


1. 40, 


from above to fol- 
lowing position 


185 


3302, 3303 




3367 


K.20 


11:10-11:15 a.n 


1. 40, 


32 22.5 117 19.15 


275 


,3305, 3306 




3368 


K.20 


1:30-1:35 p.m 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 


365 


3311,3312 


On position 12:01 


3369 


K.20 


1:. 5.5-2: 00 p.m 


40, 


32 21.4 117 19.0 
.Tulv 25. 1912 


27 


3313, 3314 


Drifted to posi 
tionat 2:48 


3370t 


K.20 


4:35-4:40 a.m 


40, 


32 22'.4 117 21.2 


55 


3335, 3336 


p.m. 


3371t 


K.20 


4:50-4:55 a.m 


40. 


4:07 to 5:45 drifted 


73 


3.337, 3338 


3372 


20 


4:5.5-5:40 a.m 


40, 


from above to fol- 
lowing position 





3339 




3373 


K.20 


.T 


20-5:25 a.m 


40, 


32 21.3 117 19.4 


73 


3340, 3341 




3374 


20 


6 


00-8:00 a.m 


40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 





3342, 45, 46 




3375 


K.20 


8 


3-5-8:40 a.m 


40, 


6:00 to 9:50 drifted 


275 


3347, 3348 




3376 


20 


8 


dn_s.^n a m 


40, 


from above to fol- 







Part of haul 3376 






lowing position 






lost on account 


3377 


K.20 


9:20-9:25 a.m 


40, 


32 21.45 117 19.4 


365 


3.350, 3351 


of leak in net 


3378 


K.20 


11:1.5-11:20 a.n 


1. 40, 


32 22.4 117 21.2 


.T 


3.3.55. .3356 


bucket 


3379 


K.20 


11:30-11:35 a.n 


1. 40, 


10:30 to 12:26 drifted 


9 


3357, 3358 




3380 
3381 


20 
K.20 


11:2.5-11:159 a.n 
11:4.5-11:50 a.n 


1. 40, 


from above to fol- 









1. 40, 


lowing position 


18 


33.5973360 




♦H 


aul began at 11:30 a.m 


and ended at 12:30 p.m. 








to 


lening 


and 


closing laws 


of net pr 


obably reversed at the 


same time. 





1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 



189 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 

Part B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Appa- Time of day Position Depth Water 

Haul ratus and , * , in sample 

number used duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters number Remarks 

July 24, 1912 

3382 K.20 12:01-12:06 p.m. 40, 27 3361,3362 

3383 K.20 12:12-12:17 p.m. 40^ 32° 22:3 117° 1814 37 3364,3365 
3385* 20 1:00-1:40 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 3372 
3386* K.20 1:15-1 :20 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 .55 3368,3369 
3387* K.20 1:30-1:35 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 73 3370,3371 

July 26. 1912 

3388 K.20 4:27-4:32 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 185 3389,3390 

3389 K.20 5:00-5:05 a.m. 40, 4:05 to 6:37 clrifteil 275 Net failed to close 

3390 20 5:00-6:30 a.m. 40, from above to fol- 3391,3393 

3391 K.20 5:40-5:45 a.m. 40, lowing position 275 3392 

3392 K.20 6:20-6:25 a.m. 40, 32 22.05 117 20.9 137 .3394,3395 

3393 20 6:5.5-8:30 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 3397,3400 

3394 K.20 7:05-7:10 a.m. 40, From 6:50 to 9:47 365 3396 Net failed to close 

3395 K.20 7:45-7:50 a.m. 40, a.m. the boat 5 3398,3399 Net failed to close 

3396 K.20 8:4.5-8:50 a.m. 40, drifted from the 9 3401,3402 

3397 20 9:00-9:05 a.m. 40, above position 3403 

3398 K.20 9:00-9:05 a.m. 40, to the following 18 3404,3405 

3399 20 9:10-9:40 a.m. 40, position 

3400 K.20 9:1.5-9:20 a.m. 40, 27 3406,3407 

3401 K.20 9:30-9:35 a.m. 40, 32 21.95 117 19.5 37 3408,3409 

3402 K.20 10:07-10:12 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 46 3410,3411 
3403t 20 40,5 10:05 to 12:14 drifted 3412,15,20 

3404 K.20 10:27-10:32 a.m. 40, ^ from above to fol- 55 3413,3414 

3405 K.20 11:30-11:35 a.m. 40^ lowing position 73 3416,3417 

3406 K.20 11 :.54-ll :59 a.m. 40; 32 23.3 117 19.0 92 3418,3419 

July 27. 1912 

3407 K.20 5:4.5-5:50 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 92 ,3441 
.3408 20 5:48-7:25 a.m. 40, From 5:20 to 7:33 3442,3449 

3409 K.20 6:07-6:12 a.m. 40, a.m. drifted from 46 3443.3444 

3410 K.20 6:2.5-6:30 a.m. 40, above to follow- 37 3445,3446 
.3411 K.20 6:4.5-6:50 a.m. 40, ing position 185 3447,3448 

3412 K.20 7:10-7:15 a.m. 40, 32 22.15 117 19..55 137 Net failed to close 

3413 K.20 8:09-8:14 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 137 3451,34.52 On position 7:45 

3414 20 8: 10-8:. 50 a.m. 40, 32 21.7 117 19.6 3450,3453 Drifted to posi- 

3415 20 9:2.5-9:55 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 34.55 tion at 8:58 
.3416 K.20 9:40-9:46 a.m. 40, 9:22 to 12:08 drifted 550 34.54 a.m. 

3417 20 10:00-10:05 a.m. 40, from above to fol- 

3418 20 10:07-11:59 a.m. 40, lowing position 3457 
.3419 K.20 10:40-10:45 a.m. 40, 18 3456 
,3420 K.20 11:40-11:45 a.m. 40, 32 21.35 117 20.5 275 3458,34.59 

3421 20 12:40-1 :00 p.m. 40, 32 22.3 117 21.4 3460 

3422 20 6:1.5-6:25 p.m. 39, 32 24.4 117 14.3 Hauls 3422-3433 

3423 20 7:00-7:10 p.m. 39^ 32 24.4 117 14.3 3473 made while the 

3424 20 8:10-8:20 p.m. 39, 32 24.4 117 14.3 boat lay at 

.3425 20 9:00-9:10 p.m. 39^ 32 24.4 117 14.3 3474 anchor" 

3426 20 10:00-10:20 p.m. 39^ 32 24.4 117 14.3 

3427 20 ll:1.5-ll:25p.m. 39^ 32 24.4 117 14.3 

July 28. 1912 

3428 20 12:01-12:16 a.m. 39^ 32 24.4 117 14.3 

3429 20 1:00-1 :10 a.m. 39, 32 24.4 117 14.3 3475 

3430 20 3:0.5-3:15 a.m. 39, 32 24.4 117 14.3 

3431 20 5:10-5:20 a.m. 39^ 32 24.4 117 14.3 .3476 

3432 20 7 :.5.5-8 :10 a.m. 39, 32 24.4 117 14.3 3477 
,3433 20 9:10 a.m. 39, 32 24.4 117 14.3 11-0 

34,34 K.20 8:10-8:15 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 5 .3478,3479 Part of haul 3434 

3435 20 8:1,5-9:35 p.m. 40, From 8:00 to 10:24 .3480 lost in con- 

3436{ K.20 8:26-8:31 p.m. 40, a.m. the boat 9 ,3481,3482 densing 

3437 K.20 8:40-8:45 p.m. 40, drifted from the 18 3483 Net failed to close 

3438 K.20 8:52-8:58 p.m. 40, above position 27 3484,3485 

3439 K.20 9:10-9:15 p.m. 40, to the following 37 Net failed to close 

3440 K.20 9: 2,5-9 :30 p.m. 40, position 37 Net failed to close 

*From 12:55 to 1:50 p.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 22:4 N 117° 19:SW. 

t Haul began at 10:10 a.m. and ended at 12:10 p.m. 

t Opening and closing jaws of net probably reversed at the same time. 



190 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Appa- 

Haul ratus 

number used 



3441 
3442 
3443 
3444 
3445 
3446 
3447 



K.20 
20 
K.20 
20 
K.20 
K.20 
K.20 



3448 20 

3449 K.20 

3450 K.20 
3451* K.20 
3452t 20 
3453*t K.20 
3454t K.20 

3455 K.20 

3456 20 
3457a K.B. 
3457b K.B. 
3458a K.B. 
3458b K.B. 
3459a K.B. 
3459b K.B. 
3460a K.B. 
3460b K.B. 
3461 20 
3462a K.B. 
3462b K.B. 
3463 20 
3464a K.B. 
3464b K.B. 
3465a K.B. 
3465b K.B. 
3466a K.B. 
3466b K.B. 

3467a K.B. 

3467b K.B. 

3468 20 

3469a K.B. 

3469b K.B. 

3469c K.B. 

3470a K.B. 

3470b K.B. 

3470c K.B. 

3471a K.B. 

3471b K.B. 

3471c K.B. 

3472 20 
347,3a t K.B. 
3473bt K.B. 
3473c t K.B. 

3474a K.B. 

3474b K.B. 

3475 20 

3476a K.B. 

3476b K.B. 



347 



K.B. 



3477b K.B. 
3478a K.B. 
3478b K.B. 

* Opening 
t From 
X From 2: 



Nlat. 
July 



W long. 
, 1912 



32° 20:75 117° 19:2 
32 21.75 117 20.6 
10:38 p.m. to 1:45 
a.m. drifted from 
above to follow- 
ing position 
July 29, 1912 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton Hauls — {Continued) 

Part B — Planlcton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Time of day 
and 

uration of haul Sectic 

:40-9 :45 p.m. 40, 

:42-10:20p.m. 40. 

;45-10:50 p.m. 40. 

47-11:45 p.m. 40. 

;00-ll :05 p.m. 40, 

15-11:20 p.m. 40, 

:35-ll :40 p.m. 40, 

:01-1 :31a.m. 40, 

: 10-1 2 :15 a.m. 40, 

; 25-1 2 :30 a.m. 40, 

;50-12 :55 a.m. 40, 

:10-3:40a.m. 40, 

:5,5-3:01 a.m. 40, 

: 30-3 :35 a.m. 40, 

:07-8:12p.m. 40, 

: 15-9 :50 p.m. 40, 

:30 p.m. 40, 

; 35 p.m. 40, 

:42 p.m. 40, 

; 47 p.m. 40, 

:55 p.m. 40, 

:00 p.m. 40, 

:07 p.m. 40, 

:20 p.m. 40, 

:10-10:25p.m. 40, 

:4o p.m. 4O3 

:50 p.m. 40s 

: .5.5-1 1:50 p.m.- 40., 

:00 p.m. 40,, 

:07 p.m. 4O5 

:15 p.m. 4O3 

:22 p.m. 40., 

:32 p.m. 40, 

:42 p.m. 40, 



19.0 
21.0 
21.0 
21.0 
21.2 



32 19.95 117 

32 21.65 117 

32 21.65 117 

32 21.65 117 

32 22.4 117 

From 7:58 to 10:30 
p.m. tlie boat 
drifted from tlie 
above position 
to the following 
position 



8 
8 

and 
02 to 
28 to 



40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40„ 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
4(1, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 
40, 



32 21.8 117 19.75 
32 23.0 117 20.8 
From 10:45 to 11:55 
p.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 

32 22.55 117 20.25 

July 30, 1912 
32 23.75 117 20.75 
From 12:05 to 2:20 
a.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 





73 

92 

137 



185 



19.7 
20.0 
20.0 
20.0 

21.2 



32 22.9 117 

32 24.75 117 

32 24.75 117 

32 24.75 117 

32 22.4 117 

From 5:.50 to 11:46 
p.m. the boat 
drifted from the 
above position 
to the following 
position 



137 

137 

1?.' 

185 

185 

185 

275 

275 

275 



365 

365 

365 

55 

55 



73 

73 

92 

92 

137 

137 



Water 
sample 
number 



3486 

3487, 3488 
3489 

3490 
3491 

3495 

3492, 3493 
3494 

3496, 3497 
3.501,3506 
3502, 3503 
3504, 3505 
3507, 3508 
3509 
3510 

3511 



Remarks 
Net failed to close 



Net failed to close 



3514 
3515 



3519 



3521, 3524 
3520 



3522 



:10 a.m. 
:17 a.m. 
:12-l:55a.m. 
:29 a.m. 
:40 a.m. 
:50 a.m. 
:00 a.m. 
:15 a.m. 
:30 a.m. 
:45 a.m. 
:00 a.m. 
:15 a.m. 
:55-2:15 a.m. 
:50 a.m. 
:12 a.m. 
:33 a.m. 
: -53 p.m. 
:00 p.m. 
: 00-8 :.55 p.m. 
:07 p.m. 
:17 p.m. 
:25 p.m. 
:32 p.m. 
:42 p.m. 
:53 p.m. 

closing jaws of net probably reversed at the same time. 

4:05 a.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 2111 

3:58 a.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 23;2. 



3523 



3524 
3525 



3528 
3532 
3529 

3530 

3531 



In all K.B. hauls 
the 5 gallons of 
water was 
filtered through 
No. 20 netting. 
From 3457a to 
3473c those 
numbered a and , 

b, or a, b, and 

c, were com- 
bined and ac- 
cessioned under 
one number; 
thereafter each 
haul was pre- 
served separ- 
atelv 



N 117° 19:5 W. 
5N 117° 18:8 W. 



1915] Michael, ef al.: Hydrograplnc Records of Scripps Institution 



191 



3479 


20 


3480a 


K.B. 


3480b 


K.B. 


3481a 


K.B. 


3481b 


K.B. 


3482 


20 


3483a 


K.B. 


3483b 


K.B. 


3484a 


K.B. 


3484b 


K.B. 


3485 


20 


3486 


20 


3487a 


K.B. 


3487h 


K.B. 


348Sa 


K.B. 


3488b 


K.B. 


3489 a 


K.B. 


34S9b 


K.B. 


3490 


20 


3491a 


K.B. 


3491b 


K.B. 


3492a 


K.B. 


3492b 


K.B. 


3493a 


K.B. 


3493b 


K.B. 


3494a 


K.B. 


3494b 


K.B. 


3495a 


K.B. 


3495b 


K.B. 


3496 


20 


3497a 


K.B. 


3497b 


K.B. 


3498 


20 


3499a 


K.B. 


3499b 


K.B. 


3500a 


K.B. 


3500b 


K.B. 


3501a 


K.B. 


3501b 


K.B. 


3502a« 


K.B. 


3502b* 


K.B. 


3503* 


20 


35043 


K.B. 


3504b 


K.B. 


3505 


20 


3506a 


K.B. 


3506b 


K.B. 


3507a 


K.B. 


3507b 


K.B. 


3508 


20 


3509a 


K.B. 


3509b 


K.B. 


3510a 


K.B. 


3510b 


K.B. 


3511 


20 


3512a 


K.B. 


3512b 


K.B. 


3513a 


K.B. 


3513b 


K.B. 


3514a 


K.B. 


3514b 


K.B. 


3515a 


K.B. 



Table 5. — D.ita Relative to Plankton H.^uls — {Continued) 

Part B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Time of dav Position Deptli Water 

and , * ^ in sample 

duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters number Renin 

July 30, 1912 

8:57-9:55 p.m. 40, 3532,3535 

9:05 p.m. 40. 185 3533 

9:15 p.m. 40, 185 

9:32 p.m. 40, 275 3534 

9:50 p.m. 40, 275 

9:56-10:55 p.m. 40, 3.535,3538 

10:07 p.m. 40, 365 3.5.36 

10:25 p.m. 40, 365 

10:50 p.m. 40, .550 3.537 

11:15 p.m. 40, 550 

11:00-11:45 p.m. 40, 32° 2i:7o 117° 19:0 

Julv 31, 1912 

12:0.5-1:05 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 20.0 3.539,3.543 

12:10 a.m. 40, From 12:01 to 2:20 275 3540 

12:20 a.m. 40, a.m. the boat 275 

12:42 a.m. 40, drifted from the 185 3541 

12:55 a.m. 40, above position 185 

1:07 a.m. 40, to the followiug . 5 3:542 

1:12 a.m. 40, position 5 

1:10-2:10 a.m. 40, 3.543,3549 

1:17 a.m. 40, 9 3544 

1:22 a.m. 40, 9 

1:27 a.m. 40, 18 

1:31a.m. 40, IS 3.545 

1:37 a.m. 40, 27 3546 

1:45 a.m. 40, 27 

l:.50a.m. 40, 37 3547 

l:.57a.m. 40, 37 

2:02 a.m. 40, 46 3.548 

2:07 a.m. 40, 46 

2:12-2:20 a.m. 40, 3549 

2:14 a.m. 40, 32 21.75 117 19.0 55 3.5.50 

2:36 a.m. 40, 32 23.0 117 19.4 55 

2:37-3:27 a.m. 40, From 2:35 to 3:37 3.5.54 

2:43 a.m. 40, • a.m. the boat 73 3.551 

2:50 a.m. 40, drifted from the 73 

2:58 a.m. 40, above position 92 3.552 

3:07 a.m. 40, to the following 92 

3:15 a.m. 40, position 137 3.5.53 

3:25 a,m. 40, 32 22.3 117 18.7 137 

August 1. 1912 

8:00 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 550 3555 

8:22 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 550 

8:0.5-8:35 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 3556 

1:44 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 275 3561 

1:58 p.m. 40, From 1 :40 to 3:15 275 

2:00-2:50 p.m. 40, p.m. the boat 3562 

2:13 p.m. 40, drifted from the 185 3563 

2:25 p.m. 40, above position 185 

2:38 p.m. 40, to the followinf; 137 3564 

2:45 p.m. 40, position 137 

2:.52-3:12p.m. 40, 3566 

2:.55p.m. 40, 92 3565 

3:05 p.m. 40, 32 21.95 117 19.2 92 

3:45 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 37 3567 

3:51p.m. 40, From 3:42 to 5:17 37 

3:51-5:15 p.m. 40. p.m. the boat 3569,3572 

3:57 p.m. 40, drifted from the 18 3568 

4:02 p.m. 40, above position 18 

4:07 p.m. 40, to the followintr 365 3570 

4:25 p.m. 40, position 365 

4:45 p.m. 40, 275 3571 

5:02 p.m. 40. 32 21.7 117 19.8 275 

5:37 p.m. 40. 32 22.4 117 21.2 185 3573 

56 to 8:58 a.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 22;45 N 117' 



192 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



351.5b 


K.B. 


3516a 


K.B. 


3.516b 


K.B. 


3517 


20 


3518a 


K.B. 


3518b 


K.B. 


3519 


20 


3520a 


K.B. 


3520b 


K.B. 


3.521a 


K.B. 


3521b 


K.B. 


3522a 


K.B. 


3.522b 


K.B. 


3523a 


K.B. 


3523b 


K.B. 


3524 


20 


3525a 


K.B. 


352ob 


K.B. 


3526a 


K.B. 


3526b 


K.B. 


3527a* 


K.B. 


3.527b* 


K.B. 


3528a* 


K.B. 


352Sb* 


K.B. 


3529a 


K.B. 


3529b 


K.B. 


3530 


20 


3531a 


K.B. 


3.531b 


K.B. 


3532a 


K.B. 


3532b 


K.B. 


3.533a 


K.B. 


3533b 


K.B. 


3534a 


K.B. 


3534b 


K.B. 


3535a 


K.B. 


3.53.5b 


K.B. 


3.536 


20 


3.537a 


K.B. 


3.537b 


K.B. 


3538a 


K.B. 


3538b 


K.B. 


3.539a 


K.B. 


3539b 


K.B. 


3540 


20 


3.541a 


K.B. 


3.541b 


K.B. 


3542a 


K.B. 


3542b 


K.B. 


3543a 


K.B. 


3543b 


K.B. 


3544 


20 


3545a 


K.B. 


3545b 


K.B. 


3546a 


K.B. 


3546b 


K.B. 


3547a 


K.B. 


3.547b 


K.B. 


3548 


20 


3549a 


K.B. 


3549b 


K.B. 


3550 


K.B. 


*From 3:00 



Table 5. — Dat.\ Belative to Plankton Hauls — (Continued) 

Part B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 

Time of day Position Depth Water 

and t ^ s in sample 

duration of haul Section N lat. W long. meters number Pemarks 
August 17. 1910 

5:50 p.m. 40, From 5:35 to 7:49 185 

6:02 p.m. 40, p.m. the boat 137 3574 

6:10 p.m. 40, drifted from the 137 

6:11-6:29 p.m. 40, above position 3575 

6:20 p.m. 40, to the following 92 3576 

6:27 p.m. 40, position 92 

6:30-7:35 p.m. 40, 3579 

6:35 p.m. 40, 73 3577 

6:45 p.m. 40, 73 

6:53 p.m. 40, 55 3578 

6:58 p.m. 40, 55 

7:10 p.m. 40, 365 3580 

7:30 p.m. 40, 32° 2i:2 117° 1719 365 

August 2, 1912 

1:28 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 5 3581 

1:35 p.m. 40, From 1 :28 to 2:40 5 

1:3.5-2 :05 p.m. 40, p.m. boat drifted 3582 

1:40 p.m. 40, from above posi- 9 3583 

1:45 p.m. 40, tion to follow- 9 

1:50 p.m. 40, ing position 550 3584 

2:15 p.m. 40, 32 22.0 117 20.0 5.50 Probably closed 

3:30 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 735 3.585 near the surface 

4:15 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 735 

4:45 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 46 3588 

4:52 p.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 46 

5:20 p.m. 40,, 32 22.7 117 20.6 37 3589 

5:27 p.m. 40, From 5:20 to 6:10 37 

5:30-6:05 p.m. 40, p.m. the boat 3.591,3595 

5:32 p.m. 40, drifted from the 27 3.590 

5:38 p.m. 40, above position 27 

5:43 p.m. 40, to the following 18 3592 

5:46 p.m. 40, position 18 

5:50 p.m. 40, 9 3.593 

5:.55p.m. 40, 9 

6:00 p.m. 40, 5 3594 

6:05 p.m. 40, 32 21.75 117 20.0 5 

August 3. 1912 

6:15 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 20.5 .550 3.596 

6:40 a.m. 40, From 6:07 to 8:21 550 

6: 40-7:. 50 a.m. 40, a.m. the boat 3597,3601 

6:58 a.m. 40, drifted from the 5 

7:02 a.m. 40, above position 5 3598 

7:35 a.m. 40, to the following 9 3.599 

7:40 a.m. 40, position 9 

7:45 a.m. 40, 18 3600 

7:50 a.m. 40, IS 

7:52-8:15 a.m. 40, 3601 

7:55 a.m. 40, 27 3602 

8:00 a.m. 40, • 27 

8:06 a.m. 40, 37 3603 

8:12 a.m. 40, 32 21.6 117 20.45 37 

8:40 a.m. 40, 32 22.4 117 21.2 46 3604 

8:45 a.m. 40, From 8:40 to 10:53 46 

8:4.5-9:26 a.m. 40, a.m. the boat 

8:52 a.m. 40, drifted from the 55 3605 

8:58 a.m. 40, above position 55 

9:05 a.m. 40, to the following 92 3606 

9:12 a.m. 40, position 92 

9:17 a.m. 40, 185 3607 

9:25 a.m. 40, 185 

9:30-10:45 a.m. 40, 3610 

9:45 a.m. 40, 365 3608 

10:00 a.m. 40, 365 

10:20 a.m. 40, 32 21.9 117 18.55 550 3609 Struck bottom 
to 5:00 p.m. the boat drifted from the position entered to 32° 2115 N 117° 1911 W. 



1915] 



Michael, ct al.: Hijdrographic Eccords of Scripps Institution 



193 



Table 5. — Data Relative to Plankton H.4.uls — (Concluded) 
Part B — Plankton Collections of Quantitative Significance 



Haul 
Dumber 


Appa- 
ratus 
used 


Time of day 

and 

duration of haul 


Sectioi 


Position 


Depth 

meters 


Water 
sample 
number 




1 N lat. 


W long. 


Remarks 


3551 


20 


7:00-7:10 p.m. 


B 


August 
32° 42:4 


4, 1912 

117° io:6 





B.487 




3552 


20 


8:00-8:15 p.m. 


B 


32 42.4 


117 10.6 





B.488 




3553 


20 


9:00-9:15 p.m. 


B 


32 42.4 


117 10.6 





B.489 




3554 


20 


10:00-10:15 p.m. 


B 


32 42.4 


117 10.6 





B.490 




3555 


20 


11:05-11:25 p.m. 


B 


32 42.4 


117 10.6 





B.491 




3556 


20 


12:01-12:16 a.m. 


B 


August 
32 42.4 


5. 1912 
117 10.6 





B.492 




3557 


20 


1:00-1 :15 a.m. 


B 


32 42.4 


117 10.6 





B.493 




3558 


20 


3:0.5-3 :20 a.m. 


B 


32 42.4 


117 10.6 





B.494 




3559 


20 


5:05-5:20 a.m. 


B 


32 42.4 


117 10.6 





B.495 




3560 


20 


7:10-7:25 a.m. 


B 


32 42.4 


117 10.6 





B.496 




3561 


000c 


11:4.5-11:55 a.m. 


(80^,) 


August 
35 8.25 


18, 1912 
120 38.7 





3618 




3562 


12 


11:4.5-11:55 a.m. 


(8O3,) 


35 8.25 


120 38.7 





3618 




3563 


000c 


4:45-4:55 p.m. 


(83„) 


35 26.2 


120 55.0 





3623 




3564 


12 


4:45-4:55 p.m. 


^83„) 


35 26.2 


120 55.0 





3623 




3565 


OOOe 


5:28-5:38 a.m. 


84,«, 


August 
35 27.0 


19, 1912 
121 0.1 





3625 




3566 


12 


5:28-5:38 a.m. 


84, „, 


35 27.0 


121 0.1 





3625 




3567 


OOOe 


6:03-6:13 p.ni. 


95,e 


36 38.3 


121 57.0 





3638 




3568 


12 


6:03-6:13 p.m. 


95m 


36 38.3 


121 57.0 





3638 




3569 


000c 


12:01-12:13 p.m. 


(101)„ 


August 
37 16.0 


20. 1912 
122 25.9 





3646 




3570 


12 


12:01-12:13 p.m. 


(101),^ 


37 16.0 


122 25.9 





3646 




3571 


OOOe 


8:14-8:24 a.m. 


(107,,) 


August 
37 58.5 


24. 1912 

122 56.7 





3657 




3572 


12 


8:14-8:24 a.m. 


(107,,) 


37 58.5 


122 56.7 





3657 




3573 


OOOe 


12:1.5-12:25 p.m. 


(109,e) 


38 17.7 


123 4.1 





3661 




3574 


12 


12:1.5-12:25 p.m. 


(109„) 


38 17.7 


123 4.1 





3661 




3575 


OOOe 


6 :.3.5-7 :05 a.m. 


(n2,„) 


August 
38 35.7 


25, 1912 

123 21.7 





3670 




3576 


12 


6:35-7:05 a.m. 


(n2,„) 


38 35.7 


123 21.7 





3670 




3577 


OOOe 


7:1.5-7:25 a.m. 


(118)™ 


August 26. 1912 
39 29.2 123 49.2 









3578 


12 
12 


7:15-7:25 a.m. 
6:50-7:01 a.m. 


(118)„. 
12o„5 


39 29.2 
August 

40 46.5 


123 49.2 
28, 1912 

124 24.8 










3579 


3686 




3580 






125,05 


40 46.5 


124 24.8 







"1 Dip-net haul in 
> ' * red water ' ' 


3581 






125,„ 


40 46.5 


124 24.8 







3582 


666c 




125,„5 
(122,„) 


40 46.5 

41 44.2 


124 24.8 
124 11.8 








J 


3583 


2:50-3:00 p.m. 


3694 


In "red water" 


35S4 


12 


2:50-3:00 p.m. 


(122„,) 


41 44.2 


124 11.8 





3694 


In ' ' red water ' ' 


3585 


666c 




126,,, 
1 26,,, 


August 
42 44.0 
42 44.0 


29, 1912 
124 30.5 
124 30.5 








Dip-net haul 


3586 


3:13-3:23 p.m. 


3705 


3587 


12 


3:13-3:23 p.m. 


126,,, 


42 44.0 


124 30.5 





3705 




3588 


12 
12 
12 




126,,„ 
(118,™) 

(ns„„) 

128,„ 


42 44.0 124 30.5 
September 6. 1912 

46 11.5 123 51.0 
September 8. 1913 

46 11.5 123 51.0 
September 10, 1912 

47 55.0 124 41.0 








3722 
3726 
3736 


Dip-net haul 

Haul 3589 to 3590 
were made in 
Columbia River 
near Astoria 


3589 
3.590 
3591 


9:00-9:10 a.m. 
9:00-9:10 a.m. 
6:00-6:10 a.m. 


3592 


12 


1:00-1:10 p.m. 


(127„„ 


) 48 22.5 


124 36.0 





3743 




3593 


12 


8:00-8:10 a.m. 


(127,„„.., 
130,„ 


) 48 22.5 124 36.0 
September 11. 1912 
48 10.0 124 49.2 








Dip-net haul 


3.594 


3747 


3595 


12 


10:00-10:05 a.m. 


(120,,,) 


September 12, 1912 
45 26.5 124 0.0 





3767 





194 Universitij of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



EXPLANATION OF TABLE 6, PART A 
This part includes the field data relative to all the dredge hauls 
and shore collections accessioned under Roman numerals. The collec- 
tions were made during 1901 (see p. 6) under the supervision of 
C. A. Kofoid, assisted by W. J. Raymond, the former Professor of 
Zoology and the latter A.ssociate Professor of Physics in the University 
of California. 

First column. — Numbers under which the collections were accessioned; the 
left part of the double number denotes the station occupied and the right part 
the haul made; the numbers are arranged first according to station, second 
according to haul. 

Second column. — Date. 

Third column. — Time at which haul began entered to the nearest minute. 

Fourth column. — Duration of haul entered to the nearest minute. 

Fifth column. — Section; for explanation see page 46. 

Sixth and seventh columns. — Latitude and longitude of beginning and end of 
haul; when both are entered they are probably accurate to 0.3 miles, but where 
only a single entry is given the error is in most cases more than 0.5 miles. 

Eighth column. — Depth of bottom at beginning and end of haul entered to 
the nearest meter above and to the nearest five below 120 meters; brackets 
indicate that the sounding was determined from the charted position. 

Ninth column. — Character of bottom denoted by the symbols adopted by the 
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey (see Appendix IV); miscellaneous 
remarks relative to the hauls. 



1915] 



Michael, et al.: Hijdrographic Records of Scripiys Institution 



195 



Table 6. — Data Relative to Dredge Hauls 
Part A — Dredge Hauls made during 1901 













Latitude 


Longitude 










Time D 


uration 


N 


W 


Depth 


Character of bottom 


Haul 
number 








Sec- 
1 tion 












and 

remarks 


Date 


day n 


linutes 


Begin 


End 


Begin 


End 


meters 




1901 








3; 


i° 


118° 






I-l 


May 22 


10:00 a.m. 


20 


52,„ 


41:8 




17;8 




18 


gy. S. M. 


1-2 


May 22 


11:00 a.m. 


15 


52,„ 


42.0 




17.9 




18 


dk. br. M. S. 


1-3 


June 13 


11:45 a.m. 




51.5,„ 


41.4 


4i:6 


18.8 


16:3 


46-24 


Net torn 


II-l 


May 23 


9:00 a.m. 


15 


(51=0 


43.8 




15.8 




4 


Quantities of seaweed 


II-2 


Ma> 23 


12:01p.m. 


20 


(51=0 


43.7 




15.6 




5 


Quantities of seaweed 


III 


May 24 


8:30 a.m. 


10 


50,.,,, 


44.7 




11.4 




13 


dk. br. M. 


IIP-1 


May 24 


9:30 a.m. 


15 


50„o 


43.0 




11.6 




36 


fne. gy. S. 


IV-1 


May 24 


11:00 a.m. 




(51,,,) 


43.3 




16.3 




5 


S.Sh. 


IV-2 


May 24 


11:30 a.m. 




(51=,) 


43.3 




16.3 




5 


S. Sh. 


IV-3 


May 24 


12:01p.m. 




(51=,) 


43.3 




16.3 




5 


S.Sh. 


V-1 


May 27 


8:30 a.m. 


20 


51.,„ 


42.3 




17.2 




20-29 




V-2 


May 27 


9:30 a.m. 


25 


51,„ 


42.1 




17.2 




29 




V'-l 


May 30 


9:00 a.m. 


20 


52,„ 


42.0 


4l!8 


19.3 


ir'ls 


44-18 


gy. s. M. 


A"-2 


June 8 


1:00 p.m. 


15 


52.,o 


42.3 


42.5 


19.8 


19.8 


37-26 


g.v. S. 


VI-1 


May 27 


1:00 p.m. 




(51=,) 


42.9 




16.3 




5 


gy. S. 


VI-2 


May 27 


1:00 p.m. 




(51=,) 


42.9 




16.3 




5 


gy- s. 


VII-1 


May 28 


8:20 a.m. 


"2.5 


(52=,) 


43.8 




22.4 




25 




VII-2 


May 28 


9:10 a.m. 


20 


(52=,) 


43.6 




22.3 




26 




VII-3 


May 28 


9:50 a.m. 


25 


(52=,) 










84 




VIII 


May 29 






(51=,) 


4'7!b 




1.5;0 







M. Shore collection 


IX 


May 30 


10 :00 a.m. 


"25 


52.,„ 




41.0 




19^8 


77-(300) 




X 


June 4 


11:4.T a.m. 


25 


(53=,) 


44.1 


44.2 


25.1 


25.1 


70-35 


gn. M. 


xr 


June 4 


2:40 p.m. 


15 


(53=,) 


46.0 


45.6 


26.4 


26.3 


64 


S. M. Sh. 


XII-1 


June 5 


10:00 a.m. 




(53=) 


49.1 


49.0 


27.0 


26.0 


265-73 


gn. M. S. 


XII-2 


June 6 


7:00 a.m. 


"26 


(53==) 


49.2 


47.7 


27.0 


26.5 


(320)-64 


bk. R. S. Sh. P. 


XIP 


June 5 


4:00 p.m. 


15 


(.53=) 


49.8 


50.2 


24.2 


23.7 


79-17 


bk. M. S. 


xn- 


June 5 


4:30 p.m. 


10 


(53==) 


48.7 


49.3 


25.4 


24.8 


55-29 


gn. M.S. 


Xlll 


June 6 


11:00 a.m. 


20 


(53=,.,; 


1 47.7 


46.0 


26.5 


27.2 


64-66 


crs. S. 


XIV-1 


June 8 


8:30 a.m. 


74 


52,,, 


39.4 


41.4 


17.8 


19.1 


(285)-73 


sft. stk. M. 


XIV-2 


June 13 


8:23 a.m. 


147 


52,„ 


38.0 


41.9 


17.6 


19.5 


(440) -46 


gn. br. M. gy. S. 


XIV-3 


July 5 


11:02 a.m. 


54 


52,0 


39.4 


40.6 


17.8 


18.5 


(275)-73 


gy-M. 


XV 


June 10 


8:25 a.m. 


30 


(49.5,, 


) 43.9 


43.5 


7.2 


7.6 


7-13 


crs. S. 


XV' 


June 10 


9:25 a.m. 


35 


(49..5,, 


) 43.8 


42.5 


7.2 


10.0 


8-20 


crs. S. 


XVI-1 


June 10 


11:50 a.m. 


95 


(50.5,„ 


,) 41.8 


42.8 


11.7 


13.4 


24-8 


S. sm. R. 


XVI-2 


June 11 


1:00 p.m. 


60 


(31=.) 


42.8 




13.6 




17 


sm. R. F. 


XV 1-3 


June 12 


11:15 a.m. 


90 


(50.5,„ 


.5) 42.0 


43;3 


11.6 


14^4 


24-13 


S. sm. R. 


XVll 


June 11 


8:45 a.m. 


60 


(51=,) 










7-17 


fne. S. 


XVTI' 


June 11 


10:00 a.m. 


60 


(51=,) 










24 


fne. S. 


XVIII 


June 12 


8:50 a.m. 


90 


51,,,.., 


36.5 


39.6 


liig 


14.1 


60-32 


S. M. 


XIX-1 


June 14 


8:15 a.m. 


60 


(47,,,) 


34.6"^ 


36.0 


.55.6 .56.0 


185-55 


sft. M. S. P. 


XIX-2 


June 14 


10:15 a.m. 




(47,.) 


34.8 


36.0 


55.6 


56.0 


140-55 


sft. M. crs. S. P. 


XIX-3 


June 14 


3:00 p.m. 




(47„) 


34.8 


36.0 


55.6 


56.0 


140-55 


sft. M. crs. S. P. 


XIX^ 


June 15 






(47„) 


.35.1 


36.0 


55.6 


.56.0 


140-55 


sft. M. crs. S. P. 


XIX-5 


June 15 






(47„) 


35.1 


36.0 


.55.6 


.56.0 


140-55 


sft. M. crs. S. P. 


XX 


June 15 


11:05 a.m. 


120 


(47,,) 


34.6 


35.5 


55.6 


55.6 


185-92 














3S 


1° 


118° 






XXT-] 


June 20 


7:45 a.m. 


130 


52,a 


21.6 


23.9 


18,4 


21.5 


103-79 


gn. M. P. S. 


XXl-2 


June 20 


10:50 a.m. 


55 


52„ 


24.1 


23.3 


21.5 


20.3 


79-140 


P.St. 


XXl-3 


June 20 


3:05 p.m. 


75 


52„ 


23.3 


21.3 


20,6 


19.4 


92-73 


P.St. 


XX 1-4 


June 21 


10:47 a.m. 


80 


52„ 


23.0 


23.5 


20.0 


19.0 


92-(290) 


gn. M. 


XX 1-5 


June 21 


2:00 p.m. 




52„ 


23.5 




19.0 




(290) 




XXII 


June 21 


9:10 a.m. 




51,c 


22.0 


23"o 


16.7 


2o;6 


(275)-92 




XXITI-1 


June 22 


7:45 a.m. 


"6.5 


52„ 


20.8 


19.4 


18.5 


18.0 


79-62 


S. brk. Sh. 


XXlll-2 


June 22 


9:10 a.m. 


75 


52„ 


19.3 


20.9 


18.2 


19.1 


5.5-42 


fne. gv. S. brk. Sh. 


XXV 


June 24 


3:10 p.m. 


27 


52„ 


17.4 


17.2 


18.5 


18.8 


90-88 


gn. M'. S. 


XXVI 


June 24 


3:58 p.m. 


85 


52„ 


18.0 


19.6 


17.5 


17.9 


90-84 


S. 


XXVTI-1 


June 25 


8:00 a.m. 


88 


54„ 


20.7 


22.0 


30,0 


29.4 


6,8-26 


gy. S. G. sm. R. 


XXVII-2 


June 25 


10:30 a.m. 


35 


54,„ 


20.5 


21.8 


300 


29.5 


73-29 


fne. gy. S. gn. M. 


XXV 11 1-1 


June 26 






54„ 


26.5 


26.9 


29.3 


29.1 


22-55 


crs. S.brk. Sh. 


XXV 111-2 


June 26 






54„ 


27.0 


26.8 


28.6 


29.3 


82-27 


crs. S. brk. Sh. 


XXIX 


June 26 






54„ 


26.7 


26.7 


29.3 


29.9 


39-18 


brk. Sh. crs. G. 


XXX-1 


June 26 


2:00 p.m. 


"50 


54„ 




28.0 




29.4 


114 





196 



Vnivcrsity of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 6. — Data Relative to Dredge Hauls — (Continued) 
Part A — Dredge Hauls made during 1901 













Latitude 


Longitude 










Time Duration 




N 


W 


Depth 


Character of bottom 


Haul 
number 








Sec- 
tion 


A 






and 
remarks 


Date 


day m 


nutes 


Begin End 


Begin End 


meters 




1901 








33° 


118° 






XXX-2 


June 26 
June 27 




"85 


54„, 
54.5,„ 5 


28f0 26:6 
21.4 22.8 


29:5 28:5 

31.2 34.0 


18.5-73 
110-(460) 




XXXI 


9:50 a.m. 


gy. M. 


XXXII 


June 27 


1:00 p.m. 


95 


54,5 5 


20.5 22.7 


30.4 29.3 


73-22 


gn. M. S. 


XXXIII-1 


June 28 


7:55 a.m. 


3 


54,e 


20.3 20.3 


31.5 31.5 


77 


R. 


XXXIII-2 


June 28 


8:35 a.m. 


15 


54,, 


20.3 20.6 


31.5 31.4 


77-73 


brk. Sh. R. 


XXXIII-3 


June 28 


9:00 a.m. 




54,5 


21.4 


30.7 


73 




XXXIII-4 


June 28 






54,e 


21.4 21.5 


30.7 30.5 


73-58 


gy. M. S. 


XXXIII-5 


June 28 


10:10 a.m. 


""ib 


54,B 


21.2 20.6 


30.6 31.4 


69-73 




XXXIII-6 


June 28 
June 28 




"i's 


54,e 
54„ 


20.6 22.0 
23.0 23.0 


31.4 29.6 
30.9 30.0 


73-46 
230-165 


gy. M. S. 
gn. M. S. 


XXXIV 


1:17 p.m. 


XXXV 


June 28 


5:45 p.m. 


75 


54„ 


25.2 25.8 


30.6 30.5 


5.5-11 


gn. M. 


XXXVI-1 


June 29 


10:50 a.m. 


65 


54.5,, 


24.5 25.2 


32.4 33.1 


230-100 


gn. M. S. 


XXXVI-2 


June 29 


12:45 p.m. 




55„ 


24.5 25.2 


33.0 33.2 


(275)-100 


gn. M. S. 


XXXVI-3 


June 29 






54.5,, 


24.7 24.8 


33.6 32.0 


230-110 


gn. M. S. 


XXXVIII 


June 29 


6:30 p.m. 


"25 


54„ 


25.0 25.3 


29.7 30.4 


5.5-26 


dk. gv. S. Sh. 


XXXIX 


July 6 


2:30 p.m. 


25 


(50.5^,) 


45.3 45.6 


13.3 11.6 


7-9 


S. 


XL 


July 6 


3:30 p.m. 


10 


50,^, 


45.3 

32° 

41.4 


11.6 


7-9 


S. R. 


XLI-1* 


July 12 


8:50 a.m. 


5 


B 


117" 
14.2 


4-6 


crs. S. brk. Sh. 


XLI-2 


July 12 


9:00 a.m. 


5 


B 


41.4 


14.2 


4-6 


crs. S. brk. Sh. 


XLI-3 


July 12 


9:15 a.m. 


10 


B 


41.4 


14.2 


4-6 


crs. S. brk. Sh. 


XLI-4t 


JiUy 12 


9:40 a.m. 


2 


B 


41.4 


14.3 


4-6 


crs. S. brk. Sh. 


XLI-5 


July 12 


9:58 a.m. 


2 


B 


41.4 


14.3 


4-6 


ers. S. brk. Sh. 


XLII 


July 12 


10:05 a.m. 


5 


B 


41.2 41.1 


14.2 14.3 


5-13 


sf t. bk. M. 


XLIII-1 


July 13 


7:35 a.m. 


5 


B 


41.2 41.1 


14.2 14.3 


5-13 


sft. bk. M. 


XLIII-2 


July 13 


8:00 a.m. 


5 


B 


41.4 41.3 


14.2 14.3 


9-15 


sft. bk. M. 


XLIII-3 


July 13 


9:40 a.m. 


10 


B 


41.4 41.3 


14.2 14.3 


9-15 


sft. bk. M. 


XLIII-4 


JulV 13 


10:30 a.m. 


2 


B 


41.4 


14.3 


9-15 


sft. bk. M. 


XLIV 


JulV 13 


4:00 p.m. 


15 


B 


42.0 42.7 


14.1 13.3 


9-11 


brk. Sh. 


XLV 


July 14 
July 15 




"ib 


B 

(38.) 


41.2 40.0 
39.9 40.2 


14.4 14.5 
11.1 10.9 



9 


Shore collection 


XLVI-1 


7:50 a.m. 


S. 


XLVI-2 


July 15 


8:20 a.m. 


60 


(38,) 


40.2 39.2 


10.9 9.8 


9-11 


s. 


XLVI-3 


July 15 


9:30 a.m. 


15 


(380 


40.2 


10.9 


9 


crs. yl. S. 


XLVI-4 


JulV 15 


10:35 a.m. 


60 


(38,) 


39.9 


10.9 


9-11 


S. 


XLVII-1 


JulV 16 


8:10 a.m. 


30 


(38,) 


38.3 39.3 


12.1 10.9 


18-15 


S. 


XLVII-2 


July 16 


9:00 a.m. 


60 


(38,.,) 


39.3 36.7 


10.9 12.1 


1.5-19 


hrd. S. P. 


XLA'II-3 


July 16 


10:20 a.m. 


60 


(38,.,) 


36.7 39.3 


12.1 10.9 


18-20 


hrd. S. P. 


XLVIII-l): 


July 16 


2:45 p.m. 


10 


B 


41.1 40.0 


13.9 13.8 


24-15 


S. brk. Sh. 


XLVIII-2 


July 16 


3:10 p.m. 


20 


B 


39.9 41.1 


13.6 13.8 


11-16 


S. brk. Sh. 


XLIX 


July 16 


4:00 p.m. 


10 


B 


40.9 


14.1 


5 


hrd. S. P. 


L-1 


July 17 


8:30 a.m. 


40 


39, 


36.9 


14.7 


39-51 


rkv. 


L-2 


July 17 


9:10a.m. 


60 


(39,.,) 


37.5 


15.3 


51-44 


S.Sh. fne. M. R. 


L-3 


July 17 


10:20 a.m. 


20 


39, 


37.5 37.2 


15.3 14.7 


44 


rky. 


LI-1 


July 17 


1:40 p.m. 


60 


B 


41.7 42.4 


14.3 13.3 


11-22 


crs. S. brk. Sh. 


LI-2 


July 17 


1:40 p.m. 


60 


B 


41.7 42.4 


14.3 13.3 


11-22 


crs. S. brk. Sh. 


LI-3 


Julv 17 


3:00 p.m. 


30 


B 


42.4 42.9 


13.7 13.0 


11-16 


M. S. 


LII 


July 17-18 






B 


41.2 


13.5 





M. S. Shore collect! 


LIII 


Julv 18 


10:00 a.m. 


"ib 


(39,) 


39.3 


13.4 


4-7 


crs. S. brk. Sh. 


LIV 


JulV 18 


11:00 a.m. 


20 


(39,) 


40.3 ...... 


14.0 


6-4 


S. 


LV-1 


JulV 18 


2:10 p.m. 


50 


39,, 


36 32 


14 15 


42^6 


sft. M. S. 


LV-2 


JulV 18 


3:15 p.m. 


25 


39c, 


32 36 


14 14 


46-41 


sft. M. S. R. 


LVI 


JulV 18 


4:15 p.m. 


15 


B 


39.0 39.7 


14.0 14.7 


16-9 


S. 


LVII 


Julv 19 


7:55 a.m. 


60 


39.5, 


26.6 26.0 


17.6 15.2 


44-33 


fne. S. M. 


LVIII 


JulV 19 


9:30 a.m. 


60 


39, 


26.0 25.2 


1.5.2 14.4 


33-27 


S. brk. Sh. 


LIX 


JulV 19 


1:05 p.m. 


30 


39, 


23.7 


13.0 


28 


fne. gy. S. 


LX 


Julv 19 


3:05 p.m. 


5 


39, 


26.8 26.8 


17.2 17.2 


55 


rky. 


LXI 


JulV 19 


4:22 p.m. 


30 


39, 






47-44 


crs. yl. S. 


LXII 


Julv 20 


9:20 a.m. 


50 


(390 


37""' "'".' 


is " "'" 


29-33 


fne. gv. S. 


LXIII 


July 20 


10:30 a.m. 


2 


(39,.,) 


37.6 36.5 


14.5 14.5 


36 


rky. 



'* Catches XLI-1 and 3 were combined, 
t Catches XLI-4 and 5 were combined. 
t Catches XLVIII-l and 2 were combined. 



1915] 



Michael, ct ah: Hydrographic Eecords of Scripps Institution 



197 



Table 6. — Data Relative to Dredge Hauls — {Continued) 









Part A- 


-Dredge Hauls made during 1901 
















Latitude 


Long 


itude 








Date 


Time D 
of 
d.i.v n 


in Sec- 
linutes tion 


N 


W 


Depth 
meters 


Character of bottom 
and 


Haul 
number 


Begin End 


Begin 


End 


remarks 




1901 








32° 


117° 






LXIV 


July 


20 


11:00 a.m. 


30 


(39„) 


37:4 38:5 


1.5:2 


14:1 


35-20 


s. 


LXV 


July 


20 


2:45 p.m. 






42.7 43.1 


13.4 


12.9 


5-6 


s. 


LXVI 


July 


20 


4:10 p.m. 


"20 


b" 


42.6 43.0 


13.4 


12.9 


13-16 


S. brk. Sh. 


LXVII 


July 


22 


8:40 a.m. 


60 


(39.) 


38 41 


16 


17 


35-57 


gy- yi- s. 


LXVIII 


July 


22 


10:00 a.m. 


55 


(39,,) 


41 44 


17 


17 


55-35 


gn. M. S. 


LXIX-1 


July 


22 


11:20 a.m. 


70 


(39,,,) 


43 39 


17.5 


16.5 


59-53 


gn. M. S. 


LXIX-2 


July 


22 


1:00 p.m. 




(39,) 


39 


16.5 




59-53 


rky. 


LXX-1 


July 


23 


8:45 a.m. 


"25 


(39„) 


52.0 


17.0 




250-100 


rkv. 


LXX-2 


July 


23 


9:55 a.m. 


10 


(39,„) 


51.6 51.6 


17.0 


leis 


180-98 


rk'y. 


LXX-3 


July 


23 


10:45 a.m. 


20 


(39„) 


52 


17 




19.5-100 


rky. f ne. M. 


LXX-4 


July 


23 


1:50 p.m. 


20 


(39,.) 


52 


17 




220-92 


R.M. Cobbles 


LXX-5 


July 


23 


2:15 p.m. 


25 


(39„) 


52 


17 




21.5-99 


M. R. 


LXX-6 


July 


31 


8:30 a.m. 


12 


(39,„) 


52 


17 




230-99 


M. R. S. 


LXX-7 


July 


31 


9:15 a.m. 


15 


(39„) 


.52 


17 




230-100 


R. 


LXXI 


July 


23 


11:30 a.m. 


30 


(39,„) 


52 


16 




102-2S 


sft. M. 


LXXII-1 


July 


24 


9:45 a.m. 


60 


39.5, 5 


35.6 37.8 


18.5 


i7!o 


84-88 


sft. gn. M. 


LXXII-2 


Jul> 


24 


11:25 a.m. 


70 


40, 


38 40 


19 


20 


93-86 


sft. gy. M. 


LXXir-3 


July 


24 


1:05 p.m. 


60 


40, 


40.0 41.2 


20.0 


18.9 


92-82 


dk. gn. M. 


LXXn-4 


July 


24 


2:40 p.m. 


60 


39.5, 


40.9 38.1 


18.9 


16.9 


86-67 


M. 


Lxxrir-1 


July 


2.5 


10:10 a.m. 


90 


40..3, 


37.5 39.3 


22.6 


21.2 


240-195 


fne. gy. S. 


LXXIII-2 


July 


25 


12:01p.m. 


85 


40, 


39.3 40.8 


21.2 


20.2 


19.5-108 


gn. M. S. 


LXXIII-3 


July 


25 


2:10 p.m. 


65 


40, 


42.0 42.5 


22.1 


20.6 


195-104 


dk. gn. M. fne. S. 


LXXIV 


July 


26 


9:30 a.m. 


30 


B 


41.2 


9.5 




4-3 


M. brk. Sh. 


LXXV 


July 


26 


10:20 a.m. 


4 


B 


39.5 


7.5 




6-4 


M. 


LXXVI 


July 


26 


2:00 p.m. 


105 


B 


41.6 


14.1 




4-6 


crs. vl. S. brk. Sh. 


LXXVII 


July 


26 


4:00 p.m. 


15 


B 


40.0 


14.0 




5-6 


hrd.'S. R. 


Lxxviri 


July 
July 


26 






B 


42.3 


9.5 






Collected from piles 
gn. M. brk. Sh. 


Lxxrx-i 


27 


9:25 a.m. 


"20 


40„ 


30.0 30.3 


20.0 


lo'.o 


115-119 


LXXIX-2 


July 


27 


10:45 a.m. 


60 


39.5, 


32.0 30.5 


18.0 


17.0 


117-105 


rkv. 


LXXTX-3 


July 


27 


1:45 p.m. 


75 


39..5„ 


30.5 31 


17.0 


19 


104-250 


rk'y. 


LXXIX-4 


July 


27 


3:25 p.m. 


55 


40,5 


32.0 34.5 


19.0 


18.5 


250-104 


rky. 


LXXX-1 


July 


29 


9:10 a.m. 


60 


40^ 


32.0 31.0 


20.0 


19.5 


250 


fne. gn. gv. M. S. 


LXXX-2 


July 


29 


11:20 a.m. 


120 


40, 


30.0 31.4 


22.2 


18.6 


230-108 


fne. M. S.' 


LXXX-3 


July 


29 


2:55 p.m. 


60 


40.5, 


30.7 31.3 


22!8 


20.0 


230-lOS 


rkv. 


LXXXI-1 


July 


30 


8:05 a.m. 


30 


39, 


37.5 37.0 


15.2 


15.5 


30-46 


b.R. 


LXXXI-2 


July 


30 


9:15 a.m. 


30 


(39,,) 


37.0 38.1 


15.5 


14.8 


46-27 


S. R. 


LXXXI-3 


July 30 


9:50 a.m. 


2 


39, 


37.0 37.0 


14.5 


14.5 


33 


S. R. 


LXXXI^ 


Jul> 


30 


10:00 a.m. 


20 


(39„) 


37.0 38.0 


14.5 


13.4 


33-18 


S. R. 


LXXXI-5 


July 


30 


10:45 a.m. 


15 


(39„) 


37.2 37.8 


14.7 


14.0 


33-27 


S.St. 














33° 


118° 






LXXXII-1 


Aug. 


5 


9:00 a.m. 


40 


52.„ 


41.4 41.7 


18.3 


19.1 


49-55 


fne. gy. S. 


LXXXII-2 


Aug. 


5 


10:00 a.m. 


75 


51..5., 


41.7 40.0 


19.1 


16.6 


5-5-56 




LXXXIII 


Aug. 


5 






51.5.0 


40 39 


18 


17 


110-240 


S. brk. Sh. 



198 Vniversittj of California Puhlications in Zaology [Vol. 15 



EXPLANATION OF TABLE 6, PART B 

This part includes all the field data relative to the dredge hauls 
and shore collections accessioned under Arabic numerals. 

First column. — Numbers under which the dredgings were accessioned; they 
are for the most part in chronological order. 

Second column. — Date. 

Third cohimn. — Time at which haul began entered to the nearest minute. 

Fourth column. — Duration of haul entered to the nearest minute. 

Fifth column. — Section; for explanation see page 46. 

Sixth and seventh columns. — Latitude and longitude at time the haul began; 
for error see pages 18 and 45. 

Eighth column. — Depth of bottom at beginning or at both beginning and end 
of haul entered to the nearest meter above 300 and to the nearest five below 
that depth. 

Ninth column. — Character of bottom denoted by symbols adopted by the 
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey (see Appendix IV). 



Table 6. — Data Relative to Dredge Hauls — (Continued) 

Part B — Dredge Hauls made Subsequent to 1901 

Time Duration Position Depth Character of bottom 

Haul of of Sec- , -^ , in and 

number Date day haul tion N lat. W long. meters remarks 
1904 

1S»0 July 15 B 32° 4i:9 117° 10:3 From piles of ferryslip 

191 July 15 (39,„) 32 51.0 117 16.5 R. Shore collection 

192 July 16 B 32 40.0 117 14.2 R. Shore collection 

194 July 16 B 32 40.5 117 13.5 Low tide collection 

195 July 16 (885) 32 41.0 117 11.5 Low tide collection 

204 July 19 B 32 41.7 117 11.5 M. Shore collection 

2.52* Aug. 20 B 32 41.5 117 14.2 6-9 S. M. 

1905 

889 June 21 (39.5,„) 32 52.2 117 17.5 208 

890 June 21 (39.5,„) 32 52.2 117 17.5 208 

891 June 21 (39.5,„) 32 52.4 117 17.5 146 

895 June 22 (39,„) 32 51.8 117 17.1 46 S. 

899 June 22 40„ 32 55.3 117 19.5 197 

901 June 22 40„ 32 55.3 117 19.5 197 

905 June 23 (39i„) S. R. Shore collection 

931 June 28 2:.55p.m 40„ 32 53.6 117 18.4 146 about La Jolla 

956a July 1 11:00 a.m (39i„) 32 52.2 117 16.8 1.55 

956b July 1 11:30 a.m (39,„) 32 52.2 117 16.8 5.5-256 

956c July 1 12:40 p.m (39,„) 32 52.2 117 16.8 1-55 

958 July 4 (39„) S. R. Low tide collec- 

972 July 7 3:00 p.m (39.5,.) 32 54.8 117 17.5 230 tion about La Jolla 

973 July 7 11:10 a.m (39,„) 32 52.4 117 17.3 146 

974 July 7 12:13 p.m (39„) 32 52.7 117 17.0 1.5.5-185 

975 July 7 12:53 p.m (39„) 32 .52.7 117 17.0 155-185 

* This haul includes all specimens taken between Aug. 20 and Sept. 1 from the mud pumped up 
by a steam harbor dredge. 



I'Jlo] 



Michael, et at.: H)jdrographic Kecords of Scripps Institution 



199 



Table 6. — Data Eelative to Dredue Hauls — {Continued) 
Part B — Dredge Hauls made Subsequent to 1901 









Time 


Duration 




Position 




Depth 


Character of bottom 


Haul 






of 


of 


Sec- 










in 




and 










number 


Date 


day 


haul 


tion 


NIat. 


Wl 


ong. 


meters 


remarks 




1905 






















989 


July 
July 


10 






(39,„) 
(39,..») 















S. R. Shore collection 


990 


10 


1:00 p.m. 




1 32" 


' 52:2 


117' 


' 17:4 


185 




about La Jolla 


991 


July 


10 


2:05 p.m. 




(39,,,,) 


1 32 


52.5 


117 


17.4 


146 






998 


July 


11 


11:40 a.m. 




(40),„ 


32 


52.3 


117 


17.7 


200 






1009 


July 


12 






(39„) 


32 


52.6 


117 


17.0 


200 






1022 


July 


18 


3:15 p.m. 


"so 


50.5,, 


s 32 


47.5 


118 


12.5 


730 




gn. M. S. 


1023 


July 


19 





















Tide pool collection at 
San Clemente Isle. 
























1025 


July 


19 


9:05 a.m. 


28 


53, 


32 


46.8 


118 


23.1 


110 




S. Sh. 


1026 


July 
Julv 


19 


11:30 a.m. 


20 


52s 










395 




S. gn. M. 


1027 


19 


3:55 p.m. 


31 


53,, 


32 


""53.0 


lis' 


"2i.(i 


605 






1028 


July 


20 


9:32 a.m. 


18 


51„5 


32 


57.5 


118 


16.9 


930 




gn M. 


1033 


July 


20 


7:00 p.m. 


25 


49„ 


32 


56.5 


118 


5.0 


660 




gn. M. 


1037 


JulV 


21 


1:30 p.m. 


55 


42„ 


32 


55.0 


117 


31.6 


760 




gn. M. 


1038 


JulV 21 


5:10 p.m. 


40 


41„ 


32 


.53.5 


117 


24.2 


565 




gn. M. 


1044 


JulV 


27 


10:30 a.m. 


25 


40„ 


32 


56.8 


117 


22.8 


460 






1047 


Juh- 


28 


11:30 a.m. 




(39„) 


32 


.54.8 


117 


17.3 


185 








1906 






















1092 


June 


19 


5:30 a.m. 




40„ 


32 


52.6 


117 


17.8 


73 




S. Sh. 


1102 


June 


20 


5:40 a.m. 




(39,„) 


32 


51.6 


117 


16.8 


64-27 


S. M. brk. Sh. 


1112 


June 


21 


6:15 a.m. 


"36 


(39,„) 


32 


51.5 


117 


17.0 


82 




gn. M. fne. S. 


1121 


June 


25 


10:15 a.m. 


35 


(39„) 


32 


54.9 


117 


17.3 


185 




gn. M. fne. S. 


1122 


June 25 


11:10 a.m. 


40 


(39„) 


32 


54.9 


117 


17.3 


185 




gn. M. fne. S. 


1123 


June 


25 


12:55 p.m. 


40 


40„ 


32 


54.6 


117 


18.3 


292 




gn, M. 


1124 


June 


25 


2:30 p.m. 


35 


40„ 


32 


.55.1 


117 


18.0 


292 




gn. M. 


1145 


June 


27 


8:23 a.m. 


17 


(39,„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


16.0 


55 




S.M. 


1146 


June 


27 


9:05 a.m. 


15 


(39,.) 


32 


52.0 


117 


15.9 


13 




S. 


1147 


June 27 


9:35 a.m. 


5 


(39,„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


1.5.9 


18 




S. 


1148 


June 27 


10:00 a.m. 


10 


(39,„) 


32 


52.0 


117 


15.9 


11 




S. 


1155 


June 28 


11:15 a.m. 


30 


(40),, 


32 


52.4 


117 


19.0 


128 




gn. M. 


1156 


June 


28 


12:32 p.m. 


28 


40„ 


32 


52.8 


117 


19.8 


230 




gn. M. 


1157 


Jjne 


28 


1:15 p.m. 


35 


40„ 


32 


53.0 


117 


20.5 


290 




gn. M. 


1164 


June 


29 


9:00 a.m. 


20 


(39„) 










24^9 


S. 


1165 


June 


29 


9:25 a.m. 


30 


(39„) 










1.5- 


T 


s. 


1166 


June 


29 


10:10 a.m. 


10 


(39„) 
(39„) 










9- 


-24 


s. 


1167 


June 


29 


10:55 a.m. 


30 










22- 


-11 


s. 


1186 


Julv 


2 


10:10 a.m. 




(40),„ 


32 


".50.3 


117' 


"2l"4 


110- 


•185 


gn. M. 


1187 


July 


2 


11 :45 a.m. 


40 


41,0 


32 


50.1 


117 


22.7 


18.5- 


-230 


gn. M. 




1906 






















IISS 


Julv 


2 


12:40 p.m. 


35 


41,0 


32 


50.0 


117 


23.4 


27.5- 


-340 


gn. M. 


1189 


Julv 


2 


1 :25 p.m. 


55 


41,0 


32 


49.8 


117 


24.8 


330- 


-365 


gn. M. 


1196 


JulV 


3 


9:30 a.m. 


15 


(40),, 


32 


51.0 


117 


20.0 


73 




rky. 


1197 


July 


3 


10:20 a.m. 


25 


(40),, 


32 


51.0 


117 


19.0 


55- 


-73 




1198 


Julv 


3 


10:55 a.m. 


20 


(40),, 


32 


50 9 


117 


18.0 


73- 


-46 




1199 


JulV 


3 


11:20 a.m. 


20 


(40),, 


32 


50.9 


117 


18.0 


46- 


-73 




1200 


Julv 


3 


1:50 p.m. 


35 


(39,„) 


32 


51.5 


117 


16.0 


33 




S. 


1201 


July 


3 


2:33 p.m. 


17 


(39,,) 


32 


51.5 


117 


16.0 


18- 


46 


s. 


1202 


July 


3 


3:00 p.m. 


15 


(39,„) 


32 


51.5 


117 


16.4 


146 




rkv. 


1203 


Julv 


3 


3:25 p.m. 




(39„) 


32 


51 .5 


117 


16.3 


27- 


■46 


S'.' 


1 238 


Julv 
Julv 


9 

10 




20 


B 
B 


32 
32 


41.5 
41.2 


117 
117 


13.5 
14.0 



IS 




S. Shore collection 


1239 


9:20 a.m. 


S. 


1279 


Julv 


14 


9:05 a.m. 


38 


(39„) 


32 


.54.4 


117 


15.8 


7- 


10 


S. 


12S0 


July 


14 


10:15 a.m. 


43 


(39„) 


32 


.54,4 


117 


15.8 


10- 


■15 


8. 


1287 


Julv 


16 


10:10 a.m. 


20 


(40),, 


32 


50.0 


117 


18 3 


5,5- 


■73 


K. 


128S 


July 


16 


10:45 a.m. 


15 


(40),, 


32 


49.7 


117 


18.6 


7,3- 


■92 


rky. 


1289 


Julv 16 


12:20 p.m. 


30 


(40),, 


32 


40 


117 


19.4 


110- 


128 


c.'s. 


1290 


Julv 


16 


1:00 p.m. 


30 


(40),, 


32 


48 7 


117 


19.8 


146- 


185 


e.g. 


1291 


Julv 


16 


1:40 p.m. 


25 


(40),, 


32 


48.4 


117 


20.1 


18,5- 


■275 


bk. S. 


1298 


Julv 


17 


9:50 a.m. 


35 


(39„) 










9 




S. 


1299 


Julv 
Julv 


17 
20 


10:50 a.m. 
9:30 a.m. 


15 
25 


(39„) 
(40),, 










10 
SO 




S. 


1330 


32 


51.2 


117 


is'^s 


M. B. 


1331 


Julv 


20 


10:15 a.m. 


30 


(40),, 


32 


.50 8 


117 


20.8 


92- 


130 




1332 


July 20 


11:00 a.m. 


45 


(40),, 


32 


51.2 


117 


21.0 


14,5- 


185 




1333 


July 


20 


11:50 a.m. 


35 


(40),. 


32 


51.2 


117 


21.0 


18,5- 


275 





200 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 6. — Data Relative to Dredge Hauls — (Concluded) 
Part B — Dredge Hauls made Subsequent to 1901 
Time Duration Position Depth Character of bottom 



Haul 
lumber 


Date 


of 
day 


of 
haul 


Sec- 
tion 


N lat. 


W long. 


meter.s 


and 
remarks 




1906 




















1334 


July 20 


12:40 p.m 


55 


(40), „. 


32° 


52:5 


117° 


18:8 


275-230 




1335 


July 20 


1:40 p.m 


40 


(40),.. 


32 


52.5 


117 


18.4 


220-155 




1360 


July 19 
July 23 
July 24 
July 24 
July 24 
July 24 
July 24 
July 24 
1908 






(39,„) 


32 


51.5 


117 


15.5 





S. ^ Shore collection 


1361 






(39,„) 
408 


32 


48.7 


117 


16.5 





R.( about La JoUa 


1365 


9:50 a.m 


50 










92-128 




1366 


10:45 a. m 


40 


40, 










128-145 




1367 


11:25 a.m 


40 


40, 










16.5-185 




1368 


12:10 p.m 
1:10 p.m 

2:05 p.m 


55 


40i, 










185-238 




1369 


50 


40s, 










238-185 




1370 


25 


40, 










16.5-128 


rky. 


















1474 


June 19 


3:15 p.m 


45 


40„ 


32 


53.7 


117 


19.1 


93-185 


fne. S. 


1475 


June 19 


3:15 p.m 


45 


40„ 


32 


53.7 


117 


19.1 


93-185 


fne. S. 


1486 


June 24 


1:00 p.m 


110 


42„ 


33 


9.7 


117 


35.8 


735 


gn. M. 


1487 


June 24 


1:00 p.m 


110 


42„ 


33 


9.7 


117 


35.8 


735 


gn. M. 


1497 


June 25 


2:10 p.m 


40 


(40),. 


32 


50.7 


117 


21.5 


93-185 


bk. S. 


1498 


June 25 


3:00 p.m 


30 


(40),, 


32 


51.4 


117 


21.5 


18.5-275 


bk. S. 


1526 


July 2 


7:45 a.m 


105 


50,3 


33 


6.7 


118 


9.4 


1140 


gn. br. M. 


1531 


July 7 


7:30 a.m 


70 


.52, 


32 


46.5 


118 


20.5 


505 


bk. M. 


1534 


July 7 


11:30 a.m 


60 


52, 


32 


45.7 


118 


19.5 


800 


gv. S. 


1539 


July 9 


10:30 a.m 


30 


55,, 


33 


0.5 


118 


33.3 


147-550 


rky. 


1540 


July 9 


12:30 p.m 


39 


55,, 


32 


59.0 


118 


31.4 


550 


gy. M. 


1.541 


JulV 9 


2:05 p.m 


95 


54,, 


33 


0.2 


118 


31.3 


249-920 


gy. M. 


1551 


JulV 17 


8:30 a.m 


30 


61, 


32 


23.2 


119 


5.4 


88 


crs. S. 


1552 


Jul> 17 


9:15 a.m 


42 


61-. 


32 


23.5 


119 


5.8 


92 


crs. S. 


1554 


July 17 


10:25 a.m 


30 


61, 


32 


23.7 


119 


6.0 


95 


crs. S. 


1555 


July 17 


11:40 a.m 


96 


61. 


32 


23.7 


119 


6.0 


92 


crs. S. 


1556 


July 17 


1:32 p.m 


37 


01, 


32 


23.7 


119 


6.0 


92 


ers. S. bk. M. 


1561 


July 18 


9:28 a.m 


11 


61, 


32 


24.2 


119 


6.2 


19-29 


rky. 


1630 


Sept. 1 


6:50 a.m 


25 


jy8 5 


27 


57.5 


115 


13.2 


33 


brk. Sh. 


1631 


Sept. 1 


8:40 a.m 


20 


14" 


27 


54.2 


115 


8.0 


33 


brk. Sh. 


1632 


Sept. 1 


10:25 a.m 


35 


13" 


28 


2.1 


115 


6.0 


73 


gn.M. 


1633 


Sept. 1 

1909 


12:15 p.m 


45 


13<= 


28 


13.3 


115 


5.2 


73 


gn. M. 


1663 


June 18 


1:35 p.m 


15 


B 


32 


40.7 


117 


8.8 


2-3 


gn. M. 


1664 


June 18 


2:05 p.m 


25 


B 


32 


.39.2 


117 


7.8 


2-3 


S. 


1665 


June 18 


3:30 p.m 


30 


B 


32 


37.8 


117 


8.2 


2-3 


S. 


1669 


June 19 


10:36 a.m 


24 


B 


32 


42.0 


117 


14.2 


3 




1670 


June 19 


11:05 a.m 


40 


B 


32 


43.1 


117 


13.0 


3 




1780 


July 1 


1:15 p.m 


65 


53„ 


32 


54.0 


118 


26.0 


185 


rky. 


1781 


July 1 


2:55 p.m 


15 


52„ 


32 


50.2 


118 


22.0 


110 




1782 


July 1 


3:34 p.m 


11 


52,0 


32 


48.1 


118 


19.7 


120 




3181 


1912 
Feb. 10 


2:40 p.m 


20 


39e 


32 


28.5 


117 


15.3 


55 


gn. M. 


3182 


Feb. 11 


5:10 a.m 


20 


(38)« 


32 


28.0 


117 


11.2 


31 


gn. M. S. 



1915] Michael, ct al. : Eydrographic Records of Scfipps Instifutloii 201 











APPENDIX I 










Dimension 


S AND 


Measurements 


OP Nets used 


IN M; 


i^KING OUR 








1 


Collections 












Size 

of 

mesh 


Meshes 

per 
sq. cm. 


Kind 

of 
nettin 


g 


Diamet 
Orifice 


Bucket 


Sla 


nt length i: 




Net 
symbol 


Head- 
piece 


Net- 
ting 


Foot- 
piece 


000 


000 


75 


bolting 


silk 


97.5 


17.0 


17.2 


180.5 


8.0 


OOOe 


000 


31 


stramine 


97.5 


17.0 


22.0 


304.8 


20.3 








224 


bolting 


silk 












S 


8 


1094 


bolting 


silk 


36.0 


4.5 


29.0 


96.5 


5.0 


9 


9 


1369 


bolting 


silk 


36.0 


4.5 


29.0 


96.5 


5.0 


10 


10 


1742 


bolting 


silk 


36.0 


4.5 


29.0 


96.5 


5.0 


12 


12 


2384 


bolting 


silk 


36.0 


4.5 


29.0 


96.5 


5.0 


20 


20 


4640 


bolting 


silk 


36.0 


4.5 


29.0 


96.5 


5.0 


L.N.I 


1 


358 


bolting 


silk 


109.5 


13.5 


51.0 


210.0 


13.0 


S.N.I 


1 


358 


bolting 


silk 


45.0 


8.0 








N.O 





224 


bolting 


silk 


62.5 


8.0 


44.7 


120.5 


10.0 


N.OOO 


000 


75 


bolting 


silk 


62.5 


8.0 


44.7 


120.5 


10.0 


K.OOO 


000 


75 


bolting 


silk 


37.0 


8.0 


15.2 


96.5 


10.2 


K.20 


20 


4640 


bolting 


silk 


37.0 


8.0 


15.2 


96.5 


10.2 


S.20 


20 


4640 


bolting 


silk 


62.5 


8.0 


51.0 




13.0 



The first eight nets are ordinary surface tow-nets (see p. 9) ; 
the next four, Nansen closing nets (see p. 10) ; the next two, Kofoid 
closing nets (see p. 11), and the last a special net designed for 
making open vertical hauls. In order to increase the filtering capacity 
the netting was cut very full and gathered, its original diameter 
exceeding by two or three times that of the orifice. The net was used 
but a short time during July, 1912, when it was lost. 



APPENDIX II 

Length in Meters op Hauls Made during July, 1912, with 
THE Kopoid Closing Net 

In the following list the duration of each haul is entered to the 
nearest minute and each length of haul to the nearest meter, while 
the haul numbers are those entered in table 5. Each length of haul 
was computed from the duration of the haul and the velocity, relative 
to the water, with which the net moved. Since the velocity was 
measured by an Ekman current meter suspended below the net, as 



202 



University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



described on page 13. each length is proportional to the volume of 
water which would have passed through the orifice of the net if 
unobstmcted. 



Hani Dm 
nmber of 

3352 


■atjon 
haul 
5 


Length 
of ban] 
164 


Depth 

in meters 

5 


Hani 

nnmber 

3396 


Dnration 

of hatil 

3 


Length 

of haul 

63 


Depth 

in meters 

9 


3354 


5 


48 


9 


3398 


5 


121 


18 


33.56 


5 


157 


18 


3400 


5 


116 


27 


3359 


5 


90 


46 


3401 


3 


144 


37 


3360 


5 


108 


55 


3402 


5 


140 


46 


3361 


5 


146 


92 


3404 


5 


126 


33 


3362 


5 


174 


46 


3405 


3 


126 


73 


3364 


5 


122 


137 


3406 


5 


130 


92 


3366 


5 


128 


185 


3407 


5 


126 


92 


3367 


5 


117 


273 


3409 


5 


130 


46 


3368 


5 


137 


363 


3410 


5 


141 


37 


3369 


5 


194 


27 


3411 


5 


123 


185 


3373 


5 


116 


73 


3413 


5 


163 


137 


3375 


5 


174 


275 


3416 


6 


158 


.530 


3377 


5 


147 


365 


3419 


5 


1.56 


18 


3378 


5 


158 


5 


3420 


5 


140 


275 


3379 


5 


137 


9 


3434 


5 


108 


5 


3381 


5 


186 


18 


3438 


6 


161 


27 


3382 


5 


211 


27 


3443 


5 


164 


37 


3383 


5 


220 


37 


3446 


5 


179 


46 


3386 


5 


204 


55 


3447 


5 


1.53 


55 


3387 


5 


224 


73 


3449 


5 


193 


73 


3388 


5 


131 


185 


3450 


5 


167 


92 


3391 


5 


262 


275 


34.54 


5 


113 


275 


3392 


5 


192 


137 


34.55 


5 


206 


46 



Haul 3405 was repeated because the net was torn to pieces on the 
first trial. Since both trials consumed the same amount of time and 
the current meter registered during both, an idea of its accuracy may 
be obtained; the length relative to the first trial was 127 and that 
relative to the second 126 meters. 



1915] Michael, ef al. : Hydrographic Records of Scripps Institution 203 



APPENDIX III 

List of Hauls axd Water Samples whose Distances from the 
Bottom are kxowx to be within 15 per cent of the Depth 

Haul numbers are those entered in table 5. sounding numbers 
those entered in table -4. and water-sample numbers those entered in 
table 1. Owing to errors due to drift, only those soundings and 
collections that were made at approximately the same time are listed. 



Haul 
lumber 


Sounding 
number 


Haul 
number 


Sounding 
number 


Water 
sample 
number 


Sounding 
number 


Water 
sample 
number 


Soundinj 
number 


920g 


1 


1905 


225 


78 


72 


2724 


319 


921g 


1 


1914 


228 


99 


84 


2745 


320 


925 


2 


1924 


236-39 


102 


85 


2763 


321 


935 


4 


1957 


245 


144 


125 


2777 


322 


938 


5 


1973 


247 


230 


140 


2788 


323 


939 


6 


2048 


250 


549 


213 


2799 


324 


950 


7 


2122 


251 


981 


216 


2804 


325 


953 


8 


2199 


255 


1002 


218 


2808 


326 


979 


10 


2567 


285 


1063 


219 


2823 


327 


1134-36 


12 


2570 . 


287 


1213 


225 


2835 


328 


1229-51 


15 


3308 


335 


1227 


226 


2845 


329 


1303-05 


17 


3332 


362 


1276 


228 


2866 


331 


1315-17 


18 


3333 


363 


1287 


234 


2873 


332 


1339-il 


20 


3334 


364 


1295 


236-39 


3223 


362 


1351-53 


21 


3335 


365 


1392 


245 


3226 


363 


1441 


63-64 


3336 


368 


2138 


284 


3228 


364 


1463-64 


72 


3337 


369 


2151 


287 


3254 


371 


1482 


84 


3338 


370 


2152 


288 


3256 


372 


1484 


So 


3339 


371 


2385 


292 


3258 


373 


1516-21 


125 


3341 


372 


2392 


293 


3260 


374 


1608 


213 


3343 


373 


2466 


303 


3609 


376 


1648 


216 


3345 


374 


2487 


306 






1705 


218 


3550 


376 


2494 


307 






1773 


219 






2703 


318 







Water-sample 2152 consisted of clear water taken within three- 
tenths of a meter from the bottom, the lower half of a sixteen-pound 
window-weight suspended directly below the Ekman bottle having 
been covered with mud. 



204 



University of Calif ontia Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 



APPENDIX IV 

Abbreviations for Character of the Bottom adopted by the 
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey 



M mud 

S sand 

Sh shells 

G gravel 

P pebbles 

Sp specks 

C clay 

St stones 

R rocks 

Co coral 



bk black 

wh white 

yl yellow 

gy gray 

bu blue 

dk dark 

gn green 

rd red 

br brown 



hrd hard 

sft soft 

fne fine 

crs coarse 

brk broken 

stk sticky 

rky rocky 

sm small 

Ig large 



appendix v 

Tables for Converting ^Meters into Fathoms and Fathoms 
into Meters 



Meters to Fathoms 
1 meter = 0.546817 fathoms (log. 9.7378416- 



10) 













Fathoms 















0.0 


0.5 


1.1 


1.6 


2.2 


2.7 


3.3 


3.8 


4.4 


4.9 


10 


5.5 


6.0 


6.6 


7.1 


7.7 


8.2 


8.7 


9.3 


9.8 


10.4 


20 


10.9 


11.5 


12.0 


12.6 


13.1 


13.7 


14.2 


14.8 


15.3 


15.9 


30 


16.4 


17.0 


17.5 


18.0 


18.6 


19.1 


19.7 


20.2 


20.8 


21.3 


40 


21.9 


22.4 


23.0 


23.5 


24.1 


24.6 


25.2 


25.7 


26.2 


26.8 


50 


27.3 


27.9 


28.4 


29.0 


29.5 


30.1 


30.6 


31.2 


31.7 


32.3 


60 


32.8 


33.4 


33.9 


34.5 


35.0 


35.5 


36.1 


36.6 


37.2 


37.7 


70 


38.3 


38.8 


39.4 


39.9 


40.5 


41.0 


41.6 


42.1 


42.6 


43.2 


80 


43.8 


44.3 


44.8 


45.4 


45.9 


46.5 


47.0 


47.6 


48.1 


48.7 


90 


49.2 


49.8 


50.3 


50.8 


51.4 


52.0 


52.5 


53.0 


53.6 


54.1 


Meters 





100 


200 


300 


400 
Fathoms 
219 


500 


600 


700 


800 


900 








55 


109 


164 


273 


328 


383 


437 


492 


1,000 


.547 


601 


656 


711 


766 


820 


875 


930 


984 


1,039 


2,000 


1,094 


1,148 


1,203 


1,258 


1,312 


1,367 


1,422 


1,476 


1,.531 


1,586 


3,000 


1,640 


1,695 


1,750 


1,804 


1,859 


1,914 


1,969 


2,023 


2,078 


2,133 


4,000 


2,187 


2,242 


2,297 


2,351 


2,406 


2,461 


2,515 


2,570 


2,625 


2,679 


5,000 


2,734 


2,789 


2,843 


2,898 


2,953 


3,007 


3.062 


3,117 


3,172 


3,226 


6,000 


3,281 


3,336 


3,390 


3,445 


3,500 


3,554 


3,609 


3,664 


3,718 


3,773 


7,000 


3,828 


3,882 


3,937 


3,992 


4,046 


4,101 


4,156 


4,210 


4,265 


4,320 


8,000 


4,375 


4,429 


4,484 


4,539 


4,593 


4,648 


4,703 


4,757 


4,812 


4,867 


9,000 


4,921 


4,976 


5,031 


5,085 


5,140 


5,195 


5,249 


5,304 


5,359 


5,413 



I 



1915] Michael, ct al.: Hydrographic Records of Scripps IiistilHf.ion 205 



Fathojis to Meters 







1 fathom : 


= 1.828- 


'68 meters (log. 


0.2621584) 






Fathoms 





1 


- 


3 


4 

Meters 


.5 


6 


7 


8 


9 





0.0 


1.8 


3.7 


5.5 


7.3 


9.1 


11.0 


12.8 


14.6 


16.5 


10 


18.3 


20.1 


22.0 


23.8 


25.6 


27.4 


29.3 


31.1 


32.9 


34.8 


20 


36.6 


38.4 


40.2 


42.0 


43.9 


45.7 


47.6 


49.4 


51.2 


53.0 


30 


54.9 


56.7 


58.5 


60.4 


62.2 


64.0 


65.8 


67.7 


69.5 


71.3 


40 


73.2 


75.0 


76.8 


78.6 


80.5 


82.3 


84.1 


85.9 


87.8 


89.6 


50 


91.4 


93.3 


95.1 


96.9 


98.8 


100.6 


102.4 


104.2 


106.1 


107.9 


60 


109.7 


111.5 


113.4 


115.2 


117.0 


118.9 


120.7 


122.5 


124.4 


126.2 


70 


128.0 


129.8 


131.7 


133.5 


135.3 


137.2 


139.0 


140.8 


142.6 


144.5 


80 


146.3 


148.1 


150.0 


151.8 


153.6 


155.5 


157.3 


1.59.1 


160.9 


162.8 


90 


164.6 


166.4 


168.2 


170.1 


171.9 


173.7 


175.6 


177.4 


179.2 


181.0 


Fathoms 





100 


200 


300 


400 
Meters 


500 


600 


700 


800 


900 








183 


366 


549 


732 


914 


1,097 


1,280 


1,463 


1,646 


1,000 


1,829 


2,012 


2,195 


2,377 


2,560 


2/43 


2,926 


3,109 


3,292 


3,475 


2,000 


3,658 


3,840 


4,023 


4,206 


4,389 


4,572 


4,755 


4,938 


5,121 


5,303 


3,000 


5,486 


5,669 


5,852 


6,035 


6,218 


6,401 


6,584 


6,766 


6,949 


7,132 


4,000 


7,315 


7,498 


7,681 


7,864 


8,047 


8,229 


8,412 


8,595 


8,778 


8,961 


5,000 


9,144 


9,327 


9,510 


9,692 


9,875 


10,058 


10,241 


10,424 


10,607 


10,790 



appendix vi 

Table giving the Length in IMeters op One Minute of Longitude 
FOE Each Degree of Latitude from the Equator to 60° 
Column 1 — Degrees of latitude. 

-Length in meters of one minute of longitude. 





Column 


(1) 


(2) 





1855.1 


5 


1848.1 


10 


1827.1 


11 


1821.2 


12 


1814.8 


13 


1807.9 


14 


1800.3 


15 


1792.3 


16 


1783.7 


17 


1774.6 


18 


1764.9 


19 


1754.7 


20 


1743.9 


21 


1732.6 


22 


1720.8 


23 


1708.5 


24 


169.5.6 


25 


1682.3 



(1) 



(2) 

1668.4 
1654.0 
1639.2 
1623.8 
1607.9 
1591.0 
1575.5 
1557.4 
1539.6 
1521.3 
1502.5 
1483.3 
1463.7 
1443.6 
1423.0 
1402.1 
1380.7 
1358.8 



(1) 


(2) 


44 


1336.6 


45 


1314.0 


46 


1290.9 


47 


1267.4 


48 


1243.6 


49 


1219.4 


50 


1194.8 


51 


1169.8 


52 


1144.5 


53 


1118.8 


54 


1092.8 


55 


1066.4 


56 


1039.7 


57 


1012.8 


58 


985.4 


59 


957.8 


60 


929.9 


61 


901.7 



206 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

While one minute of latitude is approximately equal to a nautical 
mile, owing to the spheroidal shape of the earth, it varies slightly 
with the latitude : 

At the equator it is 1842.8 meters 

At 30° it is 1847.5 meters 

At 60° it is 1856.9 meters 

At the pole it is 1861.7 meters. 

This variation in the length of one minute of latitude has been 
responsible for a lack of precision in defining a nautical mile. In 
order to establish uniformity it is now defined as 1853.248 meters, 
which is the length of one minute of a great circle of a sphere having 
the same superficial area as the earth. 

This definition is adopted by the United States Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, and the value above given was computed from Clarke's values 
for the equatorial and polar radii, 6,378,206 and 6,356,584 meters. 



UNIVEESITY or CALIFOBIfIA PUBLICATIONS— (Continued) 

4. The Marine Biological Station of San Diego, Its History, Present Con- 

ditions, Achievements, and Aims, by Wm. E. Bitter, Pp, 137-248, 

plates 18-24, and 2 maps. March, 1912 _ ?1.00 

B. Oxygen and Polarity in Tubularia, by Harry Beal Torrey. Pp. 249- 

251. May, 1912 _.. .05 

6. The Occurrence and Vertical Distribution of the Copepoda of the San 

Diego Begion, with particular reference to Nineteen Species, by Cal- 
vin O. Esterly. Pp. 253-3i0, 7 text-flgures. Jiily, 1912 1.00 

7. Observations on the SuckUng Period in the Quinea-Flg, by J. Mailon 

Bead. Pp. 341-351, September, 1912 _ _ 10 

8. Haeckel's Sethocephalus eucecryphalus (Badlolaria), a Marine Oiliate, 

by Charles Atwood Kofoid. Pp. 353-357. September, 1912 05 

Index, pp. 859-365. 

Tol. 10. (Contributions from the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.) 

1. Beport on a Collection of Birds and Mammals from Vancouver Island, 

by Harry 8. Swarth. Pp. 1-124, plates 1-4. February, 1912 1.00 

2. A New Cony from the Vicinity of Mount Whitney, by Joseph Orlnn^. 

Pp. 125-129. January, 1912 _ _ .05 

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Pp. 131-136, 2 text-figures. 
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H. S. Swarth. Pp. 137-142, 2 text-flgures. 

Nos. 8 and 4 in one cover. April, 1912 „ ,12 

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Nos. 6 and 7 in one cover. May, 1912 1§ 

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». The Species of the Mammalian Genus Sorex of West-Central Oali- 
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Swarth. Pp. 197-406, pis. 6-10. October, 1913 2.00 

Index, pp. 407-417. 

Vol. 11. 1. Birds in Belation to a Grasshopper Outbreak in California, by Harold 

C. Bryant. Pp. 1-20. November, 1912 _ — .20 

2. On the Structure and Eelationships of DinospTiaera palustris (Lemm.), 

by Charles Atwood Kofoid and Josephine Blgden Mlcbener. Pp. 21- 

28. December, 1912 - J.0 

3. A Study of Epithelioma Contaglosum of the Common Fowl, by 

Clifford D. Sweet. Pp. 29-51. January, 1913 - _ .2S 

4. The Control of Pigment Formation in Amphibian Larvae, by Mjnrtla 

E. Johnson. Pp. 53-88, plate 1. March, 1913 _ .35 

B. Sagitta calif ornica, n. sp., from the San Diego Region, including 
Remarks on Its Variation and Distribution, by Ellis L. Michael. 
Pp. 89-126, plate 2. June, 1913 ~_ .36 

6. Pycnogonida from the Coast of California, with Description of Two 

New Species, by H. V. M. Hall. Pp. 127-142, plates 3-4. August, 1913. .20 

7. Observations on Isolated Living Pigment Cells from the Larvae of 

Amphibians, by S. J. Holmes. Pp. 143-154, plates 5-6. 

8. Behavior of Ectodermlc Eplthellom of Tadpoles when Cultivated im 

Plasma, by 8. J. Holmes. Pp. 155-172, plates 7-8. 

Nos. 7 and 8 in one cover. September, 1913 _ .80 

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November, 1913 10 

10. Fourth Taxonomic Report on the Copepoda of the San Diego Region, 

by Calvin O. Esterly. Pp. 181-196, pis. 10-12. November, 1913 _. .15 

11. The Behavior of Leeches with Especial Reference to Its Modlflabllity, 

A. The General Reactions of the Iioeches Vina microstoma Moore and 
Glossiphonia stagnalis Linnaeus; B. ModiflabiUty in the Behavior of 
the Leech Dina microstoma Moore, by Wilson Gee. Pp. 197-305, 13 
text flguies. December, 1913 _ 1.00 



UNIVEE8ITY OF OAilFOENIA PUBLICATIONS— (Continued) 

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1914 ; .50 

14. A Determination of the Economic Status of the Western Meadowlark 

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Harry James Snook and J. A. Long. Pp. 511-528, plates 25-26, 1 text 

fig. April, 1914 25 

Index, pp. 529-538. 
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the San Joaquin Valley, California, by Harry S. Swarth. Pp. 1-24, 
plates 1-2, 8 text figs. November, 1913 „ .90 

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with Especial Befereuce to the Distributional Problems Presented, 
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6. A Previously Undescribed Aplodontia from the Middle North Coast of 

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from Southern California, by Charles Lewis Camp. Pp. 327-334. 

April, 1915 10 

Vol. 13. 1. The Schizopoda of the San Diego Region, by Calvin O. Esterly. Pp. 

1-20, plates 1-2. April, 1914 _ .15 

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phora of the San Diego Begion, by Calvin 0. Esterly. Pp. 21-38. 
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42, 2 text-figures. April, 1914 06 

4. Diplodinium ecaudatum, with an Account of Its Neuromotor Apparatus, 

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8. Polychaetous Annelids of the Pacific Coast in the Collections of the 

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Vol. 14. 1. A Report upon the Physical Conditions In San Francisco Bay, Based 
upon the Operations of the United States Fisheries Steamer "Alba- 
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20 text figures. July, 1914 _ „_ 2.25 

Vol. 15. 1. Hydrographic, Plankton, and Dredging Records of the Scripps Institu- 
tion for Biological Research of the University of California, 1901 to 
1912, compiled and arranged under the supervision of W. E. Bitter 
by Ellis L. Michael (Zoologist and Administrative Assistant) and 
George F. McEwen (Hydrographer). Pp. 1-206, 4 text figures and 
map. July, 1915 2.25 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLICATIONS 

IN 

ZOOLOGY 

Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 207-254, 7 figures in text November 29, 1916 



CONTINUATION OF 

HYDROGRAPHIC, PLANKTON, AND 

DREDGING RECORDS 

OF THE 

SCRIPPS INSTITUTION FOR BIOLOGICAL 
RESEARCH 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

(1913-1915) 

COMPILED AND ARRANGED UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF 
W. E. RITTER 



ELLIS L. MICHAEL 
Zoologist and Administrative Assistant 



GEORGE F. McEWEN 

Hydrographer 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS 
BERKELEY 



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Vol. 12. 1. A Study of a Collection of Geese of the Branta canademis Group from 
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plates 1-2, 8 text figs. November, 1913 _ .30 

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Belt of California, by Joseph GrlnnelL Pp. 321-325, 1 text figure. 
January, 1915 _ .06 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PUBLICATIONS 

IN 

ZOOLOGY 

Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 207-254, 7 figures in text November 29, 1916 



CONTINUATION OP 

HYDROGRAPHIC, PLANKTON, AND 

DREDGING RECORDS 

OP THE 

SCRIPPS INSTITUTION FOR BIOLOGICAL 
RESEARCH 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

(1913-1915) 

COMPILED AND ARRANGED UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF 
W. E. RITTER 



ELLIS L. MICHAEL 
Zoologist and Administrative Assistant 

GEORGE F. McEWEN 
Hydrographer 



CONTENTS PAGE 

Introduction 208 

A. Collecting apiiaratus and examination of data for errors 209 

1. New apparatus _ 209 

o. Serial closing apparatus 209 

h. Attachments to the Kofoid water bottle 212 

2. Errors in temperature, salinity, and depth 214 

a. Reasons for rejecting temperatures taken prior to June, 1908.... 215 

b. Methods of detecting and rejecting doubtful subsurface obser- 

vations 215 

B. Tabulation of data 217 

1. General explanation of tables 217 

a. Arrangement 217 

6. Recording of position _ 217 

f. Meaning and use of sections 217 

Table 1.— Ocean data 220 

Table 2.— Data relative to San Diego Bay 241 

Table 3.— Plankton field data 244 

C. Literature cited 254 



208 I'liiversity of Calif o)-nia Publications in Zoologij [Vol. 15 



INTRODUCTION 

Experience gained througrh the marine explorations of the Scripps 
Institution demonstrates that variations in hydrographic as well as in 
many strictly biological conditions decidedly influence the vertical 
and horizontal movements of marine organisms, their abundance at any 
particular time and place, and many aspects of their life-histories and 
relations to one another. In fact, such hydro-biological relations are 
too complex, by far, to be discovered without numerous and detailed 
hydrographic observations corresponding in time and place to the 
biological ones. Not only is this true, but the variability in tempera- 
ture and salinity, not to mention that of many other elements, is so 
great and its causes so complex as to demand much more continuous 
investigation than ha.s been thus far possible. With these considera- 
tions in view, the Scripps Institution has temporarily discontinued its 
systematic plankton exploi'ations, and, instead, is devoting time and 
energy to devising methods and equipment more suitable for conduct- 
ing the more intensive researches required. It seems probable, there- 
fore, that the next series of investigations will differ in many important 
respects from those already made. For this reason, together with the 
fact that a summary of all the hydrographic re.sults is ready for the 
press, it is desirable to bring the publication of our crude data to date. 

The present paper, therefore, includes the field data relative to all 
hydrographic and biological collections made since 1912. Since that 
time, no soundings, gas analyses, or current-meter observations have 
been made, and the hydrographic data relate entirely to temperatures 
and salinities. Similarly, dredging and trawling have been tempor- 
arily discontinued, except for museum and supply purposes; hence, 
the biological data relate only to plankton collections. 

The apparatus, methods of collecting, methods of laboratory meas- 
urement, and methods of detecting errors employed during this period 
were essentially the same as tho.se formerly (1915) described. A new 
serial closing apparatus has been added to the collecting equipment, 
and attachments have been made to the Kofoid closing water bottle; 
these additions are, therefore, briefly described. Furthermore, the 
criteria used for rejecting doubtful hydrographic observations were 
not treated fully enough in our former report (1915, pp. 21, 26) to 
avoid the incorrect implication that certain observations may have 
been omitted through oversight. Accordingly, these criteria are re- 
discussed under the proper heading. 



1916] 31icJiaeI, et al.: fTijdrogmphic Records of Scripps Institution 209 



A. COLLECTING APPARATUS AND EXAMINATION 
OF DATA FOR ERRORS 

1. NEW APPARATUS 

a. Serial closing apparatus. — The first step toward more intensive 
and continuous investigations consisted in devising an apparatus com- 
bining the essential advantages of the Kofoid closing net (Kofoid, 
1911) and El<man reversing water bottle (Ekman, 1905). Thanks to 
the mechanical ingenuity of our engineer, Jlr. James Ross, two such 
pieces of apparatus have been constructed (text-figs. A, B, and C). 
Tliey are not only adapted to simultaneous operation on the same 
cable, but have the additional advantage that two "equivalent" hori- 
zontal closing nets form an essential part of each. The two nets lie 
about six inches apart on opposite sides of the cable (text-figs. B and 
C), and, since they are operated simultaneously, duplicate hauls are 
made at each depth — one net thus acting as a check against the other. 
In connection with each pair of nets, a rack (t.r.) for holding two 
reversing thermometers and a small bottle (w.b.) for securing water 
samples are provided, which are operated upon closure of the nets. 
Each .serial closing apparatus, therefore, con.sists essentially of two 
"equivalent" closing nets, a thermometer rack, and a water-sample 
bottle. The two already constructed weigh approximately fifty pounds 
apiece, but it is proposed that the next ones shall be made materially 
lighter. This can be accomplished by pressing out the metal parts 
instead of casting and machining them. 

After each apparatus is clamped onto the cable and lowered to the 
desired depth, a messenger is dropped which opens the first pair of 
nets and releases a .similar messenger which opens the second pair, etc. 
After the desired length of time, another mes.senger is dropped which 
closes the first pair of nets, reverses the thermometers, secures the 
water sample, and releases a similar messenger which operates the 
second apparatus in the same way, and so on for the whole series. 

Important advantages of this apparatus are : 

1. Duplicate closing-net hauls and corresponding temperatures and 
water samples obtained simultaueou.sly at each of a series of depths. 

2. Reversal of the thermometer rack closes the water bottle, which 
makes it mechanically impossible for the thermometer to register at 



210 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 1." 




a. — accumulator sjiring. 

6. — net-bucket. 

c. — cable. 

fh. — supporting chain. 

fl. — clamp for attaching apparatus. 

CO. — closing cover. 

C.S. — coiled spring. 

e. — excentric rod. 

h.p. — headpiece of net (impervious) 

(. — latch for locking rack (t.c). 



Abbbevi.\tions 

Id. — water-bottle lid. 

m\ and m'. — opening messengers. 

/«-. and m'. — closing messengers. 

II. — netting. 

r. — supporting rod. 

rm. — net rim (37 cm. diameter). 

i:s. — rack spring. 

r.t. — rod trip. 

t. — messenger trips. 

t.r. — thermometer rack. 



iv.b. — water bottle. 



l!^'lf> I Michael, cl at. : Hi/dnxjropli ic I\( cards of Scripps I until nlinn '1\ 1 

Figs. A-C. (>|)eiation of Serial Closing Apparatus 
Fig. A. Nets closed, rea<ly for descent. Note especially the following: the 
clamps (cl.) by which the apparatus is attached to the cable (c) ; rod trip (r.t.) 
which, upon closure of water-bottle lids (Id.), releases the chain (rh.) support- 
ing terminal end of rod (r.) ; tension on nets due to accumulator spring (a). 
which insures proper adjustment of T on supporting rod r.;.net buckets (6). 
consisting of stork sheeting which has proved more satisfactory than bronze; 
messengers (m^ and m*) suspended from lower ends of trips (t) in readiness for 
opening and closing next lower pair of nets. 

Fig. B. After descent of first messenger, m\; nets open, ready for towing. 
Note especially the following: position of net rims (rm), which have been 
turned by the coiled springs (c..?.) at right angles to the closing covers (co.), the 
latter remaining in same position as in figure A; closing covers (co.) consist 
of bronze rims to which cojiper screening of finer mesh than netting is attached 
(this is readily replaced by thin bronze plates when small-meshed nets are 
used); water bottle (w.b.) also serves as axis about which net rims (rm.) have 
revolved; messenger m'., shown in figure A, has been released. 

Fig. C. After descent of second messenger, m".; nets closed, water bottle 
(iF.h.) closed, thermometer rack (i.r.) reversed, and supporting rod (r.) released, 
ready for hoisting. Note especially the following: pcrxpective at riqht angles to 
that of figures A and B; excentric rods e. (shown also in figure B), by which 
water-bottle lids (Id.) were closed when thermometer rack (t.r.) was reversed 
by the rack spring (r.s.) and locked by the latch (/.), all of which is possible 
only after both closing covers (co.) have revolved against the net rims (rm.) ; 
messenger in'., shown in figures A and B, has been released. 

one depth and the Iwtth' to clo.se at another, rrgardh.t.<> of ihc inclina- 
tion of llic vahlf. 

3. It is mechanically impossible for the thermometers to reverse 
or the water bottle to close unless both nets are closed ; thus, a valuable 
means i.s at hand for determining the approximate depth of closure 
in case it differs from that indicated by the amount of cable out. 

4. The heavy weight .suspended from the end of the cable may 
remain submerged when attaching and removing the apparatus, thus 
permitting collecting in rougher seas than would otherwise be possible. 

5. The rod (r.) to which the net buckets (b.) are attached is so 
supported from the frame that when the nets are closed it is released 
and hangs below the frame (compare figs. A and C), while the 
apparatus is being hoisted, thus preventing undue strain upon the 
netting. 

The only disadvantages so far suggested are three : 

1. The dynamical pressure of water on more than two of the 
duplicate nets of each apparatus may so deflect the cable as to prevent 
the messengers from properly opening or closing the nets, unless a 
weight of at least fifty pounds is suspended from the end of the 
cable for each apparatus attached. 

2. Even under the most favorable conditions of the sea, it is difficult 
and cumbersome to attach a fifty-pound apparatus to and remove it 
from the cable. 



212 Universitjj of California Puhlicafious in Zoology [Vol. 15 

3. The covers (co.) which project in front of the orifices of the 
nets when open (fig. B), may modify the pressure-distribution of in- 
flowing water so as to reduce significantly the rate of filtration. 

How serious these disadvantages are remains to be determined. 
As stated on page 209, the second can be largely overcome by pressing 
out instead of casting the metal parts of the apparatus. Moreover, 
the preliminary collections made during May, 1915 (water samples 
4918-5019, table 1; hauls 4062L-4205R, table 3) were much more 
satisfactory than we had reason to anticipate, because the cable then 
in use did not permit attaching as heavy a w-eight as seemed necessary. 
In spite of this, only eight cases w^ere imperfect out of seventy-two 
operations, and these were due to insufficient tension on the closing 
trip.s. Furthermore, in the twenty-eight trials made on the last day, 
ilay 16. only one case of imperfect operation was discovered. On the 
whole, these results are very encouraging, but as further experience 
will probably suggest certain desirable modifications of the apparatus, 
a detailed description is not given. ^ 

h. Attachments to the Kofoid water bottle. — To meet the require- 
ments of a microplankton trip made during September, 1913, two 
mechanically independent attachments were added to the Kofoid water 
bottle (Kofoid, 1905) in order to permit the u.se of reversing ther- 
mometers, and to obtain an additional sample of water for salinity 
determination (text-figs. D and E). The temperature in situ is always 
given more accurately by reversing thermometers than by estimates 
based on the temperature of any sample inclosed in a non-insulated 
water bottle, and, as pointed out formerly (1915. p. 14), it has been 
impossible to make any .such estimate for depths exceeding 350 meters. 
Again, in order to avoid withdrawing any of the organisms contained 
in the Kofoid bottle itself, the attachment for obtaining an additional 
water sample was added. 

Frequent testing before and during actual collecting gave no 
evidence of defective operation. But the nature and degree of cor- 
relations between temperature and depth, salinity and depth, and 
temperature and salinity demonstrated that in fully ninety per cent 
of the 176 subsurface hauls made, the Kofoid bottle closed at some 
unknown depth significantly less than that indicated by the amount 
of cable out. Indeed, it seems probable that the remaining nineteen 



1 During the summer of 1916 about two hundred trials of this apparatus were 
made from the IT. S. S. "Albatross." The very satisfactory results of this 
severe test proved the apparatus to be fully as reliable and durable as the 
Ekman water bottle. 



1916] MicluieJ, ef al. : Hydrogniphic Eccords of Scripps Institution 213 




E. 



Figs. D and E. Kofoid closing wuter bottle, sbowiug thermometer rack and 
small water-sample bottle attached. D. Ajiparatus set for tripping by messenger. 
E. After closure of both bottles and reversal of thermometer rack. Operation: 
messenger (m.) descends cable (c.) and spreads ,jaws of clutch (j.), thus releas- 
ing cover (CO.) and cylinder (cyl.) supported from it by a brass chain (ch.) 
which, dropping upon base (ha.), closes bottle. Alignment of cover and cylinder 
with base maintained by guiding sleeves (s' and s"). In closing, projecting rods 
()•', r", and r'") strike corresponding trips (f, t", and t'"), which releases ther- 
mometer rack (*.'■.), allowing coiled spring (c.s.) to reverse it, and the two lids 
(r and I") of the water-sample bottle (w.b.) to snap shut. Water is withdrawn 
from large and small bottles by removing plugs (p' and p"). 



214 I'nivcrsitii af Califoniia I'ublkalions in Zoology [Vol. Lj 

hauls were also eoutaminated, and that the correspouding tempera- 
tures and salinities were erroneous. 

The precise reason for such i-epeated failure is unknown. It is 
true that the guiding sleeves (text-figs. D and E, s') of the cover of 
the Kofoid bottle had become worn during years of previous use, and 
it is po.ssible that the trouble was largely cau-sed by the undue "play" 
of these sleeves combined with a possible inequality in tension of the 
thermometer and water-bottle trip-springs, and the usual inclination 
of the cable. It does not seem likely that the trouble was entirely 
due to the worn sleeves, since the bottle rarely failed to close properly 
prior to the addition of the attachments. 

However, whatever the cause of defective operation may have been, 
the relations observed between the temperatures and corresponding 
salinities could not have arisen had the apparatus operated properly. 
On the whole, the hydrographic results can be accounted for only on 
the assumption that the depths at which the thermometers reversed, 
those at which the water-sample bottle closed, and those at which the 
Kofoid bottle closed differed materially and in an erratic way from 
each other and from the depths indicated by the amount of cable out. 
In fact, the depths indicated by temperatures and those indicated by 
the corresponding salinities proved to be so discordant as to preclude 
estimating, even roughly, the correct depth in any one case. For this 
reason, while all the subsurface hauls, because of their biological value, 
are entered in table 3. the corresponding hydrographic data are not 
tabulated. 

■2. ERROES IN TEMPERATURE, SALINITY, AND DEPTH 
All hydrographic ob.servati(ms are subject to several important 
sources of error. Some errors are inherent in the instrument used, 
and some are due to occasional mistakes, but the most difficult to 
detect are consequent upon the impossibility of constructing any piece 
of oeeanographic apparatus that will not occasionally operate defec- 
tively. The causes of defective operation are exceedingly numerous, 
and, as stated formerly (1915, p. 21) : "we doubt if anyone who has 
not been in actual charge of such work could anticipate the extent to 
which trouble is nearly always encountered." Even though all prac- 
ticable precautions are taken, important errors unexpectedly arise, 
making it necessary to examine critically each series of observations 
in order to detect the erroneous ones and to reject those that may be 
misleading. 



1916] Micliavl. ct al.: Hijdrographic Hicords of Scripps I iistifnlion 215 

a. Reasons for rejecting temperatures taken prior to June, 190S. — 
During the preliminary explorations made between August, lf)()l, aiul 
June, 1908, about seventy-five surface temperatures were taken with 
ordinary chemical thermometers. Through oversight, their readings 
were recorded without making the necessary calibration correction, 
and. unfortunately, the thermometers were either lost or broken before 
August. 1908, when it was discovered that the recorded temperatures 
were subject to calibration errors. At this time, calibration of the 
thermometer that had been used during the two preceding mouths 
revealed an error ranging fi'om 0?9 to 1?5 C. thus indicating that all 
seventy-five temperature observations were subject to calibration 
errors approximating two degrees Ontigrade. 

Even so, the records might have been of some biological value were 
it not for serious discrepancies between the positions of the tempera- 
ture observations and those of the corresponding biological collections. 
The magnitudes of these discrepancies, for the most part, are unknown, 
but the records indicate that they must have frequently exceeded five 
miles. Since differences of two degrees have often been observed 
within a distance of two miles (MeEwen, 1916), it follows that, for 
biological investTgations. these preliminary temperature records are 
subject to an erratic error whose maximum approximates the observed 
annual range of seven degrees. Needless to say. such misleading 
temperatures are worse than none, and accordingly were not published 
in our former (1915) report. 

b. Methods of detecting and rejecting doubtful subsurface observa- 
tions. — In addition to mistakes which are not entirely avoidable, there 
are two sources of troublesome error affecting the measurement of 
temperature, and two affecting the measurement of salinity. Even the 
best reversing thermometers occasionally register incorrectly because 
the mercury column does not always break at the constriction. Like- 
wise, the best containers may occasionally permit sufficient evapora- 
tion to increase the salinity materially if the water samples are not 
tested soon after being collected. While such errors are usually large 
enough to be revealed as soon as the measurements are made, they 
may be so small as to require for their detection special examination 
of all temperatures and salinities of the corresponding series. Finally, 
the collecting apparatus is designed to operate on a vertical cable, 
and, in case of undue inclination of the latter, the thermometers may 
either not reverse at all or may register at some higher level ; similarly, 
the water bottle mav either fail to close entirelv or mav close at a 



216 University of California Publications in Zoology [Vol. 15 

higher level. Moreover, even when the cable is vertical and careful 
testing indicates that the apparatus is working properly, the ther- 
mometers occasionally reverse and the water bottle occasionally closes 
at a higher level. 

On those few occasions when such an error in depth is immediately 
indicated by the temperature reading, the observation is, of course, 
repeated. In the majority of cases, however, a depth error made 
during any particular cruise can be discovered only after all the 
observations have been critically examined. Since the apparatus 
employed is designed to insure the simultaneous reversal of ther- 
mometers and closure of the water bottle, determination of the source 
and magnitude of temperature errors requires con.sideration of the 
corresponding salinities and densities in situ; similarly, determination 
of the source and magnitude of salinity errors requires consideration 
of the corresponding temperatures. 

As indicated on page 212, correlation tables are drawn up between 
temperature and depth, salinity and depth, and temperature and 
salinity, and, if necessary, the results are compared with previous data 
obtained under similar conditions. These tables, together with the 
fact that the density in situ must increase with an increase in depth 
(Michael and McEwen. 1915, p. 25), and that temperature and salinity 
curves must have certain well defined limits for any particular month 
and position (McEwen, 1916). form our main criteria for isolating 
erroneous observations. 

Among the observations thus isolated, the temperatures are usually 
so correlated with the corresponding salinities as to sugge.st errors in 
depth rather than in either temperature or salinity. Accordingly, the 
depth is regarded as unknown and is determined indirectly from the 
temperature, and checked by a similar determination from the cor- 
responding salinity. If both agree, it is concluded that the ther- 
mometers reversed and the water bottle closed at the depth thus indi- 
cated, and the data are so tabulated. U.sually. only a few erroneous 
observations remain which cannot be thus corrected, and these are 
rejected if it is clear that the values will be misleading; otherwise, 
they are retained but questioned. It may be well to add that defective 
plankton hauls, while corrected for depth errors when possible, are 
never rejected. 



I9lt;] Michael, ct al. : Hijdrographic Records of Scripps Institution 217 



B. TABULATION OF DATA 

1. GENERAL EXPLANATION OF TABLES 

a. Armiigenicnt. — For convenience in tabulation and reference, 
the data are presented in three tables. The hydrographie data, becavise 
of their intrinsic value, are tabulated first. Therefore the data relative 
to all temperature and salinity observations made since 1912 in the 
ocean and in San Diego Bay are tabulated in tables 1 and 2 respec- 
tively. F'inally. the field data relative to all plankton collected since 
1912 for quantitative investigation are tabulated in table 3. All three 
tables are arranged on the same general plan. 

b. Recording of position. — All positions are entered in latitude and 
longitude measured from Greenwich. "Whenever the position is known 
to have varied by more than one quarter mile during a single collect- 
ing period, the latitude and longitude relative to each water sample 
and net haul are not entered as such : instead, the initial and final 

position together with thi.s statement are given: "From to 

the boat drifted (or steamed) from the above to the follow- 
ing position." the blanks being filled in with the times corresponding 
to the two positions. In all other ca.ses the position corresponding to 
each observation is entered. 

c. Meaning and use of sections. — For readily specifying the ap- 
proximate position of observations, the region explored has been 
divided into rectangular sections whose east and west boundaries are 
five minutes in latitude, and whose north and south boundaries are 
five minutes in longitude. The exact position of the center of each 
section is specified by either a number giving its distance (in units of 
5') west, or a negative number giving its distance east, of 114° W, and 
either a subscript giving its distance nortli or an exponent giving its 
distance south of 32° N. The two base lines, 32° N and 114° W, were 
chosen entirely with reference to explorations, past and future, of the 
Scripps Institution, the former in order to avoid the need of large 
subscripts, and the latter in order to exclude large numbers and avoid 
the need of referring to observations east of the selected meridian. 
We did not contemplate making observations south of Cerros Island, 
which lies in the fourteenth section west of 114° W, but, during the 
winter of 1914, opportunity was unexpectedly oft'ered for taking a few 



218 I'liivcrsitij of California ['ublications in Zoologij [Vol. 15 

samples in the vicinity of the Gulf of California, 109° W. Although 
those observations made within the gulf itself are not referred to by 
sections but by the letter G, those outside and in the vicinity of the 
Gulf require another form of reference, whence the use of negative 
numbers. 

Any section cut by the coast line is designated in one of three ways : 
when its center is within 2'5 west (or east) of the coast, the number 
is bracketed; when it is within 2'5 north or south, the subscript or 
exponent, as the case may be, is bracketed; when it is within 2f5 both 
east or west and north or south, the entire symbol is bracketed. For 
example, (40) j„ refers to a section whose center is within 2'5 west of 
the coast, 55, „4, to one whose center is within 2'5 south of the coast, 
and (39n,) to one whose center is within 2'5 north and west of the 
coast. A more detailed discu.ssion of "sections" is given on pages 46 
to 48 of our former (1915) report, and three maps are published by 
McEwen (1916) which show the approximate number of observations 
made from 1901 to 1915 in each section between Point Conception and 
Cerros Island. 



EXPLANATION OF TABLE 1 
This table includes the data relative to all the hydrographic obser- 
vations made in the ocean from 1918 to 1915, inclusive, except those 
made off Coronado Pier in connection with special observations in San 
Diego Bay. 

First coJumii. — \\ater-s;iin|ilp numbers filtered in chronological order. 

Second cohimii. — Time when the sample was obtained, entered to the nearest 
minute. 

Third column. — Section; for explanation see page 217. The letter G indicates 
that the sample was taken in the Gulf of California. 

Fourth and fifth columns. — Latitude and longitude entered to the nearest OU 
when the error was within 0;.5, and to the nearest minute when the error was 
larger; for method of tabulating see page 217; for discussion of errors see 
pages 18 to 21 of our former (191.5) report. 

Sixth column. — Depth of sample, entered to the nearest meter above and to 
the nearest five below 200 meters; for discussion of errors see page 20 of our 
former (1915) report. 

Seventh column. — Temperature in situ; all surface temperatures were deter- 
mined by a thermometer (L. Steger, Kiel) reading directly to 0?2 C, and the 
values entered may be regarded as accurate to 0?05 C. Subsurface temperatures 
were determined by either Eichter or Negretti-Zambra reversing thermometers 
(Helland-Hansen, 1911-1912, pp. 58-62), and the values entered are accurate 
to within 0?01-0?05 C. Omitted entries indicate either that no temperature 



lyitlj Michael, ct al.: Hijdroyraphic Records of Scripps Inslilalion 21!) 



was taken or that au t>rror was discovered (see p. 216) whose niafjiiitude made 
the entry valueless. 

Eighth, niiitli. and ttntli eolionn.s. — Si)eeifie gravitv of the sample under 

0° 
atmosjdieric pressure, the 1.0 beini; omitted; S — that of the sample at 0° C 

17?.^ ^° 

referred to distilled water at 4?0 C; S that of the sample at 17?.5 C referred 

t" l'-5 

to distilled water at 1'°.nC; S — density in .■<itu referred to distilled water at 
4?0 C. ■*" 

Elerentli column. — Salinity pir niillf determined by the "sinker metliod " 
(see former report, 1915, pp. 32-37), unless followed by the letter P, which 
indicates a pycnometer determination (see former report, pp. 28-30). Omission 
of salinity and specific gravity entries signifies either that no water sample 
was taken or that an error was discovered whose magnitude made the observa- 
tion valueless. A question mark (?) indicates that a smaller error in depth, 
temperature, or salinity is susjieeteil (see p. 216). 



220 



University of California Publications in Zoology 



[Vol. 15 



Table 1. — Ocean Data 





















Specific gravity 












Posit 


ion 






Temper- 






^ 




Water 


Time 












Depth 


ature 


0° 


i7;5 


t° 














sampln 


of 




^ 


)rtll 


West 


in 


in centi- 


S • 


s 


S 


Salinitv 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 
February 


longitude 
14, 1913 


meters 


grade 


4;o 


17?5 


4°0 


SO/00 


3841 


11 :25 a.m. 


39, 


32° 


37:0 


117° 


14:5 





13?4 


2688 


2555 


2513 


33.45 P 


3842 


11:44 a.m. 


39, 


32 


34.5 


117 


14.5 





13.6 


2692 


2559 


2513 


33.50 P 


3843 


11:59 a.m. 


39, 


32 


32.3 


117 


14.4 





13.5 


2688 


2555 


2511 


33.45 P 


3844 


12:15 p.m. 


39. 


32 


30.3 


117 


14.4 





13.6 


2689 


2556 


2510 


33.46 P 


3845 


12:30 p.m. 


39„ 


32 


28.3 


117 


14.4 





13.5 


2689 


2556 


2512 


33.46 P 


3846 


12:46 p.m. 


39, 


32 


26.2 


117 


14.3 





13.5 


2695 


2562 


2518 


33.54 P 


3847 


12:59 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


14.3 





13.7 


2689 


2556 


2508 


33.46 P 








February 


15, 1913 














3848 


7:45 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


14.3 


8 


13.03 


2690 


2.557 


2522 


33.48 


3849 


7:55 9 m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


14.3 


12 


13.23 


2691 


2558 


2519 


33.49 


3850 


8:00<! n. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


14.3 


10 


13.23 


2689 


2556 


2517 


33.47 


3851 


8:04-<t.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


14.3 


7 


13.23 


2694 


2561 


2522 


33..53 


3852 


8:08 a.w'. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


14.3 


5 


13.33 


2696 


2563 


2522 


33.55 


3853 


8:12 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


14.3 





13.3 


2690 


2557 


2517 


33.48 P 


3854 


8:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





13.8 


2692 


2559 


2509 


33.50 P 


3855 


9:42 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





13.9 


2683 


2551 


2498 


33.93 P 


3856 


9:55- .m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


117 


21.2 





13.8 


2688 


2555 


2505 


33.45 P 


3857 


ll:42i. n. 


40, 


Prom 9:55 a.m. 


to 





13.9 


2688 


2.555 


2503 


33.45 P 


3858 


12:05 p.m. 


40, 




::.55p.ir 


1. the boat 





13.85 


2683 


2551 


2499 


33.39 P 


3859 


12:50 p.m. 


40, 


drifted from 


the 


660 


5.05 


2766 


2630 


2723 


34.42 P 


3860 


1:15 p.m. 


40, 


above position 


5 


13.83 


2688 


2555 


2504 


33.45 


3861 


1:20 p.m. 


40, 


to the following 


7 


13.78 


2688 


2555 


2505 


33.45 


3862 


1:23 p.m. 


40, 


I 


losition 






10 


13.63 


2689 


2.556 


2509 


33.47 


3863 


1:26 p.m. 


40, 










12 


13.58 


2689 


2556 


2510 


33.47 


3864 


1:28 p.m. 


40. 










17 


13.. 58 


2689 


2556 


2510 


33.47 


3865 


1:30 p.m. 


40, 










15 


13.58 


2689 


2556 


2510 


33.47 


3866 


1:32 p.m. 


40, 










20 


13.53 


2688 


2555 


2510 


33.45 


3867 


1:35 p.m. 


40, 










25 


13.18 


2684 


2552 


2514 


33.40 


3868 


1 :39 p.m. 


40, 










30 


12.82 


2681 


2549 


2519 


33.37 


3869 


1:43 p.m. 


40, 










40 


12.92 


2687 


2554 


2521 


33.44 P 


3870 


1 :45 p.m. 


40, 










50 


12.37 


2689 


2555 


2534 


33.47 


3871 


1 :50 p.m. 


4O3 










60 


12.04 










3872 


1:54 p.m. 


4O3 










75 


11.40 


2696 


2562 


2.560 


33".5.5 


3873 


2:00 p.m. 


40, 










90 


10.90 


2705 


2572 


2578 


33.66 


3874 


2:05 p.m. 


4O3 










100 


10.30 


2709 


2575 


2592 


33.71 


3875 


2:10 p.m. 


4U3 


32 = 


' ]6;7 


117' 


' i9;o 





14.1 


2686 


2554 


2479 


33.42 P 


3876 


2:40 p.m. 


40, 


32 


18.5 




17.7 





14.0 


2686 


2554 


2499 


33.42 P 


3877 


3:00 p.m. 


39, 


32 


20.8 




16.0 





14.2 


2681 


2549 


2500 


33.36 P 


3878 


3:20 p.m. 


39, 


32 


23.0 




14.0 





14.0 


2686 


2554 


2499 


33.42 P 


3879 


3:40 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 




14.3 





13.9 


2697 


2564 


2512 


33.57 P 








February 


16,^1913 














3880 


6:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 





13.4 


2694 


2561 


2519 


33..52 P 


3881 


6:48 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22^4 




21^2 


1100 


3.66 


2775 


2637 


2747 


34.53 P 


3882 


7:20 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


800 


4.60 


2771 


2633 


2733 


34.48 P 


3883 


7:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


500 


6.10 


2761 


2625 


2706 


34.36 P 


3884 


8:00 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


200 




2752 


2616 




34.25 P 


3885 


8:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 






21.2 


150 


9.42 


2738 


2603 


2635 


34.07 P 


3886 


8:14 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 





13.5 


2692 


2559 


2515 


33.50 P 


3887 


8:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


125 


9.77 


2729 


2594 


2621 


33.96 P 


3888 


8:23 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


100 


10.37 


2707 


2573 


2589 


33.69 P 


3889 


8:29 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




2l'.2 


75 


11.47 


2700 


2566 


2563 


33.60 P 


3890 


8:35 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


60 


12.55 


2694 


2561 


2535 


33.53 P 


3891 


8:40 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


50 


12.75 


2694 


2561 


2531 


33.53 P 


3892 


8:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




2l!2 


40 


12.88 


2692 


2559 


2526 


33.50 P 


3893 


8:48 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


30 


13.15 


2691 


2558 


2521 


33.49 P 


3894 


8:53 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


25 


13.43 


2690 


2557 


2513 


33.48 P 


3895 


8:55 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


20 


13.48 


2688 


2555 


2511 


33.46 


3896 


8:.58a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


17 


13.48 


2688 


2555 


2511 


33.46 


3897 


9:02 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


15 


13.48 










3898 


9:04 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


12 


13.48 


2689 


2556 


2512 


33.47 


3899 


9:06 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 




21.2 


10 


13.48 


2692 


2559 


2515 


33.50 P 



1916] 



Michael, rf al.: Hydrogvaphic Records of Scrii)ps IiislHalioii 



221 



Table 1. — Ocean I).\ta — {Continued) 





















Specific gra 


vity 












Position 






Temper- 


f 




^ 




Water 


Time 












Depth 


ature 


0° 


17?5 


t° 
















sample 


of 




North 


West 


in 


in centi- 


s 


S 


S 


Snlinitv 


number 


day 


Section 


latitude 
Februar 


lor 
•16, 


gitude 
1913 


meters 


grade 


4?0 


17^5 


4?0 


S 0/00 


.•^(UIO 


9:08 a.m. 


40. 


32 


22.4 


11 


7 21.2 


7 


13.53 


2690 


2557 


2512 


33.48 


3901 


9:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22^4 


11 


■" 21^2 


.5 


13.53 


2687 


2554 


2509 


33.44 


3902 


9:12 a.m. 


40, 


32 


22.4 


11 


7 21.2 





13.6 


2689 


2556 


2510 


33.47 P 


3903 


9:45 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23^5 


11 


- 18.0 


152 


9.62 


2746 


2611 


2640 


34.17 P 


3904 


9:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


' 18.0 





13.4 


2689 


2556 


2514 


33.47 P 


3905 


9:53 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


" 18.0 


125 


9.92 










390(5 


9:59 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


" 18.0 


100 


10.12 


2722 


2588 


2607' 


3'3'.'8'7' P 


3907 


10:05 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


■ 18.0 


7o 


10.77 


2706 


2573 


2581 


33.68 P 


390S 


10:10 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


- 18.0 


60 


12.17 


2694 


2561 


2543 


33..52 P 


3909 


10:15 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


' 18.0 


50 


12.62 


2691 


2.558 


>531 


33.49 P 


3910 


10:18 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


1 18.0 


40 


12.67 


2691 


2SS€ 


:530 


33.49 P 


3011 


10:22 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


" 18.0 


30 


13.18 


2690 


Jos'; 


2519 


33.48 P 


3912 


10:26 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


" 18.0 


25 


13.23 


2691 


S;55Si 


2519 


33.49 P 


3913 


10:30 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


" 18.0 


20 


13.23 


2694 


2501 


2522 


33.52 P 


3914 


10:33 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


■ 18.0 


17 


13.23 


2690 


2557 


2518 


33.48 P 


391 o 


10:36 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


" 18.0 


15 


13.23 


2692 


2559 


'' 520 


33.50 P 


3910 


10:38 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


" 18.0 


12 


13.23 


2693 


2560 


■..i21 


33.51 P 


3917 


10:41 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


■ 18.0 


10 


13.28 


2693 


2560 


2521 


33.51 P 


391 S 


10:43 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.0 


11 


- 18.0 





13.38 










3919 


10:46 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


■ 18.0 


75 


10.71 










3920 


10:50 a.m. 


40, 


32 


23.5 


11 


" 18.0 





13.. 55 


2689 


2556 


2.5'ii 


s'.r'ie p 


3921 


11:00 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


■ 17.0 


91 


10.40 


2715 


2.581 


2596 


33.78 P 


3922 


11:05 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


■ 17.0 





13.6 


2694 


2561 


2515 


.33.53 P 


3923 


11:07 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


■ 17.0 


75 


10. .50 


2709 


2576 


2589 


.33.71 P 


3924 


11:12 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


■ 17.0 


60 


11.92 


2698 


2565 


2552 


33.57 P 


392.') 


11 :lo a.m. 


39; 


32 


24.0 


11 


" 17.0 


50 


12.. 55 


2693 


2560 


2534 


33.51 P 


392(1 


11:1 8 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


• 17.0 


40 


12.90 










3927 


11 :22 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


• 17.0 


30 


13.15 


2694 


2561 


2'5'24' 


sai'.'ss P 


392S 


11:26 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


■ 17.0 


25 


13.15 










3929 


11:29 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


■ 17.0 


20 


13.28 










3930 


11:33 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


■ 17.0 


17 


13.30 


'2691 


2558 


2518 


33.49 P 


3931 


11:35 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11' 


17.0 


15 


13.33 


2692 


2559 


2518 


33.50 P 


3932 


11:38 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11" 


17.0 


12 


13.33 


2693 


2560 


2519 


33.51 P 


3933 


11:40 a.m. 


39- 


32 


24.0 


IT 


17.0 


10 


13.38 


2692 


2559 


2517 


.33..50 P 


3934 


11:42 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11 


17.0 


5 


13.45 


2693 


2560 


2517 


33.51 P 


393.1 


11:43 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.0 


11" 


17.0 





13.8 


2696 


2563 


2503 


33.55 P 


3930 


11 :o5 a.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


ir 


16.3 


60 


11.23 


2705 


2572 


2571 


33.66 P 


3937 


12:01 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


11 


■ 16.3 





1 3 . 85 










393S 


12:03 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


11 


16.3 


50 


12.45 










3939 


12:07 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


ir 


16.3 


40 


12.83 


2(390 


2.5.57 


2.51.5 


33.48 P 


3940 


12:10 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


ir 


16.3 


30 


1 3 . 23 


2690 


2557 


2.518 


33.48 P 


3941 


12:13 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


ir 


16.3 


25 


13.23 










3942 


12:17 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


IT 


16.3 


20 


13.28 


2693 


2560 


2.5'2'd 


3'3'.'.5'i' P 


3943 


12:19 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


ir 


16.3 


17 


13.28 


2692 


2559 


2.519 


33.50 P 


3944 


12:23 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


11' 


16.3 


17 


13.30 


2691 


2558 


2518 


33.49 P 


3945 


12:26 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


11" 


16.3 


12 


13.33 


2690 


2557 


2516 


33.48 P 


3946 


12:28 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


IV 


16.3 


10 


13.38 


2693 


2560 


251 8 


.33.51 P 


3947 


12:31p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


\v 


16.3 


5 


13.48 


2689 


2556 


2512 


33.46 P 


3948 


12:32 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.1 


ir 


16.3 





13.8 


2688 


2.555 


2505 


33.45 P 


3949 


12:50 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


ir 


16.0 


25 


13.33 


2701 


2568 


2527 


33.61 P 


3950 


12:52 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


16.0 


20 


13.33 


2690 


2557 


2516 


33.48 P 


3951 


12:!56p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


16.0 


17 


13.40 


2690 


2557 


2515 


33.48 P 


3952 


12:58 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


16.0 





13.6 


2688 


2555 


2509 


33.46 


3953 


12:59 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


16.0 


15 


13.33 










3954 


1:01 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


16.0 


12 


13.. 33 


2689 


25.56 


2515 


33.47 P 


3955 


1:03 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


16.0 


10 


13.33 


2689 


2556 


2515 


33.47 P 


3956 


1:06 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


16.0 


7 


13.48 


2687 


2554 


2510 


33.44 P 


3957 


1:08 p.m. 


39, 


32 


24.4 


117 


16.0 


5 


13.. 53 


2685 


2552 


2508 


33.41 P 








February 17. 


1913 














3958 


6:08 a.m. 


39